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Showing posts with label lapphund. Show all posts
Showing posts with label lapphund. Show all posts

Thursday, June 28, 2018

Everything about your Swedish Lapphund

Everything about your Swedish Lapphund
  The Swedish Lapphund is a breed of dog of the Spitz type from Sweden, one of three Lapphund breeds developed from a type of dog used by the Sami people for herding and guarding their reindeer. The expression "the black beauty of Norrland" is very often attributed to the Swedish lapphund, which is most likely one of Sweden's oldest breeds. The Swedish name of the breed is Svensk lapphund.

Overview
  A typical spitz type dog of slightly less than medium size, with proud head carriage, and a weather resistant coat. The body is compact and slightly longer than tall. The chest is deep to the elbow, and there is prominent forechest. The ribcage is long and oval, with well developed last ribs. The back is level, strong, muscular and springy. The loin is short and broad. The croup is proportionally long, broad and slightly sloping. The belly is slightly tucked up.
  The breed is very receptive and willing to work, and its abilities as a guard and herder made it very useful in the reindeer trade. They are lively, alert, kind and affectionate, easy to train and suitable for many different endeavors such as obedience, agility, herding and tracking.

Other Quick Facts:
  • There are approximately 1,200 Swedish Lapphunds in the world, most of which live in Sweden. Others are located in Finland, Norway, England, Denmark, The Netherlands, France, Germany, Belgium, Austria, Switzerland, Slovenia, Russia, and Australia. Only a few live in the United States.
  • The Lappie used to use his bark to scare off predators and alert reindeer to his presence. Although he doesn’t encounter many wolves or do much herding these days, he retains his tendency to bark.
Breed standards
Breed Group: Herding
UKC group: Northern Breed
Average lifespan: 10 to 13 years
Average size: 33 to 53 pounds
Coat appearance: tight, harsh, medium length outer coat with a soft, dense undercoat
Coloration:  Black, Brown, White
Hypoallergenic: No

History
  The Swedish lapphund has its origins among the ancient hunting tribes of northern Scandinavia, from the land that the Sámi people call Sapmi. In Sámi mythology it is said that the lapphund sought the post of worker amongst the Sámi people in exchange that it would always be well-treated. The lapphund has been used mainly for hunting and guarding. When the Sámi people started to keep domestic reindeer in the mid-18th century, the lapphund's repertoire was expanded to include herding.
  Hard work in the barren landscape of northern Scandinavia has created a very resilient breed. The shifting climate demands a weatherproof coat that is easy to maintain. The rough terrain and the varied work demand a dog with endurance, agility, intelligence and independence. The resulting Swedish lapphund is a well-rounded working dog, well suited both for work as a farm, hunting, and herding dog, and as a pet.



Temperament
 Typical Swedish Lapphunds are clever, gentle, and biddable dogs. In their native Sweden, they undergo an assessment of their temperament – known as mentalbeskrivning – which has allowed breeders to select dogs with the most desirable behavioural traits, while avoiding more negative ones, and this seems to have been quite a successful approach.
  The Lapphund is generally tolerant and sociable with other dogs, and may accept cats if the two are raised together. Likewise, it is fond of children, but it is vital that this working breed is afforded plenty of exercise, as it can otherwise become excessively boisterous, especially when playing. The Lapphund has no tendency to be aggressive, but is aloof with strangers, and will respond to their approach with loud, enthusiastic barking.

Health
  Although the Swedish Lapphund is thought to be a relatively healthy breed, diabetes mellitus and progressive retinal atrophy are a few of the medical conditions that have been identified in the breed.And because they are so rare, popularity and overbreeding have yet to take a major toll on their health, it is advisable to ask the breeders about incidence of hip dysplasia and eye problems, since those are common in many different breeds.

Care
  Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath. Check the ears weekly for dirt, redness, or a bad odor that could indicate an infection. 
  If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with a gentle, pH-balanced ear cleaner recommended by your veterinarian. Start grooming your Lappie at an early age so he learns to accept it willingly.Brush the coat weekly to keep it clean and remove dead hair.

Living conditions
  It is dog resistant to bad weather, which likes to live outdoors, in a colder climate with a loving and active family. It likes exercise, long walks and feels the need to burn its energy. It doesn't run away from its master. It needs socialization and training.

Trainability
  Controlling this tendency to bark is perhaps the greatest challenge in training a Swedish Lapphund, for it is otherwise a dog that learns quickly and responds well to praise and positive reinforcement. Teaching a “silent” command is a really useful technique to curtail any nuisance barking, but it requires patience and rigorous consistency in training.
  The other approach to managing this vocalisation is thorough socialisation, introducing the Lapphund to as many new people as possible during its formative months as a pup. While this will never completely eliminate this noisy instinctive behaviour, it is likely to make it a less frequent and persistent annoyance.

Exercise
  Naturally active little dogs, they should always be encouraged to remain so. They need to be taken on a daily walk.

Grooming
  The Lappie has a thick double coat that forms a ruff around the neck and is longer on the back of the legs and the tail. Brush the coat weekly to keep it clean and remove dead hair. During spring and fall shedding seasons, daily brushing will help keep excess hair under control.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath. Check the ears weekly for dirt, redness, or a bad odor that could indicate an infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with a gentle, pH-balanced ear cleaner recommended by your veterinarian. Start grooming your Lappie at an early age so he learns to accept it willingly.

Children and Other Pets
  Swedish Lapphunds are known to be very good around children thanks to their gentle, placid natures. However, any interaction between toddlers and a dog should always be well supervised by an adult to make sure playtime does not get too boisterous which could end up with someone being knocked over and hurt, especially when dogs are still young.
  When dogs have been well socialised from a young enough age, they generally get on well with other dogs they meet and if they have grown up with a family cat in a household, they usually get on well together. However, a Lapp might decide to chase off any other cats they encounter in their travels. Care should be taken when they are around any smaller animals and pets just to be on the safe side.

Did You Know?
  • The Lapphund comes from the far north and is intolerant of heat. Keep him indoors on hot or humid days.
  • The Swedish Lapphund is the national breed of Sweden and was the first dog registered by the Swedish Kennel Club.
  • The Swedish Lapphund was added to the Foundation Stock Service program in 2007.
  • The Swedish Lapphund has been approved to compete in AKC Companion events since January 1, 2010.
  • The Swedish Lapphund has been assigned the Herding Group designation.
  • The Swedish Lapphund is an ancient breed, in existence for thousands of years. It is a natural breed believed to be a descendent of the ancient artic wolf.
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Thursday, December 21, 2017

Everything about your Finnish Lapphund

Everything about your Finnish Lapphund
  Believe it or not, this hard-working dog breed earned his keep herding reindeer in his native Lapland, in the far north of Finland. Friendly and gentle, the Finnish Lapphund retains a strong herding instinct.

Overview
  The Finnish Lapphund, also known as the Lapinkoira, Lapponian Shepherd Dog, Finish Lapland Dog, Suomenlapinkoira or Lappy, is a medium-sized dog that has the dense double coat typical of northern breeds combined with the temperament of a herding dog.
  The original Finnish Lapphunds were used for hunting and protection by the Sami, a tribe of semi-nomadic people who lived in Lapland, which is the northern region of Norway, Finland, Sweden and Russia. Eventually, the Lapphund transitioned to a herding dog, as the Sami settled into a more sedentary life of breeding reindeer.

Other Quick Facts
  • The medium-size Finnish Lapphund has a soft, sweet expression and a coat that comes in black, blond, brown, tan, and other colors and combinations.
  • The Lapphund’s habit of barking harks back to his heritage as a herding dog. If you don’t keep reindeer, though, he can learn to moderate his barking, becoming instead a good watchdog and family companion.
Breed standards
AKC group: Herding
UKC group: Northern Breed
Average lifespan: 12 to 15 years
Average size: 33 to 53 pounds
Coat appearance: A long, coarse outer coat tops a soft, thick undercoat. 
Coloration: white, black, red, and brown, as well as combinations of colors such as black and tan. 
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles, active seniors, houses with yards
Temperament: Faithful, friendly, calm, courageous
Comparable Breeds: Japanese Spitz, Keeshond

History
  The Finnish Lapphund was kept by the Sami, a semi-nomadic people inhabiting the far reaches of the Arctic north, Lapland, which comprises the northern regions of Finland, Sweden and part of Russia. The Lapphund’s job was to help to herd reindeer, but when snowmobiles came along his job went away.
  In the 1940s, interest in preserving the breed led to the writing of a breed standard, which was accepted by the Finnish Kennel Club in 1945, and establishment of a breeding program. At first, the dogs were called Lapponian Shepherd Dogs and included a shorthaired variety and a longhaired variety, both of which might be born in the same litter. In 1967, the two types were declared separate breeds, with the longhaired dogs becoming known as the Finnish Lapphund. The dogs are popular pets in Finland.
  Finnish immigrants probably brought Lapphunds with them when they came to the United States, but it wasn’t until 1987 that interest began in achieving American Kennel Club recognition for the dogs. The Lapphund will became a member of the AKC’s Herding Group on June 30, 2011.

Temperament
  The Finnish Lapphund is a very intelligent and active breed. Finnish Lapphunds take well to training due to their intelligence. Some owners and fanciers claim that "Lappies" even have the ability to think through actions first. Although small in number worldwide, a noticeable number of Finnish Lapphunds have excelled in activities such as obedience trials, agility, herding trials, and pet therapy.
  The breed is friendly and alert, and makes a good watch dog, due to its tendency to bark at unfamiliar things. The breed was originally used to herd reindeer by droving, and barking helped it to be distinguished from wolves. Even when not herding, the Finnish Lapphund tends to bark with a purpose, and more rare cases of problem barking can normally be controlled by training.
  The breed makes the ideal outdoor companion. It is active, coldproof, and waterproof, and will gladly accompany people on walking or running trips. A slight independent streak is common, though with training Finnish Lapphunds can have excellent recall and obedience skills.
  Lappies are ideal choice for a family with small children. The breed adapts well to family life, including being responsive to children. Finnish Lapphunds have a gentle nature with children, people with disabilities, and the elderly. This is a very friendly breed and it normally avoids and flees from threatening situations. The breed is very curious, so some supervision is recommended.
  In Finland, many Finnish Lapphunds have won national championships for obedience and lappies are also suitable for agility.

Health Problems
  Finnish Lapphunds are generally a very healthy breed of dog and do not suffer from a great number of hereditary ailments. They are however prone to eye problems like cataracts and GPRA, the latter which can cause permanent blindness.


Trainability
  In addition to physical activity, the Finnish Lapphund needs a healthy dose of mental stimulation. As a herding dog, this breed will analyze a situation before deciding how to handle it. Fortunately, the Finnish Lapphund enjoys training and working with people. This breed is relatively easy to train and enjoys using its finely-tuned observational skills to learn what is asked of it. These are fairly “soft” dogs. They respond best to positive reinforcement and reward-based training, using praise rather than punishment. Finnish Lapphunds have strong noses and excel at scent-related activities, such as tracking, scent discrimination work and search and rescue.



Activity Requirements
  Finnish Lapphunds are extremely active, alert and ready to be part of whatever action is going on. They were bred for outdoor work around reindeer, cattle and horses, and they appreciate the opportunity to run and explore outside. Because they hail from frigid arctic areas, these dogs do quite well living in cold climates. They enjoy going for long walks with their owners and engaging in all sorts of active canine sports. Like many other herding breeds, the Finnish Lapphund has tremendous strength and stamina. This dog is perfectly suited for people who enjoy hiking, mountain biking, backpacking and other outdoor activities. The Finnish Lapphund wants and needs lots of exercise and may become restless and destructive if its energy needs are not met.

Grooming
  Like all spitz breeds, the Lapphund has a thick, profuse coat that sheds seasonally and requires regular brushing to keep flying fur under control. Brush his double coat weekly to keep it clean and remove dead hair. During spring and fall shedding seasons, daily brushing will help to keep excess hair under control.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Keep the ears clean and dry to prevent infections. Check them weekly for redness or a bad odor that might indicate infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball moistened with a mild cleanser recommended by your veterinarian. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.
  It is important to begin grooming the Lappie when he is very young. An early introduction teaches him that grooming is a normal part of his life and to patiently accept the handling and fuss of the grooming process.

Children And Other Pets
  Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Is the Finnish Lapphund the Right Breed for you?
High Maintenance: Grooming should be performed often to keep the dog's coat in good shape. No trimming or stripping needed.
Easy Training: The Finnish Lapphund is known to listen to commands and obey its owner. Expect fewer repetitions when training this breed.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  The Finnish Lapphund comes from the far north and is intolerant of heat. Keep him indoors on hot or humid days.
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