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Showing posts with label kids. Show all posts
Showing posts with label kids. Show all posts

Friday, June 30, 2017

Everything about your Curly-Coated Retriever

Everything about your Curly-Coated Retriever
   Created to retrieve game from land or water, the Curly-Coated Retriever dog breed was popular with English gamekeepers, hunters, and poachers alike. Today he competes in such dog sports as field trials, agility, obedience, and flyball and has been successful as a therapy dog, drug detection dog, and search and rescue dog. When he’s not out working or competing, he’s happy to lie beside his favorite person, enjoying a nice back scratch.

Overview
  The Curly-Coated Retriever has been around since the late 18th century, probably created by crossing now-extinct Old English Water Dogs, Irish Water Spaniels and small Newfoundlands, with, yes, some Poodle added later. The result was a black or liver-colored retriever with tight curls on his body and a zest for water retrieving. The Curly-Coat is a fun and interesting dog, no doubt about it.
   The Curly may be uncommon, but he has a dedicated band of followers who prize him for his intelligence, trainability, multiple abilities, sense of humor and, of course, that unusual appearance. He’s not the breed for everyone, but if you can appreciate his constantly thinking brain, you will find him to be a loving, talented and entertaining companion.
  A typical retriever, he enjoys activity, although he requires somewhat less exercise than, say, a Lab or a Flat Coat. Channel his energy into dog sports such as agility, flyball and flying disc games, or teach him to pull you or your kid on skates or a skateboard. He’ll also do well in competitive obedience. The Curly is slow to mature, however, so it can take time for training to stick. Be patient, and use positive reinforcement techniques such as play, praise and food rewards. When the motivation is there, the Curly learns quickly and easily.
  Like most dogs, Curly-Coats become bored when left to their own devices. They can easily become noisy or destructive if they don’t have other dogs to keep them company and don’t receive much attention from their people. But when the Curly lives with a family who is willing to spend plenty of time training and exercising him, he thrives.

Highlights
  • The Curly-Coated Retriever has the most unusual coat of all of the retriever breeds. The coat requires only moderate grooming, and the breed sheds only twice a year.
  • Curly-Coated Retrievers generally have an oily coat, which is more likely to cause reactions in people with allergies.
  • Curly-Coated Retrievers are more reserved around strangers than other retriever breeds and needs to be properly socialized to avoid any timidity.
  • Curly-Coated Retrievers are sporting dogs and have the energy that other sporting and working dogs have. If they are not given adequate exercise, at least 30 to 60 minutes per day, they can become quite destructive in their boredom.
  • Curly-Coated Retrievers tend to be mouthy and will nip and chew everything in reach, including toys, clothes, and hands.
  • The Curly-Coated Retriever is intelligent and enjoys working, but he needs a strong, confident owner who will keep him from taking charge. He also needs variety in training and activities because he tends to get bored doing the same old thing again and again.
  • Curly-Coated Retrievers are more difficult to find than other breeds, but it is still important to look for the best possible breeder, even if long waiting lists await you.
  • Curly-Coated Retrievers take longer to mature than other breeds, so be prepared for your dog to act puppylike for at least three years.
  • In general, Curly-Coated Retrievers do well with children but small children should never be left unsupervised with any dog regardless of breed.
  • Curly-Coated Retrievers are not meant for apartments and do better in homes with a large yard where they can expend their energy. They are quieter in homes when their energy levels are met.
  • Although they enjoy the great outdoors, Curly-Coated Retrievers are not dogs who can be kenneled outside. They enjoy being with their family and can become very destructive when left away from them.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Curly dates to the 18th century and is acknowledged as the oldest of the retrieving breeds.
  • The Curly’s coat is unusual but easy to care for and sheds little. It can be black or liver-colored.
  • Like most retrievers, the Curly loves playing in water.
  • A home with a yard is the best environment for a Curly, but a person who is committed to walking him or taking him to a dog park daily can keep one happy in a home without a yard.
  • Curlies excel at many activities, including hunt tests, agility, herding instinct tests, lure coursing, dock diving, flyball, scent hurdle racing, tracking and rally. At least one has run as part of a sled-dog team.
  • A daily walk of up to a mile will satisfy a Curly, but he’ll take all the exercise you can give him.
Breed standards
AKC Group: Sporting
UKC Group: Gun Dogs
Lifespan:  8 to 12 years
Average size:  between 60 to 70 pounds
Color: Black and Brown
Coat: Dense, Short, and Water-Repellent
Hypoallergenic Breed: No
Shedding: Moderate
Grooming Needs: Low Maintenance
Comparable Breeds: English Springer Spaniel, Labrador Retriever



History
  The exact history of the Curly-Coated Retriever is not known. Popular conjecture suggests that the Curly-Coated Retriever descends from the now-extinct Old English Water Spaniel and from the Retrieving Setter. Other contributors to the breed are thought to include the small St. John’s Newfoundland, the Poodle, the Labrador Retriever, the Pointer and/or the Irish Water Spaniel. 
  This popular gun dog was first exhibited in 1860 at Birmingham. In 1889, some Curly’s were exported to New Zealand, where they have since been used for retrieving duck and quail. In Australia, Curly-Coated Retrievers are also highly prized for use on water fowl in the swamps and lagoons of the Murray River. They are excellent all-around hunting dogs, with an especially tender mouth and unparalleled water skills.
  The first breed club was established in England in 1896. The breed was introduced to America as early as 1907, with the first American Kennel Club registration of a Curly-Coated Retriever being made in 1924. They are members of the AKC’s Sporting Group. The Curly-Coated Retriever Club of America was formed in 1979 and is the breed parent club in this country. In the early part of the twentieth century, the Curly’s popularity waned while the Flat-Coated Retriever’s popularity rose. Today, the Curly-Coated Retriever retains its world-wide presence as a determined, durable hunter and a gentle family companion, although the breed is still uncommon.


Personality
  The Curly-Coat is full of retriever drive and determination. He'll work 'til the job is done. In the field or at home, he's alert and self-confident. He has an even temper but is more reserved with strangers than other retrievers. Early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds and experiences — helps prevent timidity. That said, don't confuse his independence and poise with shyness or a lack of willingness to please. Curly-Coated Retrievers take longer to mature than other breeds, so be prepared to live with a full-grown puppy for several years.
  Curlies have a mind of their own and need a confident owner who won't allow them to run the show. The Curly-Coated Retriever responds well to training, although not always as quickly as other dogs. That doesn't mean he's dumb. He simply gets bored easily. Keep him interested with a variety of training exercises. It's not unusual for a Curly to ignore his trainer when an exercise or activity becomes repetitive.


Health
  The average life expectancy of the Curly-Coated Retriever is between 10 and 12 years. Breed health concerns may include gastric dilatation and volvulus (bloat), canine follicular dysplasia, entropion, ectropion, distichiasis, cataracts, epilepsy, generalized progressive retinal atrophy, glycogen storage disease and hip dysplasia.

Care
  The Curly-Coated Retriever does not require too much maintenance. However, certain things have to be taken care of. The curls require a bit of trimming, and occasional brushing. However, this is not required at the time of shedding. A daily exercise regimen, including retrieving and swimming, is important for Curly-Coated Retrievers. And if you are in search of an outside pet, the Curly-Coated Retriever is adaptable to living outdoors in temperate climates.

Living Conditions
  The Curly-Coated Retriever is not recommended for apartment life. It does best with at least a large yard. An eager and tireless land and (especially) water retriever outdoors, but a calm companion indoors. Curlies need to be part of the family and not left alone outside in the yard all day.

Training
  Curly-Coated Retrievers grow to become large dogs so it is essential that you start training when they are puppies. It is also important that you keep in mind that because they are such great Retrievers, they tend to mouthy and chew things up as pups. This unwanted behavior must be nipped in the bud at an early age.  The Curly is highly trainable and responds well to repetitive training sessions along with positive reinforcement. His willingness to please makes the Curly-Coated Retriever the perfect candidate for AKC Sanctioned Obedience Trials.
  Owners who plan to use their Curly-Coated Retrievers for hunting purposes should acclimate the pup to water as soon as possible. This doesn’t mean that a ten week old puppy should go into icy water in the freezing cold. It’s best to buy a plastic wading pool and fill it with water on a mild day. More than likely, the pup will find his way in and have a grand, old time. A retrieving dummy will make his first experience in the water a good one.

Activity Requirements
  Like other retriever breeds, the Curly Coated version needs lots of vigorous exercise every single day. They are an active person's dog – couch potatoes should steer clear of this breed. They love running, swimming, hiking, playing ball and catching frisbees. They can be competitive in agility courses, but they are not as obedient as their Golden Retriever counterparts, so they often do not excel in this arena, but they enjoy the activity and eat up the attention.
  Curlies need as much mental stimulation as they do physical stimulation and should always be provided with plenty of interesting activities throughout the day, especially when left alone. Inactivity and boredom leads to destructiveness and hyperactivity that is hard to curb.

Grooming
  The Curly coat of small, tight, crisp curls has little odor and is easy to care for. Comb or brush it out before bathing with an undercoat rake or a slicker brush and comb. Don’t worry that brushing will take the curl out of the coat.
  Depending on how dirty a Curly gets, a bath is necessary only every month or two. Most Curly coats dry quickly, sometimes in as little as ten minutes. Don’t blow dry a Curly unless you want him to look like a chia pet. 
  The only other grooming is a little trimming to neaten any straggly hairs, a bushy tail, or excessive feathering on the backs of the legs and behind the ears. Some Curlies have tufts of fur between their toes, giving the feet the appearance of fluffy houseslippers. These tufts are usually trimmed for the show ring, but can be left alone if you like the look.
  Curlies don’t shed much, but they do shed. If your Curly spends time in the house, you will find hair on the furniture or floor. The coat usually sheds a small amount year-round, with a heavier shed twice a year.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Keep the ears clean and dry to prevent ear infections. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  The Curly-Coated Retriever is a great companion for older children who can stand up to his size and energy level, but he may be overwhelming for younger children who are easily knocked down in play. Any time your Curly interacts with children, lay down some ground rules for dog and child. No ear pulling, tail pulling or biting allowed! For the safety of both, never leave small children unsupervised with any dog.
  Curly-Coated Retrievers generally do very well with other dogs and animals but socialization is still important in regard to animal interactions.

Is the Curly-Coated Retriever the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep. No trimming or stripping needed.
Moderate Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Moderately Easy Training: The Curly-Coated Retriever is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  You might mistake the Curly-Coated Retriever for a Labradoodle, but he’s a distinct breed, created in the 18th century by crossing now-extinct Old English Water Dogs, Irish Water Spaniels and small Newfoundlands. And yes, there’s some Poodle in the mix, too.





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Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Everything about your Kerry Blue Terrier

Everything about your Kerry Blue Terrier
  The Kerry Blue Terrier is the quintessential working dog. He hails from County Kerry, Ireland, where he was bred to hunt small game and birds, kill rodents, and herd sheep and cattle. Intelligent and brave, he became a cherished pet as well, displaying fierce devotion to his family or pack. While not a particularly well-known dog breed, the Kerry Blue enjoys a dedicated following of fanciers, thanks to his working abilities and loyal companionship.

Overview
  The Kerry Blue Terrier, also known as the Irish Blue Terrier, is a breed of dog.Originally bred to control "vermin" including rats, rabbits, badgers, foxes, otters and hares, over time the Kerry became a general working dog used for a variety of jobs including herding cattle and sheep, and as a guard dog. Today the Kerry has spread around the world as a companion and working dog. Despite a Kerry Blue winning Crufts,the most important UK dog show, in 2000, it remains an "unfashionable" breed, and is distinctly uncommon; however, it not as threatened as some of the other terrier breeds such as Skye Terrier, Sealyham Terrier, and Dandie Dinmont Terrier.

Highlights
  • The Kerry Blue Terry is a quick study, though he can be strong willed at times. You'll need a lot of patience and firmness, plus a good sense of humor, when training this breed.
  • The Kerry Blue is friendly to people, but his distaste for other dogs is well known. He can be aggressive and quarrelsome. Owners must be vigilant when taking the Kerry Blue in public. If he's socialized and well trained, he probably won't pick a fight, but he might try to end it if he's taunted.
  • Keeping your Kerry Blue groomed is expensive and, if you do it yourself, it's hard work.
  • Like all terriers, the Kerry Blue can be feisty. He loves to dig, chase, chew, and sometimes bark.
  • This is an active breed. He needs plenty of exercise, every day. A yard to play in is best, combined with daily walks.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
More Quick Facts:
  • The Kerry Blue has a long head, dark eyes with a keen expression, small V-shaped ears that fold forward, a squarish body, and a medium-length tail carried up.
  • Coat and color are the Kerry’s defining characteristics. A proper Kerry coat is soft, dense, and wavy in any shade of blue gray, or gray blue. Those shades can range from deep slate to light blue gray, with darker to black areas on the muzzle, head, ears, tail, and feet.
  • Comparable Breeds: Airedale Terrier, Border Terrier
History
  The Kerry Blue Terrier was first observed in the mountains of Kerry in Ireland, hence the name of the breed.There is a romantic story of a blue dog swimming ashore from a shipwreck: the coat of this dog was so lovely that it was mated with all the female Wheaten Terriers in Kerry, producing the Kerry Blue. Perhaps this story is not entirely myth, as the Portuguese Water Dog is often suggested as part of the Kerry's makeup. Others suggest the Kerry was produced by the Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier crossed with the Bedlington
Philip Doyle with his dog "Terri" at the Killarney Show,1916.
Terrier with or without some Irish Wolfhound or Irish Terrier blood. The extinct Gadhar herding dog is also mentioned as another possible branch of the Kerry's family tree. One certain fact is the breed became very popular as an all-around farm dog in rural Ireland.

National Dog of Ireland
  With the development of dog shows in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the breed became standardised and "tidied up" for the show ring. The Irish nationalist leader Michael Collins owned a famous Kerry Blue named Convict 224. Collins even made an attempt to have the Kerry blue adopted as the national dog of Ireland. Love of dogs did, however, cross political divides. The first show of the Dublin Irish Blue Terrier club took place outside official curfew hours and was entered both by those fighting for and against an Ireland republic. The Dublin Irish Blue Terrier Club was so successful it led directly to the foundation of the Irish Kennel Club, and a Kerry blue was the first dog that club registered.




Personality
  The Kerry Blue Terrier is an energetic and often rambunctious dog who loves to play hard. They are true family dogs who love to be surrounded by the ones they love and insist upon being included in all family activities. They have enough stamina to accompany people on long walks and hikes, but prefer yard games like catch, fetch, or plain old games of tag. Kerry Blues can be trusted around children of all ages, though their yen for rough housing makes them a poor choice for homes with toddlers. They are reliable watchdogs, quick to sound the alarm that someone is approaching, and they are fearless protectors of their property and family. They are not aggressive, however, unless absolutely provoked and are a great choice for families with experience raising dogs.


Health
  The Kerry Blue Terrier, which has a lifespan of 12 to 15 years, may suffer from clotting factor XI deficiency and retinal folds. It is also prone to minor health problems like cataract, entropion, Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca (KCS), canine hip dysplasia (CHD), spiculosis, otitis externa, and hair follicle tumors, and a major issues such as cerebellar abiotrophy. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may run hip and eye exams on the dog.

Care
  The Kerry Blue should be able to spend time lots of time with its family, both outdoors and indoors. Exercise is required for the breed, but this can be accomplished with a vigorous game, a leash-led walk, or a nice romp in the backyard.
  Coat care consists of combing twice a week and shaping and clipping at least once a month. The Kerry Blue's ears will also need to be trained during its early stages of development so that its ears will be properly shaped as an adult.

Living Conditions
  Kerry Blues are good for apartment life. They are fairly active indoors and a small yard will do.

Training
  The Kerry Blue Terrier is intelligent, but being a typical terrier, he’s also quite stubborn. Being such an observant dog, the Blue will watch to see who is in charge and how they can turn any situation to their advantage. If he senses that you’re not in charge at all times, your Kerry Blue Terrier will gladly take charge. Be consistent and confident when training your Blue and never let him get the upper hand. You’ll find that you’ll make much more progress by using positive training techniques. Come to training prepared with plenty of treats and keep these sessions interesting – your Kerry will lose focus if he gets bored.
  After he masters basic obedience training, your Kerry Blue Terrier is ready to move onto advanced obedience, agility and earthdog training. Because this is an intelligent breed, you need to keep his mind stimulated, otherwise he’ll engage in destructive behaviors.

Activity Requirements
  This mid-sized terrier needs a lot of physical and mental activity in order to maintain happiness and health. They have energy to spare, and just when you think you've tired our your Kerry Blue, he'll come back for more. This breed is not for couch potatoes, and don't do well in apartments. Houses with open space and a yard to play in are the ideal living situation for a Kerry Blue Terrier. They need about one hour of vigorous exercise every day which can include brisk walks, jogs, or romping in the yard.
  In addition to physical activity, it is important to keep the Kerry Blue's mind active. A bored Kerry is a destructive Kerry. Agility training is a good option to work both his mind and his body.

Grooming 
  Even though the Kerry Blue sheds very little, or not at all, the coat requires daily brushing to prevent tangles, mats, remove dirt and distribute oils. Trimming and bathing need to occur every four to six weeks. It is recommended that a professional groomer handle the bathing and trimming of a Kerry Blue, but because the breed is not common, it can be difficult to find a groomer who is familiar with the proper Kerry Blue style. Breeders can provide references for groomers.
  Check the ears on a regular basis for signs of wax buildup, irritation or infection. Clean the ears with a cotton ball and a veterinarian-approved cleanser; never use a cotton swab in a dog's ear canal. Teeth should be brushed on a weekly basis to prevent tartar buildup, promote gum health and keep bad breath at bay. Trim nails monthly if the dog does not wear the toenails down naturally outdoors.

Children And Other Pets
  The Kerry Blue loves kids, and because he is a sturdy dog, he can take a few knocks if the play gets rough. He is good-natured, and isn't normally grouchy with children.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  He is grouchy, even aggressive, with other dogs, though with socialization and training — and altering — this tendency can be minimized. Never let your guard down, though, when the Kerry Blue is around other dogs, especially those unfamiliar to him.
  The Kerry Blue isn't especially fond of small animals either, given his strong prey drive. His instinct tells him to chase, so keep him leashed in public. The best way to ensure he'll get along with cats or small mammals in his home is to raise him with them and introduce them properly. Following that, close supervision is advised.

Did You Know?
  Kerry Blue Terrier puppies are born black. The coat should reach its mature color by the time the dog is 18 months old.

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Wednesday, September 3, 2014

Everything about your Newfoundland

 Everything about your Newfoundland
  The Newfoundland is a large, strong dog breed from — wait for it — Newfoundland. He was originally used as a working dog to pull nets for fishermen and haul wood from the forest. He is a capable and hardworking dog, well suited to work on land or water. He is a strong swimmer and equally strong "pack horse." Sweet-natured and responsive, he makes a wonderful family companion as well.
  Roundly considered to be one of the most intelligent dog breeds in the world, the Newfoundlander is an ideal companion. In addition to being an excellent pack carrier and guardian for children and families, the Newfie is unmatched at water rescues. In modern times, it is brought along for hiking and camping expeditions, but is also still held in high esteem by rural families in need of a working dog.

Overview
  Surely you remember Nana, the fictional Newfoundland employed as a nanny by the Darling family in Peter Pan? Sweet-natured Nana was first introduced to the public by Scottish novelist and playwright J. M. Barrie in his 1904 play, Peter Pan, which later became the well-loved kids' story we know today.
  It's true that Barrie's fictional account of Nana as a round-the-clock babysitter stretches reality a bit. However, there is truth in the author's characterization of the dog.
  The Newfoundland really is a sweet dog who loves children. He's naturally gentle and friendly with them, as well as protective. Fans of this breed say the Newfoundland really is a natural-born babysitter.
  Originating in Newfoundland, Canada, located on the northeastern shore of that country, the Newfoundland, affectionately nicknamed "Newfie," shares a birthplace with the popular Labrador Retriever. The breeds are similar in character, sharing a desire to please, intelligence, a strong work ethic, friendliness, adaptability and versatility.
  The Newfoundland is a giant breed (about 100 pounds). Though relatively placid, he still needs daily exercise to keep fit.
  Neat freaks need not consider the Newfoundland because his long, heavy coat is a mud-burr-dirt magnet. He is especially skilled at tracking dirt and debris throughout the house. You'll need to keep up with quite a bit of grooming to minimize the damage. And he drools — a lot.
But when it comes to training, you'll find the Newfoundland is an A student. He learns quickly and there is little this dog can't do. Training should begin early because the breed gets big quickly and it can be tough to haul a 100-pound pooch off the couch.
  All dogs have the potential for heroism, but it seems to be a hardwired into this naturally strong swimmer. There are many accounts of Newfoundlands rescuing people from the cold waters of the Atlantic following a shipwreck or plucking children from icy deep water — just in time.
  Regardless of the purpose of the Newfoundland in your life, be it worker or companion, he will no doubt capture your heart.

Highlights
  • The Newfoundland is a big dog when full grown. Though mellow, he's not your basic one-bedroom apartment dog and would probably be happier in a more spacious setting.
  • He has has a strong work ethic, needs exercise, and mental stimulation. Ongoing training and dog sports are a perfect outlet for his working abilities.
  • If you can't stand dog slobber, the Newfoundland is not for you. This breed drools. A lot.
  • To keep the Newfoundland's thick coat looking great, he needs regular grooming. You can do it yourself, which is time consuming, or you can hire a professional groomer, which can be expensive.
  • The Newfoundland thrives in cool climates, though he can adapt to living in warmer climates. To protect him from heat stroke, keep him near air conditioning or fans when it's really hot.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a shelter dog, a rescue group, or a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • Newfoundlands make excellent lifeguards and can bring a drowning adult ashore.
  • When living with a Newfie, drool is a part of life. Don’t believe breeders who claim to breed for “dry-mouthed” dogs.
Breed standards
  • AKC group: Working
  • UKC group: Guardian Dog
  • Average lifespan:  8 - 10 years
  • Average size:  99 - 155 pounds
  • Coat appearance: Thick, long, coarse
  • Coloration: Black, gray, brown and white
  • Hypoallergenic: No
  • Other identifiers: Broad-bodied; muscular, webbed feet; drooping jowls
  • Possible alterations: No
  • Comparable Breeds: Labrador Retriever, Great Pyrenees
History
  The Newfoundland comes from the Canadian province of the same name and worked alongside the fishermen of the area. Although originating in Canada, the details are sketchy.
There are three theories of how the Newfoundland came to be, though as is the case with most breeds, it's hard to validate. The first is that the Newfoundland is a cross between the Tibetan Mastiff and the now-extinct American Black Wolf. Through the pairings of those two animals, the Newfoundland eventually evolved.
  Another school of thought is that Vikings left the dogs when they visited the New World in 1000 A.D. and these dogs interbred and were eventually bred with wolves native to Eastern Canada.
  The third theory is that the Newfoundland is the result of many European breeds cross bred around the 15th and 16th centuries, among them the Pyrenean Sheep Dogs, Mastiffs, and Portuguese Water Dogs
  What is known is that sometime in the late 18th century, Sir Joseph Banks, an English botanist, acquired several Newfoundlands and in 1775 George Cartwright named them. In the late 1800s, another fan, Professor Albert Heim of Switzerland identified and described the breed.
  But the existence of the Newfie, as the breed is sometimes called, was in jeopardy until then. In the 1780s, the breed was almost wiped out because of government-imposed restrictions mandating that Canadian families had to pay taxes on the one dog they were allowed to keep.
One person who contributed to the Newfoundland's resurgence was Sir Edwin Landseer (1802-1873), who liked to include the Newfoundland in his paintings. The white and black variety of the Newfoundland was named Landseer in his honor.
  But the future of the breed was truly solidified when the Honorable Harold MacPherson (1884-1963), governor of Newfoundland, made the dog his breed of choice.
  In 1860, the first Newfoundland was shown in England. The breed was first registered with the American Kennel Club in 1879 and the first American Newfoundland champion was titled in 1883.

Personality
  The Newfoundland is known for his sweet disposition. He's like a big, loveable Teddy Bear. He loves children, is intelligent, and aims to please. He's happiest when he is with his family, and should not be left alone for long periods of time or be banished to the backyard or a kennel.
  Like every dog, the Newfoundland needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences when young. Socialization helps ensure that your Newfoundland puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.
  Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.

Health
  The Newfoundland, which has an average lifespan of 8 to 10 years, is prone to serious health conditions such as gastric torsion, Sub-Aortic Stenosis (SAS), cystinuria, canine hip dysplasia (CHD), epilepsy, and elbow dysplasia, and minor issues like von Willebrand's Disease (vWD), cataract, Osteochondrosis Dissecans (OCD), entropion, ectropion, cruciate ligament rupture. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may recommend cardiac, eye, hip, and elbow tests for this breed of dog. Additionally, some Newfoundlands are extremely sensitive to anesthesia, and most do not tolerate heat well.

Care
  Because of its heavy coat, the Newfie does not fare well in hot weather. It should be kept outdoors only in cold or temperate weather, and in summer, the coat may be trimmed for neatness and comfort, and brushed daily to manage excess shedding and prevent the coat from matting. The dog is at its best when it can move freely between the yard and the house, but still needs plenty of space indoors to stretch properly. Daily exercise is essential, as is typical with all work dogs.
  Although its relaxed appearance might indicate that this breed would prefer to lounge around, the Newfie has an abundance of energy that needs to be spent in order for the dog to be at its top shape. Regular walks and romps in the park or in a large yard will keep the Newfie fit and content. Being large dogs, they do have larger appetites, but care must be taken not to overfeed them, as they can easily become overweight, stressing the organs extremities and shortening their lifespans.
  In the summer, the Newfoundlander is more likely to drool, since it must pant more to keep its body temperature down, owing to its size and coat. Summertime water activities are ideal, since the Newfie excels at swimming, but keep in mind that even in the winter this breed benefits from a brisk swim. Cold water swimming is what they are built for, after all. According to some breeders, the Landseers are more active, thus requiring more exercise. In fact, it is ideal for families who enjoy camping, fishing, or hiking with an enthusiastic participant and helpful furry companion.

Living Conditions
  Will do okay in an apartment if sufficiently exercised. They are relatively inactive indoors and a small yard is sufficient. Newfies prefer colder climates and do not do well in the heat. Make sure there is always cool water and a shaded place for them to lie.

Exercise
  This gentle giant is quite content to laze around the house, but still needs to be taken on a daily walk. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as in a dog's mind the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human. It will enjoy frequent opportunities to swim and frolic.

Grooming
  The Newfoundland has a water-resistant double coat of black, brown, gray or Landseer (white with black markings). Using a steel comb and wire slicker brush, groom the coat at least a couple times a week to prevent mats and remove dead hair.
  Newfies shed, and regular brushing will help reduce the amount of hair floating around your house. Twice a year, in spring and fall, they shed heavily, called “blowing coat.”  Plan to spend additional time brushing to keep all the hair under control.
Newfies also drool, so get in the habit of carrying around a hand towel so you can wipe your dog’s mouth as needed, especially after he eats or drinks. Bathe the Newfoundland when he’s dirty.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath. Most important, keep this water-loving dog’s ears clean and dry to help prevent ear infections.

Is this breed right for you?
  Although Newfoundlands are huge in size, they do make wonderful apartment pets. They are a low-energy breed and require just enough exercise to keep them at a healthy weight. Due to their coarse coat, Newfoundlands don’t do well in warm climates. This is a lovable breed that thrives on companionship and a family atmosphere. Gentle and caring, Newfoundlands rank among the best breeds for children of all ages.

Children and other pets
  This cuddly giant is highly tolerant of children, which is important because he's a kid magnet thanks to his size and wealth of soft fur. But he can also accidentally knock over a toddler or small child, and can appear intimidating to children who don't know him.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  The Newfoundland is also easygoing and friendly with other pets, including cats and small mammals, as long as he is properly socialized and trained.


Famous Newfoundlands
  • Adam: Seaward's Blackbeard: 1984 Best in Show winner at the Westminster Dog Show
  • Ava Marie : 2004 Best In Show aka "Josh" Granddaughter is a lifeguard in Goshen, NY
  • Bashaw (Matthew Cotes Wyatt): The Earl of Dudley's favourite dog, a sculpture by Matthew Cotes Wyatt can be seen at the Victoria and Albert museum in London
  • Boatswain: pet of English poet Lord Byron and the subject of his poem "Epitaph to a Dog"
  • Bilbo: lifeguard at Sennon cove beach in Cornwall
  • Boo: saved a man both deaf and mute at ten months of age without any previous training
  • Brumus: Robert F. Kennedy's dog
  • Brutus: first dog to complete the Appalachian Mountain Club's "Winter 48", climbing all 48 peaks in one calendar winter
  • Bucky. Mascot of Columbia, MO-based rock band, "The Diet"
  • Carlo: Emily Dickinson's dog
  • Charlie Erhart: Lyndon B. Johnson's dog
  • Darbydale's All Rise Pouchcove (AKA Josh): 2004 Best in Show winner at the Westminster Dog Show
  • Faithful: First dog of President Ulysses S. Grant
  • Frank: Unofficial mascot of the Orphan Brigade during the American Civil War
  • Gander: the Mascot of the Royal Rifles of Canada who was killed in action at the Battle of Hong Kong when he carried a grenade away from wounded soldiers. For this he was awarded the PDSA Dickin Medal retroactively in 2000.
  • Hairy Man: The dog who helped Ann Harvey and her father and brother rescue 163 people from a shipwreck.
  • Jeff: Wonderful gorilla-loving friend of Flagstaff, AZ; mascot of dream pop band the Sea Section 
  • Luath: Landseer Newfoundland pet of J. M. Barrie and the inspiration for "Nana", the Darling children's nurse in Peter Pan.
  • Mas: first Newfoundland dog to jump out of a helicopter Ecurel B-350 in 1992 during a joint training exercise between Scuola Italiana Cani Salvataggio, SICS, and Aeronautica Militare.
  • Morse: A Newfoundland/Saint Bernard cross breed, Morse was a popular contestant on Channel 4's Superstar Dogs.
  • Smokey: Lion-styled mascot of the East Coast Bays Barracudas.
  • Plato: pet of John James Audubon.
  • Pluto: pet of the Croatian operatic soprano Ilma de Murska, which used to dine at table with her and was trained to eat a cooked fowl from a place setting without dripping gravy on the tablecloth. Pluto lived in the 1860s.
  • Robber: dog of Richard Wagner who accompanied him on his flight from his creditors from Riga on a fishing boat, which inspired the opera The Flying Dutchman.
  • Russ: last dog of Richard Wagner, buried at the feet of his master in the composer's tomb in the park of Villa Wahnfried in Bayreuth, under his own plaque: "Here rests and watches Wagner's Russ."
  • Sable Chief: mascot of Royal Newfoundland Regiment
  • Swansea Jack: Famous Welsh rescue dog identified as a Newfoundland, but had an appearance more like a modern Flat-Coated Retriever
  • Seaman: companion of explorer Meriwether Lewis
  • Yogi: John Madden's Newfoundland
Did You Know?
  A Newfoundland made an impressive appearance in the 2005 romantic comedy “Must Love Dogs,” starring Diane Lane and John Cusack. The dog, named Mother Theresa, was actually played by two Newfie puppies; director Gary David Goldberg adopted both dogs when the filming ended.

A dream day in the life of a Newfoundland
  Newfoundlands have been nicknamed "nature's nanny" for a reason: they're simply wonderful with kids and have a knack for caregiving. An ideal day would be spent swimming and playing with kids of all ages and sizes. Their large size makes this breed an excellent furry pillow and their sweet disposition means they are more than happy to nap by your side.

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Sunday, May 4, 2014

Top dog breeds for kids

Top dog breeds for kids

There are many great dogs to consider when looking for your next pet. In order to determine the best fit for your family, you must first be realistic about how a dog will affect your children.
  It is important to know that many of the dogs considered worst for getting along with kids are often miss-trained or not properly cared for.
  A common factor that places dogs in shelters is families who don’t choose the right pet for their lifestyle and don’t know how to manage the pet.

1. Bull Dog
   The Bull Dog has a sturdy build that is perfect for kids who like to roughhouse. However, it won’t win any awards for "most energetic dog." A docile, friendly, and loyal dog, it gets along well with other pets and dogs, too. The Bull Dog is comfortable living in large houses as well as small apartments.


2. Beagle
  Originally kept as hunting dogs, Beagles fit well in homes with active kids, as they are sturdily built and never too tired to play a game. Friendly, clever and cheerful, the Beagle usually gets along with other pets, too (except for a bit of chasing here and there). They do shed, and require frequent brushing and bathing, however.
  While your beagle most likely won't have a bird named Woodstock as his best friend, you can, by all means, name him (or her) Snoopy.

3.Bull Terrier
  Unfairly branded as an aggressive animal, the Bull Terrier was actually bred to be a companion dog -- friendly and loving towards grown-ups and kids alike. This well-framed dog also has a high threshold for pain, making it perfect for rambunctious children who are learning how to properly treat dogs.
  The Bull Terrier can get quite rambunctious and requires plenty of playtime. Therefore, it is a perfect dog for a large family. The Bull Terrier will return your affection by being very protective of your children.

4.Collie
  This is the dog Lassie made famous. Collies are a very gentle and predictable breed, rarely biting its human family and easily trainable, perfect for families that are unfamiliar with dogs.
  While this breed is typically mild mannered (like Clark Kent!), it was originally bred as a herding dog, so it may try and herd your children. This might be amusing at first, but it's probably best to discourage the child-herding (no matter how handy you may think it could be). The Collie's long hair means it requires regular grooming to keep its coat in tip-top shape. Collies get along great with children and love to please their owners and protect their family.


5. Newfoundland
  Nicknamed "Nature’s Babysitter," the Newfoundland dog loves children and is very protective of them. Gentle, kind, and patient, this breed is almost like the Mother Teresa of dogs. Both young and old will quickly fall in love with this wonderfully sweet, large dog.
  The Newfoundland best suits a family with large open spaces. And although it is known to drool and shed excessively, it is not considered a proper dog for the yard. This breed wants to be inside with its family. Wouldn’t you? The Newfoundland is also a great swimmer and has been known to save lives in emergency situations.

6. Vizsla
  This may be a breed you haven't heard of before, but it's actually one of the best dog breeds for kids. The Vizsla has a gentle disposition and manner, and is loyal, affectionate, and quiet, perfect for your little ones to play with.
  Additionally, it is obedient, confident and smart, forming close bonds with its family and able to learn new tricks quickly. Best of all, the Vizsla has very little "doggy" smell about it.

7. Irish Setter
  Known for its red coat, the Irish Setter is playful, energetic, loves being around people, and plays well with children. This doggy needs lots of exercise, and is a good match for energetic kids. A smart and trainable companion, the Irish setter is perfect for people with a yard.

8. Poodle
  Often given rather curious haircuts by their owners, the poodle is a very smart and gentle dog. It's also great for kids with allergies, as it sheds very little; it does, however, require scheduled grooming.
  This is a proud and elegant dog that is both caring and loyal. Seldom annoyed or bored, the Poodle's friendly demeanor, good nature, and patience make it an excellent playing partner for any child.

9. Labrador Retriever
  This is one of the most popular dog breeds, and for good reason -- the Labrador Retriever is playful, patient, loving, protective, and reliable. In fact, its sweet personality and intelligence is only matched by its beauty. What does this mean for you? A perfect family pet.

10. Golden Retriever
  Not as big as the Lab, the Golden Retriever is a kind, smart, confident, and loyal dog. Neither aggressive nor timid, the Golden Retriever is extremely patient, which is perfect for kids. While it does need a lot of exercise, its love of play makes this an easy thing to achieve.

11. Pug
  This pint-sized pup has an irresistible face and prominently curved tail that any child will find intriguing. The Pug does especially well in a moderate climate but is just as comfortable hanging out indoors to keep your kiddos entertained.

12. Yorkshire Terrier
Though a tiny canine, the Yorkie has a big adventurous personality that makes it an engaging dog. This affectionate pint-sized pup is an ideal pet if your family loves travel — it will keep your kids affectionately entertained in the back seat while you're en route.


13. Miniature Schnauzer
  The most popular of the three Schnauzer breeds (which include the giant and standard sizes), the Mini Schnauzer is an intelligent and cheerful canine that is as happy hanging out in the house with the family as it is romping outdoors with the kids in the yard or at the park.

14. Havanese
  This toy-sized silky-coated canine is in high demand as a family pet because of its affectionate temperament, easy trainability and hypoallergenic non-shedding coat. The Havanese is as eager to be a loved-on lap dog as it is to playfully chase the kids around.

15. Shetland Sheepdog
If you've got a big yard or live on a farm, the Sheltie will keep your kids well-exercised. One of the best obedience breeds, this long-haired, energetic beauty thrives on physical and mental activity.

  The Boston Terrier is a diminutive dapper-looking dog that has a gentle disposition and enjoys being close by its family's side.



  If the French bulldog is the clown-philosopher, the Cavalier King Charles spaniel may be the joker of the canine community. Named for King Charles II of Britain, these dogs' whimsical and high-spirited personalities can instantly charm even the hardest heart. They are very friendly and vivacious animals with virtually no tendency toward nervousness or aggression, Jones says.

  Cavalier King Charles spaniels are highly adaptable in their need for exercise, which is great for families who like to get out and play but also appreciate a little rest and relaxation. Jones adds that these pups are smart, obedient and generally quite eager to learn. According to the AKC, they're also relatively low-maintenance, requiring little more than weekly brushing to keep them looking great.



18. Pembroke Welsh Corgi
  Bold and friendly, the Corgi thrives on having work to do. Considered a herding dog, this strong, sturdy pup is ideal if your family lives on a farm but, if given adequate mental and physical stimulation, can adapt easily to any living situation.



The pint-sized Miniature Poodle is a top pet choice for kids with allergies. Highly intelligent, this cuddly fluff ball easily entertains its family with smile-evoking antics and heartwarming cuddles.


  If you're into royalty, you'll love the Maltese. According to the American Kennel Club (AKC), these playful and affectionate creatures have lounged alongside aristocrats for the past 28 centuries. And this is no surprise when you consider their beautiful silken locks, gentle dispositions and constant cheerfulness.
  Despite being bred for lounging on the bed -- or chaise, as the case may be -- the Maltese is actually quite enthusiastic about learning and highly trainable. The only possible downside to having a Maltese in a family with kids is that this animal needs to be brushed daily, which may be too big a responsibility for younger kids or those with only a passing interest in their pet.

21. Brussels Griffon Terrier
  The Brussels Griffon terriers are extremely lovable and sensitive animals. They will follow you around for as long as it takes to win your attention. They're also very loyal and protective. These great qualities, Weiss says, combined with the fact that they're remarkably obedient, make these pups excellent watchdogs and fun playmates for children.
  Bred in Belgium as rat catchers, Brussels Griffons are extremely smart dogs that love to learn and excel in training. But despite generally cheerful, energetic dispositions, they are also perfectly content to be snoozing in the sun room.


22. French Bulldog
  The French bulldog has been called a "clown in the cloak of a philosopher," which, according to the AKC, essentially means that dogs of this breed are smart with a powerful penchant for play. They're very lively and social, but not overly boisterous or barky. In fact, Weiss says their stellar doggie demeanors stand out among other dogs, large and small.
  Bred to be loungers, French bulldogs require very little in the way of exercise or grooming. They're also heavy-boned and fearless, which makes this breed a good choice for families who want a pet that's playful, but not too skittish or delicate. However, one important consideration is that French bulldogs do best in a mild climate, which means they need air conditioning when the temperature rises.

23. Shih Tzu
  The fact that Shih Tzu means "lion dog" in Chinese is misleading, considering that most members of this breed probably couldn't hurt a fly, let alone bring down a gazelle. Shih Tzus are ideal small dogs: lively and alert, yet rarely nervous or snappy. And despite their diminutive stature, they're strong and unafraid, which means they have no trouble holding their own when playing with children and keeping up with an active family.
  The Shih Tzu's long, luxurious coat of hair is certainly beautiful, but it can also be a lot of work to maintain. If you're considering a Shih Tzu, keep in mind that they do require regular grooming. Most pet parents don't mind this aspect of caring for their Shih Tzus, though, considering these dogs' infinitely loving and loyal nature.

24. Pomeranian
  The Pomeranian is an adorable dog with a mellow and gentle personality, but they can sometimes get noisy (just like children). As a matter of fact, if you want a Pomeranian, they are great with kids, just as long as they are introduced as puppies. However, because Pomeranians shed profusely, it may not be the best choice for a house with very small children.

25. Chihuahua
  Meek though they may look, this small dog can really pack a punch in attitude. They are known for nipping at children (probably not the best choice for a house with kids) or barking incessantly at strange dogs. They can also be loud and demanding. But before you cross this breed off the list, you should know that the Chihuahua is loyal and affectionate, even seen canoodling with cats every one in awhile (after an adjustment period, of course).


Good luck finding the best dog for your family!

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