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Showing posts with label i love dog. Show all posts
Showing posts with label i love dog. Show all posts

Tuesday, November 15, 2016

Everything about your Redbone Coonhound

Everything about your Redbone Coonhound
  As you can tell from its name, the Redbone Coonhound is a breed made famous by hunting raccoon and a few other animals. In fact, this is what it was originally bred for, having first been an “unofficial” breed in the American south for a number of years. This was before people serious about hunting wanted not only a superior Redbone Coonhound in terms of athleticism, but in coat color and overall breed quality. The result is the modern-day Redbone Coonhound, an excellent companion for families and a dog with keen hunting instincts that have also been measured against bears and cougars.
  What’s interesting about the Redbone Coonhound is just how well-suited it is for a number of households and family types. A good dog to have around children and sturdy enough to enjoy farm life and the outdoors, the Redbone Coonhound can make a highly versatile breed that brings a lot of joy to a family in so many ways.

Overview
  The Redbone Coonhound, also known as the Redbone, the Redbone Hound and the Red Coon Dog, is truly an all-American breed. This is an easy-going, friendly, good-natured hound dog that is immediately recognizable by its beautiful, deep red coat. Redbones were bred to perpetuate their instinctive desire and talent for hunting and treeing raccoons and other large game, including bobcat, cougar and even bear. Redbone Coonhounds are surefooted and swift.   They also are fantastic family dogs; they adore children and get along famously with other companion animals. Today, this is the only solid-colored purebred coonhound. The American Kennel Club accepted the Redbone Coonhound for full registration as a member of its Hound Group in 2009.

Other Quick Facts
  • Colonial settlers, especially those from Scotland and Ireland, brought red hounds with them to the United States, and those dogs are the ancestors of the Redbone.
  • The Redbone is a cold-nosed dog, meaning he’s good at following an old, or “cold,” trail.
  • Redbones occasionally have a small amount of white on their chest or feet, said to be a result of their Irish hound background.
  • The Redbone’s main quarry is raccoons, but he can also track bigger game.
  • The Redbone has a pleading expression with dark brown or hazel eyes and a sweet voice that carries over long distances.
Breed standards
AKC group: Hound

UKC group: Scenthound

Average lifespan: 11-12 years
Average size: 35-65 pounds
Coat appearance: Flat, shiny, and smooth
Coloration: Rich red
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Strong, vigorous, and striking all around, clean, well-proportioned head, black nose, strong chest, brown eyes, long, floppy ears that are close to the nose, upright tail, and small paws with thickened pads.
Possible alterations: Some may have white markings on chest and feet.
Comparable Breeds: Black and Tan Coonhound, American Foxhound

History
  In the late 18th century, many European-type hunting dogs were imported to America, most of them of Scottish, French, English, and Irish ancestry: the English Foxhound, the Harrier, the Grand Bleu de Gascogne, the Welsh Hound, the Beagle, and the Bloodhound were among these. Most often, these dogs were imported so that wealthy planters of the Tidewater could engage in foxhunting. Over time, Southern hunters selectively bred dogs that would not back down, had great stamina, and would "hound" their prey until they treed or cornered their exhausted quarry, leading to modern coonhounds.
  In the late 18th century Scottish immigrants brought red-colored foxhounds to Georgia, which would be the foundation stock of the Redbone. Later, approximately 1840, Irish-bred Foxhound and Bloodhound lines were added. The name came from an early breeder, Peter Redbone of Tennessee, though other breeders of note are Redbone's contemporary,   George F.L. Birdsong of Georgia, and Dr. Thomas Henry in the 19th century.Over time, breeders followed a selective program that led to a coonhound that is specialized for prey which climbs trees, was unafraid of taking on large animals, was agile enough to carry on over mountain or in meadow, and liked to swim if necessary. They were ideal for pack hunting of both small and larger prey. Originally, the Redbone had a black saddleback, but by the beginning of the 20th century, it was an uninterrupted red tone.
  Like many American hunting dogs, especially those from the South, they were widely known by hunters and farmers, but not well known in the show ring. The Redbone has found recognition by the two major American kennel clubs. Because of of its main use as a hunting dog rather than a show dog Redbones are extremely rare dogs outside of the United States. There are very few breeders outside of North America and it is virtually unknown in Europe or Australia.
  The Redbone Coonhound was recognized by the United Kennel Club in 1902, becoming the second coonhound breed to gain recognition.
  The Redbone Coonhound was popularized after the novel Where the Red Fern Grows, written by Wilson Rawls, was published in 1961. It told the story of Billy Colman and his Redbones.
  The Redbone Coonhound was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 2010. It was shown at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show for the first time in 2011.

Personality
  Redbone Coonhounds are determined, energetic, tenacious, tireless and fearless, especially while on the hunt. These personality traits are part of what make Redbones such fantastic scenthounds. In addition, Redbone Coonhounds are affectionate, friendly, kind-hearted, sensitive and extremely good with children and other animals. This is not a high-strung, fussy or clingy breed. Redbones adapt effortlessly to a wide variety of new situations. They are not suspicious or wary around strangers, nor are they overly boisterous or pushy. These are solid, stable hound dogs that can work in the field all day, and then comfortably relax with the family for a nice evening at home.

Health Problems
  Problems with hip dysplasia affect this dog, but that is not uncommon and they have few other health problems, making them generally pleasant around veterinarians.

Care
  Traditionally used as an outdoor dog, the Redbone has become more adaptable to indoor living with a family. It should be taken out on routine jogs, walks, or be allowed to swim nearby. However, these activities should only be done in safe and secure locations, as the dog can quickly roam off if it picks up a curious scent. While trailing or when excited, it has a loud and melodious voice.
  To maintain its coat, the Redbone should be brushed weekly. Many Redbone Coonhounds also have a tendency to drool.

Living Conditions
  The Redbone Coonhound will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. These dogs are relatively inactive indoors and will do best with at least a large yard. Their all-weather coat allows them to live and sleep outdoors and work in all kinds of terrain.

Training
  Redbone Coonhounds take well to training, and are so versatile and athletic that they can accomplish a high variety of tasks. Giving them tasks to fulfill – from swimming to hunting – can help it not only feel fulfilled, but help it feel like it plays a role in your pack. Every dog should certainly feel this way about humans, but should be trained with the discipline to realize that its role is subservient to every human in the house.

Exercise Requirements
  Capable of a lot of exercise – and indeed, they were bred that way – this is a great outdoor dog and a good companion for someone who wants to get plenty of vigorous exercise. If you’re looking for a low-maintenance dog that likes to lay around the house, this is not your breed.

Training
  Redbone Coonhounds take well to training, and are so versatile and athletic that they can accomplish a high variety of tasks. Giving them tasks to fulfill – from swimming to hunting – can help it not only feel fulfilled, but help it feel like it plays a role in your pack. Every dog should certainly feel this way about humans, but should be trained with the discipline to realize that its role is subservient to every human in the house.

Grooming
  The Redbone has a flashy, dark-red coat that’s short and smooth. Weekly brushing with a hound mitt or rubber curry brush will keep it clean and shiny, as well as remove dead hair so it doesn’t land on your floor, furniture or clothing.
  Bathe your Coonhound as needed. He may have a bit of a “houndy” odor, which some people love and others hate. Bathing can help reduce the smell if you don’t like it, but it won’t take it away completely or permanently.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails every week or two, and keep the ears clean and dry. Brush the teeth regularly with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Is this breed right for you?
  Great with children, the Redbone Coonhound will adapt to family life with ease. Loving and loyal, this dog loves his owner with passion. A great hunter, he can adapt well to the working life or be happy as a playmate. In need of a fenced-in yard, he has the natural instinct to sniff out his prey, including cats. Trained easily if done so at a young age, this breed is a great addition to add to a household.
Did You Know?
  The man who did the most to develop the breed was named George E. L. Birdsong, a well-known fox hunter and dog breeder who lived in Georgia.

A dream day in the life of a Redbone Coonhound
  Waking up ready to play, he'll greet you with a lick. Once you pet him and show him love, he's ready for his meal. After breakfast, he'll enjoy a fun walk and sniff around the block. Engaging in any activity the kiddos present him, he'll follow them around with ease. Happy to nap inside or outside, he'll need a lot of time in the backyard. After dinner, he'll enjoy a good rubdown, a swim in the pond and a lot of attention before he takes a snooze with his master.




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Thursday, September 22, 2016

Everything about your Bullmastiff

Everything about your Bullmastiff
  Choosing to add a furry friend to your growing household is a long-term commitment, and picking a breed that fits your lifestyle is the key to a happy home. With over 160 American Kennel Club-recognized breeds, that decision can seem overwhelming. We're here to help you meet the breed that's right for you. If you're looking for a devoted guard dog that gets along well with children and cats, learn everything you need to know about the Bullmastiff.

Overview
  As the name suggests, the Bullmastiff is 60 percent Mastiff and 40 percent Bulldog. Bred in England to guard estates from poachers, the idea behind the mix was to create a dog that was larger than the Bulldog, yet a bit faster and more fierce than the Mastiff. Once its services were no longer needed, it was turned into a hunter's companion due to its light complexion. Now, Bullmastiffs are known for their police work, assistance in the military and as excellent family guard dogs.

Highlights
  • Bullmastiffs don't need a lot of exercise and will be happy with a couple of short walks every day.
  • Bullmastiffs can do well in families where both parents work. They are not overly concerned with being alone, but puppies will need someone who can come home to let them out for potty breaks.
  • Bullmastiffs shed little and require only minimal grooming.
  • Bullmastiffs can do well in apartments or condos because they're so mellow.
  • Bullmastiffs can be aggressive toward other animals if they're not properly socialized
  • Bullmastiffs should live indoors with their people.
  • Bullmastiffs are prone to heat exhaustion and heatstroke and should be kept indoors during hot or humid weather.
  • Bullmastiffs drool and can be prone to gassiness. If wiping up drool bothers you in any way, this is not the breed for you.
  • Bullmastiffs need early training that continues throughout their life. Training and socialization help curb unwanted aggression and willfulness.
  • Large and loving, Bullmastiffs enjoy spending time with you on your couch, feet, and lap. They take up a lot of room but give you lots of love in return.
  • Bullmastiffs can be determined guard dogs and will protect their home and family with their life if the need arises. Their size and confidence is a deterrent to intruders.
  • Bullmastiffs are good with children, but they can accidentally knock over or step on toddlers.
  • Bullmastiffs have a high pain threshold so it can be difficult to determine if the dog is hurt.
  • Never acquire a Bullmastiff from a puppy broker or pet store. Reputable breeders do not sell to middlemen or retailers, and there are no guarantees as to whether the puppy had healthy parents. Reputable breeders perform various health tests to ensure that their breeding dogs don't pass on a predisposition to genetic diseases. Interview breeders thoroughly, and make sure the puppy's parents have been screened for genetic diseases pertinent to that breed. Ask breeders about the health issues they've encountered in their dogs, and don't believe a breeder who claims that her dogs never have any health problems. Ask for references so you can contact other puppy buyers to see if they're happy with their Beardie. Doing your homework may save you from a lot of heartbreak later.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Bullmastiff’s colors include red, fawn or brindle.
  • Bullmastiffs will drive out unknown animals from their yard and home.
  • Bullmastiffs do not have a high energy level and are satisfied with short daily walks.
Breed standards
AKC group: Working Group
UKC group: Guardian Dog Group
Average lifespan: 8 - 10 years
Average size: 100 - 130 pounds
Coat appearance: Short and dense
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Powerful, muscular body; large and square head; short muzzle; black nose; dark eyes; V-shaped ears; muscular legs; high tail that is either curved or straight
Coloration: Red, brindle or fawn
Possible alterations: May have black markings on the body.

Comparable Breeds: Boxer, Mastiff


History
  The Bullmastiff is a relatively modern breed that was developed in the mid-19th century, probably around 1860, by English gamekeepers who needed a large, quiet, fearless dog with the speed to track down poachers and the strength to hold them.
  They probably experimented with a number of breeds in an attempt to create the perfect dog for their needs, but the one that paid off was the Mastiff/Bulldog cross. The Mastiff was large but not aggressive enough, while the Bulldog, brave and tenacious, lacked the size needed to knock down and hold a man.
 The popular cross became known as the Gamekeeper's Night-Dog and worked and lived alongside the gamekeeper and his family. The dogs were bred for utility and temperament with little thought put into looks, the exception being a preference for a dark brindle coat, which provided camouflage at night.
  Poaching eventually declined, and the Bullmastiff took on a new role as a guard dog. As a result of the Mastiff influence, the fawn coat with a black mask became more common as well.
  It wasn't until the early 20th century that the Bullmastiff began to be bred as a distinct type rather than as a crossbreed.
  In 1924, England's Kennel Club recognized the breed. The American Kennel Club followed suit in 1933. The first Bullmastiff registered by the AKC was Fascination of Felons Fear in 1934.
  Today the Bullmastiff ranks 40th among the 157 breeds and varieties registered by the AKC, a testament to his qualities as a companion.

Personality
  Bullmastiffs were developed as overseers of livestock and flocks. They took their responsibility seriously and developed a reputation for fearlessness in the face of predators. Bullmastiffs were also invaluable to gameskeepers, patrolling the grounds and stopping poachers from hunting the stock. They were trained not to hurt people and would stalk the poachers and keep them subdued until backup arrived to arrest the trespasser.
  Today Bullmastiffs maintain their imposing figure and watchful eye, but make a generally docile family pet. It takes a lot to provoke a Bullmastiff and despite what their appearance may suggest, they get along just fine with children. They make great farm dogs, happily keeping an eye on livestock and accompanying farmers as they do their chores.

Health Problems
  Bullmastiffs are generally a healthy breed of dog but some health issues may occur. These include hip and elbow dysplasia , bloat or gastric torsion,  Hypothyroidism (thyroid hormone deficiency causes lack of energy, obesity, and infertility), skin problems (this breed’s sensitive skin is prone to irritation, sores, and rashes), eye problems, cancer, tumors, and cardiac disease.

Care
  The bullmastiff is a big dog and needs daily exercise to stay in shape. Its needs are moderate, however, and can be met with walks on leash and short romps. It does not do well in hot, humid weather and generally should be kept as an indoor dog. It needs a soft bed and plenty of room to stretch out. It drools; some snore. Coat care is minimal.

Living Conditions
  Bullmastiffs will do okay in an apartment if they are sufficiently exercised. They are relatively inactive indoors and a small yard will do. They cannot tolerate extremes of temperatures.

Trainability
  Bullmastiffs are not for the soft of heart. They are stubborn and willful and need a great deal of consistency and confidence from a leader or they will quickly take over the house. Training should be done with calm-assertiveness, lots of positive reinforcement and plenty of treats. They will test boundaries and employ manipulation to get their own way.
  This breed is not for the first time dog owner, either. They need constant reinforcement of leadership roles and their socialization with people and animals should be ongoing. In short, living with a Bullmastiff is a commitment to ongoing work. They are like perpetual teenagers, testing boundaries and ignoring the rules, just to see if they can get away with it. Consistency is the key ingredient to training a Bullmastiff.

Exercise Requirements
  Bullmastiffs are not active dogs – in fact, this breed just likes to take it easy and are happy lazing around the house and doing as little as possible. Be sure to get your dog outside so it stays active. Your Bullmastiff needs enough daily exercise to keep it in shape. Take your dog out for daily walks and play in a large fenced backyard. Moderate, regular exercise and monitoring its meals will keep your dog from becoming overweight.

Grooming
  The short smooth coat of a Bullmastiff is essentially wash and wear. A quick daily or weekly brushing is all it takes to get the dead hairs out and reduce shedding.
  Bathe your Bullmastiff as you desire or only when he gets dirty. With the gentle dog shampoos available now, you can bathe a Bullmastiff weekly if you want without harming his coat.
  Drool. There’s no way around it: Bullmastiffs drool. Get in the habit of carrying around a hand towel so you can wipe his mouth frequently.
  The rest is basic care. Keep the nails short, and brush the teeth regularly for overall good health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Bullmastiffs are patient with and protective of children, but because they're so large, they can accidentally knock over or step on a toddler. If you have children, take their age and size into consideration when deciding whether to get a Bullmastiff.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any ear biting or tail pulling on the part of either party.
  Teach your child to never approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or try to take away the dog's food. No dog, no matter how good-natured, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  The Bullmastiff may well be aggressive toward dogs he doesn't know. He does best with dogs of the opposite sex, especially if he's been raised with them.
  He can get along with cats if he's raised with them, although some Bullmastiffs can't resist the urge to chase them. A cat who stands up for itself will fare better than one who runs away.

Is this breed right for you?
  Active yet calm, the Bullmastiff is great for apartment or home life, but it will do best with a small yard and daily walks to avoid behavioral problems. It gets along well with cats, adores children and makes for a wonderful companion dog. Affectionate, the Bullmastiff was taught not to bite, but it is extremely fearless and will attack any threat that comes into range.   Because of this, it is best that it is socialized young and trained by a firm yet kind owner.   Sensitive, it is easily emotionally scarred and will not do well in a kennel or by being yelled at. Although it does not bark often, it is very loud when it does. A big drooler, snorer and likely to slobber, this is a kind yet messy pup. Not shedding very often, the Bullmastiff is easy to groom.

Did You Know?
  Although loving and sweet natured, the Bullmastiff is a large guard dog with a mind of his own. He needs an assertive, experienced owner. Bullmastiffs can be willful and are not likely to back down once aroused.
Famous Bullmastiffs
BrutusBob Dylan's dog in the 1980s
ButkusSylvester Stallone's dog
RockyRoloff family dog (Little People Big World)
Swagger – the live mascot of the Cleveland Browns
MudgeHenry and Mudge (children's books)

A dream day in the life
There is no doubt that the Bullmastiff would prefer to spend its day surrounded by its family. At the heel of its favorite companion, this dog will be its master's shadow whenever it is not snoozing on the couch. After a walk, it'll ensure the home is safe by checking the home's perimeter inside and out. A lover, the Bullmastiff will be happy with a good rubdown as it falls asleep.



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