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Showing posts with label hybrid dog. Show all posts
Showing posts with label hybrid dog. Show all posts

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Everything about your Goldendoodle

Everything about your  Goldendoodle
  Also known as the Groodle, the Goldendoodle ranges in size from small to large, depending on the variant of Poodle that the Golden Retriever is crossed with. Originally bred as a larger alternative to the already popular designer breed known as the Cockapoo, the Goldendoodle has proven to be an excellent family dog.
  The Goldendoodle is an affectionate and gentle dog that has gained popularity since he was first developed in 1990s. He's still a young cross compared to other designer breeds, and many of today's litters are the results of first-generation breedings between Poodles and Golden Retrievers.
  Goldendoodles are usually highly social and get along well with everyone. They don't do well in any type of guarding or watchdog role and should not be used in that capacity. They can thrive in both city and country settings, but they're not well suited to apartment living, since they do better with the space provided by a fenced yard. Goldendoodles should not live outside or in a kennel, however, since they thrive when they are in contact with the people they love.

Overview
  The Goldendoodle is a crossbreed. Opening your heart and home to a crossbreed is like opening a beautifully wrapped package on your birthday: it's exciting, but you never know what's inside. It’s often assumed that a cross breed will combine the best of two or more breeds, but genetics doesn’t always work that way. The way genes express themselves is not always subject to a breeder’s control, even less so when two different breeds are crossed. That’s something to keep in mind before you lay down lots of money for a dog that you have been assured will be hypoallergenic or healthier than a purebred.
  The Goldendoodle is a cross between a Golden Retriever and a Poodle . At their best, they are intelligent, friendly, and affectionate. They come in three sizes: miniature, medium , and standard. Because they are a cross breed, their traits are not fixed, so there is not a guarantee that the Goldendoodle puppy you purchase will fall into the desired weight range.
  Poodles have a reputation for being hypoallergenic, meaning that they can supposedly be tolerated by people who have allergies to dogs. Because they have the Poodle in their heritage, Goldendoodles are sometimes promoted as being hypoallergenic. But allergies are not caused by a particular dog coat type but by dander, the dead skin cells that are shed by all dogs . There is no scientific evidence that any breed or cross breed is more or less allergenic than any other dog. Some people with mild allergies react less severely to particular dogs, but no reputable breeder will guarantee that her dogs are hypoallergenic.

Highlights
  • Designer dogs, also called hybrids, aren't true breeds — they're crosses of two specific breeds. If you're interested in a Goldendoodle puppy, understand that his looks, size, and temperament aren't as predictable as those of purebreds, since you don't know which characteristics from each breed will show up in any given dog.
  • The Goldendoodle is considered to be a non- to light shedder, but he requires regular grooming and clipping. If the coat is kept short, it should be clipped every six to eight weeks and brushed every few weeks. If the coat is kept in its natural state, it should be brushed once every week or two.
  • The Goldendoodle is not a watch dog, and he's generally not known to be noisy. He may not bark even if someone knocks on the door.
  • Although he's got an average energy level, the Goldendoodle is not recommended for apartments. He does much better in a home with a fenced yard.
  • The Goldendoodle requires about 20 to 30 minutes of daily exercise.
  • Being a wonderful family companion, the Goldendoodle generally gets along well with children and does well with other dogs and family pets.
  • The Goldendoodle is a very social dog who should not live away from his family. He's are not suited to living in a kennel or outside; he wants to be in the house.
  • The Goldendoodle can suffer from separation anxiety if left for long periods at a time.
  • The Goldendoodle may make an excellent companion to people with allergies.

Other Quick Facts

  • Some Goldendoodles have been trained as guide dogs, a job for which their temperament and intelligence is ideally suited.
  • Goldendoodles are companion dogs. They love their people and need to live in the house, never outdoors.
  • Like their Poodle parent, Goldendoodles can come in many different colors.
Breed standards
AKC group, UKC group: Not recognized as a standardized breed by any major kennel club.
Dog Breed Group: Hybrid Dogs
Average lifespan: 10-13 years
Average size: 50 to 90 pounds
Coat appearance: Dense, Medium, Silky, Thick, and Water-Repellent
Coloration: Cream, Gold, Red, Black, Brown, White
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Families with children, singles and seniors, houses with yards
Temperament: Intelligent, lovable, energetic, friendly
Comparable Breeds: Golden Retriever, Poodle



History
  The Goldendoodle was first bred by Monica Dickens in 1969.Popularity for the goldendoodle grew in the 1990s when breeders in North America and Australia began crossing Golden Retrievers with Standard Poodles. The original purpose of the cross was to develop guide dogs suitable for visually impaired individuals with allergies. Poodles are considered to be hypoallergenic. Their coats do not shed, which reduces dander. Dander is a protein that sheds from the skin and causes allergies in humans.
  The goldendoodle is referred to as a designer dog. The Encyclopædia Britannica traces the term "designer dog" to the late 20th century when breeders began to cross purebred    Poodles with other purebred breeds in order to obtain a dog with the poodle's non-shedding coat, along with various desirable characteristics from other breeds.In regards to goldendoodles, golden retrievers are considered a great family dog,which is why they have been used to cross breed with poodles.

Temperament
  Goldendoodles of whatever generation are usually friends of everyone and strangers to no one, which makes them an ideal choice as a family dog. Due to their affable, outgoing personalities, Goldendoodles also make excellent companions for people with disabilities. They are cheerful, trustworthy, gentle, affectionate, smart and highly trainable animals that have a keen desire to please. 
  When properly socialized, Goldendoodles get along famously with kids, strangers and other companion animals. They don’t have a particularly strong prey drive and can be quite compatible with cats and smaller dogs, when introduced in a good way. These are social dogs that thrive in the presence of people and crumble if they are not given enough time, attention and affection. 
  Like any dog, Goldendoodles can get into mischief and develop behavioral problems if they are left alone for long periods of time. Goldendoodles require a moderate amount of exercise and can live happily in urban or rural environments. This is a “breed-in-progress,” whose temperament and other traits should become more consistent and predictable as time goes on.

Health Problems
  Goldendoodles can be predisposed to all of the health issues faced by Golden Retrievers and Poodles because they are a combination of the two breeds. Some of the most common health problems are hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, Von Willebrand’s Disease, juvenile cataracts, progressive retinal atrophy, subaortic stenosis, sebaceous adenitis, patella luxation, hypothyroidism and ear infections.

Care

  The Goldendoodle can be easy to train. Intelligent, he's usually eager to please — a perfect combination for either first-time trainers or experienced trainers. He should be trained with positive reinforcement, since harsh corrections could damage his confidence.
Socialization is important for all breeds, but for a gentle dog like the Goldendoodle it can be instrumental in discouraging any shyness or timidity.
  The Goldendoodle has an average energy level and will require daily exercise through walks or a good romp in the back yard. Generally speaking, 20 to 30 minutes of daily exercise will be enough to keep a Goldendoodle from becoming bored. He's known for his love of water, so swimming provides another opportunity for appropriate exercise.
  Since the Goldendoodle may grow large, he does require room to move. He's not recommended for apartments but should have a home with some type of fenced yard. He's not an ideal pet for outdoor or kennel living, since he thrives when he's with his family, so owners should expect to keep him primarily in the house.
  The Goldendoodle can also suffer from separation anxiety, which can lead to destructive behavior, if he's left alone for long periods at a time.

Trainability

  Most Goldendoodles are smart and easy to train. They are eager, willing learners that respond best to positive reinforcement and gentleness. Harsh, loud corrections or training by punishment are not helpful when working with these  dogs. Socialization and training should start while the dog is still a puppy and continue throughout its life. A well-socialized, well-trained Goldendoodle is a happy Goldendoodle and a wonderful companion.

Exercise Requirements
  Goldendoodles require a fair amount of exercise each day. They need to be walked at least three times daily. Each walk should last for around half an hour. Time to stretch their legs and run is essential for the Goldendoodle. Living in the city is fine, provided they will have access to a dog park weekly. Those who have a fenced in yard will find that the Goldendoodle will get all the exercise he needs by playing ball with the kids in the backyard. Never let this dog exercise without being in a securely, fenced area or on a leash.

Grooming
  Goldendoodles can have different types of fur. Some look like shaggy retrievers, others resemble a Poodle with loose curls and some fall somewhere in the middle. They are not low-maintenance dogs when it comes to grooming. Plan to brush the Goldendoodle at least every other day, using a slicker brush, and have him clipped every eight to twelve weeks.
  Ear infections can be a problem in Goldendoodles. Be sure to keep the ears dry and clean, especially after the dog has had a bath or gone swimming. Report redness, bad odor, head shaking, or other potential ear issues to your veterinarian. 
  The rest is basic care. Trim his nails every few weeks, and brush his teeth regularly with a vet-approved pet toothpaste -daily if possible -  especially if he’s on the small side. Small dogs are especially prone to periodontal disease. Brushing the teeth contributes to overall good health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  The Goldendoodle makes a wonderful family pet, especially if his nature takes after the Golden Retriever parent. He's likely to be highly patient and gentle and to get along well with children of all ages.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
He does well in homes with other dogs and pets and doesn't actively show aggression toward other animals. Of course, as with all dogs, it's important to properly socialize your Goldendoodle from puppyhood.

Is the Goldendoodle the Right Breed for you?
High Maintenance: Grooming should be performed often to keep the dog's coat in good shape. Occasional trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Easy Training: The Goldendoodle is known to listen to commands and obey its owner. Expect fewer repetitions when training this breed.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?

  Well-bred Goldendoodles are outgoing, social dogs and often have an uncanny ability to communicate with their people. Some Goldendoodles have even been trained as guide dogs.
  Since 2005, Goldendoodles have been used as pets, agility dogs, guide dogs, therapy dogs, diabetic dogs, search dogs and rescue dogs, as they have inherited the poodle's intelligence and the golden retriever's ease of training. Goldendoodles have also become increasingly used as domestic pets due to their affection towards families, as well as their friendliness and patience with children and strangers.



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Thursday, December 28, 2017

Everything about your Lhasapoo

Everything about your Lhasapoo
  The Lhasapoo is a cross or mixed breed the offspring of a Poodle  and a Lhasa Apso. She has a life span of 10 to 15 years and is talented in areas such as agility, rally and obedience. She is sometimes called Lhasadoodle and is an adaptable and playful and affectionate small dog.

Overview
  Small and cuddly, the Lhasapoo makes a wonderful companion for singles, couples, seniors and families alike. Gentle in nature and extremely playful, this dog would make a  great addition any growing family, as they do well with both children and other dogs . A mix of Poodle and Lhasa Apso, this designer breed is gaining in popularity. It is also a protective breed, most noticeably will its favorite human, and may bark at strangers – they are small, but mighty!
  If you’re not incredibly active, the Lhasapoo will forgive you. A trip to the park here, some vigorous playtime, and running around in the yard should be plenty for their daily dose of exercise. Due to its moderate activity requirements and small size, the Lhasapoo would do just fine in an apartment, so long as he goes outside everyday.

Other Quick Facts
  • Lhasapoos come in many coat colors and patterns, depending on the genes they inherit.
  • Most Lhasapoos are best suited to homes with older children who understand how to behave around dogs.
Breed standards
Breed Type: Crossbreed

Group: Companion dog, watch dog, toy dog, lap dog

Average lifespan: 10-15 years

Average size: 10 to 20 pounds
Coat appearance: Long, dense, straight, curly
Coloration: White, black, brown, cream, apricot or combinations
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Singles, couples, seniors or families living in an apartment or house
Temperament: Intelligent, sweet, active, protective
Comparable Breeds: Poodle, Lhasa Apso

History
  The Lhasapoo is a designer breed; he is growing quite popular as of late. However, there is not a great deal of information about how the hybrid breed came to be. So, in order to learn about the Lhasapoo, we must take a look at the parent breeds. The Lhasa Apso hails from Tibet. He was a dog that was owned by nobility, and he was the guard dog of the Tibetan monasteries. 
  The only way that anyone was able to own a Lhasa Apso was if the Dalai Lama gifted a Lhasa to that person. This happened sporadically; the Dalai Lama gifted Lhasas to Chinese nobility. In the 1930s, the Dalai Lama gifted a pair of Lhasas to a naturalist and renowned traveller, C. Suydam Cutting. Cutting returned to his kennels in New Jersey and began developing the Lhasa we know today. The Poodle is also a breed that has been around for centuries. Experts believe that he is a mixture of several European water dogs and the North African Barbet, a dog that is now extinct. Eventually, the breed we know as the Poodle ended up in Germany, where he was utilized for his hunting abilities. The Poodle's exact date of origin is not known; there are Poodle-like dogs depicted on Egyptian and Roman artwork. 
  The dogs portrayed are generally retrieving game or herding animals. The Standard Poodle is traditionally used for duck hunting, and smaller Poodles were used to sniff out truffles in the woods. Eventually, travelling performers learned that the Poodle is an adept show dog. Poodles were not very populous in the United States until after World War II. However, for a number of decades, the Poodle was the most popular breed in the U.S.



Temperament 
  These intelligently smart and affectionate dogs with dignity and pride tend to please their owners picking up tricks easily and taking part in games/shows, and being an alert watchdog. They are adaptable by nature and seek for attention and love from its family. If socialized from puppyhood, they would be good to other dogs, pets and children, provided the kids are also well-behaved.

Health Problems
  Before you introduce a Lhasapoo puppy into your home, remember to see a certificate of health from your reputable breeder. As a cross-bred dog, these pups can experience health issues from either Poodle of Lhasa Apso breeds. The most common are eye problems, patellar luxation, SA, kidney problems, Addison’s disease, Cushings Disease, epilepsy, Hypothyroidism, Legg-Parthes Disease, Von Willebrand’s disease, hip dysplasia as well as allergies.

Care
  The Lhasapoo is a breed with an average energy level. It will get most of the exercise it needs when it resides indoors. However, it will appreciate the opportunity to accompany its owner on a short or long walk. The Lhasapoo is an indoor breed. It will remain active while living indoors. The breed also loves being close to its family. Any color is acceptable for the coat of the Lhasapoo. While the Lhasapoo does not shed, it does require frequent trips to the groomer for haircuts every 6-8 weeks. They will become badly matted especially under wet or snowy conditions unless their fur is kept short.

Living Conditions
  The Ideal Environment for a Lhasa-Poo is being close to the family and getting a lot of attention. Since they are a small breed they can live in apartments if given enough exercise.

Training
  Early training methods are best to ensure the Lhasapoo learns as much as s/he can as early on as possible. Although they can be a little harder to train as puppies than as adults, this will make for a more socialized, obedient dog overall. They are an intelligent breed, but are known to be a bit stubborn at times. This designer breed requires a trainer who is patient, calm and keeps a positive attitude. Remember to always reward good behavior with plenty of treats and you’ll be on the right track in no time.

Activity Requirements
  The Lhasapoo is energetic, but he is not overly active. Keep in mine that his Poodle parent breed is notorious for being destructive if he becomes bored. Give your Lhasapoo plenty of chew toys, and take him on short, brisk walks to work off any nervous energy. He will also enjoy playtime with you indoors. The key is making sure he has regular activity, even for short spurts throughout the day. He will also make friends at the dog park, and he may surprise you by hopping from couch-to-couch. Observers often say it appears the Lhasapoo is "flying" when he does so.

Grooming
  Lhasapoos can have different types of fur, including soft, tight curls; big looping curls; loose waves; or straight hair. Most have a curly or wavy coat with a minority having either the typical Poodle coat or the straight Lhasa coat. Curly or straight, it’s always soft. A Lhasapoo coat looks its best with professional grooming every four to six weeks, and it requires brushing or combing every two to three days to prevent mats or tangles, as well as regular bathing between appointments with the groomer.
  Lhasapoos are among the breeds that commonly develop reddish-brown tear stains beneath their eyes. Your best bet is to wash the face daily, carefully wiping beneath the eyes, to prevent stains from setting.
  Your Lhasapoo doesn’t need a bikini wax, but you do need to trim the genital area for cleanliness or have the groomer shave the lower belly area.
  The rest is basic care. Trim his nails every week or two, and keep his ears clean and dry. Small dogs are especially prone to periodontal disease, so brush his teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children and other animals
  She does better with older children but with early socialization and training, and being raised with them she can also be good with younger ones as long as they are supervised in case they start tugging or pulling at her when she doesn't want it. She also does better with other animals when raised with them.

Did You Know?
  A Lhasapoo’s fur can be tightly curled, loosely curled, wavy, or straight. But whatever else it is, it’s always soft.
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Wednesday, December 27, 2017

Everything about your King Shepherd

Everything about your King Shepherd
  The King Shepherd is self-confident with a well-balanced personality and healthy nervous system. They should not exhibit any shyness or nervousness. They are extremely intelligent, easy to train and eager and faithful to please their owners. This breed makes a fine sheepherder and working dog. They are also a naturally courageous guard and watchdog, showing courage, strength, and hardiness in their role of protector.

Overview
  The King Shepherd is a large breed. The build of this dog is muscular, long, and robust; the structure is solid. The head is in good proportion with the body and moderately wide between the eyes. The forehead is slightly rounded. The cheeks are not too full and moderately curved when viewed from the top. The thick, firm ears are medium-sized and moderately wide at base. The eyes are medium-sized and almond shaped. The shades of the eyes can be varying shades of brown ranging from golden brown to almost black. The chest is broad and deep. Thickly feathered, the tail reaches at least to the hocks and is slightly curved.
  The King Shepherd is self-confident with a well-balanced personality and healthy nervous system. They should not exhibit any shyness or nervousness. They are extremely intelligent, easy to train and eager and faithful to please their owners. This breed makes a fine sheep-herder and working dog. They are also a naturally courageous guard and watchdog, showing courage, strength, and hardiness in their role of protector. They make very nice companions and are friendly to other animals and children.

Breed standards
Breed Group: Herding
Breed Type: mixed breed
Average lifespan: 10 - 14 years
Average size: 90-150 pounds
Coat appearance: Coarse and Long
Coloration: Sable, black saddle with tan, gold, cream, tan or silver markings
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Singles and families with children and other pets living in a house with a yard
Temperament: Intelligent, eager to please, energetic, protective, loyal, loving, playful
Comparable Breeds: German Shepherd, Shiloh Shepherd

History
  Two American dog breeders Shelly Watts-Cross, and David Turkheimer created this large breed from the Shiloh Shepherd (American and European German Shepherd Dogs and Alaskan Malamutes), additional American-bred German Shepherd Dogs and the Great Pyrenees. An organized dog breed club was started in 1995.


Temperament
  The King Shepherd isn't solely valued extremely for its head turning good looks however the dog is gaining popularity for its working skills and glorious temperament similarly. Loving and loyal to their family, these excellent looking dogs will be trained simply as a result of their wanting to please nature and high levels of intelligence. Its protecting instincts, loyalty to its family and aloofness towards strangers create it a superb watch and working dog though' it's not hostile to strangers. As a mild, kind and playful breed, the King Shepherd makes a really smart fellow of kids and may be a trust worthy nanny for youngsters. 
  This simple to train dog is employed in search and rescue missions, as therapy dogs and in police work similarly as sheepherders. It gets on well with other dogs and pets within the family. it's not an appropriate dog for apartment living, not solely thanks to its giant size however conjointly thanks to its high exercise demands that decision for at least an oversized yard wherever the dog will look out of its exercise desires. The King Shepherd is a superb family pet, working dog and a trustworthy guardian of the family.

Health Problems
  As is the case with all other hybrid canine breeds, the King Shepherd might be susceptible to the health conditions that commonly affect its parent breeds. However, hybrid dogs can be surprisingly healthy and hardy, and you simply can’t predict an individual dog’s long-term health. Therefore, being aware of what to look out for, and working closely with your vet, will ensure you are able to give your pet the best care possible.
  King Shepherds may be prone to conditions that include Von Willebrand’s disease, hypothyroidism, joint dysplasia, eye issues, degenerative myelopathy, allergies, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, thrombopathia, and bloat.

Care
  King Shepherds are very intelligent and energetic, and needs both challenging mental stimulation and plenty of exercise. The King Shepherd takes well to strenuous activity.

Living Conditions
  The King Shepherd dog is a large breed that requires more space. They are not recommended for apartments or other small living spaces. A large fenced in yard is ideal so the dog can get the exercise required to stay healthy and happy.

Training
  Because King Shepherds are highly intelligent, training your pet will be a pleasure. Your dog will be eager to follow your commands in order to please you, especially if you use a positive, consistent, and firm approach. Start training your King Shepherd from an early age to ensure your dog will learn all of the rules and will grow up to be a fantastic family pet.

Exercise
  Because the King Shepherd is a large breed, you will need to find time to exercise your dog every day. These canines thrive on physical and mental stimulation, and they have a lot of energy. They do best in homes with yards where they can run around and play off-leash, and they should have toys to play with while they are indoors as well.
  Use a combination of games, training, and outdoor activities to keep your King Shepherd active and healthy. Going for jogs or long walks, as well as hiking or bicycling, are great options. The key is to ensure your dog gets enough exercise to release his energy so he doesn’t become restless and potentially destructive. If you are not an active person, the King Shepherd isn’t the best choice for your lifestyle.

Grooming
  The coat is highly weather-resistant. The King Shepherd should be brushed regularly. Bathe only when necessary.

Children and other pets
  Loving and loyal to their family, these excellent looking dogs will be trained simply as a result of their wanting to please nature and high levels of intelligence. Its protecting instincts, loyalty to its family and aloofness towards strangers create it a superb watch and working dog though' it's not hostile to strangers. As a mild, kind and playful breed, the King Shepherd makes a really smart fellow of kids and may be a trust worthy nanny for youngsters.

Is the King Shepherd Right For You?
Difficult Training: The King Shepherd isn't deal for a first time dog owner. Patience and perseverance are required to adequately train it.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.
The chief qualities of this outstanding breed are : a well-balanced nervous system, readiness, lack of inhibition, vigilance, incorruptibility, combined with courage and cleverness in defense. It is known to be an excellent watch-dog and guard-dog. The King Shepherd is characterized by unsurpassed loyalty towards its master and eagerness to please.
Owing to its huge size, the King Shepherd is not recommended for apartment life. Though the King Shepherd can prove to be a good companion for kids, they should be allowed to interact with kids only under close supervision because of their stature.
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