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Showing posts with label hunting. Show all posts
Showing posts with label hunting. Show all posts

Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Everything about your Cirneco dell'Etna

Everything about your Cirneco dell'Etna
  The Cirneco dell’Etna is a small and slender dog, similar in appearance to the Greyhound but with larger ears and a chestnut/tan coat. These dogs are an ancient breed native to the island of Sicily where they were valued for their intelligence and for their natural hunting ability. If you are looking for a small, active breed – especially one that takes well to dog sports – the Cirneco dell’Etna may be the right breed for you.

Overview
  The outgoing Cirneco (the plural is Cirnechi) weighs between 18 and 27 pounds, making him suitable for just about any home. Thanks to his innate athleticism, he’s a natural at agility and lure coursing, and he also does well in obedience, rally, and tracking. The Cirneco has a reputation for being easier to train than some other sighthounds — as long as you keep the training sessions short.
  Like most dogs, the Cirneco can become bored, noisy, and destructive if he doesn’t have other dogs to keep him company or if he doesn’t receive enough attention from his people. Despite his chase instinct, if a Cirneco is raised with other pets from an early age, he can live amicably with cats and small dogs.

Other Quick Facts
  • The Cirneco dell’Etna is a rare breed not readily found outside Italy — there are only 200 or so Cirnechi in the United States.
  • Although they are mainly companion dogs today, Cirnechi are known for their silent method of hunting, which allows them to catch animals off guard.
  • Since the breed is so uncommon, little is known about the health history of the Cirneco.
  • Like most sighthounds, Cirnechi aren’t too keen on having their feet touched.

Breed standards
AKC group: Hound Group
UKC group: Sighthound & Pariah
Average lifespan: 12 to 14 years
Average size: 18 to 27 pounds
Coat appearance: Close-Fitting, Long, Sleek, Smooth, Stiff, and Straight
Coloration:  tan- to chestnut-colored coat
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles, houses with yards
Temperament: Gentle, alert, independent, playful
Comparable Breeds: Pharaoh Hound, Ibizan Hound

History
  The Cirneco dell’Etna, also known as the Sicilian Greyhound, may resemble a small Pharaoh Hound, but he’s a distinct breed of Italian origin, with his own color markings, tail shape, and triangle-shaped ears. He gets his name from Mount Etna, on the Italian island of Sicily, where his ancestors hunted rabbit and hare. He stalks silently — so much so that he can even sneak up on birds. Today, this rare breed is predominantly a family companion.
  The Cirneco was recognized by the United Kennel Club in 2006. The breed is also part of the American Kennel Club’s Foundation Stock Service, the first step toward AKC recognition. In 2012, the Cirneco dell’Etna will be admitted to the AKC’s Miscellaneous Class.

Personality
  The Cirneco dell'Etna has a strong, inquisitive, independent temperament, which is important in keen hunting dogs. It is also outgoing, friendly, affectionate and smart. Cirnechi are loyal and loving with their owners and friends. They are willing and eager to please and love to receive pets and praise. They usually make great family pets, although they can be reserved around strangers. 
  The Cirneco is an extremely adaptable breed that can thrive in a wide variety of environments. However, these are house dogs that definitely need to live indoors due to their short coats, thin skin and absence of body fat. They like to nestle on warm soft furniture, blankets and bedding, almost as much as they like to snuggle with their favorite people. 
  Cirnechi typically are tolerant of children, although this is not a bomb-proof breed and probably isn’t the best choice for families with very young kids. Cirnechi are social animals that tend to get along well with other dogs. They rarely cause problems in multiple-pet homes and, unlike most sighthounds, get along remarkably well with familiar cats. Of course, the earlier any dog is exposed to other household pets and small children, the more likely it is to get along with them as they age.

Health
  Since there are so few of these dogs, little is known about the health of Cirnechi. In general, they appear to be a hardy breed, but they can get muscle and toe injuries while running. A reputable breeder will discuss potential health problems with you, including any conditions that she has noticed in her own lines.
  As an ancient breed that has been largely unmanipulated by man, the Cirneco dell’Etna is hardy and healthy. The main health concerns to which this breed is prone include injuries that can occur while running. Responsible breeding practices and genetic testing can help to reduce the risk for inherited conditions in this and other breeds.
  Careful breeders screen their dogs for genetic disease, and only breed the best-looking specimens, but sometimes Mother Nature has other ideas and a puppy can develop a genetic condition. In most cases, he can still live a good life, thanks to advances in veterinary medicine. And remember that you have the power to protect your Cirneco from one of the most common health problems: obesity. Keeping him at an appropriate weight is a simple way to extend your Cirneco’s life.


Trainability
  The Cirneco dell’Etna is an intelligent breed so they typically respond well to training. For the best results, start training early while your puppy is still young – that is when they will soak up the most training. Socialization is also important for this breed to help introduce them to new things and situations. Positive reinforcement training methods are recommended and you should be prepared to maintain a level of firm consistency with your dog to prevent him from becoming too strong-willed or independent. These dogs do very well when trained for hunting, lure coursing, agility, or other dog sports.

Exercise Requirements
  Cirnechi are high-energy animals that need quite a bit of regular exercise to keep them physically and mentally fit. They love taking long daily walks and having a chance to stretch their legs in safely-enclosed areas. It is important for Cirneco owners to have well-fenced yards, so that their dogs can run freely and burn off excess energy, which usually happens in short bursts. While they can be gregarious and playful, Cirnechi usually are calm and quiet, both indoors and out, as long as their exercise needs are met. They are great fans of toys of all sorts. A Cirneco can play with a single toy for hours, keeping it out of mischief. Cirnechi are active contestants in lure coursing and agility competitions. Participation in these and other canine sporting events provides a great opportunity to showcase the Cirneco’s athleticism, while at the same time giving him a chance to get physical exercise and canine socialization.
  Because the Cirneco dell’Etna was bred for hunting it is a fairly active breed with fairly high exercise requirements. This breed requires at least 30 minutes of moderate exercise each day in the form of a walk or jog – active play time is also appreciated. Training your dog for hunting, lure coursing, or other dog sports can help to meet its daily exercise requirements while also providing plenty of mental stimulation.


Grooming
  The Cirneco dell'Etna is a low-maintenance breed. Its short coat only needs an occasional brushing to keep it tidy and clean. A rubber curry brush or hound glove, or even a warm damp cloth, work well to keep its coat looking shiny and lustrous. Frequent bathing is not necessary and really should only be done when the dog is obviously smelly or dirty. Other routine maintenance is the same as for most breeds, including dental care to keep teeth clean, reduce plaque build-up and prevent bad breath. Regular nail clipping is also important. 
  Many sighthounds, including many Cirnechi, are sensitive to having their feet handled. Nail care should start at a very young age, so that it does not become a struggle. Owners should do their best to avoid cutting into the quick of the nail, which is quite painful for the animal. For those who are not comfortable clipping nails, a quick trip to a professional groomer can be a godsend for both owner and dog.

Did You Know?
  It’s believed that the Cirneco dell’Etna descended from dogs who were left behind by the Phoenicians along Sicily’s coast. The breed was depicted on Sicilian coins minted as early as the 3rd century B.C.


Is the Cirneco dell'Etna the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep. No trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Moderately Easy Training: The Cirneco dell'Etna is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

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Friday, September 15, 2017

Everything about your Thai Ridgeback

Everything about your Thai Ridgeback
  Few people in the United States have heard of the Thai Ridgeback, let alone met one in person. This breed was naturally developed in Thailand and has been a favored companion of those needing a loyal companion and watchdog. This breed is strong-willed and not for the novice dog owner.
  With proper socialization and training, the Thai Ridgeback can make a wonderful family pet. Of course, he needs a lot of exercise but older kids can keep him exercised by playing ball or fetch. Running is essential to this breeds physical and mental health, so a fenced yard, dog park or owner who is an avid runner is necessary.

Overview
  Primitive dogs, sometimes known as pariah dogs, have distinctive physical traits, such as a moderate size, prick ears, wedge-shaped heads, wrinkled foreheads, squarish bodies with long legs, and smooth coats. The Thai Ridgeback is a classic example of one of these dogs. He comes in four colors — red, black, blue (gray), and yellow (fawn) — and he has pigmentation or spots on his tongue, similar to the Chow Chow and the Chinese Shar-Pei. Most (but not all) members of the breed have the signature ridge of hair running down their back with up to eight different ridge patterns.
  A Thai Ridgeback needs plenty of companionship and activity to be happy. Bear in mind that he will need at least a good hour of strenuous exercise daily. Overall health permitting, a couple of long walks or runs should satisfy him. He is also eligible to compete in lure coursing competitions.
  Better yet, keep him indoors, especially if the weather is rainy or cold. Because he's from Southeast Asia, he’s not one to appreciate that type of climate.

Other Quick Facts:
  • Some Thai Ridgebacks are born with a plush coat instead of a smooth coat. This is considered a flaw, and the dogs are spayed or neutered and sold as pets.
  • The Thai Ridgeback’s tail tapers to a point. He carries it up or curved like a sickle.
Breed standards

FCI group: Primitive Hunting Dogs 
AKC group: AKC Foundation Stock Service
UKC group: Sighthound & Pariah
Average lifespan: 10 to 12 years
Average size: 35 to 55 pounds
Coat appearance: short, hard, and straight
Coloration: solid colors of blue, black, red or fawn with a black mask being acceptable on reds
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with older children, active singles, experienced owners, houses with yards
Temperament: Strong-willed, loyal, energetic, brave
Comparable Breeds: Rhodesian Ridgeback

History
  The Thai Ridgeback was first noted more than 350 years ago in Thailand, but he is thought to be far older. One theory suggests that he is a descendant of the now-extinct Hottentot dog, which may have played a role in the development of the Rhodesian Ridgeback
 Ancient artifacts show that the Thai Ridgeback originated in the isolated islands of Eastern Thailand an estimated 4,000 years ago. Because this area was secluded from others, with poor transportation methods, this dog breed has remained very pure with little to no crossbreeding.
  The Thai Ridgeback was an all-purpose dog, kept to guard property and serve as an alarm dog,  escort or pull carts, hunt small and large game, and keep cobras at bay. He lived mainly in eastern Thailand, as well as on the island of Dao Phu Quoc, near the border of Cambodia and Vietnam. His relative isolation ensured that he maintained his distinctive look.
  Today the Thai Ridgeback is considered a very rare breed outside of Thailand, with only an estimated 300 in the United States. The breed has been in the United States since 1994. The United Kennel Club recognized the Thai Ridgeback in 1996, and it was recorded in the American Kennel Club’s Foundation Stock Service in 1997.

Temperament
  Thai Ridgebacks are an intelligent breed. The energy level is typically medium to high, with most of the day spent lounging and activity periods occurring in sporadic bursts. Well bred and properly socialized Thai Ridgebacks make loyal, loving family pets. They are naturally protective of their home and family and can be aggressive or shy when not properly socialized.
  They are best kept by consistent owners who have a thorough understanding of dog behavior. Because of prior geographic isolation and lack of human contact, the Thai Ridgeback remains independent minded and much of the original natural instinct and drives remain intact, particularly prey drive. Due to its nature, the Thai Ridgeback is not recommended for the novice dog handler. They have an excellent jumping ability and may seek to roam if not properly contained.

Health
  Thai ridgebacks are a hearty, overall healthy breed with few inherent health issues. The breed has reproduced in Thailand almost exclusively by natural selection until the very recent past. The domesticated population is small. Inbreeding depression has not been observed in the breed. Thai Ridgeback Dogs are prone to dermoid sinus. Modern lines of    Thai Ridgeback, resulting from interpopulation crosses, may also be prone to hip dysplasia and other genetic disorders.

Care
  Because this dog breed originated in a tropical climate, the Thai Ridgeback generally does not do well in colder climates and should be kept as an indoor dog. The coat of a Thai Ridgeback requires little maintenance, however daily exercise is suggested to keep a healthy lifestyle for this breed.

Living Conditions
 Thai Ridgebacks will do okay in an apartment if it sufficiently exercised. These dogs prefer warm climates and cannot withstand the cold.

Training
  An independent breed, the Thai Ridgeback requires an experienced owner who can assert himself to be the leader of the family. Manhandling and harsh discipline is counter-productive to training this breed. The Thai Ridgeback responds well to positive training methods and learns rather quickly when delectable treats are involved. Repetitive training sessions will prove to be worth the time.
  One of the things that the Thai Ridgeback was bred to do was to pull carts in Thailand. Nowadays, he is well-suited for draft trials, obedience and agility. Of course, the Thai Ridgeback can be an incredible watchdog.

Exercise Requirements
  Thai Ridgebacks were bred to work and they require a lot of exercise. Long walks or jogs are great but this breed also needs room to stretch out and run. He can tolerate living in condos or apartment buildings provided there is a dog park nearby that he can use.
  Without enough exercise, the Thai Ridgeback can become incredibly destructive and disruptive. Although not a barker, the dog will become frustrated and try to communicate his need for activity vocally. He will also tear up furniture and chew whatever he can get his teeth on if he is bored. Exercise is essential to living peacefully with a Thai Ridgeback.

Grooming
  The Thai Ridgeback has a short coat that is easily cared for with a weekly brushing. Use a rubber curry brush to keep it gleaming. He sheds year-round, but not heavily. Give him a bath when he is dirty, maybe once or twice a year.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Keep the ears clean and dry, and check them weekly for redness or a bad odor that could indicate infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball moistened with a mild pH-balanced cleanser recommended by your veterinarian. Brush the teeth regularly with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath. Introduce your puppy to grooming from an early age so that he learns to accept it with little fuss.

Is the Thai Ridgeback the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep.
Moderate Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Difficult Training: The Thai Ridgeback isn't deal for a first time dog owner. Patience and perseverance are required to adequately train it.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  The Thai Ridgeback can have as many as eight different ridge patterns formed by hair growing in the opposite direction of the rest of the coat. Patterns include whorls, circles, and even the shape of a guitar.
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Everything about your Scottish Terrier

Everything about your Scottish Terrier
  When you think of a terrier, what kind of breed do you think of? Well, depending where you are, you might have a different answer. But perhaps no terrier is as unique or easy to recognize as the Scottish Terrier.
  So what makes a Scottish Terrier special? As you’re about to find out, there’s a great deal of information about the Scottish Terrier that inspires a cult following of this playful, easy-to-get-along-with breed. Like many breeds of dog, you’ll find that the relatively peaceful personality makes for a perfect pet. Just make sure your dog gets plenty of exercise, affection and discipline and you’ll rarely go wrong.

Overview
  The Scottish Terrier, also known as the Aberdeen Terrier, the Diehard, and the Scottie, is a breed of dog in the Terrier Group. This breed is recognized by its short stature and characteristic beard in addition to its bold ‘sheriff’ type attitude. The Scottish Terrier was recognized by the AKC in 1885 and AKC approved in 1993. In 2010, a Scottish Terrier named "Sadie" won Best In Show at the world renowned Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show.
  The average Scottish Terrier stands 10 to 11 inches high at the shoulders and weighs between 18 and 22 pounds. Their coat needs to be brushed daily to prevent matting and control shedding. Professional cuts and grooming is recommended for the Scottie as well.

Highlights
  • Originally bred for hunting and following prey to ground, the Scottish Terrier is designed to dig, and he still has that drive today. It's better to find a designated digging area in your backyard then fight an active and natural instinct.
  • Scottish Terriers tend to be aloof with strangers and can be aggressive to other dogs if they are not properly socialized when young.
  • Scotties are not low-energy small dogs. They were bred as working dogs and have lots of drive and intelligence that needs to be channelled. They need daily moderate exercise and stimulation. If you're looking for a dog that's happier sitting at your side then digging holes in your backyard, a Scottie might not be for you.
  • Behind German Shepherds and Rottweilers, Scotties have been ranked third in alarm barking. They will bark at strangers and are not the ideal pet in a dwelling or area that has noise rules.
  • The Scottie isn't suited for homes with young infants and toddlers. He's been known to defend himself against unwanted pulling and prodding.
  • In terms of his size and exercise needs, the Scottie is adaptable to various types of dwellings, including apartments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The compact Scottie has an unmistakable look: a rectangular body set on short legs, a long head with a shaggy beard and eyebrows, small, bright, dark-brown to almost black eyes, prick ears covered in short, velvety hair, and a tail that tapers to a point and is carried up. Most often seen in Presbyterian black, his hard, wiry coat can also be wheaten or brindle.
Breed standards
AKC group: Terrier
UKC group: Terriers
Average lifespan: 11 to 13 years
Average size: 18 to 22 pounds
Coat appearance: Dense, Harsh and Rough, and Wire
Coloration: Black is the color  typically, but they also come in gray, steel, brindle and wheaten
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Families with children, singles, seniors, apartments, houses with/without yards
Temperament: Fearless, friendly, active, loyal
Comparable Breeds: Cairn Terrier, West Highland White Terrier


History

  There is a lot of confusion regarding the Scottish Terrier’s background, as all terriers in Scotland are referred as Scotch or Scottish Terriers. Adding to the confusion is the fact that the modern Scottish Terrier was originally placed under the group of the Skye Terriers, denoting a family of terriers belonging to Scottish Isle of Skye.
A Scotch Terrier, published in 1859
Irrespective of the origin, the earliest Scottish Terriers were first documented in the late 19th century, belonging to a group of hardy Highlanders whom they served as vermin hunters.    The first breed standard was drafted by J.B. Morrison and later published in Vero Shaw's Illustrated Book of the Dog in 1880. John Naylor is credited with introducing the breed to the United States in 1883.
  The Scottish Terrier's popularity gradually grew until World War II, after which its popularity surged. The Scottish Terrier is also the only breed of dog that has lived in the White House three times, beginning with Fala, a male Scottish Terrier gifted to President Franklin D. Roosevelt. President Roosevelt rarely went anywhere without his steady companion, even being buried by next to Fala. Most recently, President George W. Bush has owned two Scottish Terriers, Barney and Miss Beazley. Today, the Scottish Terrier is a popular pet and show dog.



Personality
  The Scottish Terrier's character and personality are a bit like the lonely moors of his homeland. He's a serious guy, not particularly jolly, and he approves of dignity and reserve. He's opinionated, as well as independent and smart as a whip. He tends to be aloof . A Scottie doesn't respond much to people who oooh and ahh over him while he's out and about. He's slow to accept anyone outside the family, but his devotion to his own people is legendary. He needs to live inside the house, because companionship is his mainstay.   Sensitive to praise and anger, he's good at adapting to the changing moods of a household. When you're quiet, he'll be quiet ; when you're ready for a walk, he'll bound outdoors with you.
  Remember his background: he's a true terrier. If another dog provokes him, he'll fight to the end. If other dogs leave him alone, he leaves them alone.
  It's important, actually critical, to take your Scottie to socialization classes starting when he's a puppy. Inviting friends and family over or going to busy places with him while he's young will tamp down his general distrust of strangers. Left unchecked, that can translate into aggression when the dog is an adult — so start training your Scottie puppy from the moment you bring him home.

Health Problems
  With a higher propensity to developing cancers than other dogs, it’s important to monitor your Scottish Terrier’s health with a close eye. Frequent trips to the veterinarian will be required particularly as your dog advances in age. Other issues like Scottie Cramp and von Willebrand’s disease might have interesting names but you don’t really want to see your terrier develop them. Be sure to keep your terrier plenty active – you might be surprised how durable they can be.

Care
  The Scottie is active and can become destructive when bored and underexercised. He loves to go for walks, but running is not part of his plan for the day. He has to be leashed for walks because he is a hunter, after all, and he will see the squirrel but not the car.
  He likes water but can't swim, and that's a bad conflict. He'll sink like a stone because of his short legs and heavy body. Scotties and uncovered swimming pools are a disaster waiting to happen, which is why Scottie Rescue groups prefer not to place them in homes with pools.
  Crate training benefits every dog and is a kind way to ensure that your Scottie doesn't have accidents in the house or get into things he shouldn't. A crate is also a place where he can retreat for a nap. Crate training at a young age will help your Scottie accept confinement if he ever needs to be boarded or hospitalized. Never stick your Scottie in a crate all day long, however. Scotties are people dogs, and they aren't meant to spend their lives locked up in a crate or kennel.

Living Conditions
  This dog is good for apartment living. It is moderately active indoors and will do okay without a yard. Prefers cool climates.

Trainability
  Scottish Terriers are not for softies who are prone to bend the rules. Scotties have very high self esteem and assume themselves to be the leader of the house. Training should begin early and should be conducted with excited praise and lots of treats in order to keep him interested. Harsh discipline will cause a Scottie to simply disregard you and your rules.   Absolute consistency is a must in order to raise a well behaved Scottish Terrier, as they see rule-bending as an open invitation to take over.
  Scotties should be socialized from an early age to accept visitors into his home. While all Scotties are discriminating, if not properly socialized, they can become overly suspicious of strangers, which can be difficult to live with.

Activity Requirements
  Scotties can adjust to any living arrangement, be it a small apartment or a sprawling estate. They need to be exercised daily, but a brisk walk around the neighborhood will cover their activity requirement. If you have a fenced yard, your Scottie will entertain himself by chasing squirrels, birds and butterflies. They do not have the athleticism or endurance to jog or take long hikes, however, so they are well suited for a more “indoorsy” family.

Grooming
  The Scottie’s sculptured appearance requires some work in the form of regular brushing and clipping, so much so that the Scottish Terrier Club of America publishes an illustrated grooming guide. The heavy-duty manual has laminated pages in a three-ring binder and contains grooming instructions for puppies, pets, and show dogs.
  At a minimum, you will need to brush the coat one to three times a week. Don’t miss the belly or the areas where the legs meet the body or they will become tangled. Be sure you brush all the way down to the skin. If you just go over the top of the coat, you’ll miss a lot of tangles. After you brush the coat, go through it again with a comb to remove any remaining loose hairs. Comb out the beard and other facial hair, too, especially after meals or after your Scottie drinks. You should also learn how to strip the coat, the process of removing dead hair by hand, which is necessary twice a year. Learn to clip him yourself or take him to a professional groomer if you want him to have the distinctive Scottie silhouette.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  He's so good with children that he's been called a nanny — but, like any terrier, the Scottie will react poorly to his tail or hair being pulled, and he's not well suited to the noise and movements of toddlers and very young children. But with well-behaved children, he's a champion and he will appoint himself their guardian.
  A true terrier, he can be aggressive with other dogs, particularly those of the same sex. Although he's not a sparring dog, if he wants to start a fight or responds to another dog's challenge, it can be a real problem. He's fine with those dogs he's been raised with.
  Because he's a hunter, he is not well suited to smaller pets. He may or may not tolerate a cat, but he's definitely bad news around small mammals such as hamsters or rats. To him, they're fast-food snacks. It's hardwired in the Scottie to go after vermin — it's not a choice.    Set him up for success by not putting him in a situation where he has to fight his own nature, because he won't.

Is the Scottish Terrier the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape. Professional trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Difficult Training: The Scottish Terrier isn't deal for a first time dog owner. Patience and perseverance are required to adequately train it.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Not Good for New Owners: This breed is best for those who have previous experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  Scottish Terriers have lived in the White House with three presidents: Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Dwight D. Eisenhower, and George W. Bush.

Famous Scotties and popular culture
Fala at the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial,
 the only Presidential dog so honoured.
  • The Scottie and the German Shepherd are the only breeds of dog that have lived in the White House more than three times. President Franklin D. Roosevelt was renowned for owning a Scottie named Fala, a gift from his distant cousin, Margaret Suckley. The President loved Fala so much that he rarely went anywhere without him. Roosevelt had several Scotties before Fala, including one named Duffy and another named Mr. Duffy. Eleanor Roosevelt had a Scottish Terrier named Meggie when the family entered the White House in 1933. More recently, President George W. Bush has owned two black Scottish Terriers, Barney and Miss Beazley. Barney starred in nine films produced by the White House.
  • Other famous people who are known to have owned Scotties include: Queen Victoria, Eva Braun, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Ed Whitfield, Rudyard Kipling and President of Poland, Lech Kaczynski. Actress Tatum O'Neal owned a Scottish Terrier. She was said to be so saddened by her dog's death to cancer and old age that she relapsed into drugs.
  • The Scottie is also renowned for being featured in the popular board game, Monopoly, as a player token. When the game was first created in the 1930s, Scotties were one of the most popular pets in the United States, and it is also one of the most popular Monopoly game tokens, according to Matt Collins, vice president of marketing for Hasbro. A Scottish Terrier named Dulcinea is a scene-stealer in the 1998 Latin American novel Yo-Yo Boing! by Giannina Braschi.
  • The Scottie was introduced
    as a token in the 1950s
  • In May 2007, Carnegie Mellon University named the Scottish Terrier its official mascot.The Scottie had been a long-running unofficial mascot of the university, whose founder's Scottish heritage is also honored by the official athletic nickname of "Tartans". Agnes Scott College in Decatur, Georgia also uses the Scottie as their mascot.The dog's image is a symbol for the Radley brand of bags. The amateur athletics organisation Jogscotland has an anthropomorphic Scottish Terrier as its mascot.

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Wednesday, December 7, 2016

Everything about your Plott

Everything about your Plott
  The Plott is first and foremost a hunting dog who specializes in big game or anything else you want him to go after. For the person who can satisfy his desire to hunt and be active, he can be a wonderful companion and watchdog, well suited to family life. His short coat is easy to groom, but it sheds.

Overview
  The Plott Hound is one of only four dog breeds developed exclusively in America; and although not previously in existence as a unique type prior to the 18th century, the Plott Hound can trace its ancestry to an archaic breed of dog called the Hanoverian Hound.  The Hanoverian Hound was developed in Germany and is believed to have originally descended from medieval Bloodhound breeds.  This lineage therefore, makes the Plott Hound undeniably ancient in its pedigree, and the only Coonhound breed not claiming British roots.

Highlights
  • Plott Hounds generally get along well with other dogs since they are a pack breed and many do best in homes where they are not an only dog.
  • Socialization is a must for this breed. They can be very dominant and should be socialized outside the home to avoid aggressive behavior.
  • Plott Hounds must have training at an early age. They are generally eager to please but without training dominance and aggression problems can arise.
  • Although they do well with older children who understand how to treat dogs, they are not recommended for homes with smaller children. They can become very possessive of food dishes and such. Even the best-trained or socialized dog should not be left alone with a young child.
  • The Plott Hound is an uncommon breed and there may be long waiting lists for a puppy. If you do not wish to adopt an older dog, please be prepared to wait and do not go to irresponsible breeders for a shorter wait.
  • Plott Hounds require at least an hour a day of walking or other exercise. They are not suited to living in apartments.
  • Plott Hounds require weekly brushing as well as other regular grooming care, such as nail trimming and tooth brushing.
  • Plott Hounds are not the best breed for an inexperienced or timid dog owner. Although they are very easy to train, they do have a dominant personality and will disregard an owner that is less sure of him or herself.
  • Plott Hounds should have a fenced yard or be kept on leash since they have a tendency to wander off in pursuit of an interesting scent. They do not have any road sense and will wander into oncoming traffic if their path takes them there.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • The Plott is an aggressive, bold, fearless hunter who is loyal, intelligent, and alert.
  • The Plott’s skin is not as loose and droopy as that of some scenthounds, and his ears aren’t as long.
  • The Plott has a distinctive “chop” — a loud, staccato, ringing bark that lets the hunter know he is on the trail of or has treed his prey.
  • The Plott is the dog of choice for big-game hunters in search of bears, cougars, or hogs. They are also used to tree raccoons, and many farmers like to keep them as all-purpose dogs.
  • The Plott’s smooth, fine coat can be any shade of brindle, black with brindle trim, solid black, or buckskin, which ranges from red fawn through sandy red, light cream, yellow ochre, dark fawn or golden tan.
Breed standards
AKC group: Hound
UKC group: Scenthound
Average lifespan: 12-14 years
Average size: 40-60 pounds
Coat appearance: Glossy, smooth, and fine
Coloration: Blue brindle, brown brindle, red brindle, black brindle
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: A medium-sized muscular and strong body, black lips and nose, black-rimmed brown or hazel eyes, tight skin around face, square-shaped muzzle, hanging ears that are medium in length, webbed toes, and long tail
Possible alterations: May be all black in color and have saddle markings. Dog has a "chop" sound when he has successfully hunted down his prey.
Comparable Breeds: Black and Tan Coonhound, Redbone Coonhound

History
  The Plott Hound descends from five Hanoverian Schweisshunds brought to North Carolina in 1750 by German immigrant Johannes Georg Plott. In Germany the dogs had been used as boarhounds, but North Carolina had bears, and that's what Plott trained his dogs to hunt. Plott's descendants continued to breed the dogs, and they became known as Plott's hounds.
Von Plott (left), a descendent of the original developers
 of the Plott hound breed in Haywood County, NC,
with a group of hounds at Lake Waccamaw, NC;
man on right is probably Von’s brother John Plott.
Circa early 1950s.
  They spread throughout the Smoky Mountains, with each hunter adding his own touch to the breed, and eventually returned to their roots by being used to hunt wild boar in addition to bear. They were also used to hunt mountain lions and, with judicious crosses to add better treeing ability, raccoons.
  In the early 1900s, a cross with some black-and-tan hounds owned by a man named Blevins brought the Plotts additional scenting talent as well as the black-saddled brindle pattern. Today, most Plott Hounds trace their pedigrees back to the two legendary hounds that resulted from this cross: Tige and Boss.
  The breed began to be registered by the United Kennel Club in 1946. The Plott Hound became the official dog of North Carolina in 1989. He's also registered by the American Kennel Club and is starting to make his way in the show ring.
  He is still relatively rare, however, and is most often found in the mountains of Appalachia, the Smokies, and other wild parts of the country where his hunting skills are appreciated.

Personality
  Plott Hounds originated in the Hills of North Carolina where they were used to hunt bear and wild boar. This makes them sturdy, fearless hunting companions and excellent family watchdogs. Plotts need to live in an active household with people who love the outdoors.   They enjoy hiking, running and romping in the yard, and hunters still use them in the field to hunt large game. Plott Hounds are pack dogs and are at their happiest in a home with multiple dogs for him to socialize with. Plotts are generally friendly toward strangers and enjoy the company of older, well-behaved children.

Health
  The Plott, which has an average lifespan of 11 to 13 years, is not prone to any major health concerns. However, some Plotts do succumb to canine hip dysplasia (CHD). To identify this condition early, a veterinarian may recommend hip exams for this breed of dog.

Care
  Although Plott Hounds have moderately low energy indoors, they are active outside. If you don't have a several fenced acres that they can explore and sniff, expect to give them about an hour of exercise daily. You can break it up into two or three walks or playtimes. The Plott is a walking companion, not a jogger. He likes to meander along and sniff out interesting trails.
  Plott Hounds should remain on leash when they are not in an enclosed area and they should have a fenced yard when they are left outside. They will wander away, and they have no road sense. They'll follow an interesting trail right into the path of a car. While a Plott needs a fenced yard for safety, he's not a yard dog. When you're home, he should be there with you.
  Plott Hounds are fairly easy to train due to their intelligence and eager to please temperament. They do have a dominant streak and are not suggested for inexperienced or timid dog owners who are unable to consistently enforce rules and commands. They do well with positive reinforcement, and corrections should never be harsh or cruel. That will only make your Plott become stubborn or sulky.
  Plott Hounds must be socialized to prevent any aggression problems. Many obedience schools offer puppy socialization classes and this is a great start. Also remember to gradually expose your puppy to various stimuli within the community and in your home.
  Plotts can be possessive of their food dishes and will attack other dogs and animals that nose around their food. Teaching your Plott Hound to allow people to handle and remove his food dishes is an important training step that cannot be missed.

Living Conditions
  The Plott Hound is not recommended for apartment life. It can live and sleep outdoors provided it has proper shelter. This breed has no road sense at all and should be kept in a safe area because it has a tendency to wander.

Trainability
  Plotts are a snap to train for experienced dog owners. If used in the field, they need virtually no training to work with a hunter. At home, obedience training goes quickly and smoothly if conducted early. This breed exhibits dominance, so it is imperative to teach them as puppies who exactly runs the household. Once leadership is established, everything else falls into place. Plotts are pack animals who instinctively respect the leader. Treats and positive reinforcement should be all you need to train a young Plott. Older Plotts who have developed bad habits may require a firmer hand, but this breed should never be treated harshly. If they aren't afraid to attack bears, they surely won't be scared to nip at you. Boundaries are important and rule enforcement should be done with absolute consistency.

Activity Requirements
  Plott Hounds need a lot of activity to maintain health and happiness. They can spend an entire day in the field tracking and penning prey, so companion Plotts should be allowed to run as much as possible during the day to burn off excess energy. They make excellent jogging companions and enjoy trotting alongside bike riders. They make excellent hiking and camping companions, acting as both comrade and protector.
  These are pure country dogs and do not do well in houses without yards or in apartments. Plotts need room to run and roam, and if penned inside all day will become rambunctious and destructive.

Grooming
  The Plott has a distinctive coat. It’s smooth and fine, but thick enough to protect the dog as he hunts in cold, wet or rough conditions. A few Plotts have a double coat: a short, soft, thick under coat topped by a longer, smoother, stiffer hairs.
  Caring for a Plott’s coat is easy. Groom it at least weekly with a rubber curry brush to remove dead hair and distribute skin oils. If your Plott spends a lot of time indoors, you might want to brush him more often to keep dead hair on the brush and off your furniture and clothing. Plotts with a double coat will shed more heavily and need to be brushed two or three times a week.
  Be aware that scenthounds such as the Plott can have what is often described as a musty odor. Regular baths can help keep the aroma under control, but it’s something you should be prepared to live with.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Keep the hanging ears clean and dry to prevent bacterial or yeast infections. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Plott Hounds do well in homes with children, although they're best suited to living with older children who understand how to interact with dogs. Plotts can be possessive of their food bowls, and this can pose a problem if a young child tries to snag a handful of kibble.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Plott Hounds can get along well with other dogs if they're introduced at a young age. If they raised with them, they can even learn to get along with cats, although they may tree cats they find outside.

Is this breed right for you?
  An outgoing and social breed, the Plott makes an excellent addition to a family with children. Loving and loyal, he does best with a home that includes a fenced-in yard. In need of a dedicated owner, he's fast to learn when given proper leadership. A natural-born athlete, this pup is in need of a lot of exercise and enjoys hunting and being outside. He's a good breed to keep inside or outside the home and is not recommended for apartment living. Only doing well with cats when raised with them, he will likely chase a cat that he doesn't know.

Did You Know?
  The mountains of western North Carolina are the birthplace of one of America’s few homegrown dogs.

A dream day in the life of a Plott
  Waking up early to hunt, the Plott will work from sunup to sundown. Returning home, he'll happily play with the family while running and chasing them outdoors. Inside, he'll engage in family time by following around those that he loves. With an afternoon walk including smelling a few scents, he'll be back in the home to spend quality time with his loving family.
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Thursday, September 15, 2016

Everything about your Transylvanian Hound

Everything about your Transylvanian Hound
  When it comes to the Transylvanian Hound, there is much to love. It has a gentle, adaptable personality that comes from centuries of working with people in the wide-ranging climate of Hungary. Gentle and good-natured, it grows very close to family members. This is the type of dog that will romp through the wilderness and cuddle on the living room floor.

Overview
  The Transylvanian Hound  is an ancient dog breed of Hungary, historically primarily used for hunting. It is a strong, medium-sized scent hound, characterized by a black body, with tan and sometimes white markings on the muzzle, chest and extremities, and distinctive tan eyebrow spots. It has a high-pitched bark for a dog of its size. The breed was rescued from extinction by focused breeding efforts in the late 20th century. There were formerly two varieties, the long-legged and short-legged, developed for different kinds of hunting in the Middle Ages. Only the long-legged strain survives.

What makes the Transylvanian Hound Unique?
  Historically, Transylvanian Hound are know primarily for hunting. These dogs re characterized by a black body, and sometimes white markings on the muzzle and they are medium-sized dogs. they are sweet, energetic, loyal and fearless.

Breed standards
FCI: Group 6, Section 1 #241
AKC: FSS- The AKC Foundation Stock Service (FSS) is an optional recording service for purebred dogs that are not yet eligible for AKC registration.
UKC : Scenthound
Life Span: 10 – 12 Years
Colour: Black, Tan
Litter Size: up to 8 puppies
Size: Males –18 to 21 inches; Females – 18 to 21 inches
Weight: Males – 66 to 77 pounds; Females –66 to 77 pounds
Origin: Hungary
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles, houses with yards, hunters
Temperament: Friendly, hardy, courageous, intelligent
Hypoallergenic: No
Comparable Breeds: Black and Tan Coonhound, Rottweiler

History
  The ancestors of the Transylvanian Hound came with the invading Magyar tribes in the ninth century, who brought in hounds and crossed them with local varieties and with Polish hounds.
  The dog was the favourite of the Hungarian aristocracy during the breed's peak in the Middle Ages, for hunting various game animals.Two height varieties developed to hunt different game in different types of terrain, and both varieties were kept together. The long-legged variety was used for hunting woodland and grassland big game, such as European bison, bear, boar, and lynx. The short-legged variety was used for hunting fox, hare, and chamois is overgrown or rocky terrain.
  The breed declined, and was marginalised to the Carpathian woodlands, shrinking with the growth of agriculture and forestry. At the beginning of the twentieth century, the breed was nearly extinct, and not recognised and standardised by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) until 1963. In 1968, efforts began to save it.Today, a substantial number of the long-legged variety of the dogs may be found in both Hungary and neighboring Romania. However, only the long-legged variety remains.
  The Transylvanian Hound is, naturally, recognised by the national dog breeding and fancier group, the Hungarian Kennel Club (using the FCI breed standard). The breed was recognised with a breed standard by one US-based group, the United Kennel Club (UKC), in 2006.The more prominent American Kennel Club publishes no standard for it, though the organisation at least provisionally recognises its existence, announcing its acceptance in 2015 into the AKC Foundation Stock Service Program, for breeders hoping to establishing it in the United States.


Temperament
  Even though the Transylvanian Hound was originally developed as a hunting dog it also makes a wonderful family pet. These dogs are friendly and amiable by nature and they can be quite loyal and loving with their families. This breed is curious and they have a tendency to follow scents, so you should always keep your dog on a leash when you take him outside.   The Transylvanian Hound can be somewhat independent at times due to their hunting instincts, but they love to spend time with family and they generally get along well with children and other dogs. This breed requires adequate daily mental and physical stimulation to prevent the development of problem behaviors.
  This breed is known for its protective ways and is a good addition as a family dog. The Transylvanian Hound is not only loyal, but also intelligent and easy to train. Bred for hunting purposes, the Transylvanian Hound is energetic, requiring daily exercise.

Health Problems
  The Transylvanian Hound is a very hardy and healthy breed for the most part, not prone to many serious health problems. Like all breeds, however, this dog can develop minor health issues. The diseases most commonly affecting this breed include hip dysplasia and elbow dysplasia.
  This dog breed lives an average of 10 to 12 years.

Care
  The Transylvanian Hound requires little coat maintenance, shedding an average amount. An occasional brushing with a firm bristle brush is sufficient, and bathing should be kept to a minimum to maintain the natural coat.

Training
  The Transylvanian Hound was originally bred for hunting so it is an intelligent breed that learns quickly – it also has the ability to hunt independently. This being the case, the Transylvanian Hound can be a little bit strong-willed at times though they generally aim to please their owners. These dogs can be trained for tracking, pointing and driving game – they may also excel at various dog sports. Positive reinforcement training methods are best for this breed and a firm but consistent hand in training is recommended. As is true for all breeds, you should start training and socialization as early as possible with Transylvanian Hound puppies.

Exercise Requirements
  As a hunting breed, the Transylvanian Hound is fairly active. This being the case, he needs a good bit of daily exercise to remain in good health. This dog will appreciate a long daily walk or jog and he will also enjoy training for hunting or other dog sports. Make sure to give this breed plenty of mental and physical stimulation to prevent the development of problem behaviors.

Coat
  The Transylvanian Hound has a short, smooth coat that is fairly dense with a shiny appearance. It is primarily black with tan markings on the muzzle and legs as well as a tan point above each eyebrow. Because the breed has a double coat, regular brushing is recommended to control shedding.

Grooming
  The Transylvanian Hound requires little coat maintenance, shedding an average amount. An occasional brushing with a firm bristle brush is sufficient, and bathing should be kept to a minimum to maintain the natural coat.

Is the Transylvanian Hound Right For You?
  They are known for being protective and is a good addition as a family dog. The Transylvanian Hound is not only loyal, but also intelligent and easy to train. Bred for hunting purposes, the Transylvanian Hound is energetic, requiring daily exercise.

What They Are Like to Live With...
  Intelligent, curious and protective, the Transylvanian Hound also serves as an admirable watchdog. It has very keen instincts, however, and knows the difference between real danger and a letter carrier, for example. Once a friend or stranger is welcomed into the house, the Transylvanian Hound relaxes and becomes more social.

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