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Showing posts with label hounting. Show all posts

Monday, December 11, 2017

Everything about your Chinese Foo

Everything about your Chinese Foo
  Named after the Chinese city Foochow , the Chinese Foo is an extant breed of Spitz-type dogsthat come with a compact, square-shaped body, broad head, pricked ears, deep chest, muscular loin, and a tail that is carried over their back.
  This Chinese breed is a loyal and lively dog that makes a loving companion. Although never confirmed, it is said that the Chinese Foo was a cross between the Chow Chow and European hunting dogs. Let's dig into the Chinese Foo Dog breed information and facts you need to know when determining if this is the dog for you.

Overviews
  The Chinese Foo Dog is found in three sizes: toy Chinese Foo Dog (10 inches or less), miniature Chinese Foo Dog (over 10 inches up to and including 15), and standard Chinese Foo Dog (over 15 inches). The Chinese Foo Dog breed can also be classified by weight, with small dogs weighing up to 20 pounds, medium dogs weighing 21 to 50 pounds, and large dogs weighing over 50 pounds. A typical Nordic-type dog, the head is broad, the ears are upright, and the eyes are dark. These dogs often have a dark blue tongue. The tail is set high and curled over the back. Some breeders dock the tail.
  The Chinese Foo Dog coat is double, with a thick, dense undercoat and an outer coat that is hard and stands away from the body. With the heavy coat, grooming is very much a part of life with these dogs. This breed needs brushing at least twice a week, although when the heavy undercoat is shed, daily brushing will help keep the hair in the house somewhat under control.
   Foo Dogs are moderately active. They enjoy a walk morning and evening and can be quite playful. Chinese Foo Dogs are appealing to the sense of humor and continue to be playful on into adulthood. One of the original uses of Chinese Foo Dog is as guard dogs, and the breed continues to be wary of strangers. However, unlike some other watchful breeds, this one does not bark unless there is a reason to do so.
  Early socialization and training is important, and teaching the dog to accept regular grooming should be a part of that. The Chinese Foo Dog is an affectionate, intelligent, playful breed. They are good with well-behaved children but will not tolerate disrespectful behavior. The breed is good with other dogs, although interactions with other pets should be supervised. This is a healthy breed with few problems.

Breed standards
AKC group: Working
UKC group: Hunting
Average lifespan: 10-12 years
Average size: 20 lb
Coat appearance:Thick, hard, weather-resistant, double-coated; straight-haired, coarse outer coat; soft, dense undercoat
Coloration: Blue, black, brown and blue, black and tan, red, orange, gray/silver, sable, cream, fawn
Hypoallergenic: No
Lion’s mane on long-haired version
Courageous nature
Guarding ability
Gentleness with children

History
  The Chinese Foo Dog is thought to be a mix between the ancient Chow Chow and European hunting dogs, or a link between the Chinese Wolf and the Chow. It is an ancient breed, possibly named after the Chinese city of Fuzhou . The Standard Chinese Foo Dog was originally bred to guard Buddhist temples. They were also used for hunting and sledding.
  Until the Chinese Foo Dog’s numbers began to increase in the 19th century, it was rare enough to be thought extinct. Today, the breed is still rare but growing in popularity in the U.S., as seen by the creation of the Chinese Foo Dog Club of America.

Temperament
  The Chinese Foo is an independent and highly intelligent breed, so it is perfect for the owner who does not want an overly attached pet. However, this independence often leads to a proud and even stubborn personality, which can make training challenging. The dog also has a tendency to be dominating, although not aggressive. Even though the Chinese Foo is big, the dog can stay calm when it is indoors, so it can be a good apartment dog.

Health
  They are immune to major health problems. Some members, however, are susceptible to cryptorchidism as well as problems with their bones and joints.

Living Conditions
  The Chinese Foo Dog will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is relatively inactive indoors and a small yard is sufficient. Sensitive to heat, can live in or outdoors in cooler weather.

Training
  Since the Chinese Foo can sometimes be stubborn and domineering, training could become a challenge for first-time dog owners.
  The Chinese Foo is not a recommended breed for a person or family getting their first dog. This pup can be domineering and a challenge to train. Even though the crossbreed is not vicious, socialization needs to be taken slowly and carefully, especially with young children and other pets. Although the dog is difficult to train, it does take to the training well once it learns. In many cases, it will make sense to seek out formal dog obedience training with this pup.


Ideal Human Companion
  • Apartment dwellers (Toy and Miniature; the Standard can be kept in a smaller space as well as long as it gets extra exercise)
  • Those looking for a good guard dog
  • Experienced dog owners
  • Those who would love a toy version of their Chow Chow
Activity Level
  The Chinese Foo is athletic and active. It needs a lot of exercise, especially when still young. A daily walk is an absolute must. Sports such as Frisbee, running and fetch are advised as well.


Exercise
  Foo Dogs need a moderate amount of daily activity including regular walking and jogging. Recreational sports such as fetching a ball and catching the Frisbee will give them a great workout. Since they are easily exhausted during warm weather, make sure that they are not overly exercised.

Grooming
  The Chinese Foo has an amazingly beautiful, thick coat of fur. In fact, the coat is so thick you can just throw that dog brush in the trash. You are going to need a long tooth comb to get at this hair. The dog should be brushed once or twice a week. Baths can be a battle with all the hair, so once a month is usually good enough and using a professional groomer is usually more than worth the cost. 

What They Are Like to Live With Chinese Foo Dog
  The Chinese Foo Dog lives up to its leonine appearance. They are bold, courageous, and king of the castle. They can also make friendly family dogs as long as they are socialized early.
  Chinese Foo Dogs are known for their gentleness with children and make quiet and dignified companions. The Chinese Foo Dog can be overly independent, so consider a different breed if you’re looking for a constant, interactive pet.
  The Chinese Foo Dog needs regular daily exercise and brushing. Be prepared to have fur everywhere in your living space.


Things You Should Know
  The Chinese Foo Dog is also known as the Chinese Celestial Dog, the Chinese Dragon Dog, and the Happiness Dog. Its ancient skill as a guard dog is still prevalent. This means you will have a well-guarded home, but it also means a dog who may be averse to strangers. This is a stubborn breed, so early obedience training is a must for all three versions.

  The Chinese Foo Dog has no known health issues.




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Tuesday, July 4, 2017

Everything about your American English Coonhound

Everything about your American English Coonhound
  A true Southern U.S. dog, the American English Coonhound loves to hunt. Loud-voiced and hard-working, the American English Coonhound is one of six official Coonhound breeds. Renowned for its speed, endurance, intelligence, and athleticism, this dog loves to be on the move. 
  Good with children and friendly with strangers, you’ll find this dog to be fairly easy to train, making it a great family pet for novice owners. It will alert you  of strangers entering your property, but will make fast friends with anyone who gives it attention. This makes the American Coonhound a good watchdog, but not the best guard dog.

Overview
  Evolved as a descendant of the English Foxhound, the American English Coonhound is a natural-born hunter. Loving barking and hunting rocky and natural terrain, this breed is a loud athlete. A pleasant and nice pup, he's sociable to both humans and animals.
  Alert, confident and friendly to people and dogs, the American English Coonhound fits in well with a variety of households. Active owners will find that it makes a wonderful companion, especially if you like to spend time outdoors with a high-energy pet. Although not suited to apartment living, this breed loves to be with its people and will thrive in a loving household. If this is the first time you’ve heard of the American English Coonhound, read on – this dog may just be the perfect fit for your family.

Breed standards
AKC group: Hound
UKC group: Scenthound
Average lifespan: 11 - 12 years
Average size: 40 - 75 pounds
Coat appearance: Rough, hard, short- to medium-length
Coloration: Red, black, blue, yellow and tricolored with ticking
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Strong build; graceful and fast-running athlete; muscular chest, back, hips, thighs and neck; Straight and strong hind legs with sloping shoulders; overall square shape; deep padded paws and medium-length, high tail; large, open nostrils; deep brown eyes and scissor-bite teeth
Possible alterations: Long, soft ears can be stretched to nose; may be post-legged
Comparable Breeds: Redbone Coonhound, English Foxhound

History
  The breed traces its ancestry from Foxhounds brought to the United States by European settlers during the 17th and 18th centuries. It shares a common ancestry with all other coonhounds with the exception of the Plott Hound. The breed developed from the "Virginia Hounds", which were developed over time from dogs imported to the United States by Robert Brooke, Thomas Walker and first President of the United States, George Washington. The dogs had to adapt to more rigorous terrain, with the breed being specifically bred over time to suit these new conditions. They were used to hunt raccoons by night and the American red fox by day. It was recognized by the United Kennel Club (UKC) in 1905 as the English Fox and Coonhound.
  The Treeing Walker Coonhound was recognized separately by the UKC in 1945, splitting it off from the English Fox and Coonhound breed. The following year the Bluetick Coonhound was also split.
  The breed was accepted into the American Kennel Club's Foundation Stock Service as the American English Coonhound in 1995. It was moved up to the Miscellaneous Class on 1 January 2010. Following the recognition of the breed by the AKC in the hound group on 30 June 2011 as the 171st breed,the American English Coonhound became eligible to compete in the National Dog Show in 2011 and both the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show and the AKC/Eukanuba National Championship for the first time in 2012.

Temperament
  English Coonhounds are energetic, intelligent and active. Loving and eager to please their owners, their great senses make them excellent hunters. This breed is an extremely fast, hot-trailing competitive type coonhound. Very devoted to its family, it makes a good companion dog. It does well living indoors and plays a fine guardian to his family and home.
  They are usually best with older considerate children, but can also do well with younger ones. Without proper human to canine leadership and communication some can be a bit dog-aggressive and/or develop behavior issues. They need owners who are firm, confident and consistent with an air of authority. Socialize this breed well, preferably while still young to prevent them from being reserved with strangers. Do not let this breed off the leash in an unsafe area, as they may take off after an interesting scent. They have a strong instinct to tree animals. Without enough mental and physical exercise they will become high-strung.

Health
  Due to its size, the American English Coonhound’s most common health issue is hip dysplasia. Other health problems that may occur include ear infections, progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) and polyradiculoneuritis.

Living Conditions
 These dogs are not recommended for apartment life. They are very active indoors and do best with acreage.

Trainability
  The American English Coonhound needs a kind but firm hand for successful training. In order to make headway, owners should maintain calm, confident, consistent authority as leader of the pack. This breed may require more time, repetition and patience than other Coonhounds to reach the owner’s training goals, because it tends to be more easily distracted than its Coonhound cousins and likes to learn at its own pace. Some American English Coonhounds find it difficult to focus on anything but hunting and treeing other animals. Those dogs need extra motivation to learn their manners and basic obedience skills. Without steady, consistent, gentle guidance, this breed can develop undesirable traits such as dominance or excessive shyness. Socialization and training should start at an early age and continue for life.

Exercise Requirements
  No surprise here – the American English Coonhound has lots of energy to burn. This is high-energy breed needs plenty of daily exercise. If you’re an active owner, make your American English Coonhound a jogging or biking partner. As a family, you can enjoy playing games such as fetch and hide-and-seek with your dog, along with long brisk walks. Another idea to consider is to get active in competitive outdoor canine sports, including field trials, tracking, agility and obedience. There are organizations that put on events such as night hunts, water races, field trials and benched conformation shows. Hunters will find faithful companions in the American English Coonhound – this dog is an energetic hunting and will happily carry out all the hunting duties it was bred for.
  Of course, if your American English Coonhound doesn’t get enough exercise, it can become bored, depressed, frustrated, anxious or hyperactive. On top of all of that, these dogs can become destructive. To ensure that the American English Coonhound is happy, you’ll need to provide plenty of mental and physical stimulation. If you don’t have enough time to exercise and socialize this dog, you should consider a different breed. The American English Coonhound needs room to run around in, so they do not do well in apartments, condominiums or houses without fenced yards. The American English Coonhound needs a fenced-in yard, where there is room to run.

Grooming
  The American English Coonhound's short, close-fitting coat is easy to care for. This certainly is not a breed that requires religious grooming or meticulous trimming. However, they do shed quite a bit throughout the year and should be brushed regularly to keep household hair build-up at bay. A thorough brushing once a week with a clean, firm-bristled brush should suffice. Coonhounds don’t need to be bathed very often. 
 Usually, they only require a good shampooing after they have romped in mud puddles or otherwise had a particularly eventful frolic in the out-of-doors. Of course, a bath is an excellent idea after a Coonhound is sprayed by a skunk or rolls in any of the wild animal or livestock feces that they find so appealing. It’s a good idea to brush them before their bath, to minimize the mess caused by excess dirt and hair. Owners can discuss a dental care regimen with their veterinarian. They should clip their Coonhounds’ nails monthly, or as often as necessary to keep them fairly short and tidy.

Is this breed right for you?
  Perfect for an athlete, this dog will keep you company on long runs. Loving other people, he would be a good fit in a family or an active single person's best friend to tag along on car rides. Best for people who live on lots of land, this dog might disturb neighbors with his loud howling and barking.
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep. No trimming or stripping needed.
Moderate Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Easy Training: The American English Coonhound is known to listen to commands and obey its owner. Expect fewer repetitions when training this breed.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Not Good for New Owners: This breed is best for those who have previous experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

A dream day in the life of an American English Coonhound
  A real-life alarm system, this breed will wake you up in the morning. After sharing breakfast, he's ready to go on a daily run with his owner. Stopping to sniff out possible raccoons, he may even chat with anyone you meet as you run your usual route. Coming home for a nap, he'll engage in after-school play as soon as the kiddos arrive. Tuckered out at the end of a busy day of exercise and play, he'll lounge around and drool while listening for possible visitors to greet with a bark.



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