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Showing posts with label houndy. Show all posts

Wednesday, December 7, 2016

Everything about your Bluetick Coonhound

Everything about your Bluetick Coonhound
  The official state dog of Tennessee, the Bluetick Coonhound is a natural hunting dog. Bred from the French Staghound and English Foxhound, the Bluetick was created for slow and steady hunting. Named after their blue coat with small black ticks, these dogs loves to hunt raccoons and other small animals. Cold-nosed dogs, these pups are in need of a working man's schedule.

Overview
  Like many Coonhounds, the Bluetick gets its name from its coat, which is covered in black hairs that give it the mottled, or “ticked” pattern for which it is named. This is a medium-sized, sturdy, athletic animal that was bred to trail and tree raccoons and other small game.   Today, in addition to its hunting talents, the Bluetick Coonhound is competitive in the conformation and performance show rings and excels in many active outdoor canine sports. It also has become a beloved family companion. The American Kennel Club admitted the Bluetick Coonhound for full registration in 2009, as a member of its Hound Group.

Other Quick Facts
  • The Bluetick is one of the breeds that can claim to be “made in the USA.”
  • A bluetick coat is a thickly mottled dark blue with black spots on the back, ears and sides. The head and ears are mostly black, and there are tan markings above the eyes and on the cheeks, and dark-red ticking on the feet, lower legs, chest and beneath the tail.
  • The Bluetick is a cold-nosed dog, meaning he’s good at finding and following an old, or “cold,” trail.
  • The Bluetick’s bark on the trail is described as a bawl.
Breed standards
AKC group: Hound

UKC group: Sighthound

Average lifespan: 11 - 12 years
Average size: 45 - 80 pounds
Coat appearance: Short and glossy
Coloration: Blue, blue with black ticks
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Stout, muscular body; dark brown, round, wide-set eyes; squared muzzle and broad head; black, cold nose; thin, low ears. high, curved tail with straight athletic legs
Possible alterations: Possible tricoloration, short howl
Comparable Breeds: Black and Tan Coonhound, American Blue Gascon

History
  The Bluetick Coonhound, which originated in Louisiana, was developed from the Bleu de Gascogne hound of southwest France, as well as the English Foxhound, the cur dog, the American Foxhound, and the Black And Tan Virginia Foxhound. Originally, Bluetick Coonhounds were registered in the United Kennel Club under the English Foxhound and Coonhound, but were recognized by the club as a separate breed in 1946. 
  Bluetick Coonhounds are also recognized by the Australian National Kennel Council and the New Zealand Kennel Club. In April 2009 the breed was accepted by the American Kennel Club and in December 2009 they became eligible to compete in AKC coonhound events. The American Blue Gascon is a subgroup of Bluetick Coonhounds that is larger, heavier, and more "houndy" looking than the standard Bluetick. American Blue Gascons are often referred to as "old-fashioned" Blueticks. This is due to their appearance and "colder" nose, or slower style of tracking, compared to other modern coonhound breeds.

Temperament
  Bluetick Coonhounds are bred to be hunting dogs. They are athletic, hardy, and need a full-time job or activity such as hunting, obedience, or agility to stay happy. They can be challenging to train and they should be monitored around cats or other small animals. They are, like their hound counterparts, very intelligent breeds, with an uncanny knack for problem-solving.
  Once trained, the members of the breed are very mindful of their owner. Something first time owners should be aware of is the daunting task of "voice-training" these dogs. They tend to be relentlessly loud barkers and/or howlers. If properly socialized from a young age, they can make a great family pet. These dogs were bred to be working/hunting dogs.
  In normal conditions, this dog is excellent around children. They are mindful and friendly dogs. However their noses will keep them in trouble, so food and garbage should never be left out unattended. The breed is often mistaken for being aggressive as the breed will "greet" strangers with its signature howl and will sniff the subject until satisfied. Usually, this is just the way the breed gets to know its subjects. Since Blueticks are driven by their strong sense of smell, they make excellent hunting/tracking dogs. If allowed, they will tree almost any animal smaller than them. Blueticks are generally easier to handle in the field than some other coon hounds.

Health Problems
  The Bluetick Coonhound is a fairly healthy breed, but it is prone to hip dysplasia, cataracts, and Krabbes disease.

Grooming

  The coat of the Bluetick Coonhound is fairly easy to care for. They only require an occasional brushing to keep their coats clean and glossy. Blueticks are not heavy-shedders. Their large, long ears should be cleaned and checked regularly for any signs of infection. They only need to be bathed when dirt or odor become especially noticeable.


Living Conditions
  The Bluetick is not recommended for apartment life. They are relatively inactive indoors and will do best with at least a large yard. Do not let this breed run free off of its lead unless in a safe, secure area. Coonhounds have a tendency to follow their noses, and if they catch wind of a scent, they may wander off for hours following it.

Training
  The Bluetick Coondog is a hunting dog, so expect some challenges in the training and housebreaking department. Always following its nose, the Bluetick Coondog is easily distracted by smells. Be firm when training, as this breed will ignore you if you are too lenient and gentle.
  But remember – the Bluetick Coonhound is sensitive to harsh words, so being firm can prove to be difficult. Don’t be discouraged because this breed is intelligent and perform trailing exercises very well. If you are not a seasoned pet owner, the Bluetick Coonhound will be a bit difficult to navigate, training wise.

Exercise Requirements
  Get off the couch, because your Bluetick Coonhound needs daily vigorous exercise. If your Bluetick Coonhound doesn’t get a long, brisk daily walk, it may become high strung and destructive. Bred for physical exercise, the Bluetick Coonhound is an anxious and energetic dog. Natural hunters, the Bluetick Coonhound has a tendency to run off and hunt if it is not kept in a fenced-in area.

Grooming
  Weekly brushing with a hound mitt or rubber curry brush will keep your Bluetick’s handsome coat clean and shiny. He’ll shed some -all dogs do - but regular brushing will remove dead hair so it doesn’t land on your floor, furniture or clothing.
  Bathe your Coonhound as needed. He may have a bit of a “houndy” odor, which some people love and others hate. Bathing can help reduce the smell if you don’t like it, but it won’t take it away completely or permanently.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails every few weeks. Keep those droopy ears clean and dry so bacterial and yeast infections don’t take hold. Brush the teeth for good overall health and fresh breath.

Is this breed right for you?
  Especially good with older children, the Bluetick Coonhound will do well with a family that lives on a larger piece of fenced-in land and enjoys to hunt. An athletic dog, hunters like his sturdy body and loyal personality. Alert and attentive, this breed works well in all terrains and weather, and has especially good vision at night.

Famous Bluetick Coonhounds
  • Smokey, the mascot of the University of Tennessee, is a Bluetick.
  • A Bluetick Coonhound named Tet was the companion of Stringfellow Hawke, the main character of the popular 1980s television show Airwolf.
  • Old Blue, a Bluetick Coonhound, was in the 1960 Elia Kazan film, Wild River.
  • Old Blue was a Bluetick Coonhound belonging to the Pritchard boys in the novel Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls.
  • A female Bluetick Coonhound is mentioned in the George Jones song "Ol' Red" which was later covered by Blake Shelton.
  • Huckleberry Hound is a Bluetick.
  • Savage Sam, the sequel to Old Yeller, is about a Bluetick Coonhound.
  • Lillian's dog, Gideon, is a Bluetick Coonhound in the song "Red Dirt Girl" written by Emmylou Harris.
  • A Bluetick Coonhound is referenced in the song "Long Haired Country Boy" written by Charlie Daniels.
  • A Bluetick hound is referred to in the 2016 song "Church Bells," written by Zach Crowell, Brett James and Hillary Lindsey, and sung by Carrie Underwood.
Did You Know?
  The Bluetick can be found in various forms of pop culture. Emmylou Harris mentions a Bluetick named Gideon in her song “Red Dirt Girl,” the University of Tennessee mascot is a Bluetick Coonhound named Smokey, and a Bluetick stars in a commercial for Miracle Whip.

A dream day in the life of a Bluetick Coonhound
  Up bright and early with his owner, the Bluetick Coonhound is ready for a hard day's work. On the trail, regardless of the weather, he's in search of prey. Likely to jump into a river or climb a tree if need be, he'll get whatever he's been tasked with. Back home, he'll chow down on dinner and be ready for another run outside. He enjoys being part of the gang and will follow his family wherever they go, from sun up to sun down.

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Tuesday, November 15, 2016

Everything about your Redbone Coonhound

Everything about your Redbone Coonhound
  As you can tell from its name, the Redbone Coonhound is a breed made famous by hunting raccoon and a few other animals. In fact, this is what it was originally bred for, having first been an “unofficial” breed in the American south for a number of years. This was before people serious about hunting wanted not only a superior Redbone Coonhound in terms of athleticism, but in coat color and overall breed quality. The result is the modern-day Redbone Coonhound, an excellent companion for families and a dog with keen hunting instincts that have also been measured against bears and cougars.
  What’s interesting about the Redbone Coonhound is just how well-suited it is for a number of households and family types. A good dog to have around children and sturdy enough to enjoy farm life and the outdoors, the Redbone Coonhound can make a highly versatile breed that brings a lot of joy to a family in so many ways.

Overview
  The Redbone Coonhound, also known as the Redbone, the Redbone Hound and the Red Coon Dog, is truly an all-American breed. This is an easy-going, friendly, good-natured hound dog that is immediately recognizable by its beautiful, deep red coat. Redbones were bred to perpetuate their instinctive desire and talent for hunting and treeing raccoons and other large game, including bobcat, cougar and even bear. Redbone Coonhounds are surefooted and swift.   They also are fantastic family dogs; they adore children and get along famously with other companion animals. Today, this is the only solid-colored purebred coonhound. The American Kennel Club accepted the Redbone Coonhound for full registration as a member of its Hound Group in 2009.

Other Quick Facts
  • Colonial settlers, especially those from Scotland and Ireland, brought red hounds with them to the United States, and those dogs are the ancestors of the Redbone.
  • The Redbone is a cold-nosed dog, meaning he’s good at following an old, or “cold,” trail.
  • Redbones occasionally have a small amount of white on their chest or feet, said to be a result of their Irish hound background.
  • The Redbone’s main quarry is raccoons, but he can also track bigger game.
  • The Redbone has a pleading expression with dark brown or hazel eyes and a sweet voice that carries over long distances.
Breed standards
AKC group: Hound

UKC group: Scenthound

Average lifespan: 11-12 years
Average size: 35-65 pounds
Coat appearance: Flat, shiny, and smooth
Coloration: Rich red
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Strong, vigorous, and striking all around, clean, well-proportioned head, black nose, strong chest, brown eyes, long, floppy ears that are close to the nose, upright tail, and small paws with thickened pads.
Possible alterations: Some may have white markings on chest and feet.
Comparable Breeds: Black and Tan Coonhound, American Foxhound

History
  In the late 18th century, many European-type hunting dogs were imported to America, most of them of Scottish, French, English, and Irish ancestry: the English Foxhound, the Harrier, the Grand Bleu de Gascogne, the Welsh Hound, the Beagle, and the Bloodhound were among these. Most often, these dogs were imported so that wealthy planters of the Tidewater could engage in foxhunting. Over time, Southern hunters selectively bred dogs that would not back down, had great stamina, and would "hound" their prey until they treed or cornered their exhausted quarry, leading to modern coonhounds.
  In the late 18th century Scottish immigrants brought red-colored foxhounds to Georgia, which would be the foundation stock of the Redbone. Later, approximately 1840, Irish-bred Foxhound and Bloodhound lines were added. The name came from an early breeder, Peter Redbone of Tennessee, though other breeders of note are Redbone's contemporary,   George F.L. Birdsong of Georgia, and Dr. Thomas Henry in the 19th century.Over time, breeders followed a selective program that led to a coonhound that is specialized for prey which climbs trees, was unafraid of taking on large animals, was agile enough to carry on over mountain or in meadow, and liked to swim if necessary. They were ideal for pack hunting of both small and larger prey. Originally, the Redbone had a black saddleback, but by the beginning of the 20th century, it was an uninterrupted red tone.
  Like many American hunting dogs, especially those from the South, they were widely known by hunters and farmers, but not well known in the show ring. The Redbone has found recognition by the two major American kennel clubs. Because of of its main use as a hunting dog rather than a show dog Redbones are extremely rare dogs outside of the United States. There are very few breeders outside of North America and it is virtually unknown in Europe or Australia.
  The Redbone Coonhound was recognized by the United Kennel Club in 1902, becoming the second coonhound breed to gain recognition.
  The Redbone Coonhound was popularized after the novel Where the Red Fern Grows, written by Wilson Rawls, was published in 1961. It told the story of Billy Colman and his Redbones.
  The Redbone Coonhound was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 2010. It was shown at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show for the first time in 2011.

Personality
  Redbone Coonhounds are determined, energetic, tenacious, tireless and fearless, especially while on the hunt. These personality traits are part of what make Redbones such fantastic scenthounds. In addition, Redbone Coonhounds are affectionate, friendly, kind-hearted, sensitive and extremely good with children and other animals. This is not a high-strung, fussy or clingy breed. Redbones adapt effortlessly to a wide variety of new situations. They are not suspicious or wary around strangers, nor are they overly boisterous or pushy. These are solid, stable hound dogs that can work in the field all day, and then comfortably relax with the family for a nice evening at home.

Health Problems
  Problems with hip dysplasia affect this dog, but that is not uncommon and they have few other health problems, making them generally pleasant around veterinarians.

Care
  Traditionally used as an outdoor dog, the Redbone has become more adaptable to indoor living with a family. It should be taken out on routine jogs, walks, or be allowed to swim nearby. However, these activities should only be done in safe and secure locations, as the dog can quickly roam off if it picks up a curious scent. While trailing or when excited, it has a loud and melodious voice.
  To maintain its coat, the Redbone should be brushed weekly. Many Redbone Coonhounds also have a tendency to drool.

Living Conditions
  The Redbone Coonhound will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. These dogs are relatively inactive indoors and will do best with at least a large yard. Their all-weather coat allows them to live and sleep outdoors and work in all kinds of terrain.

Training
  Redbone Coonhounds take well to training, and are so versatile and athletic that they can accomplish a high variety of tasks. Giving them tasks to fulfill – from swimming to hunting – can help it not only feel fulfilled, but help it feel like it plays a role in your pack. Every dog should certainly feel this way about humans, but should be trained with the discipline to realize that its role is subservient to every human in the house.

Exercise Requirements
  Capable of a lot of exercise – and indeed, they were bred that way – this is a great outdoor dog and a good companion for someone who wants to get plenty of vigorous exercise. If you’re looking for a low-maintenance dog that likes to lay around the house, this is not your breed.

Training
  Redbone Coonhounds take well to training, and are so versatile and athletic that they can accomplish a high variety of tasks. Giving them tasks to fulfill – from swimming to hunting – can help it not only feel fulfilled, but help it feel like it plays a role in your pack. Every dog should certainly feel this way about humans, but should be trained with the discipline to realize that its role is subservient to every human in the house.

Grooming
  The Redbone has a flashy, dark-red coat that’s short and smooth. Weekly brushing with a hound mitt or rubber curry brush will keep it clean and shiny, as well as remove dead hair so it doesn’t land on your floor, furniture or clothing.
  Bathe your Coonhound as needed. He may have a bit of a “houndy” odor, which some people love and others hate. Bathing can help reduce the smell if you don’t like it, but it won’t take it away completely or permanently.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails every week or two, and keep the ears clean and dry. Brush the teeth regularly with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Is this breed right for you?
  Great with children, the Redbone Coonhound will adapt to family life with ease. Loving and loyal, this dog loves his owner with passion. A great hunter, he can adapt well to the working life or be happy as a playmate. In need of a fenced-in yard, he has the natural instinct to sniff out his prey, including cats. Trained easily if done so at a young age, this breed is a great addition to add to a household.
Did You Know?
  The man who did the most to develop the breed was named George E. L. Birdsong, a well-known fox hunter and dog breeder who lived in Georgia.

A dream day in the life of a Redbone Coonhound
  Waking up ready to play, he'll greet you with a lick. Once you pet him and show him love, he's ready for his meal. After breakfast, he'll enjoy a fun walk and sniff around the block. Engaging in any activity the kiddos present him, he'll follow them around with ease. Happy to nap inside or outside, he'll need a lot of time in the backyard. After dinner, he'll enjoy a good rubdown, a swim in the pond and a lot of attention before he takes a snooze with his master.




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