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Showing posts with label hound. Show all posts
Showing posts with label hound. Show all posts

Thursday, June 28, 2018

Everything about your Smaland Hound

Everything about your Smaland Hound
  Smaland Hound is the oldest scent hound and it belongs to Sweden. It is also the shortest Swedish hound breeds. This breed is known for hunting fox and hare. Apart from being a valiant hunter it makes excellent watch dog and bold guard dog.  The breed will catch attention wherever it goes because of its incredibly friendly behavior and gestures. It adores kids and relish times spent with them. 

Overview
  The Hound Småland (Smålandsstövare) is a breed of dog that originated in Sweden in the 16th century. Thought to be the oldest scent dog breed native to Sweden, was recognized by the Kennel Club of Sweden in 1921. They are the smallest of the Swedish dog breeds, and have black markings and tan similar to Rottweiler. Internationally, it is recognized by a number of kennel clubs and registries, including the FCI and United Kennel Club. It is considered rare, even in his native Sweden, where only around sixty puppies are registered each year.

Breed standards
UKC group: Scenthound Group
Average lifespan: 12-15 years
Average size:33-40 lbs
Coat appearance: Medium length, harsh and close fitting, with a well developed undercoat
Coloration: Black and tan, with or without small white markings on the chest and toes.
Hypoallergenic: No
Comparable Breeds: Rottweiler, Doberman Pinscher

History 
  The Smålandsstövare has a storied past dating back to the 1600s when hounds similar to present day Smålandsstövares were bred to European hounds from Poland, Germany and Baltic regions. These European hounds were brought in to Småland, Sweden after the Great Wars between 1611 and 1718. The resulting dogs from these breedings were then bred to local spitz-type farm dogs to create the foundation stock for the Smålandsstövare. 
  The Smålandsstövare was used to mainly hunt hare and fox but he was also used to hunt other small game. Since the breed was developed mostly by farmers who did not have large kennels full of hunting dogs, the Smålandsstövare needed to be able to hunt alone rather than in a pack. He developed into an all around hunting dog. The breed became virtually extinct in the 20th century but breed enthusiasts fought to restore the breed and his first official standard was adopted by the Swedish Kennel Club in 1921. The number of purebred Smålandsstövares still remained small so breeders began adding dogs of similar appearance and stature in the 1950s. These similar dogs were of unknown ancestry and did strengthen the bloodline and the overall appearance of the Smålandsstövare. The Swedish breed club for the Smålandsstövare began commissioning genetic testing on a large sample between 1994 and 2008. 
  The findings showed no specific genetic health issues that were unique to the breed and deemed this breed to be very healthy. The Smålandsstövare is a still a rare breed but he is recognized by the American Rare Breed Association (ARBA), Continental Kennel Club (CKC), Federation Cynologique Internationale (FCI) and the United Kennel Club (UKC). The UKC recognized the Smålandsstövare in 2006 as the Smaland Hound. 


Temperament
  A popular Swedish hunting dog, members of the breed can form strong attachments to their master; but are also seen as household pets due to their gentle and protective nature.In hunting, they are used to drive the quarry for the hunter.They are a highly intelligent breed, and require a high level of exercise. 
  They therefore are not best suited to living in a small apartment. Smålandsstövare are wary of strangers and can be territorial, but this can also make a Smålandsstövare a good watchdog.Participation in field trials for Smålandsstövares are becoming increasingly common.They remain active up until around twelve years old.

Health
  The Swedish breed club for the Smålandsstövare commissioned genetic tests on a number of dogs between 1994 and 2008. The tests showed that there were no specific health issues unique to the breed, nor any major generic issues. They recommended that where rare health issues present themselves, that the dog involved should not be bred from in order to prevent that health issue from spreading through the breed. They have an average life expectancy of twelve to fifteen years.

Care
  Because the Smålandsstövare has a dense undercoat, he will shed seasonally. Regular weekly brushing is ideal to ensure his coat stays shiny and healthy. Use a slicker brush or a hound mitt. 
  When he is shedding seasonally, expect to brush him daily to keep loose hairs from accumulating around the house or on your clothes. A deshedder can be used when he is shedding heavily. He is not a hypoallergenic dog but does not generally have a strong dog smell. The Smålandsstövare does not need many baths unless he has found a mud puddle to play in. 
  Expect to bathe him when he begins shedding to hasten the process. Use a mild shampoo when bathing and try to keep water from getting into his ears. Ears that hang naturally are more prone to ear infections and excess moisture, such as from a bath, can cause an infection to develop. Carefully clean and dry his ears weekly.

Training
  The Smålandsstövare can be trained basic tricks relatively easily since this dog stands out for inquisitive nature and keen mind. Being a typical hound its character also has certain stubborn streak and occasionally it disagrees with the trainer’s opinion and completely ignores his commands. That’s why it’s important to disregard such moods of your pet and keep training sessions sort and fun.
  Remember that this dog can be quickly distracted by some interesting smell so even its favourite treats won’t be able to return its interest back to the lesson. In general, the optimal strategy in the work with this breed is based on using exclusively positive reinforcement.

Exercise
  The Smaland Hound is a very vigorous and cheerful dog that has be provided with plentiful of daily playtime in a securely enclosed area. Of course the perfect type of exercise for this breed will be chasing a prey in the wilderness but it will be absolutely happy to participate in any outdoor activities with its human family.
  The Smaland Hound easily endures very challenging physical exercises and can tirelessly run beside your bike for several hours. Remember that the dog that has to pass all time doing nothing will soon find its own methods to entertain itself and they surely won’t please its masters.

Grooming 
  It is a low maintenance dog. It sheds moderately. You need to brush its coat once a week to keep it mats and debris free. Bath the dog only when required. Its ears are of floppy shape so it has high chance of getting affected by dirt. Clean its ear regularly with vet approved solution. Trim its nail if you hear clicking sound on the floor. Do not forget to brush its teeth in order maintain a healthy teeth and gums.
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Everything about your Hamilton Hound

Everything about your Hamilton Hound
  The Hamilton Hound (the Hamiltonstövare or the Swedish Foxhound) is one of the most numerous breeds in Sweden although is remains very rare in other countries except for Great Britain where it becomes more and more popular as a show and working dog. It is an elegant, gentle and even-tempered hunting breed. The Hamilton Hound will be a great companion for a family with children and an excellent pack hunter for tracking and flushing the small game. 

Overview
  Rectangular, well proportioned, giving impression of great strength and stamina. Tricoloured.
  Hamilton Hounds are very easy going, but can be stubborn. They are very patient with children. This breed makes a fantastic hunter as it has a very high prey drive, so caution needs to be taken with small animals. Owners must provide plenty of daily exercise, and be the dog's firm, but calm, confident, consistent pack leader to avoid behavior issues.

Breed standards
AKC group: not yet eligible for AKC registration
UKC group: Scenthound
Average lifespan: 10 - 13 years
Average size: 50 - 60 pounds
Coat appearance: Undercoat short, close and soft, especially thick during winter. Upper coat strongly weather resistant lying close to body.
Coloration: tricolor: black, tan & white
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: active singles, house with a yard, experienced dog owners, hunters
Temperament: noble, active, even-tempered, affectionate
Comparable Breeds: Harrier, Ariegeois

History
  The Hamiltonstövare is a breed of dog, bred as a hunting hound. The breed was developed in Sweden by the founder of the Swedish Kennel Club, Count Adolf Hamilton. Its ancestry includes several German hounds as well as English Foxhounds and Harriers.
  The Hamilton Hound originated in was created in Sweden in the late XIX century by Adolf Patrick Hamilton, who also was among the founders of the Swedish Kennel Club. Count Hamilton crossed different German Beagles with English Foxhounds and now extinct German hounds . This experiment resulted the breed that was named in honor of its creator – the Hamiltonstövare. 
  Although the similar hounds existed in Sweden already in the Middle Ages, the first breed member was shown only in 1886. The Hamilton Hound was used for hunting the small game and vermin. It was also good in tracking and retrieving and was able to work in a very rough terrain and severe climate. 
  Today, the Hamilton Hound is still very rare outside Scandinavia and Great Britain where it is widely used as a companion animal and for hunting. This breed is currently recognized by the Kennel Club (England) and FCI. 


Temperament
  A typical hound in temperament—sweet and friendly to all—the Hamiltonstövare is also a hardworking hunter. It is happy to be with its family, but it is also happy to be out hunting.
The Hamiltonstövare is its "own hound," and although it is friendly and gregarious, it naturally defers to doing what it wants rather than what might be requested of it. It takes enthusiasm and praise to persuade the Hamiltonstovare to comply with its owner's requests, but it'll do it if it's inspired.

Health 
  When it comes to the health of this dog, he is susceptible to conditions such as hip dysplasia and epilepsy. Nonetheless, his chances of contracting these conditions are very low. He is full of health generally.

Care
  The Hamiltonstovare is easy to maintain. He requires at least weekly brushing with a slicker brush or a natural bristle brush. A hound mitt can also be used. Weekly brushing keeps any dead hairs from collecting on carpets, furniture or clothing.  Since the Hamiltonstovare loves to play outside, he can have a dog smell. However, constant bathing can cause dry skin so he should be bathed a maximum of once a month using a mild dog shampoo. 
  Trim his nails as needed, generally every two to three weeks. Most hounds do better with a nail grinder rather than nail clippers as they do not like the sound of the nail clippers. His ears should be checked weekly for dirt or moisture to keep infection at bay. A routine dental plan should be put in place. His teeth should be brushed weekly using dog safe toothpaste. A yearly deep cleaning should also be scheduled.

Living Conditions
  They are very adaptable and will suit any environment, given they have enough exercise.

Training 
  The Hamilton Hound is an intelligent, docile and obedient dog that is willing to learn and is quite easy to train. However, this breed is also independent, can be stubborn and without proper training methods there won’t be any success. 
  Obedience training is very important for this breed, as it prefers to do what it likes rather than what it is asked for. If your dog trusts and respects you it will learn quickly all the basic commands. The sensitive Hamilton Hound needs to be trained only with positive methods like treats, reward and praise. 
  With a competent trainer this dog will be able to learn and perform almost any task or a trick. Socialization must start from the very young age as in case with any other dog. 

Exercise
  The Hamilton Hound is a very energetic breed with a great stamina that needs to be exercised a lot and daily. Your dog will need both physical and mental stimulation. A long, brisk walk on a leash every day is a must. This breed makes an excellent jogging and cycling companion. 
  The Hamilton Hound loves to hunt, run and play. But you can let your dog off the leash only in a fully secured area as if it starts following the scent it can run away and never come back. This breed is definitely suited only for an individual or a family with an active lifestyle. It also needs a lot of space to run , therefore the Hamilton Hound is not for an apartment living.

Grooming
  The Hamiltonstövare boasts having a double coat which consists of a soft, dense undercoat and a harsher, extremely weather resistant topcoat and their undercoat tends to grow a lot thicker during the colder winter months than the rest of the year. However, these handsome dogs are low maintenance on the grooming front and only really need to be brushed on a weekly basis to remove dead and loose hair. Wiping a dog's coat over with a chamois leather helps keep a nice sheen on it too.
  It's also important to check a dog's ears on a regular basis and to clean them when necessary. If too much wax is allowed to build up in a dog's ears, it can lead to a painful infection which can be hard to clear up. In short, prevention is often easier than cure when it comes to ear infections.


Children and Other Pets
  Hamiltons are known to love people and they thrive in a family environment. They are gentle characters by nature and in particular when they are around children. However, they can be a little boisterous which means they are not the best choice for families where the children are still young and any interaction between toddlers and a dog should always be well supervised by an adult to make sure things stay calm and nobody gets knocked over, albeit by accident.
  Having been bred to work with other dogs, the Hamilton is known to be good around them more especially if they have been properly socialised from a young enough age. If they have grown up with a family cat in a household, they usually get on well together. However, a Hamilton would think nothing of chasing any other cats they come across. Because of their strong hunting instincts, care has to be taken when a Hamilton is anywhere near smaller animals and pets because they may well see them as prey so any contact is best avoided.




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Tuesday, July 4, 2017

Everything about your American English Coonhound

Everything about your American English Coonhound
  A true Southern U.S. dog, the American English Coonhound loves to hunt. Loud-voiced and hard-working, the American English Coonhound is one of six official Coonhound breeds. Renowned for its speed, endurance, intelligence, and athleticism, this dog loves to be on the move. 
  Good with children and friendly with strangers, you’ll find this dog to be fairly easy to train, making it a great family pet for novice owners. It will alert you  of strangers entering your property, but will make fast friends with anyone who gives it attention. This makes the American Coonhound a good watchdog, but not the best guard dog.

Overview
  Evolved as a descendant of the English Foxhound, the American English Coonhound is a natural-born hunter. Loving barking and hunting rocky and natural terrain, this breed is a loud athlete. A pleasant and nice pup, he's sociable to both humans and animals.
  Alert, confident and friendly to people and dogs, the American English Coonhound fits in well with a variety of households. Active owners will find that it makes a wonderful companion, especially if you like to spend time outdoors with a high-energy pet. Although not suited to apartment living, this breed loves to be with its people and will thrive in a loving household. If this is the first time you’ve heard of the American English Coonhound, read on – this dog may just be the perfect fit for your family.

Breed standards
AKC group: Hound
UKC group: Scenthound
Average lifespan: 11 - 12 years
Average size: 40 - 75 pounds
Coat appearance: Rough, hard, short- to medium-length
Coloration: Red, black, blue, yellow and tricolored with ticking
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Strong build; graceful and fast-running athlete; muscular chest, back, hips, thighs and neck; Straight and strong hind legs with sloping shoulders; overall square shape; deep padded paws and medium-length, high tail; large, open nostrils; deep brown eyes and scissor-bite teeth
Possible alterations: Long, soft ears can be stretched to nose; may be post-legged
Comparable Breeds: Redbone Coonhound, English Foxhound

History
  The breed traces its ancestry from Foxhounds brought to the United States by European settlers during the 17th and 18th centuries. It shares a common ancestry with all other coonhounds with the exception of the Plott Hound. The breed developed from the "Virginia Hounds", which were developed over time from dogs imported to the United States by Robert Brooke, Thomas Walker and first President of the United States, George Washington. The dogs had to adapt to more rigorous terrain, with the breed being specifically bred over time to suit these new conditions. They were used to hunt raccoons by night and the American red fox by day. It was recognized by the United Kennel Club (UKC) in 1905 as the English Fox and Coonhound.
  The Treeing Walker Coonhound was recognized separately by the UKC in 1945, splitting it off from the English Fox and Coonhound breed. The following year the Bluetick Coonhound was also split.
  The breed was accepted into the American Kennel Club's Foundation Stock Service as the American English Coonhound in 1995. It was moved up to the Miscellaneous Class on 1 January 2010. Following the recognition of the breed by the AKC in the hound group on 30 June 2011 as the 171st breed,the American English Coonhound became eligible to compete in the National Dog Show in 2011 and both the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show and the AKC/Eukanuba National Championship for the first time in 2012.

Temperament
  English Coonhounds are energetic, intelligent and active. Loving and eager to please their owners, their great senses make them excellent hunters. This breed is an extremely fast, hot-trailing competitive type coonhound. Very devoted to its family, it makes a good companion dog. It does well living indoors and plays a fine guardian to his family and home.
  They are usually best with older considerate children, but can also do well with younger ones. Without proper human to canine leadership and communication some can be a bit dog-aggressive and/or develop behavior issues. They need owners who are firm, confident and consistent with an air of authority. Socialize this breed well, preferably while still young to prevent them from being reserved with strangers. Do not let this breed off the leash in an unsafe area, as they may take off after an interesting scent. They have a strong instinct to tree animals. Without enough mental and physical exercise they will become high-strung.

Health
  Due to its size, the American English Coonhound’s most common health issue is hip dysplasia. Other health problems that may occur include ear infections, progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) and polyradiculoneuritis.

Living Conditions
 These dogs are not recommended for apartment life. They are very active indoors and do best with acreage.

Trainability
  The American English Coonhound needs a kind but firm hand for successful training. In order to make headway, owners should maintain calm, confident, consistent authority as leader of the pack. This breed may require more time, repetition and patience than other Coonhounds to reach the owner’s training goals, because it tends to be more easily distracted than its Coonhound cousins and likes to learn at its own pace. Some American English Coonhounds find it difficult to focus on anything but hunting and treeing other animals. Those dogs need extra motivation to learn their manners and basic obedience skills. Without steady, consistent, gentle guidance, this breed can develop undesirable traits such as dominance or excessive shyness. Socialization and training should start at an early age and continue for life.

Exercise Requirements
  No surprise here – the American English Coonhound has lots of energy to burn. This is high-energy breed needs plenty of daily exercise. If you’re an active owner, make your American English Coonhound a jogging or biking partner. As a family, you can enjoy playing games such as fetch and hide-and-seek with your dog, along with long brisk walks. Another idea to consider is to get active in competitive outdoor canine sports, including field trials, tracking, agility and obedience. There are organizations that put on events such as night hunts, water races, field trials and benched conformation shows. Hunters will find faithful companions in the American English Coonhound – this dog is an energetic hunting and will happily carry out all the hunting duties it was bred for.
  Of course, if your American English Coonhound doesn’t get enough exercise, it can become bored, depressed, frustrated, anxious or hyperactive. On top of all of that, these dogs can become destructive. To ensure that the American English Coonhound is happy, you’ll need to provide plenty of mental and physical stimulation. If you don’t have enough time to exercise and socialize this dog, you should consider a different breed. The American English Coonhound needs room to run around in, so they do not do well in apartments, condominiums or houses without fenced yards. The American English Coonhound needs a fenced-in yard, where there is room to run.

Grooming
  The American English Coonhound's short, close-fitting coat is easy to care for. This certainly is not a breed that requires religious grooming or meticulous trimming. However, they do shed quite a bit throughout the year and should be brushed regularly to keep household hair build-up at bay. A thorough brushing once a week with a clean, firm-bristled brush should suffice. Coonhounds don’t need to be bathed very often. 
 Usually, they only require a good shampooing after they have romped in mud puddles or otherwise had a particularly eventful frolic in the out-of-doors. Of course, a bath is an excellent idea after a Coonhound is sprayed by a skunk or rolls in any of the wild animal or livestock feces that they find so appealing. It’s a good idea to brush them before their bath, to minimize the mess caused by excess dirt and hair. Owners can discuss a dental care regimen with their veterinarian. They should clip their Coonhounds’ nails monthly, or as often as necessary to keep them fairly short and tidy.

Is this breed right for you?
  Perfect for an athlete, this dog will keep you company on long runs. Loving other people, he would be a good fit in a family or an active single person's best friend to tag along on car rides. Best for people who live on lots of land, this dog might disturb neighbors with his loud howling and barking.
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep. No trimming or stripping needed.
Moderate Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Easy Training: The American English Coonhound is known to listen to commands and obey its owner. Expect fewer repetitions when training this breed.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Not Good for New Owners: This breed is best for those who have previous experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

A dream day in the life of an American English Coonhound
  A real-life alarm system, this breed will wake you up in the morning. After sharing breakfast, he's ready to go on a daily run with his owner. Stopping to sniff out possible raccoons, he may even chat with anyone you meet as you run your usual route. Coming home for a nap, he'll engage in after-school play as soon as the kiddos arrive. Tuckered out at the end of a busy day of exercise and play, he'll lounge around and drool while listening for possible visitors to greet with a bark.



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Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Everything about your Rhodesian Ridgeback

Everything about your Rhodesian Ridgeback
  The Rhodesian Ridgeback is easy to spot among a canine crowd: He’s the one with the tiny Mohawk running down his spine. Expressive eyes reflect the sensitive spirit of this large, intelligent dog who loves to run and play. He’s not a barker, but a Ridgie will protect his family.

Overview
  Derived from Africa, the Rhodesian Ridgeback was bred to guard and protect children and family when parents were away. Designed to hunt lions and retrieve needed objects, the breed does well hunting with humans when on horseback. Doing well in African climates, the breed was brought to America in 1950. With high endurance and the ability to outlast humans, this dog is a strong, smart and loyal breed.
  As a pup, the Rhodesian Ridgeback is active and exuberant, but he matures into a dog with moderate exercise needs. Give him a vigorous walk or game of fetch a couple of times a day, plus a chance to run in a safely fenced area a couple of times a week, and he'll be satisfied — at least in terms of physical exercise. This intelligent breed also needs mental stimulation: a bored Rhodesian Ridgeback is a destructive Rhodesian Ridgeback.

Highlights

  • The Rhodesian Ridgeback is tolerant of kids, but can be too rambunctious for toddlers.
  • Because of their size, intelligence, and power, Rhodesian Ridgebacks aren't recommended for first-time or timid owners.
  • If a Rhodesian Ridgeback is raised with other pets, he'll be accepting of them. However, he can still be aggressive toward strange animals outside the family, even if he's well socialized and trained. Males can be aggressive toward other males, especially if they're not neutered.
  • If bored, the Rhodesian Ridgeback can become very destructive.
  • The Rhodesian Ridgeback needs a high fence to keep him from escaping and roaming. An underground electronic fence won't contain him.
  • Rhodesian Ridgebacks shed little, and you can keep them clean with a weekly brushing and a wipedown with a damp cloth. They also need regular nail trims and tooth brushing.
  • Training can be difficult if you don't start at a very young age. Rhodesian Ridgebacks can be stubborn and strong willed, but if you're consistent, firm, and fair, you can train your Ridgeback to a high level.
  • The young Rhodesian Ridgeback is energetic and active, but with maturity and training, he generally becomes a calm and quiet dog. He needs at least a half hour of daily exercise.
  • Rhodesian Ridgebacks can adapt to a number of living situations, including apartments, if they're properly exercised. The ideal is a home with a large fenced yard.
  • Ridgebacks generally don't bark a lot. Many will bark to alert you to something unusual, and some will bark when they are bored, but for the most part, this isn't a yappy breed.
  • Rhodesian Ridgebacks aren't serious diggers, but they'll dig a large hole if they're bored or to escape the heat.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from a puppy mill, a pet store, or a breeder who doesn't provide health clearances or guarantees. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies and who breeds for sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Ridgeback is the only dog who has a ridge of hair running down his spine in the opposite direction from the rest of his coat, though some purebred Ridgebacks do not have ridges.
  • The Ridgeback was created to help big game hunters go after lions, which is why he’s sometimes called the African Lion Hound.
  • Comparable Breeds: Bullmastiff, Great Dane

History
  The Rhodesian Ridgeback, once known as the African Lion Hound, was developed in South Africa by Boer farmers. The farmers needed a versatile hunting dog who could withstand the extreme temperatures and terrain of the bush, survive when water rations were low, protect property, and be a companion to the entire family.

  They started by crossing dogs they'd brought from Europe — such as Great Danes, Mastiffs, Greyhounds, and Bloodhounds — with a half-wild native dog kept by the Khoikhoi, a pastoral people. This dog had a distinctive ridge of hair along its back, and breeders noticed that crosses who had this ridge tended to be excellent hunters.
  At first, the Boers primarily used the dogs to flush partridge or bring down a wounded buck. When big-game hunting became popular, they found that the dogs were well suited for accompanying them when they hunted lions from horseback. The dogs would hold the lion at bay until the hunters arrived.
  A hunter named Cornelius von Rooyen began a breeding program in what was then known as Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe). A breed standard — a written description of what the breed should look and act like — was set down in 1922, and it's changed little since then. In 1924, the Rhodesian Ridgeback was officially accepted by the South African Kennel Union.
  Some Rhodesian Ridgebacks may have made it to the United States as early as 1911, but it wasn't until after World War II that large numbers were imported to the U.S., Britain, and Canada. The first Rhodesian Ridgeback registered by the American Kennel Club (AKC) was Tchaika of Redhouse, in 1955. The AKC recognized the breed that same year.
  Today, the Rhodesian Ridgeback ranks 54th in popularity among the 155 breeds and varieties recognized by the AKC. The Ridgeback is quite popular in South Africa, where he first began his journey as a breed.

Personality
  Rhodesian Ridgebacks are dignified, athletic dogs whose expressive eyes always look deep in thought. Developed in Africa, this breed was used by lion hunting parties to track, corner, and hold lions. The breed is still used for hunting in some circles, but has come to be more of a family companion than anything else. As puppies they have energy to spare, but with proper exercise and training grow into quiet, dignified housemates. They are not for novice dog owners, as it takes a lot of time and energy to properly train this breed, but for those who are experienced and who are already committed to an active lifestyle, the Rhodesian Ridgeback can be an ideal family dog.

Health Problems
  The biggest health concern for Rhodesian Ridgeback presents at birth. The condition is Dermoid Sinus, one that is closely related to Spina Bifida found in humans. Painful and sometimes fatal, most puppies born with this condition are put to sleep. If not, surgery is necessary and not always successful.

Care
  As a house pet, it is a wonderful family member. The Ridgeback prefers to sleep indoors, spending its days both out in the yard and indoors. The Ridgeback is a good hiking and jogging companion. Fond of running, the Ridgeback needs physical and mental exercise daily, to prevent boredom setting in. Coat care for the dog is minimal, requiring occasional brushing to get rid of dead hair.

Living Conditions
  Rhodesian Ridgebacks will do okay in an apartment as long as they get enough exercise. They are relatively inactive indoors and do best with a large yard.

Trainability
  Training a Rhodesian Ridgeback can be a challenge. They are independent thinkers who also have a tendency to exhibit dominance. They need to be trained with firmness to establish leadership, but never harshness. Strong discipline will cause a Ridgeback to shut down and ignore you completely. 100% consistency is also crucial when training because Ridgebacks will constantly test boundaries, especially in adolescence, and if you bend the rules just once, he'll take that as an invitation to rule the house.

Exercise Requirements
  It may not be able to chase lions in your neighborhood, but your Ridgeback needs daily exercise. To release pent up energy, take your dog for a long run or jog. Tire them out with play time – get your kids involved in the fun. You’ll need to put aside time every day in order to ensure your Rhodesian Ridgeback gets enough exercise.

Grooming
  Ridgebacks have an easy-care short coat. A Ridgie will shed a bit all year long, but it’s not bad. Run a brush over his coat once a week, and bathe him when you think he needs it. Brush his teeth with a vet-approved pet toothpaste, clean his ears, and trim his nails regularly, and that’s it.

Children And Other Pets
  The Rhodesian Ridgeback is tolerant with children of all ages, but he's large and can be too rambunctious for a toddler.
  As with any dog, always teach children how to approach and touch your Rhodesian Ridgeback, and supervise all interactions between dogs and young kids to prevent any biting or tail pulling from either party.
  The Rhodesian Ridgeback does well with other pets if he's raised with them. Males tend to be aggressive to other males, especially if they're not neutered. It's important to properly socialize a Rhodesian Ridgeback to other dogs and animals — expose him to lots of other creatures beginning in puppyhood — because the tolerance he shows animals in his home is often not extended to animals outside his family.

Is this breed right for you?
  A strong and protective breed, the Rhodesian Ridgeback is a great family pet. Playful and sometimes rough, he's best with older children. Athletic and in need of space, he does best living in a home with a large and spacious fenced-in yard. In need of exercise, he must be walked and jogged daily. If not given proper leadership from his master, he may become mischievous and begin to rebel. Best with cats when raised with them, the Rhodesian Ridgeback is a natural hunter. An excellent jogging and hiking companion, this pup is extremely loyal and loving.

Did You Know?
  Ridgebacks are also known as the African Lion Hound. Big-game hunters found that the dogs were good at distracting a lion, allowing the hunters to take a shot.

A dream day in the life of a Rhodesian Ridgeback
  Waking up in the bed of his owner, he's ready for his morning jog. Back at the home, he'll eat breakfast with the family prior to taking a run in the backyard. After ensuring that all is well and in its place, he'll head back inside for playtime with the kiddos. A snooze on the couch and he'll be up for any type of love that you can give him. After a hike later in the day, he'll be happy to watch TV while snuggled on the couch with the family.





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Friday, April 21, 2017

Everything about your English Foxhound

Everything about your English Foxhound
  This pack hound has been bred for more than 150 years and is used primarily for fox hunting, but with plenty of exercise he can also make a fine family companion. His size and voice make him best suited to a rural home.

Overview
  Bred in England since the 1800s, English Foxhounds have been bred in over 250 packs. Coming to America in the 1900s, the breed is meant to hunt foxes on foot next to a hunter on horseback. With a strong nose and ability to run for miles, this breed is an active and gentle dog.
  The English Foxhound has a stately bearing, but beneath his classic good looks lies a dog who’s always ready to rock and roll. This is a dog bred to run full throttle over hill and dale, hot on the heels of a fox. Expect to provide him with lots of strenuous daily activity. A bored Foxhound with energy to burn will create his own entertainment, and you probably won’t like it. He’s also noisy, with a loud bay that carries long distances. It’s not a good idea to keep him in an urban environment.

Highlights
  • English Foxhounds need a large fenced yard and daily exercise of 30 to 60 minutes per day.
  • English Foxhounds are not recommended for apartment living. They are an active breed indoors, which makes them unsuitable for small dwellings.
  • Before you purchase your English Foxhound, research the breed and to talk to breeders. The English Foxhound is not the breed for everyone, and because the information about him is limited it is easy to purchase this breed while failing to properly understand its limitations and idiosyncrasies.
  • English Foxhounds need a strong owner who is fair and consistent. Obedience training is a must and should begin at an early age.
  • This breed does well with children, but English Foxhounds are quite active and bouncy when they are young. For that reason, they are not recommended for homes with small children.
  • Being pack dogs, English Foxhounds do well with other dogs and actually do better in homes where there are other dogs. They can become bored and destructive when they are the only dog in the home.
  • English Foxhounds are a rare breed and it may be difficult to find a responsible breeder. Breeders with puppies available may have a long waiting list.
  • Bred to pursue prey, the English Foxhound still possesses this drive. For this reason, they should have a fenced yard and should be walked on leash as they may not come back if they are in pursuit of something interesting.
  • The English Foxhound generally does well with other animals in the home, but it is important to understand that they are prey driven and may chase smaller animals.
  • English Foxhounds have a loud bark. This makes them wonderful watchdogs, but it may also make them unliked by neighbors.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The English Foxhound has a short coat that can be any hound color but is typically a tricolor of black, tan and white.
  • English Foxhounds are typically kept in packs by hunt clubs, but occasionally they are placed as companion dogs.
  • English Foxhounds are the rarest of the foxhound breeds.
  • English Foxhounds usually train for six months to a year before they are ready to go out with the pack.
  • The English Foxhound has a rich, deep, mellow voice.
  • One of the greatest English Foxhounds was a dog named Belvoir Gambler, who was admired for his beautiful proportions and rich color.
  • The English Foxhound is shorter and stouter than the American Foxhound.
  • Comparable Breeds: American Foxhound, Beagle


History
  The English Foxhound was created in the late 16th century, as a result of the perception of the depletion of deer in England. Nobles and royalty had hunted deer for both food and sport, using the Deerhound or Staghound for this purpose. During the reign of Henry VIII, it was perceived that a new prey was needed, and the fox was selected. The English Foxhound was then created by a careful mixing of the Greyhound, for speed, the Fox Terrier, for hunting instinct, and the Bulldog, for tenacity in the hunt.
English Foxhound circa 1915.
  During the British Raj, English Foxhounds were exported to India for the purpose of jackal coursing, though due to the comparatively hotter weather, they were rarely long lived. Foxhounds were preferred for this purpose over greyhounds, as the former was not as fast, and could thus provide a longer, more sporting chase.
  Studbooks for the English foxhound have been kept since the 18th century.Breeding lines and the work of people involved in breeding hounds is extremely important in the continual development of this working breed. Puppy shows are important events in the hunting calendar and allow the local hunt followers and visiting hound breeders examine the latest generation from the hound pack. The International Foxhound Association was created in 2012 for the promotion of the English Foxhound as a breed.

Personality
  Foxhounds are an excellent dog for an active family. They love being outdoors and have the endurance to stay active all day long. Foxhounds get along great with children and other animals, and in fact do best when they are part of a large pack (human or canine). They are versatile enough to spend all day hunting with dad, only to come home and romp around with children. Foxhounds are adaptable and easy going and are an excellent choice for rural families.

Health
  The average life expectancy of the English Foxhound is between 9 and 11 years. Breed health concerns may include epilepsy, hip dysplasia and kidney ailments. These are remarkably healthy dogs.


Care
  Bred to be a fast hunter with a great deal of stamina, the English Foxhound requires a substantial amount of exercise. If he can't hunt in a field as he was bred to do, take him on daily runs or provide other exercise that will help him burn off his natural energy.
  He's used to kennel life and can live outdoors if accompanied by another social dog and provided with appropriate shelter. If he's an only dog, however, he should live indoors with his human pack so he won't get lonely.
  It is important to crate train your English Foxhound puppy. Puppies explore, get into things they shouldn't, and chew things that can harm them. It can be expensive both in fixing or replacing destroyed items as well as the vet bills that could arise. Crate training ensures not only the safety of your puppy but also of your belongings.

Living Conditions

  English Foxhounds are not recommended for apartment life. They are very active indoors and do best with acreage.

Training
  Like most other hound breeds, English Foxhounds are highly independent and can sometimes be stubborn. Therefore they require firm, assertive leadership and consistent training. They are also bred to hunt in packs and require this firm leadership to be well-balanced. Obedience training can however take time and patience. Owners may experience trouble with the “come” command, especially when walking this dog without a leash. Their prey instincts are easily aroused and they can run off in pursuit of interesting ‘prey’ if walked off leash.

Activity Requirements
  Foxhounds need a lot of exercise, and their overall temperament is shaped by how much daily exercise they receive. A Foxhound who does not get enough daily activity can become reserved, anxious, or begin to exhibit dominance, whereas a Foxhound who gets plenty of exercise will be even tempered, social, and obedient. Expect to vigorously exercise this breed at least one hour per day. Those who are not hunters or who do not already jog, hike or bike daily should look to another breed, as should apartment or condo dwellers.
  Foxhounds are hard working hunting dogs and can be utilized as trackers in the field. They can move for hours on end without getting tired, and once they catch a scent they become 100% focused on tracking it. This trait can backfire in home life, so when Foxhounds aren't in the hunting field they should be kept on a leash or in a fenced-in area to keep them safe.
  Foxhounds do best in multiple-dog homes. While they enjoy the company of people, they only truly thrive around other dogs, so adopting two at a time would be the most ideal situation for a Foxhound.

Grooming
  The English Foxhound’s short, dense coat is easy to groom. Brush it weekly with a hound mitt or rubber curry brush to remove dead hairs and distribute skin oils. The dogs shed moderately, and regular brushing will help prevent loose hairs from settling on your floors, furniture and clothing. Bathe the dog as needed.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails every few weeks. Keep the rounded hanging ears clean and dry so bacterial and yeast infections don’t take hold. Brush the teeth for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  The English Foxhound is great with older children who are a match for his energetic and bouncy nature. He's not recommended for homes with small children simply because they're too easily knocked over by the swishing tail or enthusiastic antics of a rambunctious dog. Kind as they are, English Foxhounds, like all breeds, should never be left unsupervised with young children.
  Being pack dogs, they love the company of other dogs, especially other English Foxhounds, and they're quite comfortable around horses. They generally do well with other animals, but with their strong prey drive, they may chase smaller pets. Supervise interactions with cats, smaller dogs, or other animals until you're sure everyone gets along.

Is this breed right for you?
  If you're not a fox hunter, then this breed is perfect for someone with an active lifestyle. A great companion for running, biking, hiking and more, this dog needs a lot of activity in his life. If left bored, he may act out and break any rules given to him. Good with children, this dog does well with other pets and prefers the company of other dogs.

Did You Know?
  The typical quarry of the English Foxhound is the red or gray fox, but they are also used to hunt coyotes. But don’t worry: a hunt is all about the chase, not the kill, and the quarry lives to run another day.

A dream day in the life of an English Foxhound
  Ready for a hiking trip first thing in the morning, this pup will be up for any challenge regardless of the length. Following his master, he'll run the trail, picking up every scent he can. A strong animal, he loves to climb rocky terrain with you and other dogs or people too. Once the hike has ended, he'll be happy to chill out and socialize with his owner before hitting the dog bed.

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