LUV My dogs: help

LUV My dogs

Everything about your dog!

Showing posts with label help. Show all posts
Showing posts with label help. Show all posts

Thursday, April 16, 2015

Why Your Dog is Good for You?

Why Your Dog is Good for You?
  Dogs offer more than just companionship. If you’ve got a furry friend already, you likely have quite a few reasons to thank your dog. If you’re considering getting a pooch, check out these surprising benefits of having a dog.

1. RESISTANCE TO ALLERGIES!


  While dogs can be one of the worst triggers for people with allergies, growing up in a house with a dog makes children less likely to develop allergies over the course of their lives. Even if you were just a fetus when your mother lived with a dog, you are still less likely to be bothered by animal hair and dander, or to develop eczema as an adult.

2. You’ll exercise more.

  Owning a dog can motivate you to exercise every day. On those days when it might be easy to skip a workout, looking at your dog standing by the door waiting to go for a walk can give you the push you need to get out there. Taking your dog for a 30 minute walk every day can greatly improve your health.

3. Dogs Boost Your Mood

  Dogs have long been known to make great companions, but did you know that they actually improve your mood? Research has shown that it only takes a mere 15–30 minutes with your pet to feel more relaxed and calm. Playing with your dog also raises your brain’s levels of dopamine and serotonin, which are neurotransmitters that are associated with pleasure and tranquility. Psychologists from Miami and St. Louis Universities found that the benefits of having a canine companion can be equivalent to having a human companion. Looks like pooches can get your tail wagging!

4. Your social life may improve.

  Not only does walking your dog help you to get exercise, it might also help you get a date. People are more likely to stop and talk with you when you’re walking a dog. Going to the dog park or taking your dogs to run errands can also lead to strangers striking up conversations with you about your dog.


5. Dogs Are Better Than Medicine

  In addition to boosting your mood, your dog is also great for your health. Your body reaps a lot of benefits from having your fur baby around. Dog owners have been found to have lower cholesterol, lower blood pressure, fewer heart attacks, and according to a study by the British Journal of Health (2004), dog owners also have the added benefit of having fewer medical problems than those without pets.

6. CANCER DETECTION!

  Your dog could save your life one day. It seems that our canine friends have the ability to smell cancer in the human body. Stories abound of owners whose dogs kept sniffing or licking a mole or lump on their body so they got it checked out, discovering it was cancerous. The anecdotal evidence was later backed up by scientific studies. Dogs are so good at this that some of them are trained to detect cancer, in as little as three hours.

7. You can grow old gracefully.

  Dog ownership benefits elderly people in many ways. Alzheimer’s patients have fewer outbursts when there is a dog in the home. Caregivers of elderly patients report less stress. Dogs offer wonderful companionship for the elderly as well.

8. Dogs Can Help Treat Rheumatoid Arthritis

  Clearly, dogs are extremely helpful in helping people deal with medical issues. Dogs have been found to be beneficial to people with various medical issues, but especially with those diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. Dogs help people with RA to move more often and encourage play as well as helping them get their mind off of their condition. Dogs are great motivators to get moving and they sure are good at distracting us from things!

9. You’ll feel safer.


  Dogs can be an effective home security system. Studies show that barking dogs deter burglars. Just knowing that you’ve got a dog who can use its keen sense of hearing to detect anyone prowling around can help increase your sense of security, which is good for both your mental and physical health.

10. BE HAPPIER!

  Dog owners are less likely to suffer from depression than non-pet owners. Even for those people who do become clinically depressed, having a pet to take care of can help them out of a depressive episode, in some cases more effectively even than medication. Since taking care of a dog requires a routine and forces you to stay at least a little active, it is harder to stay inside feeling down all the time. The interaction with and love received from a dog can also help people stay positive. Even the mere act of looking at your pet increases the amount of Oxytocin, the “feel good” chemical, in the brain.

Happy days with your dog!

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Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Rescue Dog Training

Rescue Dog Training
  Over years of training rescue dogs, I came to recognize different training tips for different rescue situations. Dogs from "broken homes" were very different to train than rescue dogs from puppy mills or shelters. Dogs that were neglected were different from ones who were abused. 
   Rescue dog training is mostly the same as regular dog training with a few special considerations.Some of the considerations depend on where your dog has been obtained from and its age, but we will look at rescue dog training and what to keep in mind.Here are special considerations for rescue dog training:

 Dogs who have been turned into shelters and rescues sometimes have training issues. Often times, the first kind of work you will do with these newly adopted dogs is to untrain the bad habits like jumping on people, chasing other animals, destructive chewing, and counter surfing. All bad habits are easily correctable!

Older dogs can be trained, but they are not always as eager to learn. They have learned habits and are more set in their ways, so rescue dog training with an older dog will require a little more patience on the handler's part. 

Rescue dog training sometimes consists of providing a dog with things they failed to receive at an early age. For example, if a dog was not well socialized early in its life, you may spend a little extra time working through issues related to it. This should not be a deterrent to adoption but rather just something to keep in mind. 

Often, rescue dog training involves working through the basic issues first like housetraining. You may adopt a four year old dog who has never been housebroken. You will need to treat this older dog just like a puppy. 

One of the first things you must do with a newly adopted dog is bond. Once the dog knows he can trust you and is bonded to you, then more advanced training can progress. 

With an adopted dog, especially if adopted from an animal control, it means you don't usually know too much about them. You won't know its likes and dislikes or what it excels at. Rescue dog training often keeps trainers on their toes trying to figure out what makes this particular dog tick. 

Separation anxiety: It is not uncommon for a shelter dog to experience some separation anxiety, especially if it has had multiple homes. Rescue dog training usually involves making the new dog feel more secure in its new home, and most anxieties usually resolve themselves. Adopting a new dog from a shelter or rescue is one of the most rewarding experiences you can have. Many say that the rescued dog repays you tenfold for the adoption. Don't be deterred from adopting a dog of any age because any dog can be trained. Just know that there are a few considerations for rescue dog training to keep in mind.

Depending on the dog you adopt, you may have some behavioral issues that have to be worked through as part of the rescue dog training. If your dog is shy or timid, it will need to progress at a slower pace. Aggression will have to be deciphered and addressed. 
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Wednesday, May 21, 2014

Are Human Pain Meds Safe for Dogs?

Are Human Pain Meds Safe for Dogs?
  As dog owners, naturally, when our pets appear to be suffering, we want to do anything and everything in our power to help. In the case of aspirin and ibuprofen, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (or NSAIDs) for humans may be easily attainable and ready to hand, but they are almost universally toxic to dogs. There are veterinarian-approved and prescribed NSAIDs specifically formulated for dogs - always consult with a veterinary health care professional before attempting to treat your dog at home. 
  
Analgesics are drugs used to relieve pain. There are many classes of painkillers. Demerol, morphine, codeine, and other narcotics are subject to federal regulation and cannot be purchased without a prescription.
  Buffered or enteric-coated aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) is an over-the-counter analgesic that is reasonably safe for a short time for home veterinary care in the recommended dosage for dogs. Buffered or enteric-coated aspirin is much safer than regular aspirin because it is less likely to cause stomach and duodenal ulcers.
  
Is Aspirin Effective?
Aspirin is one of the most common medicines used for relieving pain in dogs. However, enteric coated aspirin is safer than the usual aspirin. Aspirin can be given to dogs in case of a musculoskeletal injury, bleeding or clotting. Dosage of aspirin clearly depends on the body weight of the dog. 5 to 10 mg of aspirin per pound is sufficient. Repeat the dose after every 12 hours. However, it should not be used if the dog is pregnant.


Can you give a dog ibuprofen?
  When it comes to ibuprofen for dogs, all of the same terms and conditions for over-the-counter NSAIDs like aspirin apply. While buffered aspirin and buffered baby aspirin may be given to dogs - only with great care, and preferably after a veterinary consultation - ibuprofen has an even narrower margin of safety. In point of fact, ibuprofen for dogs is even worse and more dangerous than aspirin, and should be avoided at all costs. The same issues caused by aspirin can be caused by ibuprofen, including stomach ulcers and kidney failure. If a possible side effect of a medication is death, it's probably not worth the risk when there are canine-specific NSAIDs that your vet can prescribe.

Symptoms of accidental aspirin or ibuprofen ingestion
  What if the circumstances are different? What if you didn't give aspirin or ibuprofen to your dog, but have come home to find your bottle of Motrin or Advil open on the floor? How do you spot accidental ingestion of these NSAIDs? Since the primary ill-effects dogs suffer from these medications are related to digestion and filtration, the symptoms of poisoning are reliably related to those systems. Things to look out for if you suspect your dog has gotten hold of human pain meds include vomiting. If the dog has enough aspirin or ibuprofen in its system, that vomit may contain blood, as may the dog's feces, which may express itself as bloody diarrhea.
  Seemingly innocuous symptoms include lack or loss of appetite, which can lead to fatigue and lethargy. In large enough amounts or given enough time, the dog may experience abdominal pain, which can lead the dog to hunch over or struggle to find a comfortable resting position. The dog may also seem confused or disoriented. In more advanced cases, a dog who has ingested aspirin or ibuprofen not meant for them can have seizures and even lapse into a coma. Basically, it's bad news all the way around.

What is Glucosamine?
  Glucosamine is a herbal medication that gives immediate relief from pain to dogs. It is also effective in humans. These can be easily found in drug stores. You can also get it from your veterinarian. Taking it from a veterinarian would be a better idea since he/she will know the safest brand to take.

Use of Acetaminophen as a Pain Reliever for Dogs
  Always consult with your veterinarian before giving your dog acetaminophen. The medication is easy to overuse if you don't know the exact safe dosage. Overuse of this pain killer can cause liver and kidney damage.
  If your veterinarian does advise you to use acetaminophen over drugs approved for use in dogs, the dosage should never be more than 10 milligrams per pound. In addition, you'll never give more than two or three doses per day or serious side effects could occur.

What is Tramadol?
  Tramadol is an analgesic. These can be given in place of NSAIDs or along with them. Tramadol do not have side effects to the extent of NSAIDs or aspirin. They are great for chronic pain in both dogs and humans. Tramadol are given to arthritis patients also. The dosage should be limited to what is prescribed by the veterinarian. Overdose can lead to damage to the liver, nervous system or kidney.
What is Adequan?
  Adequan is meant to heal the pain caused by joint injuries and arthritis. They are also known to repair the areas of problems. It does not have any side effects and can be given to dogs safely. However, you will need the assistance of a specialist, since this medicine can only be given through injections.

Are Narcotics Safe?
  Narcotics are considered as an unpleasant aspect. However, it is one of the best pain relievers known. If narcotics are given in a controlled manner and under expert supervision, they can be the best way you can help your dog escape the pain. Narcotics is usually used in serious health conditions, post-surgical conditions, to fight cancer, or to treat large amount of pain. Some of the examples of narcotics that veterinarian are allowed to use are Fentanyl Patches, Amantadine, and Neurontin etcetera.

Is your dog in pain? Consult a vet!
  Can you give a dog aspirin? Technically yes, but only under certain conditions and doses.   Can you give a dog ibuprofen? Best not. The rule of thumb to follow is that if it's human pain medication, think twice before offering it to your dog, even with the purest motives and the best of intentions. After you think twice, put the bottle of ibuprofen or aspirin back in the medicine cabinet. If you cannot get to a vet, then at least give one a call - in the long run, it's possible you'll spare your dog further and completely unnecessary pain.
  If you have dogs, especially if they have free reign of the house, make certain that all human medications are safely and securely bottled. Then see to it that your cache of aspirin, ibuprofen, and all your other medications for that matter, are stored in cabinets, boxes, cupboards, or other home-storage facilities well out of reach. As we all know, dogs can get into mischief around the house; knock the wrong thing over, or the wrong thing open, and trouble can follow.

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