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Showing posts with label guard dog. Show all posts
Showing posts with label guard dog. Show all posts

Thursday, December 28, 2017

Everything about your Irish Doodle

Everything about your Irish Doodle
  The Irish Doodle is a medium to large hybrid or mixed breed that crosses the Irish Setter with the Standard Poodle. She has a life span of 12 to 15 years and has talents in guarding. She is sometimes also called the Irish Doodle Setter or an Irish Setter/Poodle hybrid. She is known for being very lighthearted and is also a devoted dog.

Overview
  Also known as the Irish Doodle Setter, Irish Poo Setter, Irish Setterdoodle, and Irish Setterpoo, the Irish Doodle is a super cute, friendly, and light-hearted medium-sized crossbreed. A mix of Irish Setter and Poodle, it’s ideal for anyone seeking a dog who won’t shed a lot and who will be loyal, social, and intelligent. This dog rarely barks and will even get along great with children and pets.
  If the Irish Doodle sounds too good to be true, rest assured that it isn’t. Combing adorable looks and an equally loveable attitude, this crossbreed is becoming hugely popular. To find out if this dog would be the right fit for your family, check out some quick facts below.

Breed standards
Breed Type: Crossbreed
Breed Group: Watchdog, Sporting Dog, Guard Dog
Average lifespan: 10 to 13 years
Average size: 40-70 pounds
Coat appearance: Long, soft, wavy
Coloration: Apricot, black, white, black and tan, brown
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Singles, families with children and other pets, seniors, and those living in apartments or houses with or without yards
Temperament: Loyal, devoted, quiet, social, intelligent, friendly
Comparable Breeds: Irish Setter, Poodle

History
  The Irish Doodle is a hybrid canine, a cross between two very different breeds of hunting dog; a German retrieving dog, the Poodle, and an elegant red field hunting dog called the Irish Setter. The Poodle is often associated with France but it was actually developed in Germany, where it was known as a Pudlehund; Pudle meaning to splash around, and hund meaning dog.
  Poodles today are still sometimes employed to retrieve waterfowl, although the modern hunter is more likely to clip them short all over to prevent tangling in the brush and weeds. The Irish Setter was developed in Ireland, at some point in the 1700s as a field hunting dog and by the early 1800s, the breed was popular not just in Ireland, but also throughout the British Isles. Most experts believe that the Irish Setter is an ancestor of breeds such as the Irish Water Spaniel, the Gordon Setter, and the Irish Terrier, but written records from the time are nonexistent. The earliest Irish Setters were bred to be able to search out birds then hold their position, preventing them from entering the line of fire and they often came in either red and white or yellow and white, but in the mid-1800s their characteristic deep red color became the ideal. 
  They were imported into the United States as gun dogs and retrievers that specialized in retrieving gamebirds during the mid-1800s as well and were recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1878. Although the Irish Setter could be crossed with a Miniature or Toy Poodle, the most commonly included Poodle for this hybrid is the Standard Poodle.


Temperament
  These dogs are loving and affectionate, and are characterized by loyalty and devotion. They are eager to please and have significant native intelligence inherited from their parents. It is their intelligent mind and careful disposition that have made them equally good with kids and other family pets. This makes them an excellent family dog ideal for apartment life. Not do they just love the members of their families, but they are also comfortable meeting strangers.
  These dogs, especially the puppies, love attention until they’re well along in years. Though, it is alert and attentive. If it happens to come across anything suspicious, it would immediately alert its family.

Health
  She is generally a healthy dog and whether or not you believe in the idea of hybrid vigor there is still the possibility a puppy might inherit conditions one or both its parents are at risk of. For the Irish Doodle these include Addison's Disease, Bloat, Cushing's disease, epilepsy, Hypothyroidism, Legg-Perthes, Patellar Luxation, SA , Von Willebrand's Disease, OCD, CAD, HOD, Joint dysplasia, eye problems and Panosteitis. To avoid getting a dog with health problems you can improve the odds by only buying after seeing health clearances for both parents.

Care
  Bathing need not be a frequent occurrence with these canines, usually just a few times a year, but thorough brushing and styling will generally be needed on a regular basis. They type of grooming implements that will be required for this animal can vary a bit, depending on which parent breed they most resemble, although most will need clipping or trimming of some sort on a regular basis. 
  Crossbreeds that inherit the single-layer Poodle coat are less likely to shed and in some cases, may even be low shedding enough to be considered hypoallergenic, however, the coat of the Irish Setter is decidedly not hypoallergenic, and the full composition of the coat may not reveal itself until your Irish Doodle has reached maturity. It is also quite important to check and clean this dog’s ears on a regular basis as they can be prone to internal and external infections.

Training
  The trainability of the Irish doodle is unpredictable. The standard poodle is a happy-go-lucky and easily trainable dog. But the Irish setters are not always so, but would rather get bored easily. Those Irish doodles that take after their setter parents sometimes demand commitment and patience from their trainers. But once the training process is successfully over, your Irish doodle will be the best trained dog in the neighborhood.
  Begin obedience and pack leader trainings from an early age. Train them to socialize and get accustomed to meeting new faces. Like their parents, the Irish doodles are naturally clean, and hence, are easy to be housetrained.

Exercise Requirements
  The Irish Doodle doesn’t need a lot of exercise. Instead, a moderate amount of daily activity, through games like fetch and a walk or jog, will help keep your dog happy and in great shape. If you do have an enclosed, safe yard, you can even let your pooch play freely outside when the weather permits.

Grooming 
  She does not shed much and is hypoallergenic so is good for those with allergies. She should be brushed at least twice a week still to remove mats and tangles and keep the coat looking bright and healthy. Use a solid bristle brush and you should find her coat easy to brush. She will need to have a bath as and when she gets dirty enough to need one! Check her ears once a week and wipe them clean and clip her nails if they grow too long.

Children and other animals
  When training and early socialization is completed she is very good with children and other pets. They will be happy to play and affectionate towards them. Children should be taught how to play nicely with any dog, and that things like ear or tail pulling or messing around with their food at feeding time is not acceptable.

Is the Irish Doodle the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Difficult Training: The Irish Doodle isn't deal for a first time dog owner. Patience and perseverance are required to adequately train it.
Slightly Active: Not much exercise is required to keep this dog in shape. Owners who are frequently away or busy might find this breed suitable for their lifestyle.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.
The Irish Setter is a more energetic dog, but when combined with the Poodle, the puppies settle down a great deal. However, I recommend these pups for more active people and families with more energetic children. They will be perfect for the person wanting a devoted running companion, as well as a therapy dog
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Thursday, September 22, 2016

Everything about your Bullmastiff

Everything about your Bullmastiff
  Choosing to add a furry friend to your growing household is a long-term commitment, and picking a breed that fits your lifestyle is the key to a happy home. With over 160 American Kennel Club-recognized breeds, that decision can seem overwhelming. We're here to help you meet the breed that's right for you. If you're looking for a devoted guard dog that gets along well with children and cats, learn everything you need to know about the Bullmastiff.

Overview
  As the name suggests, the Bullmastiff is 60 percent Mastiff and 40 percent Bulldog. Bred in England to guard estates from poachers, the idea behind the mix was to create a dog that was larger than the Bulldog, yet a bit faster and more fierce than the Mastiff. Once its services were no longer needed, it was turned into a hunter's companion due to its light complexion. Now, Bullmastiffs are known for their police work, assistance in the military and as excellent family guard dogs.

Highlights
  • Bullmastiffs don't need a lot of exercise and will be happy with a couple of short walks every day.
  • Bullmastiffs can do well in families where both parents work. They are not overly concerned with being alone, but puppies will need someone who can come home to let them out for potty breaks.
  • Bullmastiffs shed little and require only minimal grooming.
  • Bullmastiffs can do well in apartments or condos because they're so mellow.
  • Bullmastiffs can be aggressive toward other animals if they're not properly socialized
  • Bullmastiffs should live indoors with their people.
  • Bullmastiffs are prone to heat exhaustion and heatstroke and should be kept indoors during hot or humid weather.
  • Bullmastiffs drool and can be prone to gassiness. If wiping up drool bothers you in any way, this is not the breed for you.
  • Bullmastiffs need early training that continues throughout their life. Training and socialization help curb unwanted aggression and willfulness.
  • Large and loving, Bullmastiffs enjoy spending time with you on your couch, feet, and lap. They take up a lot of room but give you lots of love in return.
  • Bullmastiffs can be determined guard dogs and will protect their home and family with their life if the need arises. Their size and confidence is a deterrent to intruders.
  • Bullmastiffs are good with children, but they can accidentally knock over or step on toddlers.
  • Bullmastiffs have a high pain threshold so it can be difficult to determine if the dog is hurt.
  • Never acquire a Bullmastiff from a puppy broker or pet store. Reputable breeders do not sell to middlemen or retailers, and there are no guarantees as to whether the puppy had healthy parents. Reputable breeders perform various health tests to ensure that their breeding dogs don't pass on a predisposition to genetic diseases. Interview breeders thoroughly, and make sure the puppy's parents have been screened for genetic diseases pertinent to that breed. Ask breeders about the health issues they've encountered in their dogs, and don't believe a breeder who claims that her dogs never have any health problems. Ask for references so you can contact other puppy buyers to see if they're happy with their Beardie. Doing your homework may save you from a lot of heartbreak later.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Bullmastiff’s colors include red, fawn or brindle.
  • Bullmastiffs will drive out unknown animals from their yard and home.
  • Bullmastiffs do not have a high energy level and are satisfied with short daily walks.
Breed standards
AKC group: Working Group
UKC group: Guardian Dog Group
Average lifespan: 8 - 10 years
Average size: 100 - 130 pounds
Coat appearance: Short and dense
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Powerful, muscular body; large and square head; short muzzle; black nose; dark eyes; V-shaped ears; muscular legs; high tail that is either curved or straight
Coloration: Red, brindle or fawn
Possible alterations: May have black markings on the body.

Comparable Breeds: Boxer, Mastiff


History
  The Bullmastiff is a relatively modern breed that was developed in the mid-19th century, probably around 1860, by English gamekeepers who needed a large, quiet, fearless dog with the speed to track down poachers and the strength to hold them.
  They probably experimented with a number of breeds in an attempt to create the perfect dog for their needs, but the one that paid off was the Mastiff/Bulldog cross. The Mastiff was large but not aggressive enough, while the Bulldog, brave and tenacious, lacked the size needed to knock down and hold a man.
 The popular cross became known as the Gamekeeper's Night-Dog and worked and lived alongside the gamekeeper and his family. The dogs were bred for utility and temperament with little thought put into looks, the exception being a preference for a dark brindle coat, which provided camouflage at night.
  Poaching eventually declined, and the Bullmastiff took on a new role as a guard dog. As a result of the Mastiff influence, the fawn coat with a black mask became more common as well.
  It wasn't until the early 20th century that the Bullmastiff began to be bred as a distinct type rather than as a crossbreed.
  In 1924, England's Kennel Club recognized the breed. The American Kennel Club followed suit in 1933. The first Bullmastiff registered by the AKC was Fascination of Felons Fear in 1934.
  Today the Bullmastiff ranks 40th among the 157 breeds and varieties registered by the AKC, a testament to his qualities as a companion.

Personality
  Bullmastiffs were developed as overseers of livestock and flocks. They took their responsibility seriously and developed a reputation for fearlessness in the face of predators. Bullmastiffs were also invaluable to gameskeepers, patrolling the grounds and stopping poachers from hunting the stock. They were trained not to hurt people and would stalk the poachers and keep them subdued until backup arrived to arrest the trespasser.
  Today Bullmastiffs maintain their imposing figure and watchful eye, but make a generally docile family pet. It takes a lot to provoke a Bullmastiff and despite what their appearance may suggest, they get along just fine with children. They make great farm dogs, happily keeping an eye on livestock and accompanying farmers as they do their chores.

Health Problems
  Bullmastiffs are generally a healthy breed of dog but some health issues may occur. These include hip and elbow dysplasia , bloat or gastric torsion,  Hypothyroidism (thyroid hormone deficiency causes lack of energy, obesity, and infertility), skin problems (this breed’s sensitive skin is prone to irritation, sores, and rashes), eye problems, cancer, tumors, and cardiac disease.

Care
  The bullmastiff is a big dog and needs daily exercise to stay in shape. Its needs are moderate, however, and can be met with walks on leash and short romps. It does not do well in hot, humid weather and generally should be kept as an indoor dog. It needs a soft bed and plenty of room to stretch out. It drools; some snore. Coat care is minimal.

Living Conditions
  Bullmastiffs will do okay in an apartment if they are sufficiently exercised. They are relatively inactive indoors and a small yard will do. They cannot tolerate extremes of temperatures.

Trainability
  Bullmastiffs are not for the soft of heart. They are stubborn and willful and need a great deal of consistency and confidence from a leader or they will quickly take over the house. Training should be done with calm-assertiveness, lots of positive reinforcement and plenty of treats. They will test boundaries and employ manipulation to get their own way.
  This breed is not for the first time dog owner, either. They need constant reinforcement of leadership roles and their socialization with people and animals should be ongoing. In short, living with a Bullmastiff is a commitment to ongoing work. They are like perpetual teenagers, testing boundaries and ignoring the rules, just to see if they can get away with it. Consistency is the key ingredient to training a Bullmastiff.

Exercise Requirements
  Bullmastiffs are not active dogs – in fact, this breed just likes to take it easy and are happy lazing around the house and doing as little as possible. Be sure to get your dog outside so it stays active. Your Bullmastiff needs enough daily exercise to keep it in shape. Take your dog out for daily walks and play in a large fenced backyard. Moderate, regular exercise and monitoring its meals will keep your dog from becoming overweight.

Grooming
  The short smooth coat of a Bullmastiff is essentially wash and wear. A quick daily or weekly brushing is all it takes to get the dead hairs out and reduce shedding.
  Bathe your Bullmastiff as you desire or only when he gets dirty. With the gentle dog shampoos available now, you can bathe a Bullmastiff weekly if you want without harming his coat.
  Drool. There’s no way around it: Bullmastiffs drool. Get in the habit of carrying around a hand towel so you can wipe his mouth frequently.
  The rest is basic care. Keep the nails short, and brush the teeth regularly for overall good health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Bullmastiffs are patient with and protective of children, but because they're so large, they can accidentally knock over or step on a toddler. If you have children, take their age and size into consideration when deciding whether to get a Bullmastiff.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any ear biting or tail pulling on the part of either party.
  Teach your child to never approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or try to take away the dog's food. No dog, no matter how good-natured, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  The Bullmastiff may well be aggressive toward dogs he doesn't know. He does best with dogs of the opposite sex, especially if he's been raised with them.
  He can get along with cats if he's raised with them, although some Bullmastiffs can't resist the urge to chase them. A cat who stands up for itself will fare better than one who runs away.

Is this breed right for you?
  Active yet calm, the Bullmastiff is great for apartment or home life, but it will do best with a small yard and daily walks to avoid behavioral problems. It gets along well with cats, adores children and makes for a wonderful companion dog. Affectionate, the Bullmastiff was taught not to bite, but it is extremely fearless and will attack any threat that comes into range.   Because of this, it is best that it is socialized young and trained by a firm yet kind owner.   Sensitive, it is easily emotionally scarred and will not do well in a kennel or by being yelled at. Although it does not bark often, it is very loud when it does. A big drooler, snorer and likely to slobber, this is a kind yet messy pup. Not shedding very often, the Bullmastiff is easy to groom.

Did You Know?
  Although loving and sweet natured, the Bullmastiff is a large guard dog with a mind of his own. He needs an assertive, experienced owner. Bullmastiffs can be willful and are not likely to back down once aroused.
Famous Bullmastiffs
BrutusBob Dylan's dog in the 1980s
ButkusSylvester Stallone's dog
RockyRoloff family dog (Little People Big World)
Swagger – the live mascot of the Cleveland Browns
MudgeHenry and Mudge (children's books)

A dream day in the life
There is no doubt that the Bullmastiff would prefer to spend its day surrounded by its family. At the heel of its favorite companion, this dog will be its master's shadow whenever it is not snoozing on the couch. After a walk, it'll ensure the home is safe by checking the home's perimeter inside and out. A lover, the Bullmastiff will be happy with a good rubdown as it falls asleep.



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Monday, June 20, 2016

10 Most Dangerous Dog Breeds

10 Most Dangerous Dog Breeds
  Regardless of the breed, we can typically point to a puppy’s upbring to explain significant parts of its personality. However, certain breeds of dog have earned their terrible reputations, often labeled as vicious because of their apparent predisposition to violent interactions with other dogs and humans. Still, it has been suggested that training and domestication could iron out the kinks in the nature of an aggressive canine.
  So, almost any breed of dog can be a wonderful companion, but almost any breed of dog can kill. It’s true, though, that certain breeds are most susceptible to falling victim to a powerfully aggressive nature, and with a combination of improper care and the physical attributes and characteristics of a violent breed, these ten most dangerous breeds of dogs cause a higher number of injuries and fatalities than any other.

1. Pit Bull
  Pit Bull is one of the dangerous dog breeds in the world which types include Stafford shire bull terrier, American Pit Bull Terrier, and American Stafford shire terrier. The Pit Bull dog breed is very difficult to identify through its physical characteristics even experts may face difficulty to visually recognize the dog breeds. Pit Bull has various well known types having different behavior and temperament level towards their owners and strangers while some are both independent and stubborn and can’t be inexperienced dog owner may injure or kill other animals.
  Pit bulls often attract the worst kind of dog owners because of their power. Especially immoral people who are only interested in these dogs for fighting (which is unacceptable). While pit bulls were once considered especially non-aggressive to any people, their reputation has changed because of unscrupulous breeders and irresponsible owners. In fact, Pit bulls are commonly confident, people-oriented dogs that can develop a strong sense of dependence on their owners.

Facts About Pit Bulls: 
  • Though these dedicated companions love people more than anything but improper training can sometimes make them aggressive. They can even attack humans if not trained the right way. Otherwise, they won’t harm humans
  • 86.8% of American Pit Bull Terriers have passed their temperament tests
  • No matter what the task is, when pit bulls are committed to any task, they carry out it with full enthusiasm. It’s often the nature of pit bulls, which make us think that they have locking Jaws especially when they bite on something and refuse to release it that easily
  • Pitbulls are widely known for illegal sport of dog fighting
More about Pit Bull here...Everything about your Pit Bull


2.  Rottweilers
  Rottweilers are one of the most popular dog breeds in the world. They are powerful dogs with strong jaws, primarily meant to protect. They generally don’t like strangers and other dogs and if they think their owners are in danger, they can be very dangerous.
  This breed is often used as a police dog or guard dog. As an old breed dating as far back, according to historians, to the Roman Empire, Rottweilers have also been used as herding dogs.
  Many experts advise Rottweiler owners to seek professional training for their dogs as their strength is an inherent risk, particularly for children. If you choose to have one of these dogs, be sure it is properly socialized and always remain vigilant regarding its temperament.

Rottweiler Facts:
  • Rottweilers fall under “working dog breeds” category. It is one of the widely known Rottweiler facts
  • Life expectancy of this dangerous dog breed is around 12 to 14 years
  • After completing their first year, Rottweilers are considered as adults. 1 Rottweiler year is equivalent to 16 years of human age. After they complete 2 years, just add 5 years to find its equivalent human age
  • Generally, Rottweilers are considered unsuitable for family pet
More about Rottweiler here...Everything about your Rottweiler

3. Huskies
  Huskies is dog breed to pull sleds in northern regions which usually known for their fast pulling style mostly recognizable by its thickly furred double coat. Huskies are a very active, energetic, and resilient breed and one of dangerous dog breeds in the world because of their aggressive nature towards others. Huskies aren’t much violent but only few reasons made them vicious which can be reduced through positive reinforcement training program but consistency needed with these sessions and turned to be destructive without proper care. 

  However, they can be dangerous to smaller animals due to their strong predator instinct and are known for being destructive if they are bored.
  Huskies are very energetic and intelligent dogs. But their training is a complicated thing, and this dog is not recommended for beginning dog owners.

Husky Facts:
  • Although huskies have nabbed a spot in the list of most dangerous dog breeds, generally they are more friendly towards children, your visitors and other dogs. But again, you should train them properly
  • However, factors like improper training, poor socialization and bad social experiences can turn them aggressive
  • Due to its high shedding, huskies often don’t suit people who are allergic to dog hairs or want their home to be clean all the time
More about Husky here...Everything about your Siberian Husky

4.German Shepherds
  Famous K-9 dogs. They are known to be fearless and confident dogs. German Shepherds are in need of constant and serious physical activity though, and they seem to give preference to long walks and active games.
  The large-sized working dog breed German Shepherd developed originally for herding sheep stand among the top popular dog breeds in the United States and United Kingdom. The highly active and self assured dogs are keen to learn and eagerness to have a purpose proved as excellent guard dogs and best for search missions. German Shepherds are responsible for biting having a tendency to attack other breeds and human also became victims several times for which they are added among the most dangerous dog breeds in the world.
  The bite of a German Shepherd has a force of over 1,060 newtons, and some studies show that German Shepherds have a tendency to bite and attack smaller dogs.  German Shepherds are commonly used as police dogs today.



German Shepherd Facts:
  • Even though their aggressive nature had labeled them to be as one of the dangerous dogs but when they are trained properly, believe me — they are your best companion
  • By nature, German Shepherd is fond of food, fun and friends
  • These dogs show immense curiosity in exploring their surroundings. If you own one, you must have observed. This inquisitiveness behavior is apparently when he or she is a puppy
  • German shepherd can pick up great speed and at the same time can halt all of a sudden without stumbling on anything or its surroundings
  • German shepherd is an extreme hair shredder. Even if you brush its hair for every 15 minutes, you will still see hairs floating in air. So brush its hair every day if you want to keep your home hygiene
  • Though German Shepherds are subject to suffer from many different types of illnesses, most common one is “hip dysplasia”, which occurs due to poor breeding practices
More about German Shepherd here...Everything about your German Shepherd

5.Alaskan Malamutes
  A large breed of domestic dog Alaskan malamute is also among the top dangerous dog breeds in the world following their temperament and aggression if not trained and instructed well. Alaskan malamute can be described as more strong and sturdy compared to other dog breeds, very fond of people usually quiet dogs, seldom barking. These dogs can be dangerous or fatal for other human who are unknown to them only when they feel any danger for them and their owner or family member but other cases can be resolved through training sessions.


  Although some of these dogs are still used for mushing or sledding, most are employed as family pets where they tend to be beloved by their households.
Of course, these dogs, like other Arctic dogs, have a high prey drive. They must be watched with other small pets in the home. Due to their size, they should also be supervised around young children.
  As high-energy dogs, these animals are most likely to thrive and exhibit best traits when they have been properly socialized and have access to the exercise they need. It’s never good for Alaskan Malamutes to be caged or kept from mental stimulation.

Facts About Alaskan Malamutes:
  • Alaskan malamutes are slow learners. So you will need a lot of patience to train these dog breeds
  • These dogs are prolific hair shedders. Just bring Alaskan Malamutes to your home and watch how sooner your home is piled with whole lot of hairs
  • Alaskan Malamutes have the ability to make variety of sounds in order to convey their needs to you. As these dog breeds enjoy human company, you got to spend plenty of time with them to keep them happy
  • They need whole lot of energy, exercise, love and your attention too. Malamutes that lack exercises frequently misbehave & at times can turn dangerous too
  • They are ridiculously friendly with well-behaved kids
  • These dog breeds insist you to allow them to be a part of your family activities
More about Alaskan Malamutes here...Everything about your Alaskan Malamute

6. Doberman Pinschers
  Doberman Pinschers were once commonly used as police dogs, but this is less commonplace today. Dobermans can be often be aggressive towards strangers, but less frequently towards their owners. The breed’s reputation has improved in recent years, but their size and strength still makes them potentially dangerous. 
  Famed for their alertness, loyalty and intelligence, this breed of dogs is considered to be the best guard dog where they only attack if they are provoked or sense that their family and their property is in dangerAlthough once used as guard dogs or police dogs, they also exhibit aggressive behavior directed to strangers and other dogs, though owner-directed aggression is low. Their aggression due to their size and strength can also make them potentially dangerous.
  Trained properly, these dogs can become very loyal to their masters, but aggressive towards perceived threats to their owners. 

Doberman Pinschers Facts:
  • These intelligent dog breeds are often referred as “Dogs with a human brain”. Although Doberman pinchers serve you faithfully, you still have to train them properly with your leadership. Else, they assume they are the leaders
  • These dogs will do their best when they have something to do. They can even watch TV, help your business and suddenly can sit on your lap too. However, they are completely reserved with strangers.
  • Doberman pinchers can do self-estimations. So if your family is being threatened, you don’t have to utter a word. They will automatically sense and do everything to protect you
  •  As these dogs are highly intelligent and energetic, improper training can cause behavioral issues. This is why it has made my list of dangerous dog breeds.
  • These dog breeds are more sensitive to sounds. In fact, they can hear sounds 250 yards away
More about Doberman Pinschers here...Everything about your Doberman Pinscher

7. Chow Chows
  Some will be surprised seeing the Chow Chow in this ranking, but, nevertheless, this breed is one of the most aggressive dogs in the world. At first glance, Chow Chows are very attractive and cute fluffies, also the representatives of China. Before you buy this dog, you must remember that an adult Chow Chow cannot safely play with unfamiliar dogs and be left alone with children, because they are very irritable and defend their right to their food with a spiteful grin.
  Also Chow Chow are good guards, as they are very devoted to their owner, would not allow a stranger to approach to the master, and won’t not let anyone into their territory.  Better don’t try to get near a chow chow’s owner without his or her permission. Because chow chow is the one of the most aggressive dog breed in the world. They were bred for hunting and helping shepherds.
  They are usually held as pets, and due to their size they can be kept in apartments. The danger rests when they lack exercise or are just generally bored, and will sometimes lash out at strangers and even owners due to boredom.

Chow Chow Facts:
  • Chow Chow dog breed is the only dog breed that has purplish lips and tongue
  • Originating in China, Chow Chows are there since 4000 years. Therefore, they are believed to be one of the oldest dog breeds. Some experts believe that these dogs were the very ones to be evolved from wolves.
  • Chow Chows are usually stubborn. As they are more dominant, it’s good to train and socialize them when they are young
  • Once Chow Chows complete 1 year, they should be considered adults
More about Chow Chow here...Everything about your Chow Chow

8. Great Danes
  The large German breed of domestic dog Great Dane has enormous body and height known for looking physical affection from their owners. Great Dane are generally well disposed towards other pets including dogs and familiar human and not exhibit any extreme aggressiveness towards them but if not well trained or socialized can be very fearful and aggressive nature dog breed for unfamiliar human or any stranger happens towards them for which they have been added among the most dangerous dog breeds in the world.
  If trained properly then a Great Dane can be a gentle giant, but since these dogs are such large and imposing creatures they can prove to be very dangerous if improperly cared for.   Fully grown male Great Danes could well be killing machines, as they can weigh as much as 200 pounds and stand 86 cm tall. 

Facts About Great Danes:
  • “Giant George”, a Great Dane was measured 43-inches tall but it weighed only 245 pounds. It made a Guinness record for being the world’s tallest dog ever. There is a short sweet story about this gentle giant. You can read more about this here: “Top 10 Biggest Dog Breeds in the World”.
  • Apartment living is quite fine for this huge dog breed. Just half-an-hour walk a day can keep Great Danes fit
  • Great Danes grow rapidly. Within a year, it can grow 6 feet tall
  • These dog breeds barely eat their food
  • Great Danes are one among emotionally sensitive dog breeds. They won’t respond well to hard training methods. On the other hand, anxiety can easily kill this dog 
  • You can’t expect a poorly bred Great Dane to be a Scooby Doo friendly anyway
More about Great Danes here...Everything about your Great Dane

9. Boxer
  This dignified-looking dog is known for its distinctive head.
Revered for bravery and stamina, the boxer can make a great family pet; however, owners must be diligent when raising their boxer to be obedient and must also curb aggressive tendencies.
  The Boxer tends to be loyal and loving to its family; yet, again, proper socialization must be provided.
  Intelligent and generally tractable, the Boxer can make a great family pet, especially when positive reinforcement is employed during training.
  By nature, Boxers are not known to be vicious or overly aggressive as some breeds are. However, these negative tendencies may occur in neglected or mistreated dogs. For this reason, it’s important to get to know an adult Boxer well before introducing it to a family situation.
  Boxers are quite strong and may inflict serious injury if they choose to attack. Many trainers have insisted that Boxers boast above-average intelligence. They are very trainable and will reward their owners with loyal and even temperaments when induced. When obtaining a Boxer puppy, it’s important to provide adequate socialization.
  Though the breed was developed in Germany as a hunting dog, it is today typically employed as a companion or family dog. Some Boxers are used as guard dogs.

Facts About Boxers:
  • In United States, Boxers are the sixth most popular dog breeds
  • They became popular after WW-II when soldiers brought them home as their pets
  • One of the most funny facts about boxers is that they snore loud
  • In the past, you could have seen boxers in circus ring performances. The reason: they are intelligent and easily trainable. Thus, people used them to make money
  • Originally, these dog breeds were developed in Germany. There they are still used as police dogs
  • Boxers are loyal and die to please you. But if you punish them hardly for their wrong behaviors, they will turn worse
More about Boxer here... Everything about your Boxer

10. Akita
  Akitas are well known for their dominant temperament. Because they have a mind of their own, they can exhibit unruly behaviors which may make them risky in some situations.
  For this reason, the Akita requires a skilled owner who takes time to instill this dog with obedience.
  Akitas were originally bred to hunt deer and bears in their native Japan. They are bred for strength, endurance, and courage. As one of the world’s oldest native hunting breeds, the Akita still enjoys this pursuit and requires a good deal of exercise and mental stimulation to avoid boredom. A bored Akita is likely to find a negative pastime to occupy itself.
  Akitas boast thick double coats and don’t mind cold weather like other Spitz types of dogs such as the Siberian Husky. The breed is extremely territorial when it comes to its property. This is one reason why many people prefer the breed as it helps deter trespassers.
  Akitas can make excellent companions. Although they can be aggressive, with the right owner and family, they can make great pets. The idea is to provide an environment that allows them to thrive.

Facts About Akitas:
  • Akitas are loyal and fearless companion for your family
  • This dog breed would not back down from challenges in any situation and can’t be frightened so easily
  • If you don’t train and socialize them properly, this affectionate yet bold animal can screw up and turn into one of the most dangerous dog breeds
More about Akita here...Everything about your Akita


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Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Everything about your Doberman Pinscher

Everything about your Doberman Pinscher
  Although the Doberman has a reputation as a sharp and even sinister dog, his devoted fans consider him the most loving and loyal of companions. Believe it or not, a good Doberman is a stable, friendly dog - unless you threaten his family.
  The Doberman Pinscher was developed in Germany during the late 19th century, primarily as a guard dog. His exact ancestry is unknown, but he's believed to be a mixture of many dog breeds, including the Rottweiler, Black and Tan Terrier, and German Pinscher. With his sleek coat, athletic build, and characteristic cropped ears and docked tail, the Doberman Pinscher looks like an aristocrat. He is a highly energetic and intelligent dog, suited for police and military work, canine sports, and as a family guardian and companion.


Overview
  Because the Doberman Pinscher came into existence at the end of the 19th century, he is, in the world of dogs, the new kid on the block. This hasn't stopped the Dobie, as he is affectionately called, from becoming one of the most popular and recognized breeds in the United States.
  His look is elegant and his style is athletic; the Dobie is also intelligent, alert, and loyal. He is a courageous guard dog as well as a beloved family companion.
  The Dobie's fierce reputation precedes him. He is feared by those who don't know him, stereotyped as highly aggressive and vicious. True, he is a formidable guardian, but he is usually a gentle, watchful, and loving dog. He does not go looking for trouble, but he is fearless and will defend his family and turf if he perceives danger.
  The Doberman Pinscher enjoys being part of a family. He likes to be close to those he loves and, when this love is present, he is a natural protector. He is trustworthy with his family's children, friends, and guests as long as he is treated kindly.
  In spite of his positive qualities, the Dobie isn't the right breed for everyone. He's large, at 60 to 80 pounds, and he's extremely active, both physically and mentally. He needs a lot of exercise.
  He also needs plenty of mental challenges to keep him from becoming bored. He needs a strong owner/pack leader who can take time to properly socialize and train him, and who will keep him busy every day. This may be too much to handle for people who lead a more laid-back lifestyle.
  The current look of the Dobie is slimmer and sleeker than that of past years. His temperament has also changed somewhat, say breed enthusiasts, softening a bit from his early days in Germany, though he is still an excellent guard dog.
  Originally, Dobies' ears were cropped to increase their ability to locate sounds, and tail docking gave the breed a more streamlined look. North American breeders usually dock the tails and crop the ears of Doberman puppies, though it's not mandatory. Docking and ear cropping is illegal in some countries.
  Those who know him say that a well-bred and properly socialized Dobie is an excellent pet and companion, suitable for families with other dogs, gentle with young children, and overall a loyal and devoted family member.

Highlights
  • The Doberman has a great deal of energy and needs a lot of exercise.
  • This breed can be protective, so don't be surprised when he assumes the role of household guardian.
  • The Dobie will assume the alpha role in your household if you're not a strong leader. Early, consistent training is critical to establish your role as pack leader.
  • The Dobie is sensitive to cold weather and needs adequate shelter in winter (he likes to be in the house next to the fireplace).
  • The Doberman Pinscher is a family dog and shouldn't be left alone. He thrives when he's included in family activities.
  • The Doberman has gained a reputation as being vicious. Even though your Doberman may have a sweet personality, neighbors and strangers may be afraid of him.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Doberman originated in Germany, created by tax collector Louis Dobermann to keep himself and the taxes he carried safe from thieves.
  • In the 1950s, long before the advent of agility and freestyle competitions, the Doberman Drill Team thrilled audiences with their amazing physical feats. Today the breed is highly competitive in obedience and agility trials as well as many other dog sports and activities.
  • The Doberman who is raised with children and other pets will love and protect them and be a good companion for kids.
  • The first Doberman to win Best in Show at Westminster was Ch. Ferry v Raufelsen of Giralda in 1939. He was followed by his grandson, Ch. Rancho Dobe's Storm, who had back to back wins in 1952 and 1953 and more recently by Ch. Royal Tudor Wild as the Wind in 1989.
Breed standards
AKC group: Working
UKC group: Guardian Dog
Average lifespan: 10-11 years
Average size: 66-88 pounds
Coat appearance: Short, hard, thick
Coloration: Black, red, blue, and fawn
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Athletic build, muscular body, ears pricked and erect, tail short and cropped
Possible alterations: Dobermans are born with floppy ears and long tails.
Comparable Breeds: Dalmatian, Rottweiler
History
  Doberman Pinschers were first bred in the town of Apolda, in the German state of Thuringia around 1890, following the Franco-Prussian War by Karl Friedrich Louis Dobermann. Dobermann served in the dangerous role of local tax collector, and ran the Apolda dog pound. With access to dogs of many breeds, he aimed to create a breed that would be ideal for protecting him during his collections, which took him through many bandit-infested areas. He set out to breed a new type of dog that, in his opinion, would be the perfect combination of strength, speed, endurance, loyalty, intelligence, and ferocity. Later, Otto Goeller and Philip Greunig continued to develop the breed to become the dog that is seen today.
  The breed is believed to have been created from several different breeds of dogs that had the characteristics that Dobermann was looking for, including the German Pinscher, the Beauceron, the Rottweiler, the Thuringian Sylvan Dog, the Greyhound, the Great Dane, the Weimaraner, the German Shorthaired Pointer, the Manchester Terrier, the Old German Shepherd Dog, the American Pit Bull Terrier, Thuringian Shepherd Dog . The exact ratios of mixing, and even the exact breeds that were used, remain uncertain to this day, although many experts believe that the Doberman Pinscher is a combination of at least four of these breeds. The single exception is the documented crossing with the Greyhound and Manchester Terrier. It is also widely believed that the old German Shepherd gene pool was the single largest contributor to the Doberman breed. Philip Greunig'sThe Dobermann Pinscher (1939), is considered the foremost study of the development of the breed by one of its most ardent students. Greunig's study describes the breed's early development by Otto Goeller, whose hand allowed the Doberman to become the dog we recognize today. The American Kennel Club believes the breeds utilized to develop the Doberman Pinscher may have included the old shorthaired shepherd, Rottweiler, Black and Tan Terrier and the German Pinscher.
  After Dobermann's death in 1894, the Germans named the breed Dobermann-pinscher in his honor, but a half century later dropped the 'pinscher' on the grounds that this German word for terrier was no longer appropriate. The British did the same a few years later.
During World War II, the United States Marine Corps adopted the Doberman Pinscher as its official War Dog, although the Corps did not exclusively use this breed in the role.
In the post war era the breed was nearly lost. There were no new litters registered in West Germany from 1949 to 1958. Werner Jung is credited with single-handedly saving the breed. He searched the farms in Germany for typical Pinschers and used these along with 4 oversized Miniature Pinschers and a black and red bitch from East Germany. Jung risked his life to smuggle her into West Germany. Most German Pinschers today are descendants of these dogs. Some pedigrees in the 1959 PSK Standardbuch show a number of dogs with unknown parentage.
  In the United States, the American Kennel Club ranked the Doberman Pinscher as the 12th most popular pure-breed in 2012 and 2013.





Personality
  A super-intelligent and super-active dog — that's what you get when you get a Doberman Pinscher. You also get an extremely loyal, trustworthy dog who's playful and fun-loving with his family. He's a natural protector who won't hesitate to act when he thinks his family is under threat, but he is not aggressive without reason.
  The Dobie likes to be busy, physically and mentally. He learns quickly, and training him is easy. Because he learns so fast, it's challenging to keep lessons fresh and interesting. He can have his own ideas about things, though typically he's not overly stubborn or willful with an owner who provides consistent, kind leadership.
  The Dobie takes a while to grow up. He remains puppyish until he is three to four years old.
Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner.
  Always meet at least one of the parents — usually the mother is the one who's available — to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.
  Like every dog, the Dobie needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Dobie puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.
  Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.



Health
  The Doberman Pinscher has a lifespan of 10 to 12 years. Wobbler's syndrome, cervical vertebral instability (CVI), and cardiomyopathy are some serious health problems affecting Dobermans; some minor diseases seen in this breed of dog include canine hip dysplasia (CHD), osteosarcoma, von Willebrand's disease (vWD), demodicosis, and gastric torsion. Albinism, narcolepsy, hypothyroidism, and progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) are occasionally seen in Dobermans, while the Blue Doberman is more prone to hair loss. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may run cardiac, eye, hip, and DNA tests.


Living Conditions
  Will do okay in an apartment if sufficiently exercised, but does best with at least an average-sized yard. Dobes are very cold sensitive and are not outside dogs. That is why police in areas where it gets cold are not able to use them.

Exercise
  The Doberman is very energetic, with great stamina. They need to be taken on a daily, long walk or jog, and need to be made to heel beside or behind the human holding the lead, as in a dog's mind the leader leads the way and that leader needs to be the humans.

Care
  The Doberman requires mental and physical exertion daily or it may become destructive or frustrated. This need can be easily met with a walk on a leash, a run in an enclosed area, or a long jog. And while it can live outdoors in cool climate, the Doberman is most effective indoors as a guardian and a family companion. Its coat requires minimal care.

Grooming
  Grooming is a breeze. Brush the Doberman with a slicker brush or hound glove every week, or even just run a wet towel over him. On the days he needs a bath, use a dog shampoo, not a human product. Rinse thoroughly and let him shake dry or towel-dry him.
  The Doberman sheds moderately. Regular brushing will help keep him and your home neat.  As with any dog, brushing before a bath helps eliminate more dead hair, which leaves less hair to shed. Your vacuum cleaner will work longer if you brush your Doberman regularly.
  The rest is basic care. Trim his nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Brush his teeth for good overall health and fresh breath.

Is this breed right for you?
  The Doberman Pinscher is definitely not right for everyone. This is a highly intelligent breed meant to guard and work, and its owners must have the time and dedication to provide proper upbringing to this potentially dangerous breed, especially for households with young children. Highly trainable and loyal, the Doberman Pinscher makes a wonderful addition to an experienced household. This is a tidy breed as it does not shed much and has a low-maintenance grooming routine.

Children and other pets
  The well-bred Doberman is a wonderful family dog. He is trustworthy and protective of the children in his family, as long as he's been socialized and trained appropriately. Children must be respectful and kind to the Dobie, and he will be just that in return.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  He's also friendly with other dogs and animals in his home, especially if he has been raised with them. He can be aggressive toward dogs outside his family if he considers them a threat to his loved ones.

Famous Doberman Pinschers
  • Graf Belling v. Grönland: first registered Dobermann, in 1898.
  • First Doberman registered with the American Kennel Club, 1908
  • Ch. Big Boy of White Gate (owner/breeder Howard K. Mohr) wins the 1st Best in Show for an American-bred Doberman at the Rhode Island Kennel Club show, 1928.
  • Ch. Ferry v Raufelsen of Giralda (owner/breeder Mrs. M Hartley Dodge) is the first Doberman to win Best in Show at the Westminster Kennel Club show, 1939
  • Kurt, A Doberman who saved the lives of 250 U.S. Marines when he alerted them to Japanese soldiers. Kurt became the first k-9 casualty, July 23, when he was mortally wounded by a Japanese grenade. He was the first to be buried in what would become the war dog cemetery and he is the dog depicted in bronze sitting quiet but alert atop the World War II War Dog Memorial. Kurt, along with 24 other Dobermans whose names are inscribed on the memorial, died fighting with the US Marine Corps against Japanese forces on Guam in 1944.
  • Ch. Rancho Dobe's Storm: back to back Westminster Best in Show (1952, 1953). While other Dobermans may have more group or best in show or even more breed wins than Ch Rancho Dobe's Storm, he remains the only Doberman that has never been defeated by another Doberman.
  • Bingo von Ellendonk: first Dobermann to score 300 points (perfect score) in Schutzhund.
  • Ch. Cambria Cactus Cash: Sired 155 AKC champions as of January 2011.
  • Ch. Borong the Warlock: won his championship title in three countries, including 230 Best of Breed, 30 Specialty Show "bests," six all-breed Best in Show, and 66 Working Groups. He was the only Doberman ever to have won the Doberman Pinscher Club of America National Specialty Show three times, and in 1961 five Doberman specialists judged him Top in the breed in an annual Top Ten competition event.
  • Am. Ch. Brunswigs Cryptonite: achieved Best In Show on 124 occasions
Did You Know?
  Doberman’s get a bad reputation as attack dogs. Alpha in the Academy Award-winning film “UP” embodies every stereotype of the Doberman Pinscher: he’s both mean and not very smart. Fortunately, he’s also fictional and nothing like a real Doberman.

A dream day in the life of a Doberman Pinscher
  The Doberman Pinscher is a dog who thrives on work. Give this workaholic a job and he'll be the happiest pup on the block. Whether it's standing guard for the household, getting involved with search and rescue or any other type of accelerated training, this no-nonsense breed is up for the challenge.
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