LUV My dogs: grooming

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Showing posts with label grooming. Show all posts
Showing posts with label grooming. Show all posts

Thursday, June 29, 2017

Everything about your Wire Fox Terrier

Everything about your Wire Fox Terrier
  The Wire Fox Terrier is believed to be a descendant of the Black and Tan Terrier well-known in Wales and related areas. The breed was frequently crossed with the Smooth Fox Terrier to refine the head and reinforce the genetics for the white coat. At one time, both breeds were considered one breed with two varieties. However, the American Kennel Club (AKC) has recognized these breeds as separate since 1985 and interbreeding has ended.

Overview
  An elegant and well-built dog, the Wire Fox Terrier is surprising strong for a dog with small structure. This breed is a hunting and tracking dog by nature, so the Wire Fox Terrier has got agility and energy to spare.
  Wire Fox Terriers are courageous, alert, playful, affectionate and independent. Always up for an adventure, this dog loves to explore, run, hunt, play, and chase, so it will keep you busy. If it’s a family dog you’re looking for, you’ll be glad to learn that the Wire Fox Terrier is excellent with children. And even though it is a bold dog, it isn’t aggressive towards people. Read on to learn more about this breed.

Breed standards
AKC group: Terrier
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan:15-18 years
Average size: Male Wire Fox Terriers weigh 15 to 20 pounds and females weigh 13 to 18 pounds
Color: Black, Brown, and White
Coat: Dense, Harsh and Rough, and Wire
Shedding: Minimal
Grooming Needs: High Maintenance
Hypoallergenic Breed: Yes
Comparable Breeds: Lakeland Terrier, Welsh Terrier

Is the Wire Fox Terrier the Right Breed for you?
High Maintenance: Grooming should be performed often to keep the dog's coat in good shape. Occasional trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Moderately Easy Training: The Wire Fox Terrier is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, houses with yards
Temperament: Independent, adventurous, courageous, playful

History
Wire fox terrier circa 1915

  The wire fox terrier was developed in England by fox hunting enthusiasts and is believed to be descended from a now-extinct rough-coated, black-and-tan working terrier of Wales, Derbyshire, and Durham. The breed was also thought to have been bred to chase foxes into their underground burrows; the dogs' short, strong, usually docked tails were used as handles by the hunter to pull them back out.
  Although it is said Queen Victoria owned one, and her son and heir, King Edward VII, did own a wire fox terrier named Caesar, the breed was not popular as a family pet until the 1930s, when The Thin Man series of feature films was created. Asta, the canine member of the Charles family, was a wire fox terrier, and the popularity of the breed soared. Milou (Snowy) from The Adventures of Tintin comic strip is also a wire fox terrier.
  In the late 20th century, the popularity of the breed declined again, most likely due to changing living conditions in the Western world and the difficulty of keeping hunting terriers in cities due to their strong prey instincts.
  As of 2014, the wire fox terrier has the distinction of having received more Best in Show titles at Westminster Kennel Club dog shows (currently 14) than any other breed. Matford Vic, a wire fox terrier, is one of only five dogs to have won the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show on more than one occasion. She won the competition twice, in 1915 and 1916. The only dog to win it on more occasions was Warren Remedy, a smooth fox terrier, who won it on three occasions between 1907 and 1909.


Temperament
  A happy, eager to please, excitable dog, the Wire Fox Terrier is always eager to play and makes an excellent pet for the active person. You may notice a streak of dominance in your dog – be sure you establish your role as the alpha early on. The Wire Fox Terrier was originally bred for hunting and tracking, so this dog still loves to dig under fences, in the garden, and even through sofas. Keep your dog in a secure, fenced-in yard, because this breed likes to roam and chase.
  As hunting dogs, the Wire Fox Terrier will chase smaller animals such as squirrels, rabbits, or cats. For this reason, keep your Wire Fox Terrier on a leash at all times. This bold little dog has no issues starting problems with bigger dogs and will not back down to dogs that are several times their size.
  Even though this breed is wonderful with children, the Wire Fox Terrier will react if it is being bothered or pestered. As well, this dog is quick to bark at any new sight or sound, which makes it a good watch dog. But overall, the Wire Fox Terrier makes a loyal, affectionate family pet.

Health
  The average life span of the Wire Fox Terrier is 12 to 15 years. Breed health concerns may include cataracts, congenital deafness, distichiasis, pulmonic stenosis, insulinoma, glaucoma, Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, shoulder luxation, mast cell tumors, cerebellar malformation, epilepsy, corneal ulceration, lens luxation, progressive retinal atrophy, ectopic ureters, congenital idiopathic megaesophagus and skin allergies.

Care
  Daily exercise in the form of a vigorous game, a good on-leash walk, or an off-leash outing in a secure area is a must for the Fox Terrier. When given room, however, the Fox Terrier can exercise on its own. It does well indoors with access to a secure yard, but can live outside in temperate or warm climates.
  The dog’s coat requires combing every week, and shaping once every three months. Pets are shaped by clipping, but for show dogs stripping is effective. This is because clipping tends to make the color of the coat dull and also softens it. In addition, Wire Fox Terrier puppies may require ear shaping techniques to retain proper shape as adults.

Living Conditions
  The Wire Fox Terrier will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is very active indoors and will do okay without a yard.

Training
  Training the Wire Fox Terrier can prove to be a bit difficult, especially if this is your first time owning this breed. If you’re bringing this dog home as a puppy, watch out for its sharp teeth. As well, the Wire Fox Terrier can be difficult to house train. In the beginning, you should consider staying at home with your dog as much as possible. Socialization is important, so introduce your Wire Fox Terrier to different dogs, people and environments whenever you can.
  Since this dog is intelligent, you should include obedience tasks as part of your Wire Fox Terrier’s training.  It can have stubborn and independent nature, so be sure to be firm when giving commands. Reprimand your dog in a firm manner when it exhibits bad behavior. If this is your first time owning this breed or lack faith in your training skills, don’t be afraid to hire an experienced handler.

Activity Requirements
  Fox Terriers are small, but they have energy to spare and need a lot of exercise to maintain health and happiness. Even when indoors they are always “on the go,” constantly moving about the house. You should walk your Fox Terrier several times a day, but jogging is even better. Fox Terriers prefer running to walking, so joggers have a true blue companion in this breed. They chase balls to the point that some owners believe they are obsessed with the activity, and can use up all of their energy playing fetch, as long as your arm doesn't tire out in the process. Their size makes Fox Terriers fine apartment dogs, but a commitment must be made to keeping up with a regular exercise program.

Grooming 
  The Wire Fox Terrier's coat requires stripping in order to maintain the proper look and texture. Stripping can be done at home, or at the groomer, and should be done at least twice per year. If a dog is not competing, his coat can be clipped, however this changes the texture of the coat, making it soft and also alters the coloring of the dog.
  Check the ears on a weekly basis for signs of infection, irritation, or wax build up. Cleanse regularly with a veterinarian-approved cleanser and cotton ball. Brush the teeth at least once per week to prevent tartar buildup and fight gum disease. Additionally, nails should be trimmed once per month if the dog does not wear the toenails down naturally.

Noteworthy wire fox terriers
  • Archie, owned by Gill Raddings Stunt Dogs starred in ITV's Catwalk Dogs.
  • Bob, from the Hercule Poirot episode Dumb Witness
    Snowy (French: Milou),
    companion of Tintin
  • Caesar, the companion of King Edward VII of the United Kingdom
  • Charles, brought to Ceylon by Leonard Woolf in 1905
  • Chester, in the film Jack Frost
  • J.D. from Millionaire Dogs
  • Mickey, the companion of French composer Francis Poulenc.
  • Sky, winner of the 2012 Purina Thanksgiving Dog Show and the 2014 Westminster Dog Show.
  • Van Gogh, Paul Meltsner's dog featured in his famous painting Paul, Marcella and Van Gogh
  • Vicki, Rudyard Kipling's dog
  • Wessex, the dog of British novelist (Tess of the d'Urbervilles) Thomas Hardy
  • Willy, from Ask the Dust
  • Wuffles, the Patrician's dog in the Discworld Series

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Saturday, January 31, 2015

Everything about your Brittany

Everything about your Brittany
  Brittanys are charming, gentle and personable members of the household. Except for the Golden Retriever, you would be hard-pressed to find a more personable family dog. Lively and fun, Brittanys are always up for a roll on the carpet, a game in the back yard or a cuddle on the couch.
  Brittanys were bred as gundogs, and they definitely have birds on the brain. Although they're often called Brittany Spaniels, the American Kennel Club dropped the word "spaniel" from this pointing breed's name in 1982. The energetic Brittany is a versatile family companion and hunting dog who works more closely to the hunter than other pointing breeds.

Overview
  Great balls of fire! Life with a Brittany is never dull. This breed is smart, active, agile and relatively easy to train. For an active home with room for an active companion, you can’t do much better than the Brittany, a moderately sized dog with relatively few health or temperament problems. This dog can hunt, if that’s what you’re into, but for most people, the appeal is that the Brittany is athletic, bright and people-oriented.
  If you want a dog that will do anything you want to do as long as it’s active, this is a great dog for you. His wash-and-wear coat can be kept in shape with a weekly brushing to keep shedding under control, and he's typically friendly with other dogs, cats and children.
But make no mistake: this is not a couch-potato puppy: The Brittany is a canine overachiever and needs daily, heart-thumping exercise to keep his high spirits from bounding off. Don't get a Brittany if you're not going to make him a part of your family, or if you're not going to give him mentally and physically challenging activities.
  That work doesn't need to be hunting, although the Brittany does remain very popular among people who value a good bird dog. The Brittany does well in all kinds of canine sports, including agility, flyball and obedience and will be an active participant in any human-centered activity as well, from running and hiking to playing fetch with the kids.
  When we say you need to keep your Brittany busy, we’re not just thinking of the dog but of you. Left to his own devices and without sufficient exercise, the Brittany can become destructive and noisy instead of the happy family dog he was meant to be.

Highlights
  • Brittanys are high-energy dogs. They need at least an hour of intensive exercise each day. Without sufficient exercise, your Brittany may become neurotic and destructive.
  • Brittanys are smart and need mental stimulation as well as physical exercise. Training for dog sports is a great way to provide this.
  • Brittanys don't respond well to harsh treatment. Be gentle and consistent but firm — don't let them run the household.
  • Brittanys are people-oriented and don't like to be left alone for long periods of time without something to keep them busy. If you work outside the home, you should consider getting two Brittanys to keep each other company.
  • Although they are friendly and like children, it's not recommended that you let your small children play with your Brittany without supervision. Your Brittany has so much energy and enthusiasm, he may accidentally injure your child.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Brittany is a French breed from the province of Brittany. He was developed to point and retrieve in different types of terrain.
  • Brittanies have a short coat with a little feathering on the legs and are easy to groom, but like all breeds they shed.
  • A Brittany’s coat is white and orange or white and liver. Some Brittanies have tricolor coats, but that’s not a popular pattern.
  • Comparable Breeds: Cocker Spaniel, English Setter
History
  The name "Brittany" is taken from the Brittany region in northwestern France where the dog originated. Images of orange and white Brittany-like dogs hunting and retrieving game were first seen on tapestries and paintings from the 17th century. The first written and verifiable record of Brittanys comes from a hunting description written by Reverend Davies in 1850. He described hunting with small "bobtailed" dogs who pointed and were excellent retrievers. It was around the same time that the modern Brittany is rumored to have been bred by mating with English Setters. The Brittany was first shown at the Paris Dog Show in 1900.
  The Brittany was first recognized as a breed in 1907 when an orange and white male named "Boy" was registered in France. As a result, the first standards were outlined in the same year. America recognized the Brittany in 1931 and the breed was approved by the American Kennel Club in 1934. In 1982 the "Spaniel" was officially dropped from the name.


Personality
  Brittanys are happy and alert. As befits a pointing breed, they are curious and independent, but respond well to their people and want to please them. They can be singleminded when it comes to birds, but when they're not focused on their feathered prey, they enjoy spending time with their people, especially if they're doing something active. Brittanys are not just energetic, they're smart, so they needs loads of exercise and mental stimulation each day. When it comes to training, be consistent but never harsh.
  Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner. Always meet at least one of the parents — usually the mother is the one who's available — to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.
  Like every dog, Brittanys need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Brittany puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog. Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.


Health
  Brittanys are generally healthy and hardy dogs. The median lifespan for Brittanys in France is 12.6 years.A UK Kennel Club survey puts the breed's median lifespan at 12 years 11 months, with about 1 in 5 dogs dying of old age at an average of 14–15 years.Brittanys have no undercoat and need minimal grooming or bathing. However, their floppy ears tend to trap moisture in the ear canal and should be cleaned regularly.
  Diseases found in the breed include Hip dysplasia, with 14.9% of Brittanys tested between 1974 and 2009 by the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals displaying the condition, and a lesser rate of 10.3% for dogs born 2003-2004. The breed is listed among those commonly affected by Canine discoid lupus erythematosus. Epilepsy is also found, with owners of affected dogs encouraged to submit DNA to the UC Davis Veterinary Genetics Lab's ongoing project on Brittany and canine health.

Care
  Mental and physical exercise are very important for the Brittany, as the breed is strong and tough by nature. One need not spend a great deal of time on coat maintenance, though. Brushing a Brittany dog once or twice a week is all that is needed. Brittanys are also quite adaptable to living in temperate weather outdoors.

Living Conditions
  The Brittany is not recommended for apartment life. They are very active indoors and will do best with acreage. This breed is resistant to cold and damp conditions.

Exercise
  Brittanys need and love extensive exercise and have great stamina. They should be taken on a long, brisk daily walk or jog and need an active owner.

Grooming
  The Brittany’s flat or wavy coat has a little feathering on the legs and belly, and it’s easy to care for with a weekly brushing. His coat sheds moderately, but regular brushing will keep loose hair off your floor, furniture and clothing. A bath is necessary only when he gets dirty.

  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every couple of weeks, and brush his teeth for good overall health and fresh breath.


Children and other pets
  Brittanys are a good choice for a family with active children, but their energy level might be overwhelming for toddlers.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Brittanys enjoy the company of other dogs and can also get along fine with cats, especially if they're introduced at an early age.

Did You Know?
  Brittanies are hunting dogs, but don’t skip this breed if you’re not a hunter; they also excel at canine sports, including agility, flyball and obedience, and enjoy running, hiking and playing fetch with their people.


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Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Everything about your Afgan Hound

Everything about your Afgan Hound
  The Afghan Hound is considered an aristocratic sighthound. Tall and slender with a long, narrow, refined head, silky topknot and powerful jaws, the back part of the head and skull are quite prominent. The muzzle is slightly convex and the nose is black. The Afghan has little or no stop, which is the transition area from backskull to muzzle. The teeth should meet in a level or scissors bite. The dark eyes are almond shaped. The ears lie flat to the head. The neck is long and strong. The height at the withers should be almost level and the abdomen well tucked up. The hipbones are quite prominent. The front legs are strong and straight and the feet are large and covered with long hair. The tail has a curl or ring at the tip, but is not carried over the back. The long, rich, silky coat is most often the color of sand with a darker face and ear fringes, though all colors are permitted. White markings, however, are discouraged.

Overview
  The Afghan is built along greyhound-like lines, enabling it to execute a double-suspension gallop and run-down fleet game. The comparatively short back and steep pelvis helped it to leap great heights and to turn almost in place, essential attributes for coursing in rocky mountainous terrain. The large feet gave it a better foothold and were more resistant to injury on rough ground. The silky coat protected the dog from cold nights at high altitudes.   The Afghan appears dignified and aloof, with an exotic expression and proud carriage. This dog's gait shows great elasticity and spring; the Afghan moves with its head and tail high. 
  Despite its glamorous reputation, the Afghan hound is a hunter at heart, bred to chase down game over rugged terrain. While it maintains its regal bearings inside, it needs a daily chance to stretch its legs in a safe area. Its worst trait is a reluctance to come when called. It will chase small animals outside; inside, it will coexist peacefully. Though gentle with children, it may not be playful and interactive enough with them. Described by some as "catlike," it is independent yet sensitive and not overly demonstrative. It is reserved with strangers; some can be timid. It has a gay, clownish side.

Highlights
  • Grooming is essential. Only those who really enjoy grooming, or are willing to pay a professional groomer to do it, should consider an Afghan Hound.
  • The Afghan's natural hunting instinct prompts him to chase prey (the neighbor's cat, your son's rabbit, the third grade class hamster, etc.).
  • The Afghan Hound can be challenging to train due to his independent nature. Training can take a long time and requires patience. House training can be difficult. This breed can continue having accidents in the house up to about six months of age.
  • The Afghan Hound has a low pain tolerance. A minor wound is more bothersome to this breed than to other breeds, and this dog can sometimes seem whiny or babyish.
  • Afghan Hounds are sensitive and high-spirited and do not respond well to rough handling-so be gentle.
  • Although this particular breed is usually good and even loving with children, it is best if the puppy grows up with the children he'll live with and the children are mature enough to understand the importance of being considerate of this dog's sensitive nature.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Afghan’s coat can be any color or combination of colors, including black and tan.
  • The comedic actor Zeppo Marx was an early fan of the Afghan, importing two from Britain in 1931.
  • The Afghan Hound stands out for his distant gaze; long, silky topknot; beautiful coat; prominent hipbones; large feet; and ring tail.
  • Afghan Hounds won Best in Show at Westminster in 1957 and 1983.
Breed standards
AKC group: Hound
UKC group: Sighthound and Pariah
Average lifespan: 12 - 14 years
Average size: 50 - 64 pounds
Coat appearance: Thick, fine, silky
Coloration: Red, off-white, black
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Other identifiers: Tall and slender with long, thin heads and defined skull bone; powerful jawline with black nose and long, outward muzzle; black, almond-shaped eyes; strong neck and flat ears; scooped abdomen, elongated tail, thick, furry and slick coat; lengthy front and hind legs
Possible alterations: May have white markings; coat is kept long with face exposed
Comparable Breeds: American Foxhound, Anatolian Shepherd Dog



History 
  The Afghan Hound is from Afghanistan, but little is known of his early history or how long he has existed. A drawing of one of the dogs, sent home by Thomas Duer Broughton while he was in India in 1809, was published in a book of letters in 1813, so the breed has certainly been around for more than 200 years and likely very much longer. Studies of the canine genome indicate that the Afghan descends from one of the oldest types of dogs.
The dogs in Afghanistan were found in several different types, depending on the region they were from. Dogs from mountainous areas were more compact with darker, heavier coats, while desert-dwelling dogs were more rangy, with coats that were lighter in both color and volume. They were used to course fast-running game such as deer and antelope, as well as hares, wolves and jackals. Hunting in partnership with falcons, they flushed quail and partridges for the falcon to bring down or the hunter to shoot.
  British military officers brought the dogs to the West after being posted to the India-Afghanistan border. The dogs died out in Europe during World War I because food shortages limited the breeding and keeping of dogs, but breeding began again in 1920 when some desert-type Afghans were imported to Scotland by people who had been stationed in Baluchistan. Some of the mountain-type dogs were sent from Kabul to England in 1925.   During the same decade, Americans imported some of the Afghans from Britain. The American Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1926, but the Afghan Hound Club of America wasn’t formed until 1937. Today the Afghan ranks 86th among the breeds registered by the AKC.



Personality
  The Afghan Hound is typically a one-person or one-family dog. Do not look for this hound to eagerly greet your guests. More likely, he will offend them by being indifferent to their presence. While some hounds may bark once or twice when a stranger enters the home, this breed is not known to be a good watchdog.
  The independent thinking of the Afghan makes it a challenge to train. This hound is generally not motivated by food and does not possess as strong a desire to please as many other breeds . Though the Afghan makes a stunning presentation in the show ring, for example, more than one professional handler has been embarrassed in the ring by a refusal to cooperative. Even so, this breed is known for outperforming other breeds when the decision to do so is his own.
  Rough handling can cause this dog to become withdrawn or mildly antagonistic. Gentle handling, kindness, and patience work best with this breed, along with an understanding that there will be times when the dog simply will not cooperate.

Health
  The Afghan Hound, which has an average lifespan of 12 to 14 years, is not susceptible to any major health concerns. It should be noted that the breed can suffer from tail injuries and reacts to barbiturate anesthesia. Health ailments like canine hip dysplasia (CHD), cataract and necrotic myelopathy are also occasionally seen in the breed. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may run hip and eye exams on the dog.

Care
  This perfect house dog requires careful brushing and combing of its coat. Special care should be given at the time when the dog sheds its puppy coat. The Afghan Hound also requires daily exercise such as a long walk or a short sprint. In fact, this hound loves to run at a fast pace in small areas. Afghan Hound lovers should make it a point to provide the dog outdoor access and a nice, soft bed.

Living Conditions
  The Afghan Hound is not recommended for apartment life. They are relatively inactive indoors and do best with acreage. This breed can live in or outdoors, although it would be happier sleeping indoors.

Exercise
  The Afghan Hound needs to be taken on a long daily walk or jog. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as in a dog's mind the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human. Dogs that do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display behavior problems. Teach them to enter and exit door and gateways after the humans. They will also enjoy running free in an open, fenced, safe area.

Grooming
  The Afghan Hound has long, thick, silky hair with a fine texture. The coat does not need to be clipped or trimmed; the dog wears it in all its glory. The finishing touch is a topknot of long, silky hair.
  Grooming is an essential part of living with an Afghan. Plan to brush and comb the Afghan Hound’s thick, silky hair three times a week to prevent or remove mats and tangles, and bathe him as needed. You may want to invest in a professional dog blow dryer if you bathe him frequently.
  The Afghan sheds moderately. The more often you brush him, the less hair you will have falling off the dog and onto your floors, furniture and clothing.
The rest is basic care. Trim the nails at least monthly, and keep the long, hanging ears clean and dry to prevent infections. At mealtime, you’ll probably want to put the ears up in a snood to keep them from dragging in the food dish. Good dental hygiene is also important. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.

Is this breed right for you?
  The Afghan Hound is a playful pup who needs and loves a lot of exercise. Great companions with a love of the outdoors, Afghan Hounds need a home that will give them plenty of space to stretch their legs. Best as one person's pet or as the only pet of the family with older children, Afghan Hounds will need an owner that can devote plenty of time to grooming their long, beautiful, thick coat.

Children and other pets
  The Afghan's independent nature and large size make him best suited as an adult companion. The Afghan is not likely to want to follow around and play with children. In fact, a child's quick movements and noise level can startle the Afghan. With proper socialization, though, the Afghan can adjust to life in a family with children and be loving and with them.
  The Afghan tends to most enjoy the company of his own kind-other Afghan Hounds. The Afghan will tolerate, even be indifferent, to other pets in a household. Not surprisingly, the Afghan's hunter's instinct leads him to chase small animals, especially if they run away.

In popular culture
  Because of its distinctive appearance, the Afghan hound has been represented in animated feature films and TV shows, including Universal Pictures' Balto (Sylvie), Disney's Lady and the Tramp II (Ruby), and Brainy Barker from Krypto the Superdog, an Afghan hound also appeared on 101 Dalmatians as well as in 102 Dalmatians as one of the dogs in Cruella De Vil's party and the television series What-a-Mess (Prince Amir of Kinjan; based on children's books by Frank Muir) and, as Prissy in the 1961 Disney animated film One Hundred and One Dalmatians and 101 Dalmatians II: Patch's London Adventure. Afghan hounds have also been featured in television advertisements and in fashion magazines. The Afghan hound is represented in books as well, including being featured in a series of mystery novels by Nina Wright (Abra), and a talking Afghan Hound in David Rothman's The Solomon Scandals (2008, Twilight Times Books). In the novel Between the Acts, Virginia Woolf uses an Afghan hound (named Sohrab) to represent aspects of one of the book's human characters.
  On August 3, 2005, Korean scientist Hwang Woo-Suk announced that his team of researchers had become the first team to successfully clone a dog, an Afghan Hound named Snuppy. In 2006 Hwang Woo-Suk was dismissed from his university position for fabricating data in his research. Snuppy, nonetheless, was a genuine clone, and thus the first cloned dog in history.
  The Afghan Hound features prominently in the avant-garde music video of popular French band M83's, "Set in Stone ."

Did You Know?
  British military officers brought this breed to the West after being posted to the India-Afghanistan border.

A dream day in the life of an Afghan Hound
  Waking up early in the morning with a bowl of chow, the Afghan Hound is ready and waiting for his morning grooming session. After a good brushing, he's yearning to get out and explore the outside world. He'll chase squirrels right off the property while his owner applauds, and after a few laps around the backyard, he'll engage in a wonderful game of play with his master. Going inside for a nice nap, he'll sleep at his owner's feet as he's lovingly brushed down for the second time that day. Another few runs in the yard and the Afghan Hound will happily snuggle down in his dog bed.
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Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Grooming Your Dog

Grooming Your Dog
  Ever watched your dog roll on the ground, lick her coat or chew at a mat on her fur? These are her ways of keeping clean. Sometimes, though, she’ll need a little extra help from her friend to look her best.  
  Regular grooming is very important. It keeps your dog clean, healthy, and manageable, as well as preventing yeast infections caused by matted hair, periodontal disease caused by uncared for teeth, ear infections from excessive buildup of wax, dirt and bacteria, etc. This article covers basic at-home grooming and ways to make the process more pleasant for everyone involve.
Grooming sessions should always be fun, so be sure to schedule them when your dog’s relaxed, especially if she’s the excitable type. Until your pet is used to being groomed, keep the sessions short-just 5 to 10 minutes. Gradually lengthen the time until it becomes routine for your dog. You can help her get comfortable with being touched and handled by making a habit of petting every single part of your dog, including such potentially sensitive areas as the ears, tail, belly, back and feet.
  Brushing your dog's teeth prevents all kinds of unpleasant health problems that have nothing to do with dog breath. Keeping nails trimmed allows your dog to move around comfortably. Cutting any hair that falls into the eye can prevent eye irritatation; keeping ear hair trimmed can help prevent ear infections.
  There's also the cleanliness factor. Bathing keeps dirt from being tracked all over your home. Grooming alleviates fleas, which can cause health problems for both you and your dog. Trimmed nails won't mark your flooring.

Basic tools
Any pet supply store will stock the basic grooming supplies you'll need:
  • Brush
  • Nail clipper
  • Shampoo
  • Flea control
  • Dog toothpaste and toothbrush
  Depending on your dog's coat, you'll need a specific type of brush or a flea comb, most of which are available at good pet supply stores. Certain flea prevention products and toothpastes are only available at your veterinarian's office. If you're not sure which tools are best for your dog, a talk with your vet will help you get started.

Brushing
  Regular grooming with a brush or comb will help keep your pet’s hair in good condition by removing dirt, spreading natural oils throughout her coat, preventing tangles and keeping her skin clean and irritant-free. And grooming time’s a great time to check for fleas and flea dirt--those little black specks that indicate your pet is playing host to a flea family.

  If your dog has a smooth, short coat (like that of a chihuahua, boxer or basset hound), you only need to brush once a week:

  • First, use a rubber brush to loosen dead skin and dirt.
  • Next, use a bristle brush to remove dead hair.
  • Now, polish your low-maintenance pooch with a chamois cloth and she’s ready to shine!
  If your dog has short, dense fur that’s prone to matting, like that of a retriever, here’s your weekly routine:
  • Use a slicker brush to remove tangles.
  • Next, catch dead hair with a bristle brush.
  • Don’t forget to comb her tail.
If your dog has a long, luxurious coat, such as that of a Yorkshire terrier, she’ll need daily attention:
  • Every day you’ll need to remove tangles with a slicker brush.
  • Gently tease mats out with a slicker brush.
  • Next, brush her coat with a bristle brush.
  • If you have a long-haired dog with a coat like a collie’s or an Afghan hound’s, follow the steps above, and also be sure to comb through the fur and trim the hair around the hocks and feet.
Bathing
The ASPCA recommends bathing your dog every 3 months or so; your pet may require more frequent baths in the summertime if she spends lots of time with your outdoors. Always use a mild shampoo that’s safe to use on dogs, and follow these easy steps:
  • First, give your pet a good brushing to remove all dead hair and mats.
  • Place a rubber bath mat in the bathtub to provide secure footing, and fill the tub with about 3 to 4 inches of lukewarm water.
  • Use a spray hose to thoroughly wet your pet, taking care not to spray directly in her ears, eyes or nose. If you don’t have a spray hose, a large plastic pitcher or unbreakable cup will do.
  • Gently massage in shampoo, working from head to tail.
  • Thoroughly rinse with a spray hose or pitcher; again, avoid the ears, eyes and nose.
  • Check the ears for any foul odors or excessive debris; if you choose to use a cleansing solution on a cotton ball, take care not to insert it into the ear canal.
  • Dry your pet with a large towel or blow dryer, but carefully monitor the level of heat.
Please note: Some animals seem to think that bathtime is a perfect time to act goofy. Young puppies especially will wiggle and bounce all over the place while you try to brush them, and tend to nip at bathtime. If this sounds like your pet, put a toy that floats in the tub with her so she can focus on the toy rather than on mouthing you.

Steps
1.Gather all necessary supplies before beginning to groom the dog. Make sure you have all you need to clean eyes and ears, trim nails and/or hair, brush teeth, bathe, and dry.

2. Always brush your dog first, and do it thoroughly. Mats enlarge and become unmanageable when wet. If a mat goes undetected or coat care is neglected, you may have to shave or cut out the mat so that bacteria doesn't grow between it and the skin and cause a yeast infection. Severe matting can also pull the skin from the muscle! Short-haired dogs will probably only need to be brushed over with a curry brush or glove, while medium- to long-coated dogs may require special tools like a slicker, a pin brush, or an undercoat rake. Whatever you use, it must effectively remove loose hair and distribute oils from the skin throughout the coat.
  • Start by brushing the dog's coat. Begin on his neck and move down his body, under his belly, and on his tail.
  • If you want, you may use a human comb or hair brush. Stroke his coat gently with it to make the hairs lie flat.
  • When you are finished, praise your dog and give him a treat or two for standing still.
3. Follow with any necessary clipping or other grooming that needs to be done before the bath. For example, trim out any mats or large amounts of hair that will only waste your time shampooing and drying. Dogs look best when groomed after they are bathed and blow-dried.
  • Eyes - Some breeds require more maintenance in this area than others. While it may be a simple matter of pulling eye debris away from a potentially irritating spot in the corner of the eye, long-haired or white-haired dogs may require special attention to make sure that all gunk is truly out of the coat. There are products made specially for removing "tear stains" from a white coat available in many pet supply stores or catalogs. A healthy eye should be clear and should not show any signs of irritation or unusual discharge. Your vet can cut or trim the hair around the eyes for you, which can cause tear stains (do not attempt to try this yourself).
  • Ears - A clean ear may contain some wax and shouldn't have any particular smell to it. Warm any cleaner or medication in a container of body temperature water (as you would a baby bottle) before you put it in the ear. Cold is painful in the ear canal. A few drops of warmed rubbing alcohol will dry water from the ear canal and kill bacteria, yeast and mites. To clean your dog's ears, apply some ear cleaning solution to a cotton ball and simply wipe dirt and wax away from the inner ear. Don't rub vigorously as to cause sores, and don't travel too far into the ear; both could cause damage. And don't expect your dog to like the process; you may be met with some resistance. When you're done wiping out the ear with a damp cotton ball or cloth, gently dry it out with a dry one. If your dog's ear looks swollen, red, irritated, dark or blackened, shows signs of discharge or sores, or smells really bad, call your veterinarian. This is not normal and could be signaling an infection or disease.
  • Teeth - According to veterinarians, about 80% of dogs have periodontal disease. Ouch! If plaque is continually digested on a larger than normal scale, it can cause kidney or liver troubles. And how unbelievably painful can you imagine suffering through teeth rotting out of your head to be? Double ouch! Try to brush your dog's teeth at least 2 to 3 times a week, or use "PetzLife" antimicrobial spray if you don't have time or your dog is particularly resistant to the idea. Use only those products made specifically for dogs so that you don't unintentionally poison your dog. You can use gauze over your finger or a toothbrush, or there are more advanced and effective products available. For example pets tooth brush is a surgical glove with bristles attached to the thumb and forefinger. But either way, ease your dog into the process so that it can be a pleasant experience rather than a stressful one and you don't get yourself bitten. Pets will usually prefer human touch rather than a hard plastic brush. If your dog already has a considerable buildup of tartar and plaque, veterinary cleaning may be needed. Some dogs will let you scrape the tartar if you are brave enough to try it. Just purchase a dental scraper and be gentle. Otherwise, brushing or spraying about 3 times weekly supplemented with the occasional frozen raw bone (acquired at any butcher or deli) should be enough for maintenance. Remember that you should not use human toothpaste on your pets. Pets will swallow the toothpaste and may get sick. There are several pet toothpaste products available, just be sure that whatever you use is specifically approved for pets.
  • Nails - If left uncared for, nails can grow to enormous lengths, twisting the toe and causing a pained, irregular gait that can lead to skeletal damage, sometimes even curling into the pads of the foot. To keep your dog's nails short, clip them regularly. Depending on the dog, you may need to do it as often as once a week or as infrequently as once a month. To clip the nails, trim a very small amount of nail (like 1/16 of an inch) away with a pair of dog nail clippers (unless it is a very young puppy or very small dog, in which case human clippers may suffice). Should you accidentally clip too much nail away and hit a blood vessel, styptic powder or corn starch applied with a bit of pressure should stop any bleeding.
4. Get your dog into the tub and, if necessary, secure to something such as a suction cup-type bath lead to keep him or her in place. Some dogs are frightened by the sound of running water - if this is the case, you need to desensitize the dog to the sound. Filling a tub with water and using it for bathing just leaves your dog sitting in dirty bath water. The regular collar should be off and replaced with one that will not stain the coat or be damaged by water to restrain the dog in the tub. Do not put on the dog's regular collar until late in the day (if you bathe in the morning or early afternoon) or the next day (if you bathe in the evening). A collar can cause sores around the neck of a dog who is not fully dry.

5. Thoroughly wet down your dog. If you have a medium or large dog, or one with a double coat, a water pressurizer attached to the hose or a hose attachment for the sink, bath spout, or shower head can help you clean all parts of your dog's body with ease. Just don't force the dog if the noise hurts its ears. Desensitize it to the sound of running water so it won't be frightened.

6. Begin shampooing at the neck and move downward. Shampoos will always be easier to apply and rinse off if diluted. It's better to give 2 diluted shampoos that rinse thoroughly than one strong shampoo that leaves residue. When you are shampooing a certain area, give it a few squirts and use your hand to spread the shampoo. For double coated dogs, a curry brush such as the Kong Zoom Groom will help you work the shampoo into the coat, especially long-haired dogs cannot simply be scrubbed with a curry. They will need to have the shampoo worked into the hair by smoothing it into a length of coat and continuing like that over the dog, or you will pay in gigantic mats. Save the head for last, and don't actually use soap around the ears and eyes. Be careful around the nose and mouth too.

7. Thoroughly rinse your dog. As long as you see dirt or soap bubbles in the water coming off of an area, keep spraying, then move on. Shampoo left in the coat will cause hot spots, an irritating spot of bald, itchy, red skin.

8. Towel dry your dog as best as you can. If your dog has a very short coat or you prefer to let your dog's coat dry naturally, you're done. If you have a double coated or long-haired dog, keep reading.

  • Blow dry the dog as best as you can without completely drying him or her. You don't want to dry out the skin. If you have a dog with especially long hair, you may need to dry the coat while brushing it.
  • Dogs with curly coats like poodles and Bichons need to be dried thoroughly or the hair will revert to curl. Feet always need to be dried thoroughly as well or fungus may take hold.
  • When blow drying your dogs hair make sure that the blow dryer is on the cool setting! It may take longer than usual, but it's worth the time because there will be less of a chance your dog's hair and skin will dry out.

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Everything about your Dalmatian

Everything about your Dalmatian
  Consider this breed if you are an active person who can provide plenty of training, socialization, and opportunities for hearty exercise.
  The Dalmatian we know today comes from a long line of “coach dogs,” bred to chase horse-drawn carriages day and night. They are tough, dependable and have an incredible stamina. If you’re a cross-country runner or daily jogger, you may have met your match: Dalmatians can keep up with the most intense runners. And for those who live on a ranch or farm, Dalmatians have an instinctive calming effect on horses that goes back to their carriage-guarding days.
  Best known as the star of Disney's 101 Dalmatians, this sleek and athletic dog breed has a history that goes back several hundred years. He started out as a coach dog but has also served in many other capacities, including hunter, firehouse dog, and circus performer. As charming in life as in film, he goes from gallant to goofy to gallant again in the blink of an eye, and loves to be a part of everything his family does.
  Unique spots are the Dalmatian’s calling card, but his running ability is what made him famous. Bred to be a coaching dog, he ran alongside carriages or horseback riders for miles, discouraging stray dogs from interfering with the horses, alerting the coachman to the presence of approaching highwaymen, and guarding the carriage at rest stops. No fashionable lord or lady went driving without a pair of the flashy dogs by their side, and later the Dalmatian’s talents were adapted by firemen, who kept the dogs to clear paths through town for their horse-drawn fire engines.
  The Dalmatian has a romantic and exciting history — not to mention those spots! — but he has health and temperament issues that must be taken into account.

Overview
  One of the most recognizable breeds, the Dalmatian is the only spotted breed. Its exact origin is unknown. The modern Dalmatian was recognized in the 1800s as a carriage dog in the U.K. Now he is well-known as a firehouse mascot, circus performer, hunter, patriotic symbol and all-around great catch. Active and enjoying anything to do with running, this breed is a lovable pet for a family that can keep up with his energetic lifestyle.
  Well-trained and socialized Dalmatians can prove to be both gentle and gentlemanly, displaying good manners and a quiet demeanor, even around strangers. However, they do have a boisterous side that comes from their incredible energy and stamina. For this reason, they may not be the best pets around very small children. But their intentions are always good and they make superb playmates for older children. They also have keen protective instincts that make them very effective guard dogs.

Other Quick Facts
  • Because of their heritage as coaching dogs, Dalmatians get along well with horses and make good companions for riders.
  • The Dalmatian’s spots may be the result of a mutation in a gene for a ticked coat, but no one is really sure where they come from. The spots today are now larger and less ragged around the edges than those seen in pictures of early Dalmatians.
  • One of the British nicknames for the Dalmatian is Plum Pudding Dog, because his spots look like the plums in a Christmas pudding.
  • The Dalmatian is prone to inherited deafness and urinary stones.
  • The Dalmatian was once a popular circus dog.
History
  The Dalmatian's origins are unknown. The spotted dogs are known to have traveled with the nomadic bands of Romanies, sometimes called gypsies, and it's unclear where they may have first appeared. The Dalmatian obtained his name during his stay in Dalmatia, a province on the eastern shore of the Adriatic Sea, the area that is now known as Croatia.

  Dalmatians have been utilized for a variety of jobs during their long history, never specializing in one area. They were used as guard dogs in Dalmatia, shepherds, ratters, retrievers, circus dogs, and coaching dogs.

  It was in England that the Dalmatian was developed as the definitive coaching dog. He was used to clear a path before the horses, run alongside the coach or under the coach between the axels. He guarded the horses and coach when they were at rest. To this day the Dalmatian has a natural affinity for horses.
  This affinity took the Dalmatian on a different career path in the United States. Here he became a firehouse dog, running with the horses to the fire, watching over the equipment during a fire, and sometimes even rescuing people from burning buildings. When the excitement was over, they accompanied the fire wagons back to the station and resumed their duty as watchdog. Today most Dalmatians are companions and family members but many firehouses across the country still have Dalmatians as mascots.

Breed at a glance
  • Black spots
  • Energetic
  • Devoted
  • Protective
  • Intelligent
Breed standards
AKC group: Non-sporting
UKC group: Companion
Average lifespan: 11 -14 years
Average size: 50 - 55 pounds
Coat appearance: Velvety and soft
Coloration: White with black spots
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Athletic, squarish body; deep chest; strong, upright and tapered tail; black or dark-colored nose; toenails are white or black
Possible alterations: Born white, spots develop later; spots can vary in color from brown to brindle; 10 - 15 percent are born deaf and require special training
Comparable Breeds: Brittany, Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
Is this breed right for you?
  A hyperactive and devoted breed, the athletic Dalmatian requires a home equipped with a large yard. Due to his playful nature, he will need firm training and leadership to avoid acting out. Attached to his owner, the Dalmatian needs a lot of companionship and love to maintain his happiness. Enjoying running, it's advised the breed be run for long periods of time, daily. If not given the proper amount of exercise, he will display erratic behavior with family members. Due to this, it's advised that he is brought into a family with older children. A great watchdog, any owner that can handle his energetic personality will find a lot of love in having a Dalmatian as a family pet.

The Look of a Dalmatian
  Dalmatians are lean, medium-sized, well-proportioned dogs with distinctive black spots on white. Their muzzles are strong, eyes deeply set and their soft ears are set somewhat high. They have strong, arched necks, deep chests and level backs. Their tails extend out from their backs and curl up slightly without carrying over their backs, and they have long, well-muscled legs with round feet. Their coats are short, dense and sleek. Puppies are born solid white and develop black spots as they get older. Overall, Dalmatians have a dignified, powerful and alert posture with a steady gait.

Personality
  Born to run, the Dalmatian is a high-energy dog with an endless capacity for exercise. He loves attention and has a strong desire to please, making him easy to train through positive reinforcement such as food rewards, praise, and play.
  He's a smart dog with a sly sense of humor, and will do his best to make you laugh. The Dalmatian is alert and interested in everything that goes on around him and makes an excellent watchdog.
  Like every dog, the Dalmatian needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Dalmatian puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

Care
 The Dalmatian is a very active dog and needs plenty of exercise. He's a fast runner with a great deal of stamina. If left to his own devices a Dalmatian will head cross country on a jaunt that could last several days, so always exercise him on leash or in a secure area. Dalmatians thrive with human companionship and do not do well if relegated to the backyard. They should have plenty of time with their family or they will pine.
  Because of his unique uric acid metabolism, it's important to observe whether your Dalmatian is urinating regularly. For the same reason, be sure to provide him with easy access to fresh water all the time.

Health
  All dogs have the potential to develop genetic health problems, just as all people have the potential to inherit disease. Run from any breeder who does not offer a health guarantee on puppies, who tells you that the breed has no known problems, or who tells you that her puppies are isolated from the main part of the household for health reasons. A reputable breeder will be honest and open about health problems in the breed and the incidence with which they occur.
  Among the health problems in Dalmatians is a unique uric acid metabolism that predisposes them to stones anywhere in the urinary tract. The stones can cause urinary blockages, most commonly in males. It’s essential to notice whether a Dalmatian is urinating regularly and to provide him with plenty of fresh water at all times. Dalmatians are also prone to genetic deafness. All puppies should be BAER (Brainstem Auditory Evoked Response) tested to make sure they can hear. The Dalmatian Club of America has a foundation that sponsors grants and activities to aid research to reduce deafness and find a solution for the uric acid stone problem.
  Dalmations are also prone to allergies, skin conditions, eye problems and laryngeal paralysis.
  Not all of these conditions are detectable in a growing puppy, and it is impossible to predict whether an animal will be free of these maladies, which is why you must find a reputable breeder who is committed to breeding the healthiest animals possible.  They should be able to produce independent certification that the parents of the dog (and grandparents, etc.) have been screened for common defects and deemed healthy for breeding.
  Remember that after you’ve taken a new puppy into your home, you have the power to protect him from one of the most common health problems: obesity. Keeping a Dalmatian at an appropriate weight is one of the easiest ways to extend his life. Make the most of your preventive abilities to help ensure a healthier dog for life.

The Basics of Dalmatian Grooming
  On the plus side, the Dalmatian’s short, fine, velvety-smooth coat is easy to groom. Brush it several times a week with a bristle brush, rubber curry brush, hound mitt, or pumice stone to strip out the dead hair and keep the coat gleaming.
  On the down side, the coat sheds day and night according to many experienced Dalmatian owners. Be prepared to live with dog hair if you choose this breed.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Keep the hanging ears clean and dry to prevent bacterial or yeast infections from setting in. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children and other pets
  Just about every kid recognizes a Dalmatian on sight. His love of activity makes the Dalmatian a great playmate for older children, but his rambunctious nature and swishing tail may be overwhelming to toddlers and young children. With early socialization, Dalmatians can get along fine with other dogs and cats.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.

In popular culture
"Firehouse dog"
  Particularly in the United States, the use of Dalmatians as carriage dogs was transferred to horse-drawn fire engines, although it is unclear why this link was not made in other countries. Today, the Dalmatian serves as a firehouse mascot and is sometimes used to educate the public in fire safety, but in the days of horse-drawn fire carts, they provided a valuable service, having a natural affinity to horses. They would run alongside the horses, or beneath the cart axles. The horses have long since gone, but the Dalmatians, by tradition, have stayed. As a result, in the United States, Dalmatians are commonly known as firehouse dogs. Dalmatians are still chosen by many firefighters as pets, in honor of their heroism in the past. The Dalmatian is also the mascot of the Pi Kappa Alpha International Fraternity. In the past, Pi Kappa Alpha has been known as the firefighters fraternity, and this is why they both share the dalmatian as a mascot.

"Anheuser-Busch dog"
  The Dalmatian is also associated, particularly in the United States, with Budweiser beer and the Busch Gardens theme parks, since the Anheuser-Busch company's iconic beer wagon, drawn by a team of Clydesdale horses, is always accompanied by a Dalmatian carriage dog. The company maintains several teams at various locations, which tour extensively. According to Anheuser-Busch's website, Dalmatians were historically used by brewers to guard the wagon while the driver was making deliveries.

101 Dalmatians
  The Dalmatian breed experienced a massive surge in popularity as a result of the 1956 novel The Hundred and One Dalmatians written by British author Dodie Smith, and later due to the two Walt Disney films based on the book. The Disney animated classic released in 1961, later spawned a 1996 live-action remake, 101 Dalmatians. In the years following the release of the second movie, the Dalmatian breed suffered greatly at the hands of irresponsible breeders and inexperienced owners. Many well-meaning enthusiasts purchased Dalmatians—often for their children—without educating themselves on the breed and the responsibilities that come with owning such a high-energy dog breed. Dalmatians were abandoned in large numbers by their original owners and left with animal shelters. As a result, Dalmatian rescue organizations sprang up to care for the unwanted dogs and find them new homes. AKC registrations of Dalmatians decreased 90% during the 2000–2010 period.

A dream day in the life of a Dalmatian
  The Dalmatian loves to wake up in the bedroom of his owner. Up and ready for his day, he'll run outside for an action-filled romp in the yard before coming inside to greet the family. After a nice long run, he'll await his next command. Running back and forth indoors and out, the Dalmatian will alternate standing guard and chasing random yard vermin. Barking at any strangers, he'll also enjoy human companionship from his family throughout the day. Once night falls, the Dalmatian will happily snuggle close to his family.


                              


                       Enjoy that  Dalmatian!




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