LUV My dogs: great dane

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Showing posts with label great dane. Show all posts
Showing posts with label great dane. Show all posts

Wednesday, December 27, 2017

Everything about your Irish Dane

Everything about your Irish Dane
  The Irish Dane is a hybrid that is a cross-breed of a Irish Wolfhound and Great Dane and may demonstrate any combination of traits from those two breeds. Hybrids have become very popular in the past few years. They play a big role in the current designer dog trend. 
  The experimentation of these hybrid or designer dogs has not been recognized by the American Kennel Club or Canadian Kennel Club. The key to cross breeding to purebred dogs is what is called hybrid vigor, the breeding resulting in a healthier dog with superior genetic constitution can come from dogs purebred for so long that they have common genetic disorders.

Overview
  Irish Danes are imposing animals with big hearts – literally and figuratively. They are sweet and social creatures with a great appreciation for companionship. They do like to stay active and will seek out opportunities to gallop in open spaces. Irish Danes have a life span of 6 to 10 years and can weigh up to 150 pounds.
   When they are full grown, they can be anywhere between 30 and 35 inches tall. Irish Danes have a harsh, rough, short to medium coat that comes in solid or multi-color combinations of black, white, blue, fawn, silver, gray, red, and cream. They can have various pattern and markings on their coat as well. In terms of large designer breeds, this one fairly established. Even so, Irish Danes can vary widely in appearance and temperament. Accordingly, they are not yet recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC).

Breed standards
Breed Type: Mix
Group: Herding
Average lifespan: 8-10 Years
Average size: 100 to 150 pounds
Coat appearance: Harsh, rough, short to medium
Coloration:  black, tan, brown, red, blue, gray, and white
Hypoallergenic: No

History
  As a hybrid dog the Irish Dane can have any combination of traits and appearances from either parent, the Irish Wolfhound and Great Dane. Hybrids have had a recent surge of popularity in the last twenty years or so, also known as designer dogs. It has caused a huge variation in prices for such dogs and many puppy mills and disreputable breeders are taking advantage of this trend. Therefore be careful from whom you buy. Unlike many designer dogs the Irish Dane actually does have more of a history to them as they were first bred in the 1800s during an attempt to save the Irish Wolfhound.


Temperament
  Though the Irish Dane has an imposing presence, it is anything but scary. Irish Danes are friendly and gentle dogs that love being around others. They will never pass up an opportunity to cuddle and play. Because they are quite social, Irish Danes also do well in multi-pet households. In fact, this breed is prone to separation anxiety if it does not receive enough attention and affection from those around it. The best way to overcome this is to ensure Irish Danes are surrounded by loving people and have a relatively consistent schedule. 
  Beyond this, the Irish Dane inherits a strong hunting impulse and guard dog mentality from its parent breeds. This can make it territorial and weary of strange adults at first. Owners can combat any negative behaviors from these instincts by socializing their Irish Danes early and consistently. Nonetheless, this breed is not known to be aggressive and can be a great family dog in the right environment.

Health
  The best way to ensure you have a healthy dog is to buy from a good breeder and ask to see health clearances for both parents. While there is some argument to hybrid vigor there is a chance in any dog of inheriting the conditions their parents are prone to. In the Irish Dane's case these conditions to be aware of include Development Issues, cancer , bloat, heart problems, surgical issues, Anesthesia Sensitivity, liver problems, Fibrocartilaginous Embolic Myelopathy, OCD, eye problems and joint dysplasia.

Care
  Irish Danes are relatively easy to maintain and do not require heavy grooming. This breed will shed moderately, however, and is not hypoallergenic or suitable for owner with allergies. If your Irish Dane has a particularly long coat, it may benefit from occasional brushing. Either way, Irish Danes only need occasional baths. They should also have their teeth cleaned on a daily basis. Beyond this, Irish Danes should have their nails clipped at least once or twice a month to avoid split or cracked nails and ears clean regularly with a damp cloth to avoid wax build up and infection.

Trainability
  He should be easy to train as he is eager to please and listens to commands and is inclined to obey. In general the Irish Dane will need fewer repetitions than many other dogs so will train quicker. Because of his size it is important to train him in good behavior from a young age when on the leash, as he will be super powerful when he is an adult and you do not want him pulling at you then. Also teach him not to jump up at people. Establish yourself as pack leader and use positive but firm methods of training. Early socialization and training are very important to get a well rounded dog.

Activity Requirements
  Irish Danes have above average levels of energy. They enjoy being active and require quite a bit of daily exercise. This breed loves running and galloping in open spaces, as well as playing with other people and large animals. Owners should aim to provide their Irish Dane with this type of activity about 45 to 90 minutes each day. Beyond this, Irish Dane also like to cuddle with family members and lay around the house. This breed is suited for all types of environments, though it should not be over exercised in extreme hot or cold conditions. Additionally, Irish Danes are not suited for apartment, urban, or suburban living due to their large size. They do best in larger homes with lots of outdoor space.

Grooming 
  The Irish Dane is a low shedding dog and grooming him is quite easy to do. If he has a coat more like the Irish Wolfhound you may need to have it clipped occasionally. Bathe him as he needs it, it is a good idea to train him for this from a young age, as when he is full sized you will not be lifting him in and out of the bath. You could also opt to use the hose in the yard or use a bathing station at a groomers. Make sure you use a dog shampoo. Once a week you need to check his ears and wipe them clean. His teeth should be brushed at least three times a week. His nails may need clipping if he does not naturally keep them worn down.

Children and other animals?
  He is good with children as he has a gentle nature. His size does mean he may knock over small children without meaning too so they may need to be watched. Children should also be taught how to play with him and that things like pulling ears, trying to ride him and messing with his food are not things that are acceptable to do. Irish Danes are also good with other pets if they have been socialized though they can see smaller animals as prey to chase.

Is the Irish Dane the Right Breed for you?
Easy Training: The Irish Dane is known to listen to commands and obey its owner. Expect fewer repetitions when training this breed.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

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Friday, July 7, 2017

Everything about your Dogo Argentino

Everything about your Dogo Argentino
  The Dogo Argentino, also known as the Argentine Mastiff, is a large, white, muscular dog that was developed in Argentina primarily for the purpose of big-game hunting, including wild boar; the breeder, Antonio Nores Martínez, also wanted a dog that would exhibit steadfast bravery and willingly protect its human companion. It was first bred in 1928, from the Cordoba Fighting Dog along with a wide array of other breeds including the Great Dane.

Overview
  Dogo Argentinos have powerfully built well-muscled bodies. Their large heads are equipped with extremely powerful jaws designed to bite and hold on to large prey. Their necks have an abundance of skin designed to protect their necks when hunting dangerous game. The Dogo’s coat is pure white and any colored markings are considered a fault.
  Despite their imposing appearance, Dogos are in fact extremely gentle and loving. They are highly devoted to their masters and will willingly risk their lives to protect their human owners. Unfortunately, they are banned in certain countries like Ukraine, Iceland, Australia and Singapore.

Other Quick Facts:
  • The Dogo Argentino can weight upwards of 80 pounds
  • This breed was traditionally used to hunt big game in Argentina. 
Breed standards
AKC group: Working

UKC group: Guardian Dog

Average lifespan: 10 to 12 years
Coat appearance: Short
Coloration: White
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, houses with yards, farms/rural areas houses
Temperament: Intelligent, loyal, protective, friendly
Comparable Breeds: American Bulldog, Boxer

History
  In 1928, Antonio Nores Martinez, a medical doctor, professor and surgeon, set out to breed a big game hunting dog that was also capable of being a loyal pet and guard dog. Antonio Martinez picked the Cordoba Fighting Dog to be the base for the breed. 
  This breed is extinct today, but it was said that as a large and ferocious dog, it was a great hunter. Martinez crossed it with the Great Dane, Boxer, Spanish Mastiff, Old English Bulldog, Bull Terrier, Great Pyrenees, Pointer, Irish Wolfhound and Dogue de Bordeaux. Nores Martinez continued to develop the breed via selective breeding to introduce the desired traits.

Personality
  The Dogo Argentino is an amiable, outgoing, powerful breed that should never be aggressive towards people. It was bred to be gentle and protective of family members, especially children. However, it also was bred to be a strong, tenacious, fearless hunter of large, dangerous prey. These qualities are sometimes in conflict, although this breed has a remarkable instinctive ability to separate its ferociousness from its friendliness. Dogos can make excellent companions for active, experienced dog owners. Some Dogos – especially intact males – are assertive, overbearing and territorial around other dogs.   However, the breed generally has a kind and loving disposition and is gentle at home, easily making the transition from hunter to companion. Dogos are terrific watchdogs, being protective and loyal to their family without showing overly-aggressive behavior. A properly-socialized Dogo Argentino makes friends easily but reacts instantly to threatening or challenging behavior from friend or foe. This breed will usually try to assert itself as Alpha over other animals and people. It is important that a clear hierarchy be established within the household so that all people and pets can coexist harmoniously.

Health
  As in the Dalmatian, white Boxer, and the white Bull Terrier, the dogo may experience pigment-related deafness. There is possibility of an approximate 10% deafness rate overall with some dogos afflicted uniaurally (one deaf ear) and some binaurally (deaf in both ears). Studies have shown that the incidence of deafness is drastically reduced when the only breeding stock used is that with bilaterally normal hearing.

Hunting and legality
  While the Dogo Argentino was bred primarily from the extinct Cordoba Fighting Dog, it was bred to be a cooperative hunter, i.e. to accompany other catch dogs and bay dogs on the hunt without fighting with the other dogs. Aggressive traits inherent in the Cordoban Dog were specifically bred out to enable a stable cooperative nature in a pack. However, in areas where illegal dog fighting continues, the Dogo Argentino has been used for fighting due to its fearless nature and great stamina. Dogos of these lines are not suited for big game hunting, unlike the original Dogo Argentino.
  The Dogo Argentino is banned in certain countries including Ukraine, Denmark, Iceland, Fiji,Australia, Singapore and the Cayman Islands. In the United Kingdom, under the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991, it is illegal to own a Dogo Argentino without lawful authority.

Living Conditions
  This breed will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised and does best with at least an average-sized yard. Be sure to bring the Dogo inside when temperatures drop below freezing.

Training
  Dogos are incredibly intelligent and are quick learners. They respond well to training when it is done consistently, gently and with positive reinforcement. When given praise, rewards and affection for proper behavior, Dogos quickly learn what is expected of them. When scolded, yelled at or punished harshly, Dogos tend to withdraw and become stubborn or unresponsive. They can also become unruly with rough treatment, and sometimes turn dangerous. Basic obedience training and socialization must start at an early age for this breed. Delaying socialization can create a fearful, aggressive dog instead of the friendly yet imposing watchdog that the Dogo Argentino was bred to be. Dogos are competitive in dog sports such as obstacle coursing and disc-catching. Obedience training is fun for these dogs. They are natural heelers and want to please their owners. If bred and raised properly, they have a steady temperament and seem to adjust themselves quickly to different situations.

Exercise Requirements
  Dogo Argentinos are highly energetic dogs and are unsuitable for owners that cannot provide them with daily, rigorous exercise. They are able to navigate various types of terrain and make excellent jogging partners. As a working breed of dog, they are also at their happiest when given a ‘meaningful’ task which they can devote themselves to.

Grooming
  Grooming the Dogo is easy because of his short coat, though his large size means it’s a big job. A bath every three months  in a mild dog shampoo is a good idea. Brush his sleek coat with a natural bristle brush or mitt once a week. Use coat conditioner/polish to brighten the sheen.
  The rest is basic care. His ears need to be checked every week and cleaned if needed and toenails trimmed once a month. Regular brushing with a soft toothbrush and vet-approved doggie toothpaste keep the teeth and gums healthy. It is essential to introduce grooming to the Dogo when he is very young so he learns to accept the handling and fuss peacefully.

Is the Dogo Argentino the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep. No trimming or stripping needed.
Moderate Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Moderately Easy Training: The Dogo Argentino is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  You may have heard that the Dogo Argentino is hypoallergenic. That is not true. No breed is. Allergies are not caused by a particular dog coat type but by dander, the dead skin cells that are shed by all dogs.

In popular culture
  • Bombon (film) Carlos Sorín's, a 2005 film starring a Dogo Argentino named Gregorio
  • On Animal Planet's Pit Boss episode "Shorty's Top Dog", Shorty Rossi and Hercules adopted a Dogo Argentino puppy named Mario.

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Tuesday, November 15, 2016

Top 10 Quietest Dog Breeds

Top 10 Quietest Dog Breeds
  We all love dogs, but constant barking is a sure-fire way to upset your neighborhood and get yourself in trouble. And let’s face, incessant barking drives us insane too! So if you’re looking for a dog but don’t think you’ll be able to curb a barker’s noise, or perhaps just don’t want to deal with the possibility at all, we’e compiled a list of some of the most silent dog breeds.
  Whether your desire for a dog who doesn't bark stems from the fact that you share a thin wall with your neighbor or you just like a fairly quiet place to call home, we've got you covered. 

10.Collie


 The Collie isn’t exactly a silent breed — if he were, Lassie would never have been able to tell us that Timmy had fallen down the well! Still, this gentle and affectionate dog generally only speaks when he really has something to say. Given the appropriate amount of exercise, he shouldn’t be a nuisance barker.
  In addition to being one of the most intelligent dog breeds out there, the Collie is also one of the quietest. This breed does not tend to bark except when he really needs to. Because this breed is so smart, training is easy so, if barking does become an issue, you can just teach your dog a “hush” command.

9. Shiba Inu
  The Shiba Inu looks almost like a fox in appearance and does equally well as a jogging partner as an indoor companion.  He is clean, easy to groom, and loves his people. 
While he is quiet, he has a very strong prey drive which means he should never be off leash. 
  They are intelligent and independent, making them very attractive to people who want a small dog, who is quiet, but not necessarily one that is “in their face.”

8.Irish Setter

  Unlike many of the other dogs on this list, the Irish Setter is a rowdy and rollicking dog with more energy than he knows what to do with. Happily, though, that energy is rarely channeled into nuisance barking, and as long as he’s given plenty of exercise, he can be a great choice for families.
  This medium-sized breed does have a good bit of energy but, with proper exercise and mental stimulation, barking is rarely a problem. Irish Setters don’t tend to expend their extra energy by barking – they would much rather play a game or run around the house with your kids. That makes him an excellent family pet and a good listener! 

7.Bullmastiff
  Large and loveable, most of the noises that come out of the Bullmastiff are snorts and snuffles. Sure, he may not get along with cats , but this large breed is loyal with his family, fairly low-maintenance and saves his barking for special occasions.
  Strong-willed and incredibly loyal, the Bullmastiff isn’t a big barker, but he is not always good with other dogs  or cats .

6.Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

  This small breed is playful and friendly – he tends to form strong bonds with family and does not like to be alone. As long as you give the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel enough attention, he will remain calm and placid at home, not prone to barking. One thing to be wary of with this breed is that he can be a little stubborn at times. 
  Sweet and docile, these dogs get along well with everyone.  They are one of the larger of the toy breeds, weighing in at between 13 and 18 pounds. But they are still considered a quiet small breed dog.
  Fiercely loyal, they will follow you everywhere. 
  Some think of them as lazy, lounging around in your most-comfortable chair, but they are also playful and enjoy walks and activities as long as it involves their owners. 

5.Saint Bernard

  St. Bernards are very social, affectionate dogs, although they may bark at strangers. However, as long as they are properly socialized as young puppies, Saints will typically grow to love everyone they meet and have little need to bark.
  The Saint Bernard is a member of the Mastiff family. He can be sweet, shy and stubborn, but with proper training and socialization, this quiet breed can be fantastic for families or for use as a therapy dog.
  This giant breed is the definition of “gentle giant” – despite his size, he is sweet and friendly. The Saint Bernard can be a little aloof around strangers and he may have a bit of a stubborn streak, but barking generally isn’t a problem. These dogs are particularly well suited to families with children and they make great therapy dogs. 

4.Italian Greyhound

  Tiny, intelligent and a bit fragile, the Italian Greyhound can be rather defiant, but barking is rarely an issue. Housetraining, however, may be another story.
  The Italian Greyhound (IG for short) may need a few reminders from time to time that he is a small dog and not the same as his bigger cousin the Greyhound. 
  Energetic and playful, he will keep you going and happily amused for years to come.  His grooming needs are minimal, but extra effort might be needed when training.  You will need to convince him that what you want him to do is what he wanted to do all along.

3. Great Pyrenees
  Another large breed, the Great Pyrenees is known for its long white coat. This breed was developed for livestock guarding so he is protective and independent by nature, but with proper training he isn’t much of a barker.
  Like the first two breeds on this list, the Great Pyrenees is a large dog with an equally big heart. When properly trained, he’s calm, gentle and protective, but you’ll have to do your homework in order to get this strong-willed dog to that point.

2. Great Dane

  The breed named quietest of them all is also one of the biggest: the Great Dane. He’s a gentle giant with a calm nature, and while he doesn’t bark often, when he does, his voice will be louder and deeper than just about any other breed.
  He’s a gentle giant with a calm nature, and while he doesn’t bark often, when he does, his voice will be louder and deeper than just about any other breed.

1.Basenji

  Basenjis are actually known for their inability to bark! But that doesn’t mean they don’t make noise. Bred as hunting dogs in Africa, they make a yodeling sound instead of barking. However, they typically only do this when they feel there is a reason, and are not known to make noise often.
  Patience and a sense of humor are essential to living with a Basenji. He will chew up or eat whatever's left in his reach, and he's quite capable of putting together a plan to achieve whatever it is he wants, whether that's to get up on the kitchen counter or break into the pantry where the dog biscuits are stored. 

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Thursday, September 8, 2016

Top 10 Black Dogs Breeds

Top 10 Black Dogs Breeds
  Black colored dogs are usually rarer than the other color varieties. From all dog coat colors, the black color is also the most fascinating and one of the few ones that has been purposely bred for a specific function. In the Northern countries for example, the Black Norwegian Elkhound was bred as a separate breed since 1877 because its distinctive color helps the hunter see his dog in the snowy landscape.
  There's no doubt that black dogs have a bad reputation. According to the ASPCA, they are the last to be adopted and the first to be euthanized. What's worse is that many people perceive them as less lovable because they are harder to see, and have been negatively portrayed in the media. In celebration of black dogs, we've rounded up 10 of the most popular black dog breeds that are giving it their all to proudly represent their coat color.

1. Great Dane
  The Great Dane was originally bred to hunt wild boar, but he probably wouldn't be very good at it today. The ferociousness necessary to track down such a large, wily animal was eventually bred out of the Great Dane. He's now a gentle soul who generally gets along well with other dogs, animals, and humans.
AKC standard for Black Great Danes: The color shall be a glossy black. White markings at the chest and toes are not desirable.  Any variance in color or markings as described above shall be faulted to the extent of the deviation. Any Great Dane which does not fall within the above color classifications must be disqualified.

2. Rottweiler
  Rottweiler dogs are sturdy build rectangular proportioned energetic dog which is a little longer in length than in height. The body structure is heavy boned with powerful muscle and dense substantial physique. Great stamina to drive cattle throughout the day, Rottweiler is not ignorant in its duty of herding. The powerful and elegant gait of the dog is full of confidence, signifies good drive and approach. The coat of Rottweiler is dense and straight but moderately rough; collectively expression projects a keen, alert responsive and confident investigator.
  "Rottweiler breeders aim at a dog of abundant strength, black coated with clearly defined rich tan markings, whose powerful appearance does not lack nobility and which is exceptionally well suited to being a companion, service and working dog."This breed is all about balance, endurance, proportionality, intelligence and strength. The various standards in place for the Rottweiler's physical appearance specify these characteristics.

3.Cane Corso
  The black breed Cane Corso originates from Italy. They are a large Italian breed of dog that is also known as Italian mastiffs. This breed is reserved, calm, quiet and evenly tempered. They are also very well muscled and less bulky than other mastiff dogs. Cane Corsos are closely related to Neapolitan mastiffs and have many similarities with them. Most of the Cane Corso assist in guarding big properties and hunt big wild boars. For many people, they are the favourite black dog breed.
  Majestic look Cane Corso is a muscular dog with massive build. The look is furious rather dreadful to warn intruder without any action by dog. Cane Cosro can spring into action with astonishing speeds to pin culprits. This is a versatile breed domesticate able to a variety of applications starting from hunting, guardian, watchdog , general working dog besides trustworthy companion. Its short coat is coarser; some could be near to smooth while dense to offer resistance to water and other climatic severe effects. Favourite color is Black to achieve formidable expression.

4. Doberman Pinscher
  Doberman pinscher, popularly known as Doberman is a medium large sized domestic dog. They originate from Germany and in the early 19th century, they were used as guard dogs. They are a mix breed of Rottweiler, Black Terriers and German Pinscher. Dobermans are strong and sometimes they can also be stubborn. Height of a male Doberman is around 66-72 cm whereas females are around 61-68 cm. A Male Doberman weighs around 34-45 kg and female ones weigh 27-41 kgs. They are highly energetic and intelligent dogs, best used for police and military work.
  The Doberman is compactly built, muscular, powerful and square-proportioned. It combines elegance and strength with speed and endurance. Its carriage is proud and alert, and its gait is free and vigorous. Its coat is short, smooth and hard, showing off the exceptionally clean-cut lines of this athletic breed.
  The Doberman pinscher is an intelligent capable guardian, ever on the alert and ready to protect its family or home. It is also a loyal and adventurous companion. It likes to be mentally challenged and is a gifted obedience pupil. It is sensitive and very responsive to its owner's wishes, though some can be domineering. It is generally reserved with strangers. It can be aggressive with strange dogs.

5. Newfoundland
  Newfoundland is one of the strongest breeds of dog which is perfect for being a lifeguard. He was originally used as a working dog for pulling nets for fishermen and haul wood from the forest. The breed Newfoundland originates from Canada. It is well suited for working on both land as well as water. It is known for its giant size, calm dispositions, loyalty and also forbeing anexcellent swimmer.
  Brown, black, gray and black with white are the recognized Newfoundland colors. Solid colors and white with black may have white on the chest, chin, toes and on the tip of the tail. A tinge of bronze may appear on a gray or black coat and lighter furnishings may appear on a brown or gray coat. Facial and muzzle hair is short and fine. The back legs are feathered for the entire length. The hair on the tail is long and dense.

6. Portuguese Water Dog

  Classified as a working dog, the Portuguese Water Dog is a hard worker and a loyal companion. It has been appreciated for its strength, soundness and spirtit for centuries along the coast of Portugal. This robust breed has a waterproof coat, giving it the ability to swim for hours. Called a Cao de Aqua, or dog of water in Portugal, the dog was bred as a working dog for fisherman on boats. The breed has dove for fish, retrieved broken nets, carried messages back to shore and guarded his master's boats while in foreign ports.
  The Water Dog has a thick coat of strong hair. It covers the body evenly except where the forearm joins the groin area where it is thinner. Some coats are curly and lusterless. Other coats are more wavy than curly with a slight sheen. 
  Coat color is white, black or tones of brown. The coat may also be a combination of brown, black and white. Water Dogs with white, black or black and white coats have bluish skin.

7.Neapolitan Mastiff 

  With its massive size made even more imposing by its abundant loose skin and dewlap, the Neapolitan Mastiff may have the most alarming appearance of any dog, and some say this look was purposefully bred in order to scare away intruders without the dog having to act. However, when forced to act, the Neo can spring into action with surprising speed. Its massive muscular body can knock down almost any intruder. Its huge head with short, powerful jaws and large teeth can crush or hold an opponent. The skin is tough and hanging, adding to the imposing impression of size as well as formidable expression.
  The Neapolitan Mastiff was bred for centuries to guard its family. As such, it is incredibly loyal and devoted to its family, watchful and suspicious of strangers, and tolerant of acquaintances. It is a stay-at-home-type dog. Although it is loving toward children, its sheer size can make accidents possible. It may not get along well with other dogs, especially domineering-type dogs. Because of its size, it should be carefully socialized at an early age.
  The Neo is short-haired with straight hairs that are one inch long or shorter. The coat is dense with hair uniform in length, giving a smooth appearance all over the body. There are no tufts or fringed hair anywhere. 
  Solid colors for coats include light and dark shades of black, gray-blue, tawny and mahogany. The AKC allows some brindling in all colors if the brindling is tan. This is known as reverse brindling. Some may have white markings on the chest, throat, underside of the body or on the toes. White hairs behind the wrists are accepted by the AKC.

8. Havanese
  Known for being the “National Dog of Cuba” and the only dog breed native to the island country, the Havanese is a small dog breed known for its silky coat that protects it against the harsh heat of the tropics. As a trainable and intelligent dog that possesses a naturally friendly and affectionate disposition, the Havanese is currently ranked as the 28th most popular dog breed in the United States by the American Kennel Club. If you are wondering whether the Havanese is the perfect match for you, the following is a complete description on this energetic toy breed.
  The abundant coat of the Havanese is acceptable in all coat colors, with white, fawn, red, cream brown, beige, orange, black, blue, chocolate, and silver being quite common. While the coat may be one solid color, others will have markings that create sable, brindle, black and tan, Irish piebald, part-colored, piebald, beige black, and more color patterns.
  Sometimes referred to as “Havana Silk Dogs,” the Havanese is a double-coated breed with soft, wavy, and silky lightweight hair on both the outer coat and undercoat. Reaching six to eight inches in length if never clipped or altered, the profuse coat is extremely light and insulating with a sheen appearance.

9.Yorkshire Terrier
  Affectionately referred to as “Yorkies” by their loyal owners, Yorkshire Terriers are members of the Toy Group that offer big personalities in a small package. As a portable pooch prized for its compact size and luxurious long-haired coat, the Yorkshire Terrier is currently ranked as the 6th most popular breed in the United States by the American Kennel Club. Read on to find a full breed description on the Yorkshire Terrier to determine whether the active dog will be an ideal match for your family’s lifestyle.
  Since the breed is often defined by its color, the breed standard indicates that the only acceptable coloring for the Yorkshire Terrier is steel blue and tan. While the body and tail are typically blue, the remainder of the dog’s body is tan. Puppies are often tan, black, and brown with white markings, but the pups will usually reach its final coloring by their third birthday.

10. Affenpinscher
  The Affenpinscher is a terrier type breed that originated in Central Europe, specifically Munich, Germany and France. The name Affenpinscher translates from German into Monkey Terrier. It is one of the oldest breeds in the Toy Group. During the 17th century they were kept on farms and stores to serve as ratters and in the home to keep mice out of the mistresses' boudoirs. It is an energetic little dog with the face and impishness of a monkey. They strut around with all the confidence of a larger dog. Their small size makes them a good dog for city and apartment dwellers. They are active indoors and can most of their exercise inside.
  The Affenpinscher's coat hair is thick and rough and about one-inch in length on the shoulders and body. The hair may be shorter on the backside and the tail. The hair on the head, chest, neck, stomach and legs is a little longer and softer. An adult will have a cape of sturdy hair that blends into the back coat near the withers. Longer hair on the head, beard and eyebrows frames the face to form the monkey-like expression. 
  Coat colors include black, red, silver, gray, black and tan or belge (a mixture of black and reddish brown.) Dogs with a black coat may have a few silver or white areas mixed in or may have a rusty cast. Reds vary from orange-tan to brownish red. The belge color coats have black, brown and/or white mixed in the red. Some dogs may have a small white spot on the chest. This is not penalized by kennel clubs but large white patches are not desirable.


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Saturday, July 19, 2014

Everything about your Great Dane

Everything about your Great Dane
  Very large but very gentle, this is truly a great dog. Sometimes referred to as the "Apollo of Dogs," the Great Dane was developed in Germany for its graceful appearance, large size, and hunting ability — all important attributes to the landed gentry. These same characteristics have made the breed popular today in America, even appearing in popular culture, such as the Hanna-Barbera cartoon character Scooby-Doo, the newspaper comic character Marmaduke, and Astro in the TV show The Jetsons.
  Great Danes combine robust strength with a refined dignity. In the home and around the yard, you’ll find them uniquely gifted with mental and physical strengths. Truly gentle giants, Great Danes are loving, affectionate and pleasant companions that like nothing better than to hang around the house with the family.

Overview
  The Great Dane was originally bred to hunt wild boar, but he probably wouldn't be very good at it today. The ferociousness necessary to track down such a large, wily animal was eventually bred out of the Great Dane. He's now a gentle soul who generally gets along well with other dogs, animals, and humans.
   However, his size and his power bark will scare the wits out of a burglar. Anyone who owns one of these dogs eventually understands that while you may be used to his awesome size, others usually need a little time to get there.
  The Great Dane was developed from Mastiff-type dogs, but he's more refined than other descendents of this ancient breed. A Great Dane is sleek and elegant. He has an athletic, muscular body. His massive head — and massive is the right word — is long and narrow. He's got a long, graceful neck. His ears can be cropped or left natural. 
  His size can present problems. Eyeballing a dog who weighs what you do makes some folks nervous. His tail can knock over a lot of things, particularly in a small space. And given the opportunity, he's an impressive counter surfer. Luckily, he isn't rambunctious or highly energetic.
  Size notwithstanding, a Great Dane is a sweet, affectionate companion. He loves to play and is gentle with children. He has a peaceful disposition, although he hasn't lost any of the courageousness that helped him hunt wild boar. Although he isn't particularly vocal , he wouldn't hesitate to defend his family.
  Even given his inherent gentleness, it's advisable to teach him good manners and attend obedience training classes when he's young. His sheer size alone could make him impossible to control when he's an adult, and — as with any dog — you never know when he might see something he just has to chase.
  He's eager to please and highly people-oriented, demanding a great deal of attention from those around him. He tends to nudge people with that big old head of his when he wants to be petted. Sometimes you'll meet one with lapdog tendencies who see no reason not to hop onto the sofa and drape themselves on you.
  Surprisingly, the Great Dane typically doesn't eat as much food as you'd think. And while he needs daily exercise, he doesn't need a huge yard to play in. 
Because of his beauty and gentle nature, more and more people are discovering the Great Dane. He currently ranks as the 24th most popular dog breed, according to registrations with the American Kennel Club.
  Just be aware that because of his size, he's got a relatively short life span of around eight years old. That means he takes up a huge space in your heart for a short amount of time.

Highlights
  • The Great Dane is sweet, eager to please, people-oriented, easy to housetrain, and he responds well to training using positive reinforcement.
  • Like many giant dogs, Great Danes are short-lived.
  • Great Danes require a lot of space. Even though they make great housedogs, they need a lot of room just to move around. There's little that they can't reach , and their tails can easily sweep your coffee table clean.
  • Everything costs more when you have a big dog — collars, veterinary care, heartworm preventive, food. In addition, you'll need both a crate and a vehicle that are large enough to hold your Great Dane without crumpling him into a pretzel. And let's face it, you'll scoop up a lot of poop.
  • It takes a while for the bones and joints of large dogs such as Great Danes to stop growing and become stable. Don't allow your Great Dane puppy to jump, and don't take him jogging until he's at least 18 months old; this will reduce stress on the growing bones and joints.
  • The Dane's special giant-breed dietary requirements have to be followed, or else orthopedic issues can develop.
  • Great Danes aren't particularly suited to apartments or small houses, simply because they're so big. They're not jumpers, fortunately, so a six-foot fence will contain them.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
  • Comparable Breeds: Boxer, Mastiff
History
   Drawings of dogs who look like Great Danes have been found on Egyptian artifacts dating back to 3000 B.C. and in Babylonian temples that were built around 2000 B.C. There's evidence that similar dogs originated in Tibet, with written reports of such dogs appearing in Chinese literature in 1121 B.C.
   The breed is thought to have been taken into various parts of the world by the Assyrians, who traded their dogs to the Greeks and Romans. The Greeks and Romans then bred these dogs with other breeds. Ancestors of the English Mastiff were probably involved in the breed development, and some folks believe that the Irish Wolfhound or Irish Greyhound also may have played a role.
  Great Danes originally were called Boar Hounds, because boars were what they were bred to hunt. Their ears were cropped to prevent boar tusks from tearing them. In the 16th century, the name of the breed was changed to "English Dogges."
  Late in the 1600s, however, many German nobles began keeping the largest and most handsome of their dogs in their homes, calling them Kammerhunde . These dogs were pampered and wore gilded collars lined with velvet. Talk about a sweet life.
  The name Great Dane arose in the 1700s, when a French naturalist traveled to Denmark and saw a version of the Boar Hound who was slimmer and more like a Greyhound in appearance.   He called this dog Grand Danois, which eventually became Great Danish Dog, with the more massive examples of the breed called Danish Mastiffs. The name stuck, even though Denmark did not develop the breed.
  Most breed historians give credit to German breeders for refining the breed to be the well-balanced, elegant dog we love today. In 1880, breeders and judges held a meeting in Berlin and agreed that since the dogs they were breeding were distinctly different from the English Mastiff, they would give it its own name — German Dog.
  They founded the Deutscher Doggen-Klub of Germany, and many other European countries took up the name as well. The Italians and English-speaking countries didn't accept this name, however.
  Throughout the late 1800s, wealthy German breeders continued to refine the breed. They turned their attention to the dog's temperament, because Great Danes had aggressive, ferocious temperaments due to the fact that they were originally bred to hunt wild boar, a particularly ferocious beast. These breeders tried to produce more gentle animals, and — luckily for us today — they succeeded.
  We don't know when the first Great Danes were brought to the U.S., or even where they came from, but the Great Dane Club of America was formed in 1889. It was the fourth breed club allowed to join the American Kennel Club.


Personality
  A well-bred Dane is one of the best-natured dogs around. He's a gentle, sweet, affectionate pet who loves to play and is relaxed with children. He has a great desire to please, which makes him easy to train.
  The Great Dane wants to be where the family is. He likes people a lot, including strangers and children, and will welcome visitors happily, unless he thinks you need defending. Then he can be fiercely protective.
  Some Danes wish they were lapdogs, and they'll keep trying to get there even if you and your lap mysteriously keep moving.
  Good-natured as they are, Great Danes definitely need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Great Dane puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.
  Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.


Is this breed right for you?
  As one of the tallest and largest breeds in the world, it's plain to see the Great Dane needs ample space to stretch its legs; however, due to its calm and lazy disposition, this breed can adapt to smaller dwellings. By nature, this is an athletic breed and daily exercise is required to keep the Great Dane in tip-top health. Great Danes love to be around people and do very well with families of all ages and sizes. Owners with very young children will want to make sure training and socialization is implemented early on as this extra-large breed could be a hazard to small children if not properly trained. This breed is prone to a short lifespan and may suffer from bloat. Owners should be prepared for potential health hazards and vet visits.


Health
  Great Danes, like most giant dogs, have a fairly slow metabolism. This results in less energy and less food consumption per pound of dog than in small breeds. Great Danes have some health problems that are common to large breeds, including bloat (gastric dilatation volvulus(GDV)). The average life span of Great Danes is 6 to 8 years. Like many larger breeds, Great Danes are at particular risk for hip dysplasia.
  Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and many congenital heart diseases are also commonly found in the Great Dane, leading to its nickname: the Heartbreak breed, in conjunction with its shorter lifespan. Great Danes also may carry the merle gene, which is part of the genetic makeup that creates the harlequin coloring.
   The merle gene is an incomplete dominant, meaning only one copy of the gene is needed to show the merle coloring; two merle genes produce excessive white markings and many health issues such as deafness, blindness, or other debilitating ocular issues. Great Danes can also develop something called "wobblers disease" that can affect their vertebral column. Since these dogs do grow at a rapid rate, the bones in their vertebrae can push up against the spinal cord and cause a little bit of weakness in the legs. This can be treated with surgery or it may straighten itself out.

Care
  Coat care for this breed is minimal. It does, however, need regular exercise, which can be accomplished with a lengthy walk or a fast-paced game. And although the Great Dane looks sturdy, the dog cannot live outdoors. Instead, it is more suited to an equal schedule of indoor and outdoor activities. While indoors, it should be given plenty of space and a soft bed for sleeping.

Living Conditions
  The Great Dane will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is relatively inactive indoors and does best with at least a large yard.


Exercise
  Like most dogs, Great Danes require daily walks to maintain their health. However, it is important not to over exercise this breed, particularly when young. Great Dane puppies grow very large, very fast, which puts them at risk of joint and bone problems. Because of a puppy's natural energy, Dane owners often take steps to minimize activity while the dog is still growing.
Given their large size, Great Danes continue to grow (mostly gaining weight) longer than most dogs. Even at one year of age a Great Dane will continue to grow for several more months.

Grooming
 The smooth, shorthaired coat is easy to groom. Comb and brush with a firm bristle brush and dry shampoo when necessary. Bathing this giant is a major chore, so it pays to avoid the need by daily grooming. The nails must be kept trimmed. This breed is an average shedder.


Children and other pets
  A Great Dane loves children and is gentle with them, especially when raised with them from puppyhood. Keep in mind he doesn't have any idea how big he is compared to a small child, and so can accidentally knock them over quite easily.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child not to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away.
  Generally speaking, a Great Dane will get along with other pets in the household, but occasionally some can be aggressive with livestock, or they just may not care for the other pets. It's an individual taste: some won't tolerate another animal in the house, while others will snooze with the cats and other dogs.

Popular culture
  • Fang, Hagrid's dog from the Harry Potter series, is a boarhound, another name for Great Danes. Though in the movie, the role was played by a Neapolitan Mastiff.
  • Manchester United goalkeeper Peter Schmeichel was nicknamed the "Great Dane".
  • The Great Dane was named the state dog of Pennsylvania in 1965.
  • Scooby-Doo, the famous Hanna-Barbera character, was based on a Great Dane by animation designer Iwao Takamoto. Takamoto based his illustrations on sketches given to him by a Hanna-Barbera employee who bred this dog. Scooby closely resembles a Great Dane, although his tail is longer than the breed's, bearing closer resemblance to a cat's tail.
  • The athletic teams of the University at Albany have been known as the Great Danes since 1965. Damien The Great Dane has been the mascot since that time. In 2003, the school added Lil' D, a smaller Great Dane, to help Damien entertain the crowds.
  • The University of Iowa had Great Danes, Rex I and Rex II, as mascots before the Hawkeye was chosen.
  • Astro, the dog in The Jetsons.
  • Brutus in The Ugly Dachshund, a Great Dane raised by a Dachshund mother.
  • Marmaduke is a newspaper comic strip drawn by Brad Anderson from 1954 to the present day. The strip revolves around the Winslow family and their Great Dane, Marmaduke.
  • Singer, the main but tragic hero of The Guardian, a novel by Nicholas Sparks.
  • Elmer, a Great Dane in Oswald the Lucky Rabbit by Walter Lantz
  • In each film version of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles, a Great Dane was cast as the cursed hellhound that kills the Baskerville family.
  • Ace the Bat-Hound, from the Batman TV series, was depicted as a Great Dane mix. In the animated series Batman Beyond, Bruce Wayne owns a black Great Dane mix he picked up on the street, also named Ace.
  • Ben, Hōgen, and Genba from Japanese anime and manga, Ginga Nagareboshi Gin and Ginga Densetsu Weed.
  • Just Nuisance who was the only dog to be officially enlisted in the Royal Navy. Done mainly as a morale booster for World War II enlisted troops, Nuisance proved to be a lasting legacy of the small Cape Town suburb of Simons Town.
  • Chestnut: Hero of Central Park revolves around the inventive ways the Great Dane is kept hidden from his new owners.
A dream day in the life of a Great Dane
  Watching a television show marathon on a cloudy Sunday afternoon would make this giant a happy camper. To make the day even better, a nap on your lap would complete a perfect day. This breed does have an athletic built and needs daily exercise. Although he would prefer the couch or bed, he'll be a healthier pooch with daily walks, meaning more time and more years to spend lounging around with you.



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