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Showing posts with label giant. Show all posts
Showing posts with label giant. Show all posts

Friday, September 16, 2016

Everything about your Giant Schnauzer

Everything about your Giant Schnauzer
  The Giant Schnauzer, also for a time known as the Russian Bear Schnauzer, the Munich Schnauzer the Munchener, the Munchen Dog and the Riesenschnauzer , is a large, intelligent, loyal and sometimes headstrong breed developed in Germany hundreds of years ago. The first Giant Schnauzer was shown in Munich in 1909 under the breed name of the Russian Bear Schnauzer. The Giant Schnauzer was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1930, as a member of the Working Group.

Overview
  The Giant is the largest of the three Schnauzer breeds. He was created by German land owners who wanted a tough dog to drive their cattle. It’s thought that they started with the large and shaggy “Bear Schnauzer” and mixed in some herding and working dogs such as the Bouvier des Flandres, the black Great Dane, and the Standard Schnauzer. Today’s Giant Schnauzer has many good qualities, but he is demanding.
  The Giant Schnauzer is smart, but like any dog with a working background, he is an independent thinker. You must begin early teaching him to think of you as his leader. The Giant Schnauzer is not an appropriate choice for a first-time dog owner.
  It’s important to give him a job to do, from his daily training exercises to participating in a dog sport such as agility, obedience, rally, or tracking. Giant Schnauzers are energetic and athletic, and they enjoy long walks, jogging, and hiking on leash. Plan to take yours for at least a 20-minute walk twice a day, at a good pace, plus training practice for 20 minutes to an hour.
  Be aware that a Giant Schnauzer can be messy to keep. His beard will drip water after he drinks and will need to be cleaned after meals. You may also need to wipe walls or furniture if he shakes his head before you can get to a towel. His coat picks up all kinds of dirt and debris which may be deposited throughout your home.
  The Giant Schnauzer is best suited to a home with a large yard surrounded by a solid fence that is at least five or six feet high. Do not rely on an underground electronic fence to keep him contained. The shock it provides is nothing to this tough dog, and he won’t let it deter him from leaving the yard if that’s what he wants to do.
  Giant Schnauzers are a good choice for families with older children. They can be too active in the presence of toddlers and may accidentally knock them over.
  The Giant Schnauzer’s coat must be brushed or combed at least a couple of times a week to prevent or remove mats and tangles. To maintain the Giant Schnauzer’s distinctive look, you’ll need to trim his head and body regularly. You can take him to a professional groomer or learn to do it yourself. Other grooming requirements include cleaning the ears and trimming the nails as needed, brushing his teeth, and bathing him when he’s dirty.
  While you might think of him as an outdoor dog, nothing could be farther from the truth.   Chaining a Giant Schnauzer out in the yard and giving him little or no attention is not only cruel, it can also lead to aggression and destructive behavior. Giant Schnauzers are guardian dogs, devoted to their people. A Giant Schnauzer should have access to a securely fenced yard, but when the family is home, he should be in the house.

Highlights
  • Giant Schnauzers are energetic breed and require at least two long walks per day or 30 to 60 minutes of vigorous exercise in the backyard.
  • Without proper exercise and mental stimulation, Giant Schnauzers can become very destructive and difficult to handle.
  • Giant Schnauzers are not recommended for first-time or timid owners. They need a strong leader who can provide clear and consistent rules without resorting to physical force.
  • Although they are a very affectionate breed, the Giant Schnauzer is not recommended for homes with young children because of their size and forceful behavior.
  • Giant Schnauzers will make excellent guard dogs.
  • Apartments are not suitable dwellings for Giant Schnauzers. They need a large fenced yard where they can play and run safely.
  • Socialization is a must with this breed. They can be aggressive toward people, dogs, and other animals they don't know. They are naturally suspicious of strangers and need to become accustomed to experiencing new people and situations.
  • Giant Schnauzers are companion dogs and should live indoors. They thrive when they are with the people they love.
  • Giant Schnauzers require brushing one to three times a week. Their coats must also be stripped or clippered to remain neat looking.
  • Giant Schnauzers are intelligent dogs who learn quickly and excel at a variety of jobs. Be firm and consistent, and use positive reinforcement techniques such as praise, play, and food rewards. Giant Schnauzers will see and take advantage of any inconsistencies in your behavior.
  • Never buy a Giant Schnauzer from a puppy mill, a pet store, or a breeder who doesn't provide health clearances or guarantees. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies and who breeds for sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Schnauzer hallmark is a harsh beard and eyebrows.
  • Its large body is nearly square, while the head has a strong rectangular appearance.
  • There are three Schnauzer breeds, classified by size.
  • The breed is named for a show dog named Schnauzer, who won a dog show in Hanover in 1879.
Breed standards
AKC: Working
UKC Guardian Dog
Life span: 10-12 years
Coat Dense, wiry
Color: Black or "pepper and salt"
Comparable Breeds: Doberman Pinscher, Rottweiler


History
  The first Giant Schnauzers emerged from Swabia in the German state of Bavaria, and Württemberg in the 17th century.These original Giant Schnauzers were considered a rough-coated version of the German pinscher breeds, and their hair was thought to help them withstand the harsh German winters and bites from vermin. The origins of the breed are unclear, but sources speculate it originated through some combination of black Great Danes, German Shepherds, Rottweilers, Dobermans, Boxers,Bouvier des Flandres, Thuringian Shepherds, and the Standard Schnauzer.
  The Giant Schnauzer was originally bred as a multipurpose farm dog for guarding property and driving animals to market. By the turn of the 20th century the Giant Schnauzer was being used as a watchdog at factories, breweries, butcheries, and stockyards throughout Bavaria.It was unknown outside Bavaria until it was used as a military dog in World War I and World War II. The first Giant Schnauzers were imported to America in the 1930s, but they remained rare until the 1960s,when the breed became popular. In 1962, there were 23 new Giant Schnauzers registered with the American Kennel Club; in 1974 this number was 386; in 1984 it was over 800 and in 1987 it was around 1000 animals. In 2012, there were 94 new dogs registered, down from 95 in 2011.
  In modern times, the Giant Schnauzer is used as a police dog; is trained for obedience, dog agility, herding, search and rescue, and schutzhund; and is shown in conformation shows. They are also used for carting. In Europe, the breed is considered to be more of a working dog than a show dog. The focus in many European Schnauzer clubs is not so much on conformation shows, but on the working ability of the breed. In several countries, including Germany, dogs must achieve a Schutzhund Champion title before they can qualify to be a conformation champion.

Personality
  The Giant Schnauzer has the calm, loving temperament of a companion dog and the assertiveness, boldness and energy required of a guard and working dog.
He takes his responsibilities seriously and is protective of home and family, willing to defend them with a fierceness that can be intimidating. This is a territorial dog who's distrustful of strangers, but when he's not needed as a guardian, he's a playful and affectionate companion.
  His intelligence can pose a challenge to the inexperienced trainer, however. Giant Schnauzers require consistent and firm guidance. Without it, they're quite capable of thinking for themselves and running the household the way they think it ought to be run.
  As with every dog, Giant Schnauzers need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Giant Schnauzer puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.
Health
  The Giant Schnauzer, which has an average lifespan of 10 to 12 years, suffers from minor health issues such as Osteochondrosis Dissecans (OCD), hypothyroidism, and gastric torsion. This breed is also prone to canine hip dysplasia (CHD), a serious health concern. To identify some of these issues early, a veterinarian may recommend regular hip and thyroid exams for the dog.

Care
  Giant Schnauzers are not recommended for apartments or condos. They have high energy levels indoors and out, and are best suited to a home with a fenced yard where they can safely run off some of that energy. When they're not playing outdoors, Giant Schnauzers should be inside with their people, whom they will happily follow around the house.
  Giant Schnauzers require at least an hour of daily exercise. Plan on a couple of half-hour walks at a good clip or vigorous play. He can be a digger or chewer, so always give him something constructive to do instead.
  This is a breed that needs a job. Train him to do tricks or help you around the house if you want to forestall destructive behavior. He doesn't like to be bored, so avoid frequent repetition and turn training into a challenging game to get the best out of him.
Train him with firmness and consistency. He can be stubborn and you must be more stubborn. You must be able to provide leadership without resorting to physical force or harsh words.
  It's best if you work with a trainer who's familiar with and understands the breed. Your Giant Schnauzer will respond with enthusiasm to training techniques that are positive and keep him on his toes.

Living Conditions
  The Giant Schnauzer is not suited for apartment life. It is fairly active indoors and will do best with acreage.

Training
  Giant Schnauzers require good training to grow up properly socialized. They are outdoor dogs that need a lot of exercise, so exercise should be included in their training. These dogs need to be raised to understand that other dogs are not a threat and that strangers are not, either. Displaying your status as a pack leader in your dog’s perceived tribe is very important with these dogs, as they can quickly believe that they are the pack leaders without the presence of someone with more discipline than them.
  If a Giant Schnauzer has been properly trained, it can have a very endearing personality and can even be known as a very playful breed.

Activity Requirements
  For people who aren't prepared to walk or run several miles a day, the Giant Schnauzer is not the right choice. For active people, he makes an excellent companion, as his daily activity requirements are high. Walking, jogging, hiking and biking are good ways to keep Schnauzers physically fit, and enrolling them in agility training can keep their minds sharp.   Couch potatoes or city dwellers may not be the right choice for this breed, as they need lots of space, both indoors and out. Proper exercise not only keeps Giant Schnauzers physically fit, but it also helps maintain a steady temperament. High-strung Schnauzers are probably not getting enough exercise.

Grooming
  The Giant Schnauzer’s distinctive look — eyebrows, thick beard, clipped body — doesn’t come naturally. Regular grooming is essential, including brushing, bathing, haircut, nail trim, and ear cleaning. Expect to groom  your dog every six to eight weeks, especially if you wish to keep the coat trimmed short and those eyebrows distinct. Regular brushing every week between stylings will keep the breed’s double coat.
  Shop around before choosing a groomer. Grooming a Giant Schnauzer properly requires good clippering and scissoring skills. Make sure the groomer has experience with the breed, both in terms of styling and handling.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Because of their size, energy level, and commanding nature, Giant Schnauzers are not recommended for homes with young children. The suggested age range is 12 and older who have the maturity to interact appropriately with a large-breed dog.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party.
  Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how good-natured, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Giant Schnauzers don't tend to be buddy-buddy with other dogs, especially those of the same sex, and they probably shouldn't be trusted alone with cats, no matter how well they seem to get along.

Did You Know?
  The Giant Schnauzer was probably developed in southern Bavaria and for a long time was known as the Munchener, after the city of Munich.

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Friday, August 7, 2015

Everything about your Bernese Mountain Dog

Everything about your Bernese Mountain Dog
  The Bernese Mountain Dog is a striking. tri-colored, large dog. He is sturdy and balanced. He is intelligent, strong and agile enough to do the draft and droving work for which he was used in the mountainous regions of his origin. Male dogs appear masculine, while bitches are distinctly feminine.
  The Bernese Mountain Dog, called in German the Berner Sennenhund, is a large-sized breed of dog, one of the four breeds of Sennenhund-type dogs from the Swiss Alps. The name Sennenhund is derived from the German Senne and Hund, as they accompanied the alpine herders and dairymen called Senn. Berner  refers to the area of the breed’s origin, in the canton of Bern in Switzerland. This mountain dog was originally kept as a general farm dog. Large Sennenhunde in the past were also used as draft animals, pulling carts. The breed was officially established in 1907. In 1937, the American Kennel Club recognized it as a member of the Working Group.

Overview
  This good-looking Swiss farm dog takes his name from the canton of Bern, where he likely originated. Berners helped farmers by pulling carts, driving livestock to fields or market, and serving as watchdogs. These days, the Berner is primarily a family companion or show dog, beloved for his calm and patient temperament. If you want a Bernese Mountain Dog, be prepared to do your due diligence to find him and put in plenty of effort training and socializing him once you bring him home.
  This is a large breed. A Bernese puppy certainly looks snuggly and manageable, but he will quickly reach his adult weight of 70 to 120 pounds, more or less .
The Berner, as he’s nicknamed, has moderate exercise needs. In general, plan to give him a walk of at least a half hour daily, plus several shorter trips outdoors throughout the day.   Bernese are individuals, so the amount of exercise they desire can vary.
 To keep your Bernese Mountain Dog’s mind and body active and healthy, involve him in dog sports. Depending on the individual dog’s build and temperament, Bernese can excel in activities such as agility, drafting , herding, obedience, rally, or tracking. Organized sports not your thing? Take your Bernese hiking. He can carry his own water and treats in a canine backpack. Bernese also make excellent therapy dogs, having a gentle, mellow temperament as well as being the perfect height for standing at a bedside and being petted.

  Though you might think of him as an outdoor dog, nothing could be further from the truth. Bernese Mountain Dogs love their people, especially children, and will pine without human companionship. They should certainly have access to a securely fenced yard, but when the family is home, the Bernese should be with them.

Highlights 
  • Berners have numerous health problems due to their small genetic foundation, and perhaps due to other reasons yet undiscovered. Currently, the life span of a Bernese Mountain Dog is comparatively short, about six to eight years.
  • Because of the Berner's popularity, some people have bred dogs of lesser quality in order to sell the puppies to unsuspecting buyers. Be especially careful about importing dogs from foreign countries that have few laws governing kennel conditions. Often these dogs are bought at auction and little is known about their health history.
  • Veterinary care can be costly because of the health problems in the breed.
  • Berners shed profusely, especially in the spring and fall. If shedding drives you crazy, this may not be the right breed for you.
  • The Berner likes to be with his family. He's likely to develop annoying behavior problems, such as barking, digging, or chewing, if he's isolated from people and their activities.
  • When Berners are mature, they are large dogs who like to have a job to do. For those reasons, it's wise — and fun — to begin obedience training early.
  • Although they're very gentle with children, Berners sometimes accidentally knock over a small child or toddler.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • Most Bernese are considered to have a dry mouth, meaning they don’t drool, but that’s not true of all of them. A Bernese with tight, or close-fitting, lips is less likely to drool than one with loose or hanging lips.
  • The Bernese Mountain Dog’s tricolor coat is thick and moderately long with straight or slightly wavy hair. The coat sheds heavily.
  • Berners are sensitive to heat and humidity. If outdoors, they need access to plenty of shade and fresh water.
  • Comparable Breeds: Saint Bernard, Appenzeller Sennenhunde

History
  The Bernese Mountain Dog comes from Switzerland and is one of four tri-colored varieties of Swiss mountain dogs, which also include the Appenzeller Sennenhund, the Entlebucher Sennenhund and the Greater Swiss Mountain Dog. The long coat of the Bernese Mountain Dog distinguishes it from its close relatives. It was bred to be a draft dog, a watchdog and an all-around farm dog. It is thought to have descended centuries ago from crosses between mastiff-type dogs and native flock-guarding dogs in the valleys of the Swiss Alps, before becoming popular with modern breed fanciers. One of its main historical tasks was to transport fresh milk, cheese and other produce for small farmers who were too poor or otherwise unable to own draft horses to pull carts containing their wares.
  Until the late nineteenth century, due to a lack of concerted breeding efforts, this breed was all but forgotten except by rural inhabitants of the Berne area of Switzerland. Starting in 1892, a Swiss innkeeper, and shortly thereafter a college professor from Zurich, scoured the countryside in an attempt to find good specimens of the breed. After much searching, they finally were able to find quality dogs, thus starting the rehabilitation of the breed. A breed specialty club was founded in Switzerland in 1907, and the Bernese Mountain Dog thereafter became sought as show dogs and companions, in addition to continuing their working roles as “beasts of burden” on market days.
  The breed was first brought to the United States in 1926 and achieved recognition by the American Kennel Club in 1937. The parent club was formed in 1968  and became an AKC member club in 1981.



Temperament
  The breed standard for the Bernese mountain dog states that dogs should not be “aggressive, anxious or distinctly shy”, but rather should be “good-natured”, “self-assured”, “placid towards strangers”, and “docile”. The temperament of individual dogs may vary, and not all examples of the breed have been bred carefully to follow the standard. All large breed dogs should be well socialized when they are puppies, and given regular training and activities throughout their lives.
  Bernese are outdoor dogs at heart, though well-behaved in the house; they need activity and exercise, but do not have a great deal of endurance. They can move with amazing bursts of speed for their size when motivated. If they are sound (no problems with their hips, elbows, or other joints), they enjoy hiking and generally stick close to their people. Not being given the adequate amount of exercise may lead to barking and harassing in the Bernese.
  Bernese mountain dogs are a breed that generally does well with children, as they are very affectionate. They are patient dogs that take well to children climbing over them. Though they have great energy, a Bernese will also be happy with a calm evening.
Bernese work well with other pets and around strangers.

Health
  The Bernese Mountain Dog is occasionally prone to health problems like von Willebrand's Disease (vWD), hypomyelination, allergies, hypothyroidism, hepatocerebellar degeneration and progressive retinal atrophy (PRA). The minor diseases that the dog is likely to suffer from are cataract, sub-aortic stenosis (SAS), entropion, and ectropion. The more serious ailments affecting this breed include canine hip dysplasia (CHD), elbow dysplsia, gastric torsion, and mast cell tumor. A lot of care should be taken to prevent heat stroke.
  DNA, cardiac, hip, eye, and elbow tests are advised for the Bernese Mountain Dog, which has an average lifespan of 6 to 9 years.

Activities
  The Bernese's calm temperament makes them a natural for pulling small carts or wagons, a task they originally performed in Switzerland. With proper training they enjoy giving children rides in a cart or participating in a parade, such as the Conway, New Hampshire holiday parade. The Bernese Mountain Dog Club of America offers drafting trials open to all breeds; dogs can earn eight different titles — four as individual dogs and four brace titles, in which two dogs work one cart together. Regional Bernese clubs often offer carting workshops
  On July 1, 2010, the Bernese Mountain Dog became eligible to compete in AKC Herding Events. Herding instincts and trainability can be measured at noncompetitive herding tests. Berners exhibiting basic herding instincts can be trained to compete in herding trials.

Living Conditions
  Bernese Mountain Dogs are not recommended for apartment life. They are relatively inactive indoors and will do best with at least a large, fenced-in yard. Because of their thick coats they are sensitive to the heat and would much rather be in cold temperatures.

Care 
  Berners are not suited to apartment or condo life. A home with a large, securely fenced yard is the best choice. Because the Berner is a working dog, he has plenty of energy. In addition to yard play, he needs a minimum of 30 minutes of vigorous exercise every day; three times that amount keeps this sturdy dog in top condition.
  With his thick, handsome coat, the Berner is a natural fit for cold climates. He loves to play in the snow. Conversely, with his black coat and large size, he's prone to heat stroke. Don't allow him to exercise strenuously when it's extremely hot; limit exercise to early mornings or evenings, when it's cooler. Keep him cool during the heat of the day, either inside with fans or air-conditioning or outside in the shade.
  You'll need to take special care if you're raising a Berner puppy. Like many large-breed dogs, Berners grow rapidly between the ages of four and seven months, making them susceptible to bone disorders and injury. They do well on a high-quality, low-calorie diet that keeps them from growing too fast.
  Additionally, don't let the Berner puppy run and play on hard surfaces , jump excessively, or pull heavy loads until he's at least two years old and his joints are fully formed. Normal play on grass is fine, and so are puppy agility classes, with their one-inch jumps.

Grooming Needs
  Berners shed year round, with the heaviest shedding coming during the changes in season. Brushing at least once a week – more in spring and fall – will help keep the coat neat and will reduce the amount of hair that hits the floor or furniture. Depending on the dog's activity level and desire to romp in the dirt, they only require a bath once every couple of months.
   Their ears can can trap bacteria, dirt, and liquid so weekly cleanings with a veterinarian-recommended cleanser can help prevent painful ear infections. Weekly brushing of the teeth is also recommended to reduce tartar and bad breath. Active Berners will naturally wear their toenails down to a good length, but some do not. The general rule is if the dog's nails click on a hard floor, they are too long. Monthly trimming may be required.

Is this breed right for you?
  Calling all farmers, acreage owners and great outdoor enthusiasts: This breed thrives on open land, room to roam and work to pick up. Implied in this breed's name, the Bernese Mountain Dog was bred with a thick coat to sustain him in cold weather and a strong, muscular frame for hours of work and climbing. This people-oriented breed absolutely loves being around its human counterparts and protecting the little ones while they play. Although the Bernese Mountain Dog is low-maintenance in terms of grooming, you may opt to brush that thick coat regularly to control its constant shedding.

Children And Other Pets 
  The Berner is an excellent family pet, and he's usually gentle and affectionate with children who are kind and careful with animals. Being so large, he can inadvertently bump or knock over very young or small children.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
The Berner gets along with other pets well, though the greater the size difference, the more supervision and training required to keep everyone safe.

Did You Know?
  He’s not a Bernice Mountain Dog or a Burmese Mountain Dog. He takes his name from the Swiss canton of Bern, where he was a valued farm dog who excelled at pulling carts, driving livestock to fields or market, and serving as watchdogs.

Notable Bernese Mountain Dogs
  • Hercules is Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger's dog that he brought home from the Emmental region of Switzerland during a 2006 weeklong trip to discover his family's roots in the country.
  • Sasha was a Bernese Mountain Dog that followed a goat off of a cliff and managed to survive the fall as well as three days on an ice shelf waiting for rescue.
  • A Bernese Mountain Dog character named Shep was voiced by Carl Reiner in the 2003 movie Good Boy!
  • The characters Bryan (Andrew Rannells) and David (Justin Bartha) in the 2012 TV series The New Normal own a Bernese Mountain Dog named "Smelly".
  • Hola, the titular dog in Martin Kihn's memoir Bad Dog: A Love Story, is a Bernese Mountain Dog.
  • Ohly was a Bernese Mountain Dog who achieved notoriety in Canada after disappearing and then being found on Mount Seymour in a dangerous area known as "Suicide Gulley." Members of North Shore Rescue, a local mountain rescue team, tracked, located and rescued Ohly.
  • Benson was a Bernese Mountain Dog who features in the memoir, The Boy Who Got A Bernese Mountain Dog by Brook Ardon. Benson had a great temperament the breed is famous for, he lived near the beach in New Zealand.
  • Quincey von Wiesmadern, has appeared in various videos with Hansi Hinterseer, an Austrian singer, entertainer and former member of the Austrian Ski Team.
  • Hannah is the real-life inspiration for the protagonist of children's books such as A Beach Day for Hannah and A Snow Day for Hannah by Linda Petrie Bunch.
  • Argus and Fiona were two Bernese mountain dogs that were shot and killed when they entered a neighbor's yard. The neighbor who shot the dogs admits that he was overreacting.A Pennsylvania state law states that humans are free to kill animals attacking domestic animals. The man feared a possible attack on his sheep, who were in their fenced off grazing area. Attacks on a neighbor's farm had taken place and resulted in the death of several animals sometime the previous year, although the type of dog who ruthlessly attacked those animals was not a Bernese. However, since no attack was in progress at the time of the shooting, the shooter was charged with two counts of cruelty to animals and one count of recklessly endangering another person, the latter a result of there being a house within the possible line of fire. There were no residents at home at the time of the shooting. On September 11, 2013, the shooter was convicted on two counts of animal cruelty. He faces up to five years in jail for each count.
  • Nico (2015) a recently adopted Bernese mountain dog became a hero when he saved two people who were being swept out into the ocean by a California rip current.
A dream day in the life of a Bernese Mountain Dog
  Rising early and taking in the cool brisk mountain air before heading to work on the farm starts the day off just right for the Bernese Mountain Dog. Pulling anything from kids to livestock, you'll often see this breed smiling with a cart in tow. Just be aware not to push his limits; due to his size the Bernese Mountain Dog is prone to hip and joint issues. A great companion and watchdog, a Berner's perfect day wouldn't be complete without love and hugs from his human family.

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Saturday, January 3, 2015

Everything about your Saint Bernard

Everything about your Saint Bernard
  The imposing Saint Bernard is powerful and proportionately tall. It is strong and well-muscled — necessary qualities in a dog that must trek through deep snow for miles. Its coat comes in two types: smooth, in which the short hair is very dense and tough, and long, in which the medium-length hair is straight to slightly wavy. Its expression should appear intelligent. 
  The calm, easy going Saint Bernard is gentle and patient around children, although it is not particularly playful. It is devoted to it`s family and is willing to please, although at its own pace. It can be stubborn.

Overview
  No, the Saint Bernard never wore a miniature brandy keg around his neck. The image was merely the product of artistic license taken by Edwin Landseer, who painted a portrait of the breed while visiting Switzerland in 1819. The public loved it, and the brandy keg remains a symbol of the breed to this day.
  It’s true, though, that monks at the hospice of Saint Bernard, high in the Swiss Alps, used the dogs to seek out and rescue lost travelers. These days, the Saint is primarily a family companion or show dog, beloved for his calm and patient temperament. The Saint Bernard has many good qualities, but  he may also have health and temperament issues. If you want the calm, protective dog of legend, be prepared to do a lot of homework to find him and put in plenty of effort training and socializing him once you bring him home.
  The Saint Bernard is a member of the Mastiff family, as evidenced by his huge head and tall, powerful body. He is gentle, but his size alone is enough to deter many would-be intruders or assailants. He is only moderately active, making him suited to homes with small yards. He drools and is sensitive to heat, so he must live in air-conditioned comfort in hot climates.
  This is a giant breed. A 25-pound Saint Bernard puppy certainly looks manageable, but he will eventually weigh 120 to 180 or more pounds. His huge size is often what attracts people to him, but the tradeoff is a heartbreakingly short life span of approximately 7 to 10 years. And if you reach your home by stairs and should ever need to haul him up and down, you might be in trouble. If none of that fazes you, a Saint Bernard may well be your dog.
Contrary to his size, the Saint Bernard’s food and exercise needs are modest. He doesn’t eat more than any other large breed dog, and he will be satisfied with a couple of short walks daily. Like any dog, Saint puppies are inveterate chewers and because of their size can do more damage than puppies of other breeds. They are prone to ingesting items such as socks and dish towels, resulting in veterinary visits or even surgery for intestinal blockages.
  Though you might think of him as an outdoor dog, the Saint Bernard loves his people and will pine without human companionship. They are also prone to heatstroke and should never be left outdoors for a long time in hot weather. Saints should have access to a securely fenced yard, but when the family is home, the dog should be with them indoors.

Highlights
  • A Saint Bernard is a giant-size breed and although they are generally quiet inside, they are not best suited to apartments. They need space to move or just to stretch out in.
  • If you consider yourself a neat freak, then the Saint Bernard is not the breed for you. They drool and their paws track in their fair share of mud. They are heavy shedders and shed, or blow, their coat twice a year.
  • Saint Bernards generally take longer to mature mentally. This leaves you with a very big puppy for several years.
  • Although Saint Bernards make wonderful family pets, they are not recommended for homes with young children, as they can unintentionally knock over and hurt small children.
  • Originally bred to withstand the cold temperatures of the Alps, the Saint Bernard does not do well in heat.
  • Saint Bernards are not known for barking without cause.
  • Saint Bernards are a short-lived breed, usually only 8 to 10 years.
  • The Saint Bernard should not live outdoors away from his family. All dogs do better when they are in the house with the family they love, and the Saint Bernard is no exception. Although their coats and build make them an obvious choice for outdoor living, their temperament and inability to cope with heat makes it a poor decision.
  • Thanks to the popularity of movies such as Beethoven, which features a large Saint Bernard, many irresponsible breeders and puppy mills produce these gentle giants. To make sure you get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • The Saint Bernard drools. Don’t believe a breeder who claims to produce “dry-mouth” Saints.
  • Saint Bernards excel at dog sports such as drafting, weight-pulling, and obedience trials.
  • The Saint Bernard’s coat can be long or short and ranges from deep brown to red brownish-yellow with white markings.
  • Comparable Breeds: Newfoundland, Great Pyrenees
History
  The Saint Bernard probably has its roots in the Roman Molossian dogs, but it wasn't until between 1660 and 1670 that the breed developed into the magnificent dog responsible for saving so many lives. Around this time, the first of these large dogs arrived at the St. Bernard Hospice, a refuge for travelers crossing between Switzerland and Italy. 
  The Saint Bernards originally came to help pull carts and turn spits and may have also functioned as watchdogs or companions, but the monks soon found them invaluable pathfinders through the deep snow. The dogs were adept at locating lost travelers. When a dog found a person, it would lick the person's face and lie beside him, thus reviving and warming the person. The dogs continued to serve in this invaluable role for three centuries, saving over 2,000 lives. 
  The most famous of all Saint Bernards was Barry, who was credited with saving 40 lives. Before Barry's death, the dogs were known by several names, including hospice dogs, but by the time he died he was of such fame that the dogs were called Barryhund in his honor. In the early 1800s many of the dogs were lost to severe weather, disease and inbreeding. Some of the remaining dogs were crossed with Newfoundlands in 1830. 
  As a result, the first long-coated dogs of Saint Bernard type appeared. Although it seemed that long hair would help a dog in the cold snow, in fact it hindered them as the ice clung to the coat. Thus, these long-haired dogs were not kept for rescue work. The first Saints came to England around 1810 and were referred to by many different names, among them sacred dog. By 1865, the name Saint Bernard was in common use, and it became the official name in 1880. 
  Around this time, the breed caught the eye of American fanciers. By 1900, the Saint Bernard was extremely popular. Although it has since vacillated in popularity, it is always one of the most popular giant breeds.
  "St. Bernard" wasn't in widespread use until the middle of the 19th century. The dogs were called "Saint Dogs", "Noble Steeds", "Alpenmastiff", or "Barry Dogs" before that time.

Personality
  True to their heritage as hospice dogs, Saints are friendly and welcoming. They have a steady, benevolent temperament and are kind and careful with children. They love attention but aren't as demanding of it as some breeds.
  Because of their large size, it's important to begin training Saints at an early age, while they're still easily manageable. They're intelligent and willing to please but sometimes stubborn. They should never be aggressive unless it's in defense of a family member.
  Like every dog, Saint Bernards need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Saint Bernard puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

Health
  The very fast growth rate and the weight of a St. Bernard can lead to very serious deterioration of the bones if the dog does not get proper food and exercise. Many dogs are genetically affected by hip dysplasia or elbow dysplasia. Osteosarcoma  has been shown to be hereditary in the breed.They are susceptible to eye disorders called entropion and ectropion, in which the eyelid turns in or out. The breed standard indicates that this is a major fault. The breed is also susceptible to epilepsy and seizures, a heart disease called dilated cardiomyopathy, and eczema.
  US and UK breed clubs put the average lifespan for a St. Bernard at 8–10 years.A 2003 Danish breed survey  puts the median lifespan at 9.5 years while a UK breed survey in 2004  puts the median lifespan at 7 years. In the UK survey about one in five lived to >10 years with the longest lived dog at 12 years and 9 months.

Care
  The daily exercise requirements of the Saint Bernard are met with short runs and moderate walks. The dog is best when raised outdoors, keeping it away from smooth surfaces. Oversized puppies, which are brought up indoors, are susceptible to hip problems.
The Saint Bernard is not tolerant of heat; in fact, it loves cold weather. It does best when given access to the yard and the house. The coat requires weekly brushing and more frequently during shedding season. In addition, many St. Bernards have a tendency to drool.

Living Conditions
The Saint Bernard will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. These dogs are relatively inactive indoors and a small yard is sufficient. They can live outdoors, but would much rather be with their family. They have a low tolerance for hot weather, warm rooms and cars. Can wheeze and snore.

Exercise
A long walk each day is needed to keep the Saint Bernard in good mental and physical condition. Puppies should not have too much exercise at one time until their bones are well formed and strong. Short walks and brief play sessions are best until the dog is about two years old.

Grooming
  Saint Bernards come in two coat types: shorthaired and longhaired. The shorthaired Saint has a dense, smooth coat. His longhaired brother has a medium-length coat that is slightly wavy. Either coat type can be white with red or red with white.
  Both varieties shed heavily in spring and fall and need weekly brushing year-round to keep loose hair under control. It’s probably a good idea to brush a longhaired Saint a couple of times a week.
  Clean the ears and trim the nails as needed, and bathe the Saint when he’s dirty. You’ll want to wipe his mouth after your Saint eats or drinks — before he shakes his head and slings water, drool, or food debris everywhere. Brush his teeth with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children and other pets
  Saints are, well, saintly around kids. Patient and gentle, they step carefully around them and will put up with a lot. That doesn't mean they should have to, though. Supervise interactions between young children and Saints to make sure there's no ear- or tail-pulling, biting, or climbing on or knocking over on the part of either party.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs and never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how trustworthy or well trained, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
Saints can also get along well with other pets, especially if they're introduced to them in puppyhood. Supervise them around smaller dogs and cats just to make sure they don't accidentally step or lie on them.

Record size
  An 1895 New York Times report mentions a St. Bernard named Major F. measuring 8 feet 6 inches (2.59 m) in length, who, if the claims are true, would be the longest dog in history.Another St. Bernard named Benedictine V Schwarzwald Hof (Pierson, Michigan - USA) also reached 315 lb (143 kg), which earned a place in the 1981 edition of the Guinness Book of World Records.

Famous St. Bernards
  • Bamse, a Norwegian dog honoured for exploits during World War II memorial statue in Montrose, Scotland where he died in 1944
  • Barry, famous Alpine rescue dog
  • Bernie, mascot of the Colorado Avalanche
  • Bernie "Saint" Bernard, mascot of the Siena Saints
  • Bernie, mascot of the Northampton Saints
  • Gumbo, team mascot for the New Orleans Saints
  • Porthos, J.M. Barrie's dog
  • Schnorbitz, on-stage partner of British comedian Bernie Winters during his later career
  • Schotzie & Schotzie "02", beloved pets and mascots of Cincinnati Reds' owner Marge Schott
  • Scipio Saint Bernard of Orville Wright
  • Shirley Temple and a St. Bernard friend
  • Wallace , mascot of The Canadian Scottish Regiment (Princess Mary's)
  • Båtsman, a St. Bernard in Astrid Lindgren's story Vi på Saltkråkan
  • Beethoven. The 1992 comedy film Beethoven features a large, friendly but troublesome St. Bernard and, in later sequels, his mate and their brood of unruly pups. According to the producers of the sequel Beethoven's 2nd, the St. Bernards used in the film grew so fast during filming that over 100 St. Bernard puppies were cast to portray the sequel's four puppies  and a mother St. Bernard named Missy.
  • Bolivar a/k/a Bornworthy and Bernie, Donald Duck's non-anthropomorphic pet, and Bolivar's son, Behemoth
  • Buck, from Jack London's novel, The Call of the Wild, is described as half St. Bernard and half "Scotch shepherd dog", but was rendered as full St. Bernard in at least one of the six movie versions.
  • Cujo, a dog who contracts rabies and becomes crazed, terrorizing the residents of the fictional town of Castle Rock, Maine from the 1981 Stephen King novel Cujo and the 1983 film of the same name.
  • George, from the 1971 movie George! and its 1972–74 spinoff television series.
  • Nana, in the Disney and Columbia Pictures Peter Pan movies 
  • Neil, the martini-slurping St. Bernard of George and Marion Kerby in the 1950s television series Topper. 
Legends
  The famous Barry found a small boy in the snow and persuaded the boy to climb on his back, and then carried the boy to safety.
  A St Bernard named Major is often credited with being the dog that helped save Manchester United, currently one of the world's largest football clubs, from financial ruin. The legend goes that in 1902 when the club owed sizable debts, the then captain Harry Stafford was showing off his prized St Bernard at a fund-raiser for the club when he was approached by a wealthy brewery owner, J.H.Davis, who enquired to buy the dog. Harry Stafford refused the offer but managed to convince him to buy the club thus saving Manchester United from going bankrupt.

Did You Know?
  It’s true that the Saint Bernard was a savior to stranded travelers in the Swiss Alps, but he never wore a brandy keg around his neck.
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Wednesday, September 3, 2014

Everything about your Newfoundland

 Everything about your Newfoundland
  The Newfoundland is a large, strong dog breed from — wait for it — Newfoundland. He was originally used as a working dog to pull nets for fishermen and haul wood from the forest. He is a capable and hardworking dog, well suited to work on land or water. He is a strong swimmer and equally strong "pack horse." Sweet-natured and responsive, he makes a wonderful family companion as well.
  Roundly considered to be one of the most intelligent dog breeds in the world, the Newfoundlander is an ideal companion. In addition to being an excellent pack carrier and guardian for children and families, the Newfie is unmatched at water rescues. In modern times, it is brought along for hiking and camping expeditions, but is also still held in high esteem by rural families in need of a working dog.

Overview
  Surely you remember Nana, the fictional Newfoundland employed as a nanny by the Darling family in Peter Pan? Sweet-natured Nana was first introduced to the public by Scottish novelist and playwright J. M. Barrie in his 1904 play, Peter Pan, which later became the well-loved kids' story we know today.
  It's true that Barrie's fictional account of Nana as a round-the-clock babysitter stretches reality a bit. However, there is truth in the author's characterization of the dog.
  The Newfoundland really is a sweet dog who loves children. He's naturally gentle and friendly with them, as well as protective. Fans of this breed say the Newfoundland really is a natural-born babysitter.
  Originating in Newfoundland, Canada, located on the northeastern shore of that country, the Newfoundland, affectionately nicknamed "Newfie," shares a birthplace with the popular Labrador Retriever. The breeds are similar in character, sharing a desire to please, intelligence, a strong work ethic, friendliness, adaptability and versatility.
  The Newfoundland is a giant breed (about 100 pounds). Though relatively placid, he still needs daily exercise to keep fit.
  Neat freaks need not consider the Newfoundland because his long, heavy coat is a mud-burr-dirt magnet. He is especially skilled at tracking dirt and debris throughout the house. You'll need to keep up with quite a bit of grooming to minimize the damage. And he drools — a lot.
But when it comes to training, you'll find the Newfoundland is an A student. He learns quickly and there is little this dog can't do. Training should begin early because the breed gets big quickly and it can be tough to haul a 100-pound pooch off the couch.
  All dogs have the potential for heroism, but it seems to be a hardwired into this naturally strong swimmer. There are many accounts of Newfoundlands rescuing people from the cold waters of the Atlantic following a shipwreck or plucking children from icy deep water — just in time.
  Regardless of the purpose of the Newfoundland in your life, be it worker or companion, he will no doubt capture your heart.

Highlights
  • The Newfoundland is a big dog when full grown. Though mellow, he's not your basic one-bedroom apartment dog and would probably be happier in a more spacious setting.
  • He has has a strong work ethic, needs exercise, and mental stimulation. Ongoing training and dog sports are a perfect outlet for his working abilities.
  • If you can't stand dog slobber, the Newfoundland is not for you. This breed drools. A lot.
  • To keep the Newfoundland's thick coat looking great, he needs regular grooming. You can do it yourself, which is time consuming, or you can hire a professional groomer, which can be expensive.
  • The Newfoundland thrives in cool climates, though he can adapt to living in warmer climates. To protect him from heat stroke, keep him near air conditioning or fans when it's really hot.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a shelter dog, a rescue group, or a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • Newfoundlands make excellent lifeguards and can bring a drowning adult ashore.
  • When living with a Newfie, drool is a part of life. Don’t believe breeders who claim to breed for “dry-mouthed” dogs.
Breed standards
  • AKC group: Working
  • UKC group: Guardian Dog
  • Average lifespan:  8 - 10 years
  • Average size:  99 - 155 pounds
  • Coat appearance: Thick, long, coarse
  • Coloration: Black, gray, brown and white
  • Hypoallergenic: No
  • Other identifiers: Broad-bodied; muscular, webbed feet; drooping jowls
  • Possible alterations: No
  • Comparable Breeds: Labrador Retriever, Great Pyrenees
History
  The Newfoundland comes from the Canadian province of the same name and worked alongside the fishermen of the area. Although originating in Canada, the details are sketchy.
There are three theories of how the Newfoundland came to be, though as is the case with most breeds, it's hard to validate. The first is that the Newfoundland is a cross between the Tibetan Mastiff and the now-extinct American Black Wolf. Through the pairings of those two animals, the Newfoundland eventually evolved.
  Another school of thought is that Vikings left the dogs when they visited the New World in 1000 A.D. and these dogs interbred and were eventually bred with wolves native to Eastern Canada.
  The third theory is that the Newfoundland is the result of many European breeds cross bred around the 15th and 16th centuries, among them the Pyrenean Sheep Dogs, Mastiffs, and Portuguese Water Dogs
  What is known is that sometime in the late 18th century, Sir Joseph Banks, an English botanist, acquired several Newfoundlands and in 1775 George Cartwright named them. In the late 1800s, another fan, Professor Albert Heim of Switzerland identified and described the breed.
  But the existence of the Newfie, as the breed is sometimes called, was in jeopardy until then. In the 1780s, the breed was almost wiped out because of government-imposed restrictions mandating that Canadian families had to pay taxes on the one dog they were allowed to keep.
One person who contributed to the Newfoundland's resurgence was Sir Edwin Landseer (1802-1873), who liked to include the Newfoundland in his paintings. The white and black variety of the Newfoundland was named Landseer in his honor.
  But the future of the breed was truly solidified when the Honorable Harold MacPherson (1884-1963), governor of Newfoundland, made the dog his breed of choice.
  In 1860, the first Newfoundland was shown in England. The breed was first registered with the American Kennel Club in 1879 and the first American Newfoundland champion was titled in 1883.

Personality
  The Newfoundland is known for his sweet disposition. He's like a big, loveable Teddy Bear. He loves children, is intelligent, and aims to please. He's happiest when he is with his family, and should not be left alone for long periods of time or be banished to the backyard or a kennel.
  Like every dog, the Newfoundland needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences when young. Socialization helps ensure that your Newfoundland puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.
  Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.

Health
  The Newfoundland, which has an average lifespan of 8 to 10 years, is prone to serious health conditions such as gastric torsion, Sub-Aortic Stenosis (SAS), cystinuria, canine hip dysplasia (CHD), epilepsy, and elbow dysplasia, and minor issues like von Willebrand's Disease (vWD), cataract, Osteochondrosis Dissecans (OCD), entropion, ectropion, cruciate ligament rupture. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may recommend cardiac, eye, hip, and elbow tests for this breed of dog. Additionally, some Newfoundlands are extremely sensitive to anesthesia, and most do not tolerate heat well.

Care
  Because of its heavy coat, the Newfie does not fare well in hot weather. It should be kept outdoors only in cold or temperate weather, and in summer, the coat may be trimmed for neatness and comfort, and brushed daily to manage excess shedding and prevent the coat from matting. The dog is at its best when it can move freely between the yard and the house, but still needs plenty of space indoors to stretch properly. Daily exercise is essential, as is typical with all work dogs.
  Although its relaxed appearance might indicate that this breed would prefer to lounge around, the Newfie has an abundance of energy that needs to be spent in order for the dog to be at its top shape. Regular walks and romps in the park or in a large yard will keep the Newfie fit and content. Being large dogs, they do have larger appetites, but care must be taken not to overfeed them, as they can easily become overweight, stressing the organs extremities and shortening their lifespans.
  In the summer, the Newfoundlander is more likely to drool, since it must pant more to keep its body temperature down, owing to its size and coat. Summertime water activities are ideal, since the Newfie excels at swimming, but keep in mind that even in the winter this breed benefits from a brisk swim. Cold water swimming is what they are built for, after all. According to some breeders, the Landseers are more active, thus requiring more exercise. In fact, it is ideal for families who enjoy camping, fishing, or hiking with an enthusiastic participant and helpful furry companion.

Living Conditions
  Will do okay in an apartment if sufficiently exercised. They are relatively inactive indoors and a small yard is sufficient. Newfies prefer colder climates and do not do well in the heat. Make sure there is always cool water and a shaded place for them to lie.

Exercise
  This gentle giant is quite content to laze around the house, but still needs to be taken on a daily walk. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as in a dog's mind the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human. It will enjoy frequent opportunities to swim and frolic.

Grooming
  The Newfoundland has a water-resistant double coat of black, brown, gray or Landseer (white with black markings). Using a steel comb and wire slicker brush, groom the coat at least a couple times a week to prevent mats and remove dead hair.
  Newfies shed, and regular brushing will help reduce the amount of hair floating around your house. Twice a year, in spring and fall, they shed heavily, called “blowing coat.”  Plan to spend additional time brushing to keep all the hair under control.
Newfies also drool, so get in the habit of carrying around a hand towel so you can wipe your dog’s mouth as needed, especially after he eats or drinks. Bathe the Newfoundland when he’s dirty.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath. Most important, keep this water-loving dog’s ears clean and dry to help prevent ear infections.

Is this breed right for you?
  Although Newfoundlands are huge in size, they do make wonderful apartment pets. They are a low-energy breed and require just enough exercise to keep them at a healthy weight. Due to their coarse coat, Newfoundlands don’t do well in warm climates. This is a lovable breed that thrives on companionship and a family atmosphere. Gentle and caring, Newfoundlands rank among the best breeds for children of all ages.

Children and other pets
  This cuddly giant is highly tolerant of children, which is important because he's a kid magnet thanks to his size and wealth of soft fur. But he can also accidentally knock over a toddler or small child, and can appear intimidating to children who don't know him.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  The Newfoundland is also easygoing and friendly with other pets, including cats and small mammals, as long as he is properly socialized and trained.


Famous Newfoundlands
  • Adam: Seaward's Blackbeard: 1984 Best in Show winner at the Westminster Dog Show
  • Ava Marie : 2004 Best In Show aka "Josh" Granddaughter is a lifeguard in Goshen, NY
  • Bashaw (Matthew Cotes Wyatt): The Earl of Dudley's favourite dog, a sculpture by Matthew Cotes Wyatt can be seen at the Victoria and Albert museum in London
  • Boatswain: pet of English poet Lord Byron and the subject of his poem "Epitaph to a Dog"
  • Bilbo: lifeguard at Sennon cove beach in Cornwall
  • Boo: saved a man both deaf and mute at ten months of age without any previous training
  • Brumus: Robert F. Kennedy's dog
  • Brutus: first dog to complete the Appalachian Mountain Club's "Winter 48", climbing all 48 peaks in one calendar winter
  • Bucky. Mascot of Columbia, MO-based rock band, "The Diet"
  • Carlo: Emily Dickinson's dog
  • Charlie Erhart: Lyndon B. Johnson's dog
  • Darbydale's All Rise Pouchcove (AKA Josh): 2004 Best in Show winner at the Westminster Dog Show
  • Faithful: First dog of President Ulysses S. Grant
  • Frank: Unofficial mascot of the Orphan Brigade during the American Civil War
  • Gander: the Mascot of the Royal Rifles of Canada who was killed in action at the Battle of Hong Kong when he carried a grenade away from wounded soldiers. For this he was awarded the PDSA Dickin Medal retroactively in 2000.
  • Hairy Man: The dog who helped Ann Harvey and her father and brother rescue 163 people from a shipwreck.
  • Jeff: Wonderful gorilla-loving friend of Flagstaff, AZ; mascot of dream pop band the Sea Section 
  • Luath: Landseer Newfoundland pet of J. M. Barrie and the inspiration for "Nana", the Darling children's nurse in Peter Pan.
  • Mas: first Newfoundland dog to jump out of a helicopter Ecurel B-350 in 1992 during a joint training exercise between Scuola Italiana Cani Salvataggio, SICS, and Aeronautica Militare.
  • Morse: A Newfoundland/Saint Bernard cross breed, Morse was a popular contestant on Channel 4's Superstar Dogs.
  • Smokey: Lion-styled mascot of the East Coast Bays Barracudas.
  • Plato: pet of John James Audubon.
  • Pluto: pet of the Croatian operatic soprano Ilma de Murska, which used to dine at table with her and was trained to eat a cooked fowl from a place setting without dripping gravy on the tablecloth. Pluto lived in the 1860s.
  • Robber: dog of Richard Wagner who accompanied him on his flight from his creditors from Riga on a fishing boat, which inspired the opera The Flying Dutchman.
  • Russ: last dog of Richard Wagner, buried at the feet of his master in the composer's tomb in the park of Villa Wahnfried in Bayreuth, under his own plaque: "Here rests and watches Wagner's Russ."
  • Sable Chief: mascot of Royal Newfoundland Regiment
  • Swansea Jack: Famous Welsh rescue dog identified as a Newfoundland, but had an appearance more like a modern Flat-Coated Retriever
  • Seaman: companion of explorer Meriwether Lewis
  • Yogi: John Madden's Newfoundland
Did You Know?
  A Newfoundland made an impressive appearance in the 2005 romantic comedy “Must Love Dogs,” starring Diane Lane and John Cusack. The dog, named Mother Theresa, was actually played by two Newfie puppies; director Gary David Goldberg adopted both dogs when the filming ended.

A dream day in the life of a Newfoundland
  Newfoundlands have been nicknamed "nature's nanny" for a reason: they're simply wonderful with kids and have a knack for caregiving. An ideal day would be spent swimming and playing with kids of all ages and sizes. Their large size makes this breed an excellent furry pillow and their sweet disposition means they are more than happy to nap by your side.

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