LUV My dogs: frustration

LUV My dogs

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Showing posts with label frustration. Show all posts
Showing posts with label frustration. Show all posts

Wednesday, October 26, 2016

How to Stop a Dog from Digging?

How to Stop a Dog from Digging?
  One of the biggest frustrations that comes with dog ownership is trying to establish how to stop dogs from digging. Our dogs bring lots of joy into our lives, but excessive digging problems can certainly put a strain on the owner-dog relationship.
 Dogs  dig when trying to get warm or stay cool, to entertain themselves, to bury valued items, and when hunting ground-dwelling animals.

Why Do Dogs Dig?


  • To learn how to stop dogs from digging holes it is crucial to determine the reason why your puppy or older dog is digging in the first place. That is a list of the most common reasons your dog may be digging:
  • He simply likes to dig!
  • Your dog may just seeking your attention.
  • May be bored and digs for mental and physical stimulation.
  • If your dog is digging under the fence he may be trying to get out to search for a mate.
  • Dogs are often attracted to fertilized dirt - the smell of fertilizer is irresistible to some dogs.
  • For shelter, to cool themselves down or warm themselves up.
  • Some breeds are very prone to digging, it is instinctual and bred into them.
  • May be because your dog is hunting for some little critters that live in your garden.
  • For food storage purposes. 

How To Stop Dogs From Digging?

1. Diagnose the problem. If you can figure out why your dog is digging holes, your odds of changing the behavior will dramatically improve. Some digging is random and unable to be diagnosed, but usually there are discernible reasons for the behavior.
2. Give your dog more attention. As many a dog-lover can attest, canines are not all that different from children in many ways, including a desire to get attention by whatever means necessary. Your dog may have learned that digging a hole in your nice garden gets attention from you, even if that attention is of the negative variety.
3. Reduce your dog's boredom. Dogs often dig for no other reason than simply because they are bored. Your dog may be bored if he stares at fences for a long time, whines, or engages in playful or "hyperactive" behavior, including digging holes.
4. Create safe discouragements. You have to catch the dog in the act of digging a hole if you want to effectively associate your disapproval with the activity. Since most of the digging is likely to happen while you're not watching, you need to find ways to make the act of digging while you are not around a little bit less pleasurable for the dog.
5. Try more unpleasant  discouragements if your dog continues to dig. If you've unsuccessfully tried to discourage your dog from digging the polite way, it may be time to step up your tactics. Here are some less pleasant ways of discouraging your dog from digging.
6. Seek professional assistance as needed. If you are having trouble diagnosing why your dog digs, or in stopping the digging even if you know why it happens, it may be time to call in the pros. Certified dog trainers and animal behaviorists can offer you personalized tips and techniques for addressing the causes and conditions of your dog's digging.
7. Construct a doggy-digging "sandbox." This is a designated, defined area of your yard where it is okay for the dog to dig. Encourage your dog to play in this area instead of the restricted area.
8. Create a shaded area for your dog outside. If you don't have an outside shelter to keep your dog cool in hot weather, he might be digging to find a respite from the heat. This is especially likely if the digging is near the foundations of buildings, trees, or water sources.
9. Eliminate any prey that your dog may be chasing. Some dogs are natural hunters and love the thrill of the chase. If the dog digs at the roots of trees or plants, or there's a raised path leading to the digging site, it's possible that your pet has spotted a rodent or other type of animal to hunt.
10. Keep your dog from escaping. Your dog may be trying to escape the premises to get to something, to get somewhere, or to simply to get away. This is the case especially if the digging happens near fencing. If you think this may be the case, try to figure out what your dog is running to or from, and provide incentives to stay put in the yard.
11. Remove temptations. The more temptations the dog has, the harder it is to resist digging. If you create a yard that is less tempting to dig holes in, the behavior will be much easier to keep under  control.



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Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Reasons Why Shih Tzu Become Violent

Reasons Why Shih Tzu  Become Violent
  Dog aggression is a major dog problem for owners. I want to help you understand the causes of dog aggression, so you can overcome this dog problem. Dog aggression stems from the dog's frustration and dominance. The dog's frustration comes from a lack of dog exercise, and the dog's dominance comes from a lack of calm-assertive leadership.

  Shih Tzu are small cute dogs that don't look like they could harm a fly. This then means that many of us make the mistake of thinking that they can get away with being aggressive and that we don't need to train it out of them.
  However this is a big mistake and while your Shih Tzu might not be a threat to your health, it is nevertheless still important to make sure that they aren't aggressive and that they recognise you as in charge. For one this is important because while you may not be afraid of a little bad pup, your visitors and other people might and this can be very upsetting for them if they have to deal with a dog that is constantly growling at them. At the same time if they are aggressive to other dogs they might well get themselves into a fight that they can't win – so it's important for their safety too. And anyway it is simply not pleasant to have a little dog who you love growling at you every time you move – you're supposed to be friends.
  Aggressive Shih Tzu behavior specially when it is a family dog should be resolved quickly or it may lead to danger and scare not just people in your family but also visitors and others who are around you. This aggressive behavior is a condition that might have developed since it was a puppy, like being attacked by another dog or it might not like the feeling of being dominated by a master.


Reasons behind Aggressive Behavior in Dogs- The delicate age for a Shih Tzu behavior development is at the 6th week. Whatever the environment gives makes it significant like socializing with other dogs and training to ensure they are people-friendly. You can easily apply this to a dog until it is 14 weeks old or can extend longer as you deem necessary.


How Does a Dog Become Aggressive?
  So the question is, how did your Shih Tzu get to be aggressive in the first place? Well there are a couple of ways. Firstly aggression can sometimes gradually occur as your dog grows up through play. If you dog bites and mouths you and you don't ever teach it to stop, then this biting can increase to the point where it is drawing blood and leaving teeth marks and it is then somewhat too late to stop it. 
  At the same time you might find that your dog is aggressive because it believes itself to be the leader of the pack or the 'alpha male'. Dogs are descended from wolves and they are pack animals as a result. Thus your dog will conclude that it's in charge if you pander to its every need and will use aggression to keep you in line. Lastly, sometimes aggression can be learned, and if you are very aggressive towards your dog, and to each other, your dog might simply learn the behaviour and might act out because it's unhappy.

What you should do to bring up a non-aggressive Shih Tzu are:

1. Let the Shih Tzu puppy on it's own with its litters until 2 months old. Do not use violent practice to a puppy aged between 8 and 10 weeks but alternatively address it tenderly. Talk to it softly and avoid hurting it physically if you would like grow a dog without aggressive Shih Tzu habits.
2. The Shih Tzu have to understand how to get along with other dogs (many dogs that are highly sociable can get along well together with other pets like cats, birds, horses, etc.) and more importantly with people. At the age of 14 weeks, if your puppy had been taught how to socialize you've great probability of an aggressive Shih Tzu.
3. Provide a conducive and wholesome setting whenbreeding up a puppy, totally free of mean masters, appropriate and enough living conditions with socialization, and protect it from attack by not just other dogs but in addition other animals.
4. Aggression is also seen as a hereditary and genetics affect.meaning that naturally some breed of dogs are aggressive but some are friendly. But it does not follow that a naturally aggressive breed can't be nurtured to lose its aggressive behavior.
5. A dog that would like to establish dominance over a territory displays aggression. Your shih tzu should learn that you're the master of the house at a very early age.


Reward Your Dog
  But the rest of your time should be spent petting your dog and rewarding it for all its good behaviour. Make sure you pay it attention and stroke it as often as possible. This will make your dog feel happy and loved and as a general rule a happy dog is a well behaved dog.

What to Do If a Shih Tzu Shows Aggressive Behavior

  A dog actually reaches sexual maturity at age of 14 months. If it shows signs of aggression during this period, take best suited actions straight away. At the moment the Shih Tzu puppy must have understood it that you are the master. It should not get any reward after expressing aggression out of being fearful. That will teach the dog a lesson.
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Saturday, July 12, 2014

Tips On How To Get Your Dogs Attention

Tips On How To Get Your Dogs Attention
 “My dog just doesn’t listen!” 
  It is very frustrating when your dog ignores you, but is he really ignoring you, or does he not realize you are even speaking to him. 
  Dogs are interesting beasts. They crave your attention and companionship. Why do you suppose there are times when your dog just completely ignores you?
  One of the things you have to learn is that you need to give your dog a reason to follow your command. If your pet has become accustomed to getting in trouble when his name is called, he is less likely to respond to you. The worst thing you can do is to call your dog, only to punish him. Would you turn to acknowledge someone calling your name if you knew it was not going to be a pleasant encounter? I wouldn't.
  Dogs, for the most part, are happy-go-lucky. They are always ready to play and get their feelings hurt very easily when there is a negative confrontation. You have the capability of humiliating or embarrassing your dog just by your actions. You do not want to do that. Believe me when I tell you, your dog is very sensitive to how you treat him. He wants your approval more than anything else. 
  If he is used to you reprimanding or punishing him when you call him, why shouldn't he ignore you. He may be thinking you will just go away if he pretends not to hear you.

Here’s how to teach your dog the “look” command:
1. Getting Started
“Look” is a very simple command to teach. You will need some treats, and your clicker if you are working on clicker training. Teaching “look” is a great way to introduce your dog to the clicker if you have not already done so. You should begin training in a quiet spot with very little to distract your dog. Once you have your clicker and treats ready, say your dog’s name followed by the command “look.”
2. Getting Your Dog’s Attention
For many dogs, hearing their name will be enough to get their attention. If your dog looks at your face after you give the command, you can praise him or click, and give him a treat.
Some dogs may not respond immediately to hearing their name paired with the “look” command. In this case, after you give the command, wave a treat in front of your dog’s nose, and then pull the treat up to your face. Your dog will follow the treat, and end up looking at your face. Praise him or click, and give him a treat immediately.
Within a few short training sessions, you will have no problem getting your dog to focus his attention on you. Continue practicing with your dog, and gradually move up to working in more distracting surroundings. Soon you will be able to get your dog’s attention in any situation.
  You want your dog to respect you for being fair and kind. Their feelings are not much different from our own. There is a difference between a command and a threat. "Come Shadow, good boy", this is good. "Shadow, if you don't get over here, you are going to get it", not good. Dogs respond to the tone of your voice. Do not confuse him by giving a command in an angry voice. You can be sure he will be ignoring you in no time.
  Your dog does not purposely disobey you. There is a better chance that he just does not understand what you want him to do. You need to give him a clear command so he does understand. 

There are a few things you can do to get your dog to acknowledge you... 
1. Does your dog know his name? Make sure you use his name a lot during training sessions while showing affection at the same time. If he does not know his name, that is your first problem. The idea is that you want him to pay attention to you when you speak to him or give him a command. He will begin to recognize his name and associate it with something pleasant.
2. Does your dog know you are talking to him? I know that sounds silly, but depending on your tone of voice, he may not be intentionally ignoring you at all. He may think you are talking to someone else.
3. Does your dog like to wander around and investigate the premises? When your pet does this, he is just in his own little world. It is as if we, as people, have something on our mind. We will just tune out our surroundings. So if we do it, why can't they? Get his attention by petting him and saying his name. Once you have gotten his attention, then give him a command.
4. Do not be afraid to make eye contact with your dog. It is hard for him to ignore you if you are looking him right in the eyes. This also helps to establish you as the alpha of his pack.
5. Once your dog realizes that what you want him to do is not going to be unpleasant, he will begin to acknowledge you. Always keep in mind that your tone of voice can put a different feel to any command. Always keep your voice pleasant, but not passive.
6. Do not try to get his attention if you are going to do something unpleasant. If you are going to bathe him or clip his nails, for instance, you need to go get him. This will help to keep real commands positive so he will listen to you.
7. Your body language is very important when training your dog to listen to you. Just like people, dogs will associate your body language with your mood. If, for instance, your arms are crossed and you are standing tall, your dog could associate this with you being angry. Stay relaxed and your dog will be relaxed and respond better.
8. If you are training your dog to come to you with treats, let him come all the way to you. Do not reach out and offer him the treat. Hold the treat next to your leg and make him come all the way to you. 
9. You need to establish yourself as the alpha dog, but not by seeming threatening to your dog. Always speak to your dog in a pleasant voice. Once your dog understands what you want, he is less likely to ignore you.

  By the way, did you notice how in order to teach your dog to pay attention to you, you have to pay attention to your dog? Yes, that’s the secret decoder ring of dog training, right there.

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Wednesday, March 26, 2014

6 Tips To Minimize Dog Aggression

6 Tips To Minimize Dog Aggression
  Dog aggression is a major dog problem for owners. Dog aggression stems from the dog's frustration and dominance. The dog's frustration comes from a lack of dog exercise, and the dog's dominance comes from a lack of calm-assertive leadership.
  While extreme cases should be handled by a professional, dog owners can try these six tips to begin to address their dog's aggression towards other dogs.


1. Trainin is a must

Having a trained dog is very important. In fact usually when a dog has been trained well we don't see dog aggression, because the dog has been taught that showing aggression is not allowed.

2. Re-socialize your dog to other dogs
Teaching your pooch how to play and socialize with other dogs without aggression or fear is essential training for new puppies. After an attack by another canine, socialization becomes even more important in order for your buddy to return to his bouncy, friendly self.


3. Keep your dog distracted with a command
With a trained dog this is easy to do simply by giving a "heel" command. A nicely trained dog will ignore the distraction and do what it was commanded.

4. Neuter or spay to prevent sexually-based aggression

5. Put your dog in a down-stay when he needs a moment to calm down
The down and down stay commands or the most important and powerful exercises you have for gaining control of your dog. When you need control simply put it in the down position. With dogs that show aggression this exercise is a must.

6. Make sure you do not give the wrong body language

  Think of the difference between your body language during your lecture and during an average daily greeting or interaction. You are using a different tone of voice, moving erratically, giving very stern looks, and not touching your dog as you normally do. Your dog looks at you and sees and very different individual than he sees on an average day.

As you can see, dog aggression can be handled many different ways. By learning to work through aggression problems, you can begin to help your pet learn new ways of handling himself around other dogs.
  If your pet is going to show dog aggression it will usually happen sometime around 12-24 month of age. Keep in mind that this type of aggression usually doesn't get better by itself so be sure to look for help from a canine behavior specialist or a trainer with experience with dog aggression.
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