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Showing posts with label friend. Show all posts
Showing posts with label friend. Show all posts

Friday, June 30, 2017

Everything about your Curly-Coated Retriever

Everything about your Curly-Coated Retriever
   Created to retrieve game from land or water, the Curly-Coated Retriever dog breed was popular with English gamekeepers, hunters, and poachers alike. Today he competes in such dog sports as field trials, agility, obedience, and flyball and has been successful as a therapy dog, drug detection dog, and search and rescue dog. When he’s not out working or competing, he’s happy to lie beside his favorite person, enjoying a nice back scratch.

Overview
  The Curly-Coated Retriever has been around since the late 18th century, probably created by crossing now-extinct Old English Water Dogs, Irish Water Spaniels and small Newfoundlands, with, yes, some Poodle added later. The result was a black or liver-colored retriever with tight curls on his body and a zest for water retrieving. The Curly-Coat is a fun and interesting dog, no doubt about it.
   The Curly may be uncommon, but he has a dedicated band of followers who prize him for his intelligence, trainability, multiple abilities, sense of humor and, of course, that unusual appearance. He’s not the breed for everyone, but if you can appreciate his constantly thinking brain, you will find him to be a loving, talented and entertaining companion.
  A typical retriever, he enjoys activity, although he requires somewhat less exercise than, say, a Lab or a Flat Coat. Channel his energy into dog sports such as agility, flyball and flying disc games, or teach him to pull you or your kid on skates or a skateboard. He’ll also do well in competitive obedience. The Curly is slow to mature, however, so it can take time for training to stick. Be patient, and use positive reinforcement techniques such as play, praise and food rewards. When the motivation is there, the Curly learns quickly and easily.
  Like most dogs, Curly-Coats become bored when left to their own devices. They can easily become noisy or destructive if they don’t have other dogs to keep them company and don’t receive much attention from their people. But when the Curly lives with a family who is willing to spend plenty of time training and exercising him, he thrives.

Highlights
  • The Curly-Coated Retriever has the most unusual coat of all of the retriever breeds. The coat requires only moderate grooming, and the breed sheds only twice a year.
  • Curly-Coated Retrievers generally have an oily coat, which is more likely to cause reactions in people with allergies.
  • Curly-Coated Retrievers are more reserved around strangers than other retriever breeds and needs to be properly socialized to avoid any timidity.
  • Curly-Coated Retrievers are sporting dogs and have the energy that other sporting and working dogs have. If they are not given adequate exercise, at least 30 to 60 minutes per day, they can become quite destructive in their boredom.
  • Curly-Coated Retrievers tend to be mouthy and will nip and chew everything in reach, including toys, clothes, and hands.
  • The Curly-Coated Retriever is intelligent and enjoys working, but he needs a strong, confident owner who will keep him from taking charge. He also needs variety in training and activities because he tends to get bored doing the same old thing again and again.
  • Curly-Coated Retrievers are more difficult to find than other breeds, but it is still important to look for the best possible breeder, even if long waiting lists await you.
  • Curly-Coated Retrievers take longer to mature than other breeds, so be prepared for your dog to act puppylike for at least three years.
  • In general, Curly-Coated Retrievers do well with children but small children should never be left unsupervised with any dog regardless of breed.
  • Curly-Coated Retrievers are not meant for apartments and do better in homes with a large yard where they can expend their energy. They are quieter in homes when their energy levels are met.
  • Although they enjoy the great outdoors, Curly-Coated Retrievers are not dogs who can be kenneled outside. They enjoy being with their family and can become very destructive when left away from them.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Curly dates to the 18th century and is acknowledged as the oldest of the retrieving breeds.
  • The Curly’s coat is unusual but easy to care for and sheds little. It can be black or liver-colored.
  • Like most retrievers, the Curly loves playing in water.
  • A home with a yard is the best environment for a Curly, but a person who is committed to walking him or taking him to a dog park daily can keep one happy in a home without a yard.
  • Curlies excel at many activities, including hunt tests, agility, herding instinct tests, lure coursing, dock diving, flyball, scent hurdle racing, tracking and rally. At least one has run as part of a sled-dog team.
  • A daily walk of up to a mile will satisfy a Curly, but he’ll take all the exercise you can give him.
Breed standards
AKC Group: Sporting
UKC Group: Gun Dogs
Lifespan:  8 to 12 years
Average size:  between 60 to 70 pounds
Color: Black and Brown
Coat: Dense, Short, and Water-Repellent
Hypoallergenic Breed: No
Shedding: Moderate
Grooming Needs: Low Maintenance
Comparable Breeds: English Springer Spaniel, Labrador Retriever



History
  The exact history of the Curly-Coated Retriever is not known. Popular conjecture suggests that the Curly-Coated Retriever descends from the now-extinct Old English Water Spaniel and from the Retrieving Setter. Other contributors to the breed are thought to include the small St. John’s Newfoundland, the Poodle, the Labrador Retriever, the Pointer and/or the Irish Water Spaniel. 
  This popular gun dog was first exhibited in 1860 at Birmingham. In 1889, some Curly’s were exported to New Zealand, where they have since been used for retrieving duck and quail. In Australia, Curly-Coated Retrievers are also highly prized for use on water fowl in the swamps and lagoons of the Murray River. They are excellent all-around hunting dogs, with an especially tender mouth and unparalleled water skills.
  The first breed club was established in England in 1896. The breed was introduced to America as early as 1907, with the first American Kennel Club registration of a Curly-Coated Retriever being made in 1924. They are members of the AKC’s Sporting Group. The Curly-Coated Retriever Club of America was formed in 1979 and is the breed parent club in this country. In the early part of the twentieth century, the Curly’s popularity waned while the Flat-Coated Retriever’s popularity rose. Today, the Curly-Coated Retriever retains its world-wide presence as a determined, durable hunter and a gentle family companion, although the breed is still uncommon.


Personality
  The Curly-Coat is full of retriever drive and determination. He'll work 'til the job is done. In the field or at home, he's alert and self-confident. He has an even temper but is more reserved with strangers than other retrievers. Early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds and experiences — helps prevent timidity. That said, don't confuse his independence and poise with shyness or a lack of willingness to please. Curly-Coated Retrievers take longer to mature than other breeds, so be prepared to live with a full-grown puppy for several years.
  Curlies have a mind of their own and need a confident owner who won't allow them to run the show. The Curly-Coated Retriever responds well to training, although not always as quickly as other dogs. That doesn't mean he's dumb. He simply gets bored easily. Keep him interested with a variety of training exercises. It's not unusual for a Curly to ignore his trainer when an exercise or activity becomes repetitive.


Health
  The average life expectancy of the Curly-Coated Retriever is between 10 and 12 years. Breed health concerns may include gastric dilatation and volvulus (bloat), canine follicular dysplasia, entropion, ectropion, distichiasis, cataracts, epilepsy, generalized progressive retinal atrophy, glycogen storage disease and hip dysplasia.

Care
  The Curly-Coated Retriever does not require too much maintenance. However, certain things have to be taken care of. The curls require a bit of trimming, and occasional brushing. However, this is not required at the time of shedding. A daily exercise regimen, including retrieving and swimming, is important for Curly-Coated Retrievers. And if you are in search of an outside pet, the Curly-Coated Retriever is adaptable to living outdoors in temperate climates.

Living Conditions
  The Curly-Coated Retriever is not recommended for apartment life. It does best with at least a large yard. An eager and tireless land and (especially) water retriever outdoors, but a calm companion indoors. Curlies need to be part of the family and not left alone outside in the yard all day.

Training
  Curly-Coated Retrievers grow to become large dogs so it is essential that you start training when they are puppies. It is also important that you keep in mind that because they are such great Retrievers, they tend to mouthy and chew things up as pups. This unwanted behavior must be nipped in the bud at an early age.  The Curly is highly trainable and responds well to repetitive training sessions along with positive reinforcement. His willingness to please makes the Curly-Coated Retriever the perfect candidate for AKC Sanctioned Obedience Trials.
  Owners who plan to use their Curly-Coated Retrievers for hunting purposes should acclimate the pup to water as soon as possible. This doesn’t mean that a ten week old puppy should go into icy water in the freezing cold. It’s best to buy a plastic wading pool and fill it with water on a mild day. More than likely, the pup will find his way in and have a grand, old time. A retrieving dummy will make his first experience in the water a good one.

Activity Requirements
  Like other retriever breeds, the Curly Coated version needs lots of vigorous exercise every single day. They are an active person's dog – couch potatoes should steer clear of this breed. They love running, swimming, hiking, playing ball and catching frisbees. They can be competitive in agility courses, but they are not as obedient as their Golden Retriever counterparts, so they often do not excel in this arena, but they enjoy the activity and eat up the attention.
  Curlies need as much mental stimulation as they do physical stimulation and should always be provided with plenty of interesting activities throughout the day, especially when left alone. Inactivity and boredom leads to destructiveness and hyperactivity that is hard to curb.

Grooming
  The Curly coat of small, tight, crisp curls has little odor and is easy to care for. Comb or brush it out before bathing with an undercoat rake or a slicker brush and comb. Don’t worry that brushing will take the curl out of the coat.
  Depending on how dirty a Curly gets, a bath is necessary only every month or two. Most Curly coats dry quickly, sometimes in as little as ten minutes. Don’t blow dry a Curly unless you want him to look like a chia pet. 
  The only other grooming is a little trimming to neaten any straggly hairs, a bushy tail, or excessive feathering on the backs of the legs and behind the ears. Some Curlies have tufts of fur between their toes, giving the feet the appearance of fluffy houseslippers. These tufts are usually trimmed for the show ring, but can be left alone if you like the look.
  Curlies don’t shed much, but they do shed. If your Curly spends time in the house, you will find hair on the furniture or floor. The coat usually sheds a small amount year-round, with a heavier shed twice a year.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Keep the ears clean and dry to prevent ear infections. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  The Curly-Coated Retriever is a great companion for older children who can stand up to his size and energy level, but he may be overwhelming for younger children who are easily knocked down in play. Any time your Curly interacts with children, lay down some ground rules for dog and child. No ear pulling, tail pulling or biting allowed! For the safety of both, never leave small children unsupervised with any dog.
  Curly-Coated Retrievers generally do very well with other dogs and animals but socialization is still important in regard to animal interactions.

Is the Curly-Coated Retriever the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep. No trimming or stripping needed.
Moderate Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Moderately Easy Training: The Curly-Coated Retriever is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  You might mistake the Curly-Coated Retriever for a Labradoodle, but he’s a distinct breed, created in the 18th century by crossing now-extinct Old English Water Dogs, Irish Water Spaniels and small Newfoundlands. And yes, there’s some Poodle in the mix, too.





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Friday, February 26, 2016

Everything about your Finnish Spitz

Everything about your Finnish Spitz
  Choosing to add a furry friend to your growing household is a long-term commitment, and picking a breed that fits your lifestyle presents the key to a happy home. With over 160 American Kennel Club-recognized breeds, that decision can seem overwhelming. 
  Finnish Spitz want to be members of the family and are naturally protective. They are sensitive dogs and don't do well in homes where there's a lot of tension. But give them a loving atmosphere and include them in everything you do and they'll become a loyal, lively, and fun-loving friend. We're here to help you meet the breed that's right for you. If you're looking for an active breed that gets along well with every member of the family, learn all you need to know about the Finnish Spitz.

Overview
  The Finnish Spitz barks. That’s the first thing you should know about him. He was developed to bark and that’s what he does. He uses many different sounds to communicate, and “talking” to you will be an important part of his life. Get this dog only if you are willing to teach him when it’s okay to bark and when it’s not. On the plus side, he’s an excellent watchdog and will always let you know if someone is approaching the house or something out of the ordinary is going on.
  This is an active dog that needs daily exercise that will challenge him physically and mentally and prevent him from becoming destructive or noisy in an attempt to entertain himself. Plan to exercise him for 20 to 30 minutes at least once a day. He performs well in dog sports such as agility, flyball, obedience and rally, and is a sturdy and tireless playmate for kids.
  This intelligent and highly trainable dog responds well to positive reinforcement techniques such as play, praise and food rewards, but he is an independent thinker. Don’t expect unquestioning obedience from him and you won’t be disappointed. Keep training sessions short and fun so he doesn’t get bored.
  If the presence of Finnish Spitz dust puppies would make you crazy, reconsider your decision to get this breed. He’s not difficult to groom, but he does shed a fair amount of hair. Brush his double coat weekly to keep it clean and remove dead hair. During spring and fall shedding seasons, daily brushing will help to keep excess hair under control. In addition, trim his nails as needed, brush his teeth, and keep the ears clean to prevent infections.
  Last but not least, it should go without saying that a people-loving dog like the Finnish Spitz needs to live in the house. It’s an unhappy Finnish Spitz who is relegated to the backyard with little or no human companionship.

Highlights
  • Finnish Spitz are lively, high-energy dogs and require lots of daily exercise.
  • These dogs are called Bark Pointers for a good reason. They love to bark! Train them at an early age to stop barking on command, or hope that you have tolerant neighbors!
  • Because Finnish Spitz are hunting dogs, they should never be turned out in unsecured areas. A fenced yard is a necessity.
  • If left outside alone for too long, Finnish Spitz will bark at everything they see unless trained at an early age not to do so.
  • Finnish Spitz take a long time to mature mentally, and can be rather silly and puppyish until they are three to four years old.
  • Hunting dogs in general can be independent thinkers, which makes them appear to be stubborn at times. Finnish Spitz are no different. Learn the proper training methods and motivations, however, and you'll be pleased with your dog's intelligence and willingness to learn.
  • Finnish Spitz generally are good with other pets in the household, but can be aggressive with dogs they don't know.
  • This is a breed that tends to be aloof and suspicious of strangers. They aren't good guard dogs, but they will alert you by barking if someone approaches your home.
  • Finnish Spitz love to eat, especially treats. Since they can be somewhat manipulative, they will try to get as many treats from you as possible and can become overweight. Try giving them a carrot or a low-fat treat instead.
  • Never buy a Finnish Spitz from a puppy mill, a pet store, or a breeder who doesn't provide health clearances or guarantees. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies and who breeds for sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • In Finland this breed is called the Finsk Spetz. Other names include Finnish Hunting Dog and Barking Bird Dog.
  • When you look at a Finnish Spitz, you see a medium-size dog with a wedge-shaped head, small prick ears, a foxlike expression, a square body covered in beautiful red-gold coat and a tail that curls over the back. Males are larger with more coat.
  • The Finnish Spitz was bred to track everything from squirrels and rodents to big game like bears.
  • The Finnish Spitz's ancestors were bred from Spitz-type dogs in central Russia over 2000 years ago.
Breed standards
AKC group: Non-sporting
UKC group: Northern Breed
Average lifespan: 12 - 15 years
Average size: 31 - 35 pounds
Coat appearance: Soft undercoat, harsh outer coat
Coloration: Red, auburn, honey
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Square and well-balanced body and frame with a deep chest; resembles a red fox; black nose, lips and black-rimmed eyes; catlike feet and hairy tail that curls upward
Possible alterations: Born with a darker coat that gets lighter as he gets older
Comparable Breeds: Siberian Husky, Chinese Shar-Pei

History
  The Finnish Spitz developed from selectively bred Spitz-type dogs that inhabited central Russia several thousand years ago. Isolated Finno-Ugrian tribes in the far northern regions bred dogs according to their specific needs. 
  These small clans of woodsmen relied on their dogs to help them obtain food, and the excellent hunting ability of the Finnish Spitz made it a favorite choice.
  By 1880, as advanced means of transportation brought diverse peoples and their dogs together, Finnish Spitzes mated with other breeds of dogs, and were becoming extinct as a distinct breed. At about that time, a Finnish sportsman from Helsinki named Hugo Roos observed the pure native Finnish Spitz while hunting in the northern forests. He realized the many virtues of the pure Finnish Spitz breed and decided to select dogs that were untainted examples of the genuine Finnish Spitz in order to try to revive the breed.Thirty years of careful breeding resulted in the modern Finnish Spitz; the dogs are descendents of his original foundation stock.
  In the 19 th century, as mass transportation became more available and convenient, the Finns began crossing the Finkie with other breeds, so much so that by 1880 few examples remained of the original, unadulterated dog. Two hunters from Helsinki realized what was about to be lost and launched a successful effort to revive the breed, culminating in the breed’s recognition by the Finnish Kennel Club in 1892.
  The Finnish Spitz was first imported to the United States in 1959. The Finnish Spitz Club of America was founded in 1975, and the American Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1988, adding it to the Non-Sporting Group. The Finnish Spitz ranks 158 th among the breeds registered by the AKC.

Lineage
Nearly all dog breeds’ genetic closeness to the gray wolf is due to admixture.However, several Arctic dog breeds show a genetic closeness with the now-extinct Taymyr wolf of North Asia due to admixture. These breeds are associated with high latitudes - the Siberian husky and Greenland dog that are also associated with arctic human populations, and to a lesser extent the Shar Pei and Finnish spitz. An admixture graph of the Greenland dog indicates a best-fit of 3.5% shared material, however an ancestry proportion ranging between 1.4% and 27.3% is consistent with the data. This indicates admixture between the Taymyr wolf population and the ancestral dog population of these 4 high-latitude breeds. This introgression could have provided early dogs living in high latitudes with phenotypic variation beneficial for adaption to a new and challenging environment. It also indicates the ancestry of present-day dog breeds descends from more than one region

Personality
  This Nordic breed is active and friendly. His alert nature makes him an excellent watchdog, and he's protective of family members. He may be cautious toward strangers but should never be shy or aggressive.
  He loves children and gets along with other animals, especially when he's been raised with them. On the down side, he's an independent thinker and can be a challenge to train. He may not be mentally and emotionally mature until he's three or four years old.
  Like every dog, Finnish Spitz need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Finnish Spitz puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

Health
  All purebred dogs have the potential to develop genetic health problems, just as all people have the potential to inherit a particular disease. Run, don’t walk, from any breeder who does not offer a health guarantee on puppies, who tells you that the breed is 100 percent healthy and has no known problems, or who tells you that her puppies are isolated from the main part of the household for health reasons. A reputable breeder will be honest and open about health problems in the breed and the incidence with which they occur in her lines.
  That said, the Finnish Spitz is a pretty healthy breed. Health problems that may be seen include diabetes, hypothyroidism, cataracts, an autoimmune skin condition called pemphigus foliaceous, and epilepsy.
  Do not purchase a puppy from a breeder who cannot provide you with written documentation that the parents were cleared of health problems that affect the breed.   Having the dogs "vet checked" is not a substitute for genetic health testing.
  Remember that after you’ve taken a new puppy into your home, you have the power to protect him from one of the most common health problems: obesity. Keeping a Finnish Spitz at an appropriate weight is one of the easiest ways to extend his life. Make the most of your preventive abilities to help ensure a healthier dog for life

Activity Requirements
  The Finnish Spitz is not a lazy house dog. They were developed to be sturdy bird-hunting companions and they have a built-in need to run and keep their minds active. Their medium size may be appealing to condo or apartment dwellers, but the Finnish Spitz needs several hours of vigorous exercise every day in order to stave off boredom and destructiveness.    
  Active families are perfect for this breed, as they are a true family dog who will happily engage in group activities like jogging, hiking or biking. They adore children and will romp in the yard with kids for hours on end. Yards should be fenced in, as this hunter will take off after birds or small animals and aren't likely to obey calls to return home. For this reason, farms are not an ideal locale for the Finnish Spitz.

Care
  Although the Finnish Spitz can survive outdoors in cool and temperate climates, it prefers living indoors, as it craves social contact. Because it is lively and active, the Finnish Spitz requires daily physical exercise such as a long on-leash walk or a run around the park. One should be careful, however, that this hunting breed does not go hunting on its own.
Its double coat requires occasional brushing every week and more often during the shedding season. The Finkie is not oily and generally remains clean.

Living Conditions
 The Finnish Spitz will do okay in an apartment and without a yard provided it gets enough exercise. It is relatively inactive indoors and prefers cool climates.

Trainability
  Their independent streak, coupled with a four-year strong puppyhood can make a Finnish Spitz difficult to train. Calm assertiveness is the best tack to take with this breed, as they don't respond well to discipline. They can become easily bored with repetitive training exercises, so breeders and trainers recommend keeping sessions short and mixing up the routine.
  Once leadership is established and basic obedience has been mastered, the Finnish Spitz should be graduated to advanced obedience classes or agility training. They are intelligent dogs and need to be mentally stimulated as much as they need to be physically exercised.

Grooming
  This handsome redhead has a double coat of a soft, dense undercoat covered by long, straight, harshly textured guard hairs. The Finnish Spitz is a naturally clean dog, but he does need some grooming. He should be brushed with a slicker brush at least once a week to minimize shed hair around your house, and bathed every three to four months.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually once a month. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath. Check the ears weekly for dirt, redness or a bad odor that can indicate an infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with a gentle, pH-balanced ear cleaner. Begin grooming the Finnish Spitz when he is very young so he learns to accept the handling and fuss of grooming patiently.  


Children And Other Pets
  Finnish Spitz love children and will tolerate a lot, walking away when they've had too much. They're sturdy enough that they're not easily injured by toddlers whose motor skills aren't fully developed.
  That said, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how good-natured, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Finnish Spitz get along well with other dogs and cats, especially if they're raised with them, but they can be aggressive toward dogs they don't know. And pet birds might want to watch their back around them.

Is this breed right for you?
  Getting along well with other animals and children, the Finnish Spitz is an awesome addition to families. Regardless of his loud bark, the breed is well-suited to apartment life if given daily exercise and walks. 
 Preferring the indoors, a small yard will do just fine for this dog. It's best that the Finnish Spitz receive a good amount of leadership and training from his owner to avoid poor behavioral traits. Do not let him believe he's the dominant member of the household or he'll act negatively. In addition, this dog requires a good amount of grooming and is a normal shedder.

Did You Know?
  This is one dog who can truly lay claim to the title King of the Barkers. The Finnish Spitz, the national dog of Finland, was developed to be a barking hunting dog. That is, he trails game, and when he finds it, he barks until the hunter arrives to bag it. One Finnish Spitz each year is chosen for his hunting prowess to be King of the Barkers.

A dream day in the life of a Finnish Spitz
  A sweet and mild-tempered dog, he may wake you up with a bark if he hears something out of the ordinary. Spending his day inside with the family, the Finnish Spitz will be happy to let the kiddos roll about and roughhouse with him. Playing quietly with his toys, he will bark when he feels he's protecting the security of his home. Running inside and outside the house, he loves to use his doggie door. Going for a short walk when you return home, he'll be happy to end his day in the comfort of his family.
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Friday, July 11, 2014

Successful Dog Training Techniques

Successful Dog Training Techniques
   Many people can’t imagine life without dogs. We admire and adore them for their loyalty, unconditional affection, playful exuberance and zest for life. Nevertheless, dogs and people are very different animals. Although officially “man’s best friend,” dogs have some innocent but irksome tendencies-like jumping up to greet, barking, digging and chewing-that can make it downright difficult to live with them! To make the most of your relationship with your dog, you need to teach her some important skills that will help her live harmoniously in a human household.
    When you bring a dog into your home, you must be dedicated to helping him be the best dog he can be.  That is one of the most important jobs you have as the parent of a canine.      Providing him with the essentials for living is one aspect of this job, but teaching him right from wrong should be considered just as important.  As you raise your children, you teach them these lessons to make them happy and successful people.  Your dog deserves this same assistance and consideration.  

Old Dog, New Tricks?
  Many people are under the mistaken impression that if you adopt an adult or older dog, that he is past the age to be trained. Nothing can be further from the truth.  Dogs are extremely intelligent creatures, and their intelligence does not decrease over the years.  If anything, they get smarter as they get older.  Yes, they may be a little more set in their ways and a little less eager to jump on the training bandwagon, but with the love, support, and consistency of a good parent, any dog can learn better behavior.


Be Consistent
  Give clear and consistent commands for the desired behavior. For example, a "down" command should not be used interchangeably with an "off" command. Technically, these are two different behaviors. Always use commands and avoid vague words such as "no" or simply calling their name. For best results, replace "no" with the exact behavior you want him or her to do.


Too Young To Learn

   Alternatively, another myth with dog training is that if you begin training too early, your dog

will not be able to learn because she is too young.  This is not true, either.  No matter how

young your puppy is when you bring her home, start your training immediately. They are
essentially babes in the woods and do not know how to interact with the world around them.
      You are responsible for showing them what to do and what not to do.  Without this guidance, she will run amuck and get into things and damage your belongings, as well as injuring themselves or others.  

Be a Good Leader
   Some people believe that the only way to transform a disobedient dog into a well-behaved one is to dominate her and show her who’s boss. However, the “alpha dog” concept in dog training is based more on myth than on animal science. More importantly, it leads misguided pet parents to use training techniques that aren’t safe, like the “alpha roll.” Dogs who are forcibly rolled onto their backs and held down can become frightened and confused, and they’re sometimes driven to bite in self defense.

Positive and/or Negative Reinforcement
   Whether you are raising a human child or a canine one, you will hear a lot about positive and negative reinforcement.  Positive reinforcement is when you see that your child is doing the right thing so you pat him and speak to him in an approving voice and tell him what a good job he did. 
This is a very key part to almost any type of successful training activity.  When a puppy or dog is told that she is doing good things and getting positive attention based on her actions, she will want to continue doing these things.  She wants your love and approval, so she will do what she can to get it.  Your dog is extremely smart and will make the connection between her actions and your reactions.  Many owners choose to use a higher pitched voice when conveying approval. Dogs do respond well to this. 
   Negative reinforcement is basically the same process, but it is something you do when she has done something she should not.  Based on the rules of negative reinforcement, when your dog does something bad or dangerous, your reaction should be negative.  You should speak to her in a low and unhappy tone, telling her that his action was bad.  This does work, but should be used sparingly.  If your pooch is always getting negative reactions to her behaviors, she will go through life an unhappy, maladjusted dog.  She will become nervous and worried about pleasing you and could even develop anxiety problems.
When teaching new skills, keep training sessions short and sweet
 Like kids, dogs don’t have long attention spans. There’s no hard-and-fast rule, but an ideal average training session should last 15 minutes or less. Within that session, you can work on one skill or switch between a few different skills. To keep things interesting, try doing 5 to 15 repetitions of one behavior and then doing 5 to 15 repetitions of another behavior. You can also practice new skills and keep old ones polished by doing single repetitions at convenient times throughout the day. For example, before giving your dog a tasty new chew bone, ask her to sit or lie down to earn it.

Positive Reinforcement Only
  This tact has been used very successfully for many people, including various types of law enforcement personnel when training their dogs.  Using only positive reinforcement to help your dog understand what she is doing right and completely ignoring any bad action is a mainly passive type of training.  This can often take longer, but has been proven to work long term much better than other training methods.  Using this method, the only time you give your dog any attention for doing something negative is if what she is doing will endanger he in any way. 
   No matter what type of training you use with your dog, make sure that you reassure her of your love and acceptance.  You are doing what is best for her, which makes you the best parent you could ever be.

Help him Focus
  Some training sessions may be impromptu, and those are great if you can keep your dog's attention. If your dog is having difficulty focusing, he may need to drain some energy before hand with a walk, a game of fetch, time on the treadmill, or a play date. Focusing is as much of a skill as the command you are trying to teach. If your dog is having difficulty loose leash walking outside, practice inside where there are fewer distractions. Gradually increase diversions as he masters the skill.

  A training session can last as little as a minute or long as you have your dog's attention. Training and learning can be a way of life for your dog when he is guided to live within your rules and boundaries. Having your dog sit before you feed him, or wait at the door before you exit, or slowly walk down the stairs with you, these are all examples of daily training in action. Think of training as simply communicating with your dog and not something that requires special treats, experts, or lots of time. By communicating clearly, consistently, and with affection, your dog can always be learning.

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Friday, April 4, 2014

Best Dog Names

Best Dog Names
  Bringing home a new member of the family is always a fun and exciting time. Many families already have a name picked out for their new dog when it arrives but some prefer to wait to see what characteristics the dog has before picking that perfect name. There are a number of ways to pick the perfect name for a dog, picking favorite literary characters, picking more predictable dog names and naming the dog after certain characteristics. For some dogs and dog owners only the cute names appeal and there are certainly plenty of these to choose from. Cute dog names can originate from a wide variety of places and depending upon the dog’s origin you may find that the originating country has as much to do with selecting a name as the meaning of the name itself!
  Names are used during introductions, and they color what others think of our dog. A dog named Killer, will invite a very different type of reaction, than a dog named SweetiePie.
  Therefore, take your time in naming your dog. Observe his energy level, most loved activities, and wait until his true personality comes through. When it does, you will know what is the right name for him.

How to Name Your New Puppy or Dog

Fast Tricks for Naming a Pup
  1.Stick with shorter names. Dogs have an easier time recognizing names that are either one or two syllables long, compared to names that are more complex. Instead of naming your dog something like Sir Merlin of Mangovia, you should shorten the name to Merlin, or Mango.
  If you do want to give your pup a longer, more formal name, know that you will ultimately end up shortening it no matter what (it will just be easier to call for him to come that way) so go with a name that shortens into something cute.

  2.Try out names sharp consonants. Dogs hear high frequency sounds very well, so names starting with s, sh, ch, k, etc. work well when catching a dog's attention. Dogs will respond more quickly to these relatively sharp sounds. At the same time, consider names that end with a vowel, particularly a short ‘a’ or a long ‘e’ sound.
Some example names that follow these rules include Simba, Chico, Kassie, Sweetie, Delilah, etc.

  3. Do not pick a name that sounds similar to a command. Because dogs do not particularly recognize the actual word, but instead understand the frequency of the word, they can get confused by words that sound too similar--particularly when one of those words is a command that they are suppose to follow.
  For example, the name "Kit" can easily be confused with the command "sit". The name “Bo” could be confused with “no”.

4. Stick with similar sounds if you are renaming an older dog. Be careful when changing an older dog's name. Stick with similar sounds, such as changing "Barney" to "Farley." It's more important to keep the vowel sounds the same than the consonants, since vowels are easier for the dog to pick up on and what the dog is actually listening for. So "Pinky" will accept "Mikey" but not "Porky."

  5. Remember that you’ll be using your dog’s name in public. Some names have a family meaning, but it may not go over well at the vet or dog park. Also, choosing a name that's too common will mean your dog might run to someone else (or you might get someone elses dog jumping on you).
Names like “Fido” or “Rover” should probably be avoided, as they are some of the more traditional, and therefore more popular, dog names.
You should also consider the sort of reaction that the name you give your dog might inspire. For instance, people will probably be a little more wary of a dog named “Murder” than a dog named “Honey”.

  6. Ask before using a family member or friend's name. You may think it’s an honor to name your pup after your favorite Aunt Matilda, but she may not take it as a compliment. She might think of it as disrespect.

  7.Try the name out for a couple of days before you make it permanent. Once you’ve chosen a new name, try it out for a day or so. See if it grows on you. You’ll know really soon whether it’s a keeper or not. If not, try something else. There are always many more puppy names to explore and try out. Don't forget to reward your puppy or dog when they respond to their new name. The more treats, love and hugs they receive now, the sooner they'll come running when you call later.
  Pay attention to how it feels to say your pup’s potential name. Could you see yourself using that name over and over again? If your answer is no, you may want to consider choosing a different name.

  8. Explore many names. If you are really struggling on what you should name your dog, and need a little help being creative, you can always run an internet search for a list of cool dog names. There are quite a few websites that specialize in this topic and may help you to get your creative juices flowing.


Where Do the Best Dog Names Come From?
  When looking for dog names, there are several places to get good ideas:


Fictional characters – We can find some great names from our favorite movies, books, or games. Pick the best fictional hero or villain, depending on the personality and/or look of our dog.

Famous people – Another interesting set of names are from famous and inspirational people, or historical figures. We can pick rulers such as Alexander the Great, Charlemagne, or Napoleon Bonaparte. We can pick innovators such as Edison or daVinci. We can pick poets, writers, musicians, movie stars, or sports heroes.

Country of dog breed – Different dog breeds emerge from different locations. We can select a favorite name or word from our dog’s country of origin.


Stars and heavenly bodies – Finally, a great source of dog names come from stars and other heavenly bodies. For example, if our dog loves to hunt, we may name him Rigel, which is the brightest star in The Hunter constellation.

Cute Dog Names by Personality Traits
Puck – The name Puck has American origins and can be used to refer to a dog that bounces similar to a hockey puck or a dog that is mischievous like the character Puck from A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare.

Shep – The name Shep comes from the word shepherd and is generally used for dogs that show sheep herding traits. This name is English in origin.

Happy – This name is American in origin and is obviously used for dogs who appear to be smiling or who have happy and joyful dispositions.

Fidelity – The name Fidelity is American in origin and is perhaps best known for being the name of one of Theodore Roosevelt’s horses. Just as the English word “fidelity” relates to loyalty and faithfulness so too does the name when used for a dog.

 Jet – Jet is an American name and while it has a number of meanings it is most commonly used to describe dogs that are both jet black in color or who are constantly speeding or jetting around. This name can also be used by fans of the NFL team the New York Jets or by those with a love for aircraft. Rutherford B Hayes had a dog that he named Jet.

General – General is an American name in origin and is best used for a dog who is commanding and a leader by nature. The term general is used to refer to an army general whose responsibility it is to command his army.

Killer – American in origin, this name is fairly self explanatory. The name Killer has been used both as a name for a dog who shows aggressive tendencies as well as for a dog that shows not an ounce of aggression.

Popular Dog Names
To help you on your way, here are the most popular 5 male and female dog names. There are a variety of lists, but these names appear at the top of almost all of them.
Most popular male dog namesMax, Buddy,Jake, Charlie, Bailey.
Most popular female dog namesBella, Daisy, Molly, Lucy ,Maggie.

Top male dog names: Top female dog names:

1. Max (2*)                        1. Bella (1*)
2. Bailey (3*)                     2. Lucy (4*)
3. Charlie (7*)                   3. Molly (5*)
4. Buddy (8*)                     4. Daisy (6*)
5. Rocky                             5. Maggie (9*)
6. Jake                               6. Sophie (10*)
7. Jack                               7. Sadie
8. Toby                               8. Chloe
9. Cody                              9. Bailey
10. Buster                         10. Lola
11. Duke                           11. Zoe
12. Cooper                       12. Abby
13. Riley                            13. Ginger
14. Harley                          14. Roxy
15. Bear                             15. Gracie
16. Tucker                          16. Coco
17. Murphy                         17. Sasha
18. Lucky                           18. Lily
19. Oliver                           19. Angel
20. Sam                             20. Princess
21. Oscar                           21. Emma
22. Teddy                          22. Annie
23. Winston                       23. Rosie
24. Sammy                        24. Ruby
25. Rusty                            25. Lady
26. Shadow                       26. Missy
27. Gizmo                          27. Lilly
28. Bentley                         28. Mia
29. Zeus                             29.Katie
30. Jackson                      30. Zoey
31. Baxter                         31. Madison
32. Bandit                         32. Stella
33. Gus                              33. Penny
34. Samson                      34. Belle
35. Milo                              35. Casey
36. Rudy                            36. Samantha
37. Louie                           37. Holly
38. Hunter                         38. Lexi
39. Casey                         39. Lulu
40. Rocco                         40. Brandy
41. Sparky                        41. Jasmine
42. Joey                            42. Shelby
43. Bruno                         43. Sandy
44. Beau                          44. Roxie
45. Dakota                       45. Pepper
46. Maximus                    46. Heidi
47. Romeo                       47. Luna
48. Boomer                     48. Dixie
49. Luke                          49. Honey
50. Henry                        50. Dakota



One of the best advices to take when naming your dog is to adopt a wait-and-see attitude. Getting to know your puppy for a few days will let you see a part of his personality or behavior that you will not see while the puppy was still in the kennel or on the day you brought him home.
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