LUV My dogs: feed

LUV My dogs

Everything about your dog!

Showing posts with label feed. Show all posts
Showing posts with label feed. Show all posts

Friday, January 13, 2017

How to Care for a Small Dog

How to Care for a Small Dog
  Small breed dogs are ideal for owners in a variety of living situations. For example, tiny dogs do better in small apartments than larger breeds.Toy dog breeds are extremely popular companion dogs. 
  Many small dog breeds were once the prize possessions of members of the ruling class, and some are a scaled down version of another breed. Bred as house pets, they have served as companions for hundreds, even thousands of years.
  As man's best friend, many small dogs were bred to be companion animals and are very loyal. Like other pets, small dogs have basic needs that are the responsibility of their owner. Caring for small dogs requires an owner to pay attention to the dog's health, their happiness, and their well-being. While dog ownership is a big commitment, it is very rewarding!

Choosing The Right Small Dog Breed
  Not all dogs are created equal and some breeds will be more suitable for your household than others. The first thing you should do once you've identified the breeds you like is to carry out a little research on their care needs, temperament and likely health issues. Don't be scared off by potential health problems - you will find long lists of ailments which can befall particular breeds but your dog may never suffer from any of them. Use them as a guide to what could happen in the future. Provided you are financially and emotionally capable of dealing with illness, you will be fine. If you can purchase pet insurance, do so at an early stage.
  When you are certain that you want to go ahead and buy a small dog, check out breeders in your area. 

Their small size makes them perfect for:


  • Apartment and city dwellers as well as those that live in the country
  • The young and old and everyone in between
  • For singles, couples,  and those with families
  • Basically just about anyone!



Research the unique characteristics of your pet's breed. We use the term ‘small dog’ to refer to dogs that are typically less than eighteen inches tall and weigh less than twenty pounds. This includes toy, miniature, and small breeds like Yorkshire Terriers, Chihuahuas, Miniature Poodles, and Miniature Pinschers. Each breed has their own temperament, appearance, characteristics, and needs.

Feed on a regular schedule. It is important to feed your dog on a regular schedule to maintain consistency and to establish a routine. The amount of food your dog will need to consume each day will depend on their age, size, and activity level. Incorporate training into your feeding schedule by having your dog practice certain obedience commands before you let them eat.

Brush your dog’s teeth several times a week. Tiny dogs often suffer from tooth decay and gum disease, and frequent brushing will keep the teeth and gums healthy.


Avoid feeding small dogs human food. It can be very tempting to share bits of your meal or to give human food to your pet as a treat. However, there are a number of foods that are very harmful to dogs. Feeding your dog human food also encourages negative behaviors, such as begging or bothering people when they are eating.


Always provide access to clean water. Along with food, dogs need water to stay healthy. Always leave a bowl of clean and fresh water for your dog to enjoy.

Crate your tiny dog when you can’t watch her closely. Very little dogs can squeeze into small spaces and may injure themselves trying to escape. Crating is also useful during parties and family gatherings to keep small dogs out from underfoot.

Provide a comfortable place to sleep. Whether you decide to crate train your dog or have them sleep in their own dog bed, your dog wants to feel safe when they sleep. Small dogs sleep an average of twelve to fourteen hours a day as adults, and puppies will sleep even more.

Fit your dog with clothes during cold weather. Dog clothes, such as jackets and sweaters, help regulate body temperature and keep your dog from getting too cold. Choose tight-fitting clothes made from soft material to keep your dog warm and dry.


Schedule routine veterinarian visits. Like humans, dogs need routine medical care to stay healthy. Different small breeds are at higher or lower risks for certain conditions than other breeds.

Spay or neuter your dog. Unless you are planning to breed your dog, neutering or spaying your dog has health benefits and can improve temperament. On average, dogs that are spayed or neutered live up to two year longer than dogs that have not undergone these procedures.


Vaccinate your dog. Your veterinarian will administer vaccinations to your dog, and the number of vaccinations that your dog needs will depend on their age and the area that you live in.

Exercise frequently. Some small dog breeds have more energy than others, though all small dogs need to exercise to stay healthy. Their exercise needs will depend on your dog’s age, their health, and their breed.

Groom the dog at least once a week. Many people assume that small, inside dogs don’t need to be groomed, which is untrue. Brush your dog from nose to tail with a soft brush, and check for mats in long-haired breeds. Clip her nails with a small pair of pet nail clippers, clipping off small bits at a time to prevent cutting the quick.

Provide mental stimulation. Much like physical exercise, small dogs need to exercise their brains to stay stimulated and engaged. Dogs that are not stimulated often exhibit destructive behaviors, like chewing on furniture and digging, because they are bored.

Handle your dog throughout the day. Little dogs are notorious nippers and may bite if not handled enough. Pet the dog gently, run your hands over her ears and touch each of her feet to acclimate her to being handled.

Train your dog. Many small dog breeds have stubborn and independent temperaments that can make training difficult. However, small dogs need to be trained to follow basic obedience commands and to walk on leashes.


Read More

Tuesday, August 12, 2014

What to Feed a Sick Dog

What to Feed a Sick Dog
  Everyone gets sick at one time or another and having someone to look after you, look after you, and guide you in the correct direction in this time of need can make all the difference in getting you back to your normal health and strength. Dogs are no exception to this rule and looking after and caring for your dog can make all the difference to their recovery.
  When your dog's tummy is upset, he can't tell us what's wrong. When lethargy and "accidents" tell us there's an upset, there are general rules to follow when feeding a sick dog. Just like children, they have systems that are smaller than those of adult humans, tend to recover quickly and need to start eating again to replace lost water and nutrients. However, if the upsets are violent or last more than a few days, it's time to take your friend to the doctor.
  But what happens if your dog has lost their appetite and you know they need some sort of food inside them before they run into more illness? Well this is a very common situation to be in with an ill dog so there are a few ideas that you might want to try and they might shorten your dogs suffering and help keep it bearable for the time being. 

Let your dog eat grass
  Let them eat cake! And by cake, we mean grass! Grass is one of those instinctual remedies dogs may go for when they’re feeling unwell. Grass may cause a dog to vomit.  Let your dog’s instincts lead you both. If they want to eat grass when they’re not feeling well, if they want to vomit a bit, that may be just what they need to do to feel better. Just make sure to keep them well hydrated. If they vomit more than twice, or persistently eat grass and vomit every time they take a trip outside, call a vet.



  Give your dog bland food (food with little or no strong flavours, smells, and tastes) to start with, bland food will help them keep their food down with not too much in it to upset the stomach and cause more illness. Anything that makes it easier for your dog to eat without too much strain is best; if they have to put a lot of effort into eating when ill they will probably not bother in fear of causing more illness and sick feeling, try blending food up finely so they can lick it up instead of chewing and swallowing, as this often works well for a lot of pets.


Simple foods
Your dog’s kibble may be a bit too rich for them when they have an upset stomach. Try some simple boiled shredded chicken with a bit of white rice, or try some mashed pumpkin. Offer small amounts at a time, rather than a full meal. If they appear eager for more, it’s a good sign. Their tummy might be on the mend. If they’re still dubious, consider a no-salt chicken broth to entice them to eat a bit. Add water to whatever you offer them, as dehydration is the real danger of your average run of the mill upset tummy.

Gradual Feeding
  After fasting for 24 hours, your pup could probably down an entire bowl of food within a few minutes. Feeding him a small amount at first and then increasing that amount each day prevents him from stuffing himself to the brim and vomiting again. Washington State University College of Veterinary Medicine suggests feeding your dog his bland diet three to six times a day. The amount of food you should give your dog depends mostly on his size. Feeding an adult German shepherd 2 cups of bland food on the first day will be fine, but feeding that same amount to a Yorkshire terrier is too much. After about two days, begin mixing in your dog’s regular food with the bland food diet until he’s off the bland meals completely.

Check for dehydration
  Lift your dog’s lips and look at their gums. Gums should be pink and slick. That is, wet in appearance instead of dry. If you’re not sure, press on your dog’s gums until you see the color change. Remove your finger, and note how long it takes for color to come back. Color should come back immediately. If it takes a couple of moments, your dog could be dehydrated. 
  You can also pull at the scruff of their neck, the way a mother animal may lift their young. If the skin snaps back, they should be fine. If it takes a long time for the skin to retract, they could be dehydrated.

How to prevent and treat dehydration
  If your dog is showing the above signs of dehydration, it’s time to take their condition seriously. Many people offer their dehydrated dogs unflavored Pedialyte, which is a child’s electrolyte drink. Even if your dog is drinking water, it sometimes isn’t enough, and Pedialyte will help replace electrolytes they may have lost from vomiting. Other dog-friendly products like Rebound may also help.
  If they won’t drink it on their own, you may wish to use a feeding syringe (needle-less) to feed them the Pedialyte. Put the syringe into the side of the mouth, between the cheek and gums, and go slowly to prevent your dog from choking or breathing in the liquid. Be careful, take it slowly, and keep them calm. Really sick dogs sometimes don't have the greatest gag reflex, and aspiraton of these liquids can be dangerous.
  How much should you give? A dose to help a dog maintain hydration should be at least 15 mL per pound of body weight per day. This can turn out to be quite a bit of fluid to deliver with a syringe, so you may want to divide the dose into 4 a day.

You can also simply take your dog to the vet, where they'll be able to treat dehydrated dogs by delivering fluids under the skin.

 If this works then you should build the tastes up slowly from bland food to normal stronger tasting foods but always keeping to what your dog is comfortable with, if you do too much too soon then your dog will become ill again so take it slowly.


If this doesn't work then try to feed them sufficient amounts of water if nothing else. When a dog is unwell they may have other symptoms like diarrhea which will cause them to become dehydrated easily and set them up for more misery so try to maintain good hydration levels, which in turn will maintain your dog's happiness.


If all else fails and nothing seems to be working then you should contact your vet and seek advice there, if you do not then you risk your dogs health and bodyweight deteriorating and there may be other difficulties to overcome before your dog will start to become better.

Read More