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Showing posts with label family. Show all posts
Showing posts with label family. Show all posts

Tuesday, December 6, 2016

Everything about your Black and Tan Coonhound

Everything about your Black and Tan Coonhound
  A descendent of the Bloodhound and Black and Tan Foxhound, this pup was bred to hunt raccoon and other small game. With a strong ability to deal with excessive heat and cold, he has since moved on to bigger game, including the mountain lion. An adaptable pet perfect for working and hunting, he is a loyal and passionate worker.

Overview
  The Black and Tan Coonhound is a true hound breed in every sense of its name. Not only does it look the part, but it’s got a nose on it that will track down whatever it is hunting – but the Black and Tan Coonhound really loves going after raccoons and opossums. Known to bay and howl until the hunter arrives, this dog is mellow, calm, determined and hardworking.
  A great pet for families and lovers of the outdoors, the Black and Tan Coonhound may be the perfect fit for your household.

Highlights
  • Bays and howls as only a hound can; city living is not recommended
  • Easily distracted by various scents. Once he has decided to follow one you'll have a very hard time calling him off — this dog needs to be leashed!
  • Coonhounds are not homebodies and will roam if given the chance. They can go for miles before looking up and realizing that home is nowhere to be found.
  • Makes a good jogging or running companion but is also more than satisfied with 30 to 60 minutes of daily exercise, and walks that allow for plenty of sniffing time.
  • This breed does well with children, but is active and bouncy when young.
  • Easily gains weight if given the chance.
  • Can be stubborn and independent, making training a challenge.
  • A bored Coonhound is a noisy, destructive Coonhound. He needs lots human companionship and training.
  • Obedience training is highly recommended and likely to lead to a closer relationship with your dog.
  • Never buy a Black and Tan Coonhound from a puppy broker or pet store. Reputable breeders do not sell to middlemen or retailers, and there are no guarantees as to whether the puppy had healthy parents. Interview breeders thoroughly, and make sure the puppy's parents have been screened for genetic diseases pertinent to that breed. Ask breeders about the health issues they've encountered in their dogs, and don't believe anyone who claims that her dogs never have any health problems. Ask for references so you can contact other puppy buyers to see if they're happy with their Coonhound. Doing your homework may save you a lot of heartbreak later.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Black and Tan was the first Coonhound breed admitted to AKC registration.
  • The Black and Tan is known as a “trail and tree hound,” meaning he can not only find his quarry but also tree it.
  • This breed has a black coat with tan points above the eyes, on the sides of the muzzle, and on the chest, legs and breeching (the upper thigh area), plus black pencil markings on the toes.
  • Comparable Breeds: Bloodhound, Chesapeake Bay Retriever

History
  Scenthounds descend from the Talbot Hound, the hunting dog used by nobles and kings a thousand years ago. The direct ancestor of the Black and Tan Coonhound is the English Foxhound, but the coonhound breeds themselves are a uniquely American creation.

  The Black and Tan Coonhound, developed in the mountains of the southern United States in the 1700s, takes his size, coloring, long ears, and scenting ability from the foxhounds and bloodhounds perched in the branches of his family tree.
  He was bred to tree raccoons and possums, but he's more than capable of running bigger game. That versatility made him an ideal companion for colonial settlers who created him to be a "trail and tree" dog, meaning he could find his quarry and tree it until the hunter arrived.
  The American Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1945. The first Black and Tan Coonhound registered by the AKC was Grand Mere Big Rock Molly.
  Despite his fine qualities, the Coonhound has never made the leap to popular companion dog, something for which his fans are probably grateful. He ranks 131st among the 155 breeds and varieties recognized by the AKC.

Personality
  Black and Tan Coonhounds are a pleasant, laid-back addition to families of all sizes and ages. Playful as puppies, this breed mellows out considerably in adulthood and is happy with moderate exercise and lots of time to relax around the house. Black and Tans are good with children, they are patient and not dominant, but they aren't particularly playful when the get older. Many Black and Tan Coonhounds think they are lapdogs, despite their size, and can ball up into the tiniest of spaces to sleep next to the people they love.

Health
  The Black and Tan Coonhound, which has an average lifespan of 10 to 12 years, is prone to minor health concerns such as ectropion and hypothyroidism, and major issues like canine hip dysplasia (CHD). The Coonhound also occasionally suffers from Hemophilia B. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may recommend hip and thyroid tests for the dog.

Care
  Grooming a Black and Tan Coonhound consists of the occasional brushing of the coat and regular ear checkups. Exercise, meanwhile, may be satisfied with a long walk, short jog, or an excursion on a field. The Coonhound also loves to run a few miles and wanders on catching a scent. As the Black and Tan drools, it is a good idea to wipe its face regularly.

Living Conditions
  The Black and Tan Coonhound is not recommended for apartment life. They are relatively inactive indoors and will do best with at least a large yard.

Trainability
  Black and Tans assume they are the leader and require their trainer to prove otherwise. They can be stubborn and even manipulative with their expressive brown eyes and droopy faces. Training a Black and Tan is not for the soft-hearted.
  As with most hound breeds, the Black and Tan is sensitive and needs to be trained with a confident, consistent, but gentle hand. Harsh treatment can lead to avoidance behaviors, and extremely sensitive individuals can shut down completely. Positive reinforcement, treats, and a lot of patience will yield the best results when training a Black and Tan.

Activity Requirements
  Black and Tans don't need an excessive amount of vigorous activity, and as adults they quite enjoy relaxing on the living room rug or attempting to curl up next to you on the couch, despite their large size. They can adapt to just about any living situation and will do just fine in an apartment.
  While outside, the Black and Tan Coonhound should be kept on a leash or in a fenced in yard. If they catch a scent, their instincts will take off and employ true hound dog “selective deafness,” and will not obey your commands to return home. They make excellent companions for hunters and farmers. They will track an animal across any terrain, in any weather, and won't stop working until they have that animal penned up a tree.

Grooming
  The Black and Tan Coonhound has a short, dense coat. It’s easy to groom, but it sheds a lot. Brush the coat with a hound mitt or rubber curry brush one to three times a week to remove dead hair and distribute skin oils.
  Regular brushing should keep your Coonhound pretty clean, but if he has a houndy odor you can bathe him to help reduce the smell. Be sure to rinse thoroughly. Shampoo left on the coat can cause dry, flaky skin.
  Keep those droopy ears clean and dry to prevent bacterial or yeast infections from taking hold. Plenty of Coonhounds like to swim, so dry the ears thoroughly any time they’ve been in the water.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Black and Tan Coonhounds are patient and tolerant with children. That said, it's never appropriate to leave dogs and young children alone together. They should always be supervised to prevent any ear biting or tail pulling on the part of either party.
  Being pack dogs, Black and Tan Coonhounds are always happy to have the company of other dogs. A bored hound will find ways to entertain himself — destructive ways that you won't like — so if no one's home during the day, it's best if he has at least one canine buddy.
  They can also get along well with cats, rabbits and similar pets if they're raised with them in the home. Be sensible and don't leave them unsupervised with other pets until you're sure they all get along.

Is this breed right for you?
  Due to great exercise needs, this pet will do best with an active family. Playful, loyal and passionate, this gentle giant is dedicated to his owner and his family. A friendly pooch, he'll greet others with ease. Needing good training, this breed will learn appropriate behaviors — without it, he may act out. Best for older children, he may be too aggressive and playful with younger children. In need of a yard and walks, in addition to being a big drooler, apartment life may not be suited for him.

Did You Know?
  Although they’re called Coonhounds, Black and Tans can also hunt other game, including deer, mountain lions and bear.

A dream day in the life of a Black and Tan Coonhound
  Waking up with a job to do, this pup will be happy to be taken on a walk first thing in the morning. After being fed and engaging in a bit of play, he'll head right back outside to ensure that the home is protected. Satisfied that no stray animals or new humans have come into his territory, he'll go back inside for a pat-down to reward him for a job well done. After an evening run and a swim in the pond, he'll catnap to prepare for tonight's guard watch. If you leave him, he may howl to let everyone know that he's there.



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Everything about your Silky Terrier

Everything about your Silky Terrier
  Bred in Australia from the Yorkshire Terrier and Blue and Tan Australian Terrier, the Silky Terrier was singled out as her own breed. Originally referred to as the Sydney Terrier, the vermin hunter was brought to America by servicemen in the 1950s. Small but fierce, the Silky Terrier makes an excellent watchdog.

Overview
  Some people think they're large Yorkshire Terriers, and others think they're tiny Australian Terriers. But even though those dogs are in his ancestry, the Silky Terrier has his own identity – and isn't likely to let you forget it. Sure, he's a charmer and, at 10 pounds or so, highly portable. But he's also a smart, sassy demanding little dog with a great gift for getting his humans to do exactly what he wants them to, and being a pretty big pain in the neck  when they don't.
  Make no mistake: He might be tiny and he might lack the usual scruffy-rough coat of his terrier cousins, but the Silky is no lap dog. Or he is, but mostly on his own terms. He's endlessly curious, full of energy and loves to play. And like most terriers, he has a great fondness for that sub-genre of gardening known as "digging huge holes in the yard" along with a well-developed interest in barking loudly and chasing cats.
  Train him gently but consistently from a young age to channel his cleverness and independence into activities that won’t involve noise or destructiveness. The American Kennel Club's Earthdog events offer one such possibility; agility or other active sports are others. He's also a bit difficult to housetrain, so careful training from the day he comes home is essential as well.
  Bigger than the Yorkshire Terrier, the Silky is a better choice for families with children, but is still much too small to be played with roughly or unsupervised. In fact, he can be a bit nippy and possessive of his toys, food, and favorite humans. And while the Silky Terrier is not a big shedder, his coat is long and – yes, you guessed it – silky, and it requires frequent brushing to prevent matting.

Highlights
  • Silky Terriers are active dogs who need exercise and mental stimulation. This doesn't mean strenuous hikes or hours of retrieving, but it does mean you'll need to provide more activity than tummy rubs on the couch.
  • Although they need exercise, they can make good apartment or condo dogs.
  • Silkies have a strong prey drive and will chase cats, squirrels, rodents, and sometimes other dogs. A Silky may not be the best choice if you've got other small pets. Also, keep your Silky leashed when you're in unsecured areas to avoid having him disappear into the wild blue yonder when something small and furry streaks by.
  • Silkies like to be with their families and are happiest when they can spend the whole day in your company.
  • Despite the long coat, Silkies are fairly easy keepers. But they do require some grooming: thorough brushing two to three times a week and a monthly bath.
  • Like all terriers, the Silky enjoys digging. To save your flowerbeds, either consider another breed, or train your Silky to dig in a specific area. It's much easier to channel the instinct than to suppress it.
  • Barking, another terrier trait, is a much-enjoyed pastime for Silkies. Although you can teach your Silky a "Quiet" command, he'll still bark when he thinks it's necessary. The upside is, Silkies are excellent watchdogs.
  • Silky Terriers can be good family dogs, but because of their scrappy personality, children should be about 10 years old and up.
  • Although they're generally friendly, Silkies can be territorial and aggressive toward other dogs if they're not socialized properly.
  • A Silky shouldn't be left unattended in a yard. He's small enough to be considered prey by larger wild animals, terrier enough to dig his way out, and Silky enough to get into mischief.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • Silky Terriers are active in many events. They have earned titles or participated in obedience, rally, agility, herding, tracking, flyball, and earthdog tests. Some Silkys are therapy dogs.
  • The Silky stands low to the ground and is slightly longer than he is tall. His silky blue and tan coat parts to each side, all the way down his back to his tail. It’s not so long that it falls all the way to the floor. He has a moderately long wedge-shaped head; small dark almond-shaped eyes; small V-shaped ears carried erect; and a black nose. The docked tail is carried between the twelve o’clock and two o’clock position. He moves with a lively and light-footed step.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy
UKC group: Companion
Average lifespan: 12 - 15 years
Average size: 8 - 10 pounds
Coat appearance: Long, silky and parted down the middle.
Coloration: Born black; grows to have a blue coat with red or tan markings
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Other identifiers: Small with fine bones and cat-like feet; body is longer than breed is tall; black nose; black almond-shaped eyes with black rims; erect ears and high-set tail
Possible alterations: Hair is matted if not properly groomed
Comparable Breeds: Cairn Terrier, Yorkshire Terrier

History
  The Silky Terrier originated in Australia in the 1890s, when breeders crossed imported Yorkshire Terriers with their native Australian Terriers. Some of the offspring looked like Yorkies, some looked like Australian Terriers, and others looked like the Silky of today, with a size and coat length that was between the two parent breeds. The Silky-looking dogs were interbred until the puppies predictably had Silky traits.
  In 1906, Australian fanciers developed a breed standard — written guidelines for what the breed should look, move, and act like — in Sydney, New South Wales. In 1909, another standard was drawn up in Victoria. The two standards didn't completely match up, mostly on the preferred weight and ear type. The two camps compromised and a new breed standard came out in 1926.
  The breed has had several names: initially, he was called the Sydney Silky Terrier. In 1955, he became the Australian Silky Terrier (still the official name for the breed in Australia). In the U.S., the name was changed to Silky Terrier.



Personality
  A better name for the Silky Terrier might be the Spunky Terrier. These little dogs pack a lot of personality into a small package. Like other terriers, they believe they are the center of the universe and expect everyone to bow to their needs. Silkies make (harmless) mischief whenever possible, especially if they realize it gets them extra attention. This is an intelligent breed who knows how to manipulate a situation in his favor, and can sometimes even be considered bossy, but most owners don't mind because they are just too darn cute to stay mad at. Silkies are great family dogs for those with older children, as they enjoy the company of people and prefer to have plenty of laps to choose from when it is naptime.

Health
  The Silky Terrier, which has a lifespan of about 11 to 14 years, may suffer from minor problems like patellar luxation and Legg-Perthes disease. Diabetes, epilepsy, allergies, tracheal collapse, and Cushing's disease may sometimes be seen in this breed as well. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may run knee and elbow exams on the dog.

Care
  The Silky Terrier may look like a toy, but he's a real dog who needs exercise and training. He enjoys daily walks, romping with you in the yard, or trips to a dog park with a special area for small breeds. In a pinch, the Silky is happy to take his workout indoors with a rousing game of fetch in the hallway.
  These are not outdoor dogs. The Silky craves the companionship of his people, and he's also small enough to be considered prey by wild animals. And despite his size, another risk is that he may fight with another dog who wanders onto his turf.
When it comes to training, Silky Terriers make willing and able students. Because they're so smart, however, you need to be consistent; otherwise they'll be inclined to make up their own rules. The best way to win your Silky's cooperation is with fun lessons that use positive reinforcement.
  Crate training is the easiest way to housetrain your Silky, and crates are also a good way to keep your Silky safe and out of trouble when you're away from home. Silky Terriers are mischievous by nature and can be destructive when left unsupervised. A crate is also a place where he can retreat for a nap. Crate training at a young age will help your dog accept confinement if he ever needs to be boarded or hospitalized.
  Never stick your Silky in a crate all day long, however. It's not a jail, and he shouldn't spend more than a few hours at a time in it except when he's sleeping at night. Silkys are people dogs, and they aren't meant to spend their lives locked up in a crate or kennel.

Living Conditions
  The Silky Terrier is good for apartment life. These dogs are very active indoors and will do okay without a yard if sufficiently exercised.

Trainability
  Like other terrier breeds, Silkies can be a handful to train. They are willful and stubborn and most definitely have minds of their own. Training should begin early and be conducted with calm-assertive leadership and never a harsh hand. Small terriers are prone to defensive reactions and if you physically correct your Silky – even to push his bottom down in a “sit” position – he may bite. Treats and excited praise should be enough to motivate a   Silky Terrier, but sessions should be kept short so that he doesn't lose interest.
  When basic obedience has been mastered, your Silky can move on to advanced obedience, trick training or agility classes. These are smart dogs who, despite their stubbornness excel in these activities.

Exercise Requirements
  Silky Terriers are full of energy, have plenty of stamina and love going on daily walks or runs. This breed has a hunting background, so Silky Terriers like to chase small animals. Along with daily walks, your dog will enjoy time spent in an outside fenced yard or a trip to the dog park. If you can’t get outside, an energetic game of fetch, tug-of-war, or chase indoors will keep your dog exercised and active. 

Grooming
  It is difficult to improve on the Silky Terrier’s natural good looks, but you can maintain his long, silky coat by brushing and combing it several times a week with a pin or soft slicker brush and metal comb. Spray-on detangler can make this easier and help prevent breakage. Regular brushing prevents tangles, removes dirt and distributes oils, making for a healthy shine. Periodic bathing, every four weeks or so, and light trimming around his ears, eyes and feet, is also necessary. For extra easy care, some owners opt to have their Silkys trimmed short like a Schnauzer.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every one to two weeks. Keep the ears clean and dry to help prevent infections. Check them weekly for redness or a bad odor that might indicate infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball moistened with a mild pH-balanced cleanser recommended by your veterinarian. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath. Introduce your puppy to grooming from an early age so that he learns to accept it with little fuss.

Children And Other Pets 
  The Silky can be a wonderful family pet, so long as he's raised with kids and grows up around their noise and commotion. Given his strong personality, though, he's usually best for families with children older than 10 who know how to handle a dog. He may not tolerate pokes and prods from younger kids.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  The Silky gets along with other dogs very well so long as he's been raised to be dog-friendly, though there may be occasional bossiness and rivalry for attention or treats. Like all terriers, the Silky loves to chase small animals, so he may not be suited for homes with cats, rabbits, or other small pets.

Is this breed right for you?
  Fun-loving and active, the Silky Terrier is a small breed that enjoys activity. Having strong affection for its owner, the breed is smart and can do well with apartment living, although she prefers her own space to play and investigate by nose or digging. An inside dog, the Silky Terrier can develop small dog syndrome if not given the right amount of training or guidance. Doing well with children if she has a good leader, the Silky Terrier can learn to adapt to other animals if socialized correctly.

Did You Know?
  When he was first developed in Australia, this breed was known as the Sydney Silky Terrier. The name was changed in Australia to Australian Silky Terrier in 1955. The same year, in the United States, the name was changed to Silky Terrier.

A dream day in the life of a Silky Terrier
  A playful pup, the Silky Terrier will enjoy waking up and immediately investigating her backyard. With a quick run, she'll sniff out the perimeter to ensure everything is safe. Returning inside, she'll greet her owner with a small amount of affection before requesting a bit of quality playtime. After a game of fetch in the yard, she'll be ready for breakfast. Keeping up on her primary duty of watchdog, she'll be happy in the constant company of her family. After her evening walk, she'll be ready for her daily grooming session of a bath and blow-dry. Once she's brushed and pampered, the Silky Terrier will be ready for a snooze.
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Tuesday, November 15, 2016

Everything about your Redbone Coonhound

Everything about your Redbone Coonhound
  As you can tell from its name, the Redbone Coonhound is a breed made famous by hunting raccoon and a few other animals. In fact, this is what it was originally bred for, having first been an “unofficial” breed in the American south for a number of years. This was before people serious about hunting wanted not only a superior Redbone Coonhound in terms of athleticism, but in coat color and overall breed quality. The result is the modern-day Redbone Coonhound, an excellent companion for families and a dog with keen hunting instincts that have also been measured against bears and cougars.
  What’s interesting about the Redbone Coonhound is just how well-suited it is for a number of households and family types. A good dog to have around children and sturdy enough to enjoy farm life and the outdoors, the Redbone Coonhound can make a highly versatile breed that brings a lot of joy to a family in so many ways.

Overview
  The Redbone Coonhound, also known as the Redbone, the Redbone Hound and the Red Coon Dog, is truly an all-American breed. This is an easy-going, friendly, good-natured hound dog that is immediately recognizable by its beautiful, deep red coat. Redbones were bred to perpetuate their instinctive desire and talent for hunting and treeing raccoons and other large game, including bobcat, cougar and even bear. Redbone Coonhounds are surefooted and swift.   They also are fantastic family dogs; they adore children and get along famously with other companion animals. Today, this is the only solid-colored purebred coonhound. The American Kennel Club accepted the Redbone Coonhound for full registration as a member of its Hound Group in 2009.

Other Quick Facts
  • Colonial settlers, especially those from Scotland and Ireland, brought red hounds with them to the United States, and those dogs are the ancestors of the Redbone.
  • The Redbone is a cold-nosed dog, meaning he’s good at following an old, or “cold,” trail.
  • Redbones occasionally have a small amount of white on their chest or feet, said to be a result of their Irish hound background.
  • The Redbone’s main quarry is raccoons, but he can also track bigger game.
  • The Redbone has a pleading expression with dark brown or hazel eyes and a sweet voice that carries over long distances.
Breed standards
AKC group: Hound

UKC group: Scenthound

Average lifespan: 11-12 years
Average size: 35-65 pounds
Coat appearance: Flat, shiny, and smooth
Coloration: Rich red
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Strong, vigorous, and striking all around, clean, well-proportioned head, black nose, strong chest, brown eyes, long, floppy ears that are close to the nose, upright tail, and small paws with thickened pads.
Possible alterations: Some may have white markings on chest and feet.
Comparable Breeds: Black and Tan Coonhound, American Foxhound

History
  In the late 18th century, many European-type hunting dogs were imported to America, most of them of Scottish, French, English, and Irish ancestry: the English Foxhound, the Harrier, the Grand Bleu de Gascogne, the Welsh Hound, the Beagle, and the Bloodhound were among these. Most often, these dogs were imported so that wealthy planters of the Tidewater could engage in foxhunting. Over time, Southern hunters selectively bred dogs that would not back down, had great stamina, and would "hound" their prey until they treed or cornered their exhausted quarry, leading to modern coonhounds.
  In the late 18th century Scottish immigrants brought red-colored foxhounds to Georgia, which would be the foundation stock of the Redbone. Later, approximately 1840, Irish-bred Foxhound and Bloodhound lines were added. The name came from an early breeder, Peter Redbone of Tennessee, though other breeders of note are Redbone's contemporary,   George F.L. Birdsong of Georgia, and Dr. Thomas Henry in the 19th century.Over time, breeders followed a selective program that led to a coonhound that is specialized for prey which climbs trees, was unafraid of taking on large animals, was agile enough to carry on over mountain or in meadow, and liked to swim if necessary. They were ideal for pack hunting of both small and larger prey. Originally, the Redbone had a black saddleback, but by the beginning of the 20th century, it was an uninterrupted red tone.
  Like many American hunting dogs, especially those from the South, they were widely known by hunters and farmers, but not well known in the show ring. The Redbone has found recognition by the two major American kennel clubs. Because of of its main use as a hunting dog rather than a show dog Redbones are extremely rare dogs outside of the United States. There are very few breeders outside of North America and it is virtually unknown in Europe or Australia.
  The Redbone Coonhound was recognized by the United Kennel Club in 1902, becoming the second coonhound breed to gain recognition.
  The Redbone Coonhound was popularized after the novel Where the Red Fern Grows, written by Wilson Rawls, was published in 1961. It told the story of Billy Colman and his Redbones.
  The Redbone Coonhound was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 2010. It was shown at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show for the first time in 2011.

Personality
  Redbone Coonhounds are determined, energetic, tenacious, tireless and fearless, especially while on the hunt. These personality traits are part of what make Redbones such fantastic scenthounds. In addition, Redbone Coonhounds are affectionate, friendly, kind-hearted, sensitive and extremely good with children and other animals. This is not a high-strung, fussy or clingy breed. Redbones adapt effortlessly to a wide variety of new situations. They are not suspicious or wary around strangers, nor are they overly boisterous or pushy. These are solid, stable hound dogs that can work in the field all day, and then comfortably relax with the family for a nice evening at home.

Health Problems
  Problems with hip dysplasia affect this dog, but that is not uncommon and they have few other health problems, making them generally pleasant around veterinarians.

Care
  Traditionally used as an outdoor dog, the Redbone has become more adaptable to indoor living with a family. It should be taken out on routine jogs, walks, or be allowed to swim nearby. However, these activities should only be done in safe and secure locations, as the dog can quickly roam off if it picks up a curious scent. While trailing or when excited, it has a loud and melodious voice.
  To maintain its coat, the Redbone should be brushed weekly. Many Redbone Coonhounds also have a tendency to drool.

Living Conditions
  The Redbone Coonhound will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. These dogs are relatively inactive indoors and will do best with at least a large yard. Their all-weather coat allows them to live and sleep outdoors and work in all kinds of terrain.

Training
  Redbone Coonhounds take well to training, and are so versatile and athletic that they can accomplish a high variety of tasks. Giving them tasks to fulfill – from swimming to hunting – can help it not only feel fulfilled, but help it feel like it plays a role in your pack. Every dog should certainly feel this way about humans, but should be trained with the discipline to realize that its role is subservient to every human in the house.

Exercise Requirements
  Capable of a lot of exercise – and indeed, they were bred that way – this is a great outdoor dog and a good companion for someone who wants to get plenty of vigorous exercise. If you’re looking for a low-maintenance dog that likes to lay around the house, this is not your breed.

Training
  Redbone Coonhounds take well to training, and are so versatile and athletic that they can accomplish a high variety of tasks. Giving them tasks to fulfill – from swimming to hunting – can help it not only feel fulfilled, but help it feel like it plays a role in your pack. Every dog should certainly feel this way about humans, but should be trained with the discipline to realize that its role is subservient to every human in the house.

Grooming
  The Redbone has a flashy, dark-red coat that’s short and smooth. Weekly brushing with a hound mitt or rubber curry brush will keep it clean and shiny, as well as remove dead hair so it doesn’t land on your floor, furniture or clothing.
  Bathe your Coonhound as needed. He may have a bit of a “houndy” odor, which some people love and others hate. Bathing can help reduce the smell if you don’t like it, but it won’t take it away completely or permanently.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails every week or two, and keep the ears clean and dry. Brush the teeth regularly with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Is this breed right for you?
  Great with children, the Redbone Coonhound will adapt to family life with ease. Loving and loyal, this dog loves his owner with passion. A great hunter, he can adapt well to the working life or be happy as a playmate. In need of a fenced-in yard, he has the natural instinct to sniff out his prey, including cats. Trained easily if done so at a young age, this breed is a great addition to add to a household.
Did You Know?
  The man who did the most to develop the breed was named George E. L. Birdsong, a well-known fox hunter and dog breeder who lived in Georgia.

A dream day in the life of a Redbone Coonhound
  Waking up ready to play, he'll greet you with a lick. Once you pet him and show him love, he's ready for his meal. After breakfast, he'll enjoy a fun walk and sniff around the block. Engaging in any activity the kiddos present him, he'll follow them around with ease. Happy to nap inside or outside, he'll need a lot of time in the backyard. After dinner, he'll enjoy a good rubdown, a swim in the pond and a lot of attention before he takes a snooze with his master.




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Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Everything about your Otterhound

Everything about your Otterhound
  This is a large, shaggy scenthound who nearly disappeared after hunting otters became illegal in Britain, but fans have repurposed him as a companion. He’s entertaining to live with but can be difficult to keep clean. The Otterhound is laid-back, but that doesn’t mean he’s a couch potato. Expect to exercise him thoroughly every day.

Overview
  Thought to come from French ancestors, the Otterhound is a large breed that's close to extinction. Used in packs by fishermen to help catch and retrieve otters, the dog has a good scent trail and webbed feet to help retrieve fish. With sea otters on the endangered list, we're seeing less of this breed. Extremely affectionate and devoted to his family, this breed is a large and loving animal.

Highlights
  • Otterhounds require a great deal of exercise, and not just chasing a ball in the backyard. A vigorous daily workout of jogging or swimming for several miles is needed to keep him physically and mentally healthy. However, because of the adverse effect of strenuous exercise on growing joints and bones, you should limit exercise among puppies and adolescent Otterhounds. Swimming is the best exercise for younger dogs, because the risk of joint injury is minimal.
  • Otterhounds are enthusiastic and loud barkers. But don't expect yours to be a guard dog — he's far too friendly for that.
  • Don't allow your Otterhound off-leash in unfenced areas; you never know when he might catch an enticing scent and run off.
  • Otterhounds enjoy being outdoors, but they're best suited to living daily life inside the house with their families.
  • A fenced yard is mandatory. Otterhounds have been known to jump fences as high as five feet, so be sure the fencing is at least six feet tall.
  • The Otterhound is affectionate, but he's also independent. He won't follow you around, begging for attention. He'll probably greet you when you get home, and then — if he doesn't need exercise — he'll return to his favorite snoozing spot.
  • The Otterhound loves food and can become obese if you don't monitor his diet. Also, his incredible sense of smell enables him to locate those special goodies you've hidden in the cabinets, and his size and cleverness enable him to find a way to get at them.
  • Big dog, bigger expense. Everything for a big dog costs more, from food to grooming to veterinary care.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts:
  • Otterhounds are rare - there are fewer than 1,000 throughout the world. Approximately 350 live in the U.S. and Canada. The rest are primarily in Great Britain, the Netherlands, Scandinavia, Germany, and Switzerland.
  • The Otterhound played a role in the creation of another breed: the Airedale. He was crossed with black and tan terriers to add size and water ability.
  • Comparable Breeds: Spinone Italiano, Wirehaired Pointing Griffon


History
  Closely resembling the Petit Basset Griffon Vendéen, the Otterhound may have its roots in France. Being a very unusual member of the Hound Group, the Otterhound is a hardy scenthound, whose origin is unknown. The Otterhound may have its roots in breeds such as the Welsh Harrier, Bloodhound, Southern Hound, or a kind of water spaniel.
  Although there is not much to be said about the genetic makeup of the breed, it was a prized otter hunter in England as early as the 13th century. In 1212, King John kept the earliest documented Otterhound packs. This dog was used for searching for otters, which were exhausting the fish in local streams. The dog trailed the prey to its hideout and bayed after locating it. After the hunters arrived, they would take away the Otterhound and use small terriers to kill the otter.
  Although otter hunting was not a popular sport - as it lacked the formality of foxhunting and took place in wet weather conditions - the breed rose in popularity during the later part of the 19th century, when more than 20 packs hunted in England. However, this sport started losing its prominence after World War II.
  The first Otterhound was introduced to the United States at the turn of the 20th century; soon thereafter, the American Kennel Club would formally recognize the breed.
  Unfortunately, this ancient English breed is slowly becoming extinct. Otterhound fanciers are often not in favor of breeding the dog for dog shows and thus it has not been very popular as a pet or show dog.

Personality
  The Otterhound is an amiable fellow, with plenty of affection for every member of the family. He loves children, though he can play a little rough due to his large size. He is devoted to his family, but not overly so.
  He's likely to extend happy greetings when you come home at the end of the day, but don't expect him to follow you from room to room. He's too independent for that.
  The Otterhound's characteristic independence makes training challenging. You have to convince him that he wants to do what you're asking. This is entirely possible, as long as you are patient and skilled.
  The good-natured Otterhound is not a top candidate for a watchdog. He'll sound a loud warning bark to intruders, but that's about it.
  As with every dog, the Otterhound needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Otterhound puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.
  Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.

Health Problems
  Like most large, rapid growing breeds, Otterhounds occasionally suffer from joint problems such as hip and elbow dysplasia. They are also known to suffer from ear infections due to the long, droopy shape of their ears. Otterhounds can also sometimes suffer from epilepsy and this is considered to be a hereditary ailment.

Care
  The Otterhound is not a breed that can brag of its tidiness, as food often gets trapped in its mouth a face, or mud in its hairy feet. Therefore, the dog should be brushed and combed at least once a week.
  More over, the Otterhound requires a daily exercise regimen. It can sleep outdoors in cool and temperate climates if given proper shelter.

Living Conditions
  The Otterhound is not recommended for apartment life. They are relatively inactive indoors if they have sufficient exercise. They do best with at least a large, well-fenced yard. It can sleep outdoors in temperate or cool climates if given a good shelter.

Training
  Otterhounds were never bred to be kept as companions and are therefore not the easiest of dogs to train. Training them requires a firm hand and a great deal of patience. They are also a good-natured breed and do not respond well to harsh training methods. A firm but gentle approach always works best with this breed. It is also important that an Otterhound’s owner display consistent leadership as this dog can turn willful and stubborn if faced with a meek or passive owner.

Exercise Requirements
  Otterhounds have a great deal of stamina and require strenuous and daily exercise. They make excellent jogging and hiking partners and can keep up a steady trot for the better part of the day. When not exercised sufficiently they can sometimes turn destructive.

Grooming
  The Otterhound has a rough double coat that sheds water and has a crisp texture. It’s easy to care for with weekly brushing. The coat can be two to six inches long, and some coats are oilier than others. An Otterhound who has a longer, oilier coat gets dirty more quickly than one with a shorter, less oily coat, so the need for bathing varies. Some Otterhounds need a bath monthly, while others can get by with a bath only once a year. However frequently you bathe him, plan to clean the Otterhound’s beard after every meal to prevent odor. You will also spend a lot of time cleaning his feet, which have a tendency to attract mud and debris.
  With some Otterhounds, you may need to strip the coat once or twice a year to maintain its crisp texture. Stripping is the process of pulling out dead hair by hand. Ask your dog’s breeder if it is necessary and how to do it. Clipping the coat will make it soft, which is okay as long as you don’t show your dog and don’t mind the loss of the traditional texture. The Otterhound Club of America offers good grooming tips on its website.
  Anytime the Otterhound gets wet, whether from a bath, a swim, or a face wash, be sure you dry him completely to avoid a mildew-like effect, especially under the chin or any other place he has skin folds. In addition, if the Otterhound doesn’t get dry right down to the skin, he can develop painful, itchy, tender spots.
  The rest is basic care. Trim his nails every week or two and keep his ears clean and dry. Good dental hygiene is also important. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Otterhounds are boisterous, fun-loving dogs, but because of their size and tendency toward clumsiness, you should supervise them when they are with small children. They love children and wouldn't hurt them intentionally, but their size and exuberance might cause them to knock a small child to the ground. The Otterhound is probably better suited to a family with older children, ages 10 and up.
  If properly trained and socialized, the Otterhound gets along well with other dogs. Use caution when introducing him to small pets, however. The Otterhound's hunting instinct is strong, and he's likely to chase animals he perceives as prey.

Is this breed right for you?
  A loving and devoted companion, the Otterhound is good with children of all ages. Affectionate and smart, this breed gets along well with all members of the family, including cats. Known to have a knack for hunting, he may chase small animals and fish if given the opportunity. A terrific companion and great for outdoor life and camping, he'll enjoy any type of activity that involves swimming. Although inactive indoors, this breed is not recommended for apartment living due to his large size and need for regular exercise.

Did You Know?
  The water-loving Otterhound has large webbed feet to facilitate his ability to swim. Combined with his rough coat, they give him a look all his own.

A dream day in the life of an Otterhound
Waking up to hang out with the family around the breakfast table, the Otterhound will be ready for his morning walk. Once back inside, he'll snooze before the gang leaves. When alone, he'll ensure the home turf stays protected. Frequenting the backyard, he may swim a few laps in the pool. Once home, he'll greet you with a furry smile. After a rubdown and another walk, he'll be ready to relax with the entire family.
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Thursday, September 22, 2016

Everything about your Bullmastiff

Everything about your Bullmastiff
  Choosing to add a furry friend to your growing household is a long-term commitment, and picking a breed that fits your lifestyle is the key to a happy home. With over 160 American Kennel Club-recognized breeds, that decision can seem overwhelming. We're here to help you meet the breed that's right for you. If you're looking for a devoted guard dog that gets along well with children and cats, learn everything you need to know about the Bullmastiff.

Overview
  As the name suggests, the Bullmastiff is 60 percent Mastiff and 40 percent Bulldog. Bred in England to guard estates from poachers, the idea behind the mix was to create a dog that was larger than the Bulldog, yet a bit faster and more fierce than the Mastiff. Once its services were no longer needed, it was turned into a hunter's companion due to its light complexion. Now, Bullmastiffs are known for their police work, assistance in the military and as excellent family guard dogs.

Highlights
  • Bullmastiffs don't need a lot of exercise and will be happy with a couple of short walks every day.
  • Bullmastiffs can do well in families where both parents work. They are not overly concerned with being alone, but puppies will need someone who can come home to let them out for potty breaks.
  • Bullmastiffs shed little and require only minimal grooming.
  • Bullmastiffs can do well in apartments or condos because they're so mellow.
  • Bullmastiffs can be aggressive toward other animals if they're not properly socialized
  • Bullmastiffs should live indoors with their people.
  • Bullmastiffs are prone to heat exhaustion and heatstroke and should be kept indoors during hot or humid weather.
  • Bullmastiffs drool and can be prone to gassiness. If wiping up drool bothers you in any way, this is not the breed for you.
  • Bullmastiffs need early training that continues throughout their life. Training and socialization help curb unwanted aggression and willfulness.
  • Large and loving, Bullmastiffs enjoy spending time with you on your couch, feet, and lap. They take up a lot of room but give you lots of love in return.
  • Bullmastiffs can be determined guard dogs and will protect their home and family with their life if the need arises. Their size and confidence is a deterrent to intruders.
  • Bullmastiffs are good with children, but they can accidentally knock over or step on toddlers.
  • Bullmastiffs have a high pain threshold so it can be difficult to determine if the dog is hurt.
  • Never acquire a Bullmastiff from a puppy broker or pet store. Reputable breeders do not sell to middlemen or retailers, and there are no guarantees as to whether the puppy had healthy parents. Reputable breeders perform various health tests to ensure that their breeding dogs don't pass on a predisposition to genetic diseases. Interview breeders thoroughly, and make sure the puppy's parents have been screened for genetic diseases pertinent to that breed. Ask breeders about the health issues they've encountered in their dogs, and don't believe a breeder who claims that her dogs never have any health problems. Ask for references so you can contact other puppy buyers to see if they're happy with their Beardie. Doing your homework may save you from a lot of heartbreak later.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Bullmastiff’s colors include red, fawn or brindle.
  • Bullmastiffs will drive out unknown animals from their yard and home.
  • Bullmastiffs do not have a high energy level and are satisfied with short daily walks.
Breed standards
AKC group: Working Group
UKC group: Guardian Dog Group
Average lifespan: 8 - 10 years
Average size: 100 - 130 pounds
Coat appearance: Short and dense
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Powerful, muscular body; large and square head; short muzzle; black nose; dark eyes; V-shaped ears; muscular legs; high tail that is either curved or straight
Coloration: Red, brindle or fawn
Possible alterations: May have black markings on the body.

Comparable Breeds: Boxer, Mastiff


History
  The Bullmastiff is a relatively modern breed that was developed in the mid-19th century, probably around 1860, by English gamekeepers who needed a large, quiet, fearless dog with the speed to track down poachers and the strength to hold them.
  They probably experimented with a number of breeds in an attempt to create the perfect dog for their needs, but the one that paid off was the Mastiff/Bulldog cross. The Mastiff was large but not aggressive enough, while the Bulldog, brave and tenacious, lacked the size needed to knock down and hold a man.
 The popular cross became known as the Gamekeeper's Night-Dog and worked and lived alongside the gamekeeper and his family. The dogs were bred for utility and temperament with little thought put into looks, the exception being a preference for a dark brindle coat, which provided camouflage at night.
  Poaching eventually declined, and the Bullmastiff took on a new role as a guard dog. As a result of the Mastiff influence, the fawn coat with a black mask became more common as well.
  It wasn't until the early 20th century that the Bullmastiff began to be bred as a distinct type rather than as a crossbreed.
  In 1924, England's Kennel Club recognized the breed. The American Kennel Club followed suit in 1933. The first Bullmastiff registered by the AKC was Fascination of Felons Fear in 1934.
  Today the Bullmastiff ranks 40th among the 157 breeds and varieties registered by the AKC, a testament to his qualities as a companion.

Personality
  Bullmastiffs were developed as overseers of livestock and flocks. They took their responsibility seriously and developed a reputation for fearlessness in the face of predators. Bullmastiffs were also invaluable to gameskeepers, patrolling the grounds and stopping poachers from hunting the stock. They were trained not to hurt people and would stalk the poachers and keep them subdued until backup arrived to arrest the trespasser.
  Today Bullmastiffs maintain their imposing figure and watchful eye, but make a generally docile family pet. It takes a lot to provoke a Bullmastiff and despite what their appearance may suggest, they get along just fine with children. They make great farm dogs, happily keeping an eye on livestock and accompanying farmers as they do their chores.

Health Problems
  Bullmastiffs are generally a healthy breed of dog but some health issues may occur. These include hip and elbow dysplasia , bloat or gastric torsion,  Hypothyroidism (thyroid hormone deficiency causes lack of energy, obesity, and infertility), skin problems (this breed’s sensitive skin is prone to irritation, sores, and rashes), eye problems, cancer, tumors, and cardiac disease.

Care
  The bullmastiff is a big dog and needs daily exercise to stay in shape. Its needs are moderate, however, and can be met with walks on leash and short romps. It does not do well in hot, humid weather and generally should be kept as an indoor dog. It needs a soft bed and plenty of room to stretch out. It drools; some snore. Coat care is minimal.

Living Conditions
  Bullmastiffs will do okay in an apartment if they are sufficiently exercised. They are relatively inactive indoors and a small yard will do. They cannot tolerate extremes of temperatures.

Trainability
  Bullmastiffs are not for the soft of heart. They are stubborn and willful and need a great deal of consistency and confidence from a leader or they will quickly take over the house. Training should be done with calm-assertiveness, lots of positive reinforcement and plenty of treats. They will test boundaries and employ manipulation to get their own way.
  This breed is not for the first time dog owner, either. They need constant reinforcement of leadership roles and their socialization with people and animals should be ongoing. In short, living with a Bullmastiff is a commitment to ongoing work. They are like perpetual teenagers, testing boundaries and ignoring the rules, just to see if they can get away with it. Consistency is the key ingredient to training a Bullmastiff.

Exercise Requirements
  Bullmastiffs are not active dogs – in fact, this breed just likes to take it easy and are happy lazing around the house and doing as little as possible. Be sure to get your dog outside so it stays active. Your Bullmastiff needs enough daily exercise to keep it in shape. Take your dog out for daily walks and play in a large fenced backyard. Moderate, regular exercise and monitoring its meals will keep your dog from becoming overweight.

Grooming
  The short smooth coat of a Bullmastiff is essentially wash and wear. A quick daily or weekly brushing is all it takes to get the dead hairs out and reduce shedding.
  Bathe your Bullmastiff as you desire or only when he gets dirty. With the gentle dog shampoos available now, you can bathe a Bullmastiff weekly if you want without harming his coat.
  Drool. There’s no way around it: Bullmastiffs drool. Get in the habit of carrying around a hand towel so you can wipe his mouth frequently.
  The rest is basic care. Keep the nails short, and brush the teeth regularly for overall good health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Bullmastiffs are patient with and protective of children, but because they're so large, they can accidentally knock over or step on a toddler. If you have children, take their age and size into consideration when deciding whether to get a Bullmastiff.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any ear biting or tail pulling on the part of either party.
  Teach your child to never approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or try to take away the dog's food. No dog, no matter how good-natured, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  The Bullmastiff may well be aggressive toward dogs he doesn't know. He does best with dogs of the opposite sex, especially if he's been raised with them.
  He can get along with cats if he's raised with them, although some Bullmastiffs can't resist the urge to chase them. A cat who stands up for itself will fare better than one who runs away.

Is this breed right for you?
  Active yet calm, the Bullmastiff is great for apartment or home life, but it will do best with a small yard and daily walks to avoid behavioral problems. It gets along well with cats, adores children and makes for a wonderful companion dog. Affectionate, the Bullmastiff was taught not to bite, but it is extremely fearless and will attack any threat that comes into range.   Because of this, it is best that it is socialized young and trained by a firm yet kind owner.   Sensitive, it is easily emotionally scarred and will not do well in a kennel or by being yelled at. Although it does not bark often, it is very loud when it does. A big drooler, snorer and likely to slobber, this is a kind yet messy pup. Not shedding very often, the Bullmastiff is easy to groom.

Did You Know?
  Although loving and sweet natured, the Bullmastiff is a large guard dog with a mind of his own. He needs an assertive, experienced owner. Bullmastiffs can be willful and are not likely to back down once aroused.
Famous Bullmastiffs
BrutusBob Dylan's dog in the 1980s
ButkusSylvester Stallone's dog
RockyRoloff family dog (Little People Big World)
Swagger – the live mascot of the Cleveland Browns
MudgeHenry and Mudge (children's books)

A dream day in the life
There is no doubt that the Bullmastiff would prefer to spend its day surrounded by its family. At the heel of its favorite companion, this dog will be its master's shadow whenever it is not snoozing on the couch. After a walk, it'll ensure the home is safe by checking the home's perimeter inside and out. A lover, the Bullmastiff will be happy with a good rubdown as it falls asleep.



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