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Showing posts with label family. Show all posts
Showing posts with label family. Show all posts

Tuesday, June 26, 2018

Everything about your Rat Terrier

Everything about your Rat Terrier
  Rat Terriers are extraordinary pets. While it is interesting to learn about the breeding purpose of Rat Terriers, their genetics actually influence health, outward appearance and behavior. Some behaviors make the Rat Terrier and some can be quite irritating! Understanding her unique needs will help you keep her healthy and will create a stronger bond between the two of you. 

Overview
  The Rat Terrier, also known as the American Rat Terrier, the Decker Giant, the Squirrel Terrier and the Feist, was developed in England to control vermin. Rat Terriers became so adept at killing rats both above and below ground that breed enthusiasts in England entered them in rat-baiting contests, where bets were wagered on how many rats a particular dog could kill. One Rat Terrier reportedly killed 2,501 rats in a seven-hour period. Today’s Rat Terriers retain their strong hunting instinct and also make terrific family companions.

Highlights
  • Lots of visitors to your home? Though devoted to his family, the Rat Terrier takes time to warm up to strangers.
  • A propensity for digging combined with a high prey drive means your Rat Terrier will leap over — or dig under — any fence he can.
  • A Rat Terrier has lots of energy; you should be able to spend at least 40 minutes a day exercising your dog. If you do not, the Rat Terrier can become destructive as a way to release pent up energy.
  • They need plenty of mental stimulation too. A bored Rat Terrier will resort to barking and chewing if he doesn't receive it.
  • The Rat Terrier's compulsion to chase doesn't make him the best choice for an off-leash dog. Even the most well-behaved are likely to "forget" their training in the face of tantalizing prey.
Other Quick Facts

  • A Rat Terrier’s ears can be erect or dropped, and both types can be seen in the same litter. In either case, they are always natural, never cropped.
  • The amount of white on a Rat Terrier can range from a small patch of white about the size of a quarter to as much as 90 percent of the body.
  • A Rat Terrier with blue eyes, wall eyes, or China eyes  may be more prone to deafness than those with dark or hazel eyes.
  • Rat Terriers come in what’s called a “pied” pattern: large patches of one or more colors with white. Colors you’ll see are black, chocolate, red, apricot, blue, fawn, tan, lemon or white, with or without tan markings.
Breed standards
AKC group: Terrier
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 13 to 18 years
Average size: 8 to 25 pounds
Coat appearance: Single, smooth
Coloration: Black, tan, chocolate, blue, grey Isabella (pearl), lemon and apricot. May be tri-color or bi-color, with at least one color being white.
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, apartments, houses with/without yards, farms/rural areas
Temperament: Loyal, active, playful, intelligent

History 
  One of the breeds that can proudly claim to be made in the USA, the Rat Terrier was bred to be an all-purpose farm dog whose job it was to kill rats and other vermin and hunt small game. In the early 20th century, this was one of the dogs you were most likely to see on a farm.
  Like so many Americans, the Rat Terrier has a highly diverse background. His ancestors include Fox Terriers and various other types of terriers, Beagles, Whippets, Italian Greyhounds, and dogs known as feists. The Whippet and Italian Greyhound blood added speed, while the Beagle brought in scenting ability and a pack mentality. The result was a dog with speed, versatility, “nose,” and a great disposition. President Theodore Roosevelt was a fan of Rat Terriers, and they were among the many pets he and his family brought to the White House.
  For many years, Rat Terriers were simply farm dogs and pets. They faded in popularity as more people moved to cities and fewer lived in rural areas. Fortunately, they weren’t completely forgotten and  in 1999 the United Kennel Club recognized Rat Terriers as a distinct breed. In the American Kennel Club, the Rat Terrier belongs to the Miscellaneous Class, the final step before AKC recognition.


Personality
  Intelligent, wary, and stubborn, this breed is a dynamo. Understand their general dislike of strangers and know that most warm up to visitors (although chances of that happening are slimmer if you're not there). If they're not properly socialized they will be fine with their family but they could become aggressive to strangers and other animals. They are also absolutely fearless, which can be a wonderful trait, though not if they are aggressive. 
  A good family pet, Rat Terriers are amazingly perceptive and intuitively respond to your moods. They have a great desire to please, love praise, and will follow you around the house. Bred to work all day on the farm, these guys need a lot of exercise and if they don't get it, their sharp little minds can turn devious to amuse themselves. Their people live with the mantra that a tired dog is a good dog. As with every dog, the Rat Terrier needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. 
  Socialization helps ensure that your Rat Terrier puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog. Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.

Health
This is an extremely long-lived and healthy breed, with an average life span of 13 to 16 years. Breed health concerns may include food and contact allergies, elbow and hip dysplasia, malocclusion (bad bites), demodicosis (demodectic mange) and patellar luxation.

Care
The Rat Terrier requires a good amount of daily outdoor exercise such as a long walk or jog. It will do fine as an apartment dog so long as it is provided with an adequate amount of exercise. The Rat Terrier sheds lightly and requires occasional brushing.

Living Conditions
Rat Terriers will do okay in an apartment so long as they get at least 20-30 minutes of exercise a day. They are fairly active indoors and should have at least a small to medium-sized yard. Rat Terriers love to dig, and they can get out of a fenced yard relatively easily. Provided they have the proper protection, they are able to spend a good amount of time outdoors. They love to be inside the house and outside to play.

Training
  The Rat Terrier is quite intelligent, but is also stubborn. They aren’t eager to please you – they’re in it for their own fun! That’s why you should either have some experience training dogs or be prepared to enlist the services of a professional. A good way to get the upper hand when it comes to training is to start early. Keep training sessions short and interesting in order to keep your dog focused.
  After you’ve conquered the basics, your Rat Terrier will be ready to take training to the next level. This breed excels at agility training and Earthdog activities. Anything you can do to keep these dogs occupied is helpful, as it keeps both their minds and bodies active and engaged.

Exercise 
  Don’t let its size fool you – the Rat Terrier as plenty of energy to spare. It needs at least 40 minutes of exercise a day in order to keep healthy and happy. If you live on a farm, this breed will go to work keeping the rodent population in check. If not, take your Rat Terrier for walks a few times a day, or take him to the dog park to work off all that excess energy. And there’s nothing that the Rat Terrier likes more than to play catch for hours on end.
  Because of its small size, this breed can live in an apartment, but you have to be committed to making sure they get outside for daily exercise. Once they get tuckered out, your Rat Terrier will happily curl up on the couch by your feet.

Grooming
  Rat Terriers have short, easy-care coats. Brush them weekly or more often with a soft bristle brush or rubber curry brush. The more often you brush, the less loose hair you’ll have floating around your house. Rat Terriers shed moderately year-round and they have a heavier shedding season in the spring and fall. An occasional bath is all he needs to stay clean.
  Be sure you don’t trim your Rattie’s whiskers, and don’t let a groomer do so. Whiskers are an important tactile aid for the Rattie.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Small dogs are prone to periodontal disease so brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
Although Rats who aren't used to children should be supervised, most Rats are wonderfully patient with kids, even kids who aren't part of the family. They are extremely fond of their family kids. Parents who don't like the idea of the family dog sleeping under the covers with the kids might be in for trouble. 
As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child. Although there may be a few disagreements regarding food and sleeping arrangements, the Rat Terrier likes other dogs. 
He doesn't spar with them and generally is not aggressive towards them. As a matter of fact, many Rats want to play with other dogs, so you need to be on your lookout for dog-reactive or aggressive dogs. Once an aggressive dog provokes a fight, these terriers return the emotion. Unfortunately, they are size-blind and don't care if the aggressor outweighs them five times over. Rats are prey-driven so any small, quick moving animal, including a hamster, mouse, chinchilla, and of course, a rat, is seen as prey, and may be chased. If a Rat is raised with a cat, bird, chicken, or other animal in a household, they will generally get along as family members.

Is the Rat Terrier the Right Dog for You?
If you are looking for an active, energetic, family-friendly dog, the rat terrier should be one of your considerations. Exercise needs are high, but grooming and health problems are substantially lower than with other breeds. If you have small animals or rodents, you will need to take extreme care around a rat terrier because of their high prey drive. If it sounds like these requirements are what you are looking for, the rat terrier might be a good fit for your household.

Did You Know?
One of the breeds that can proudly claim to be made in the USA, the Rat Terrier was bred to be an all-purpose farm dog whose job it was to kill rats and other vermin and hunt small game.



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Friday, November 24, 2017

Everything about your Briard

Everything about your Briard
  Centuries old and beloved by the French since the Middle Ages, the Briard is busy, active dog that loves to protect his flock. And if he doesn’t have a flock to protect, he’ll be content watching over your family. Quite happy to move from the farm to a house, this breed is a wonderful companion for people who like to stay active. Also known as the Berger Briard, the Chien Berger de Brie and the Berger de Brie, the Briard is loyal to a fault and will love you with his whole heart, right from the start.

Overview
  Often called "a heart wrapped in fur," the Briard makes a great family dog. He is devoted to his owner, happiest following you around the house while you do chores or watching you watch television on a rainy day.
  With a strong instinct to herd, it's not unusual for him to try to gather or keep the children or adults in his family within certain boundaries. He may nudge, push, or bark at his "flock."
  The Briard is an intelligent breed and a quick study when it comes to training, though he can be stubborn and want to do things his own way. Owners must be prepared to establish pack leadership from an early age or the dog is likely to take a shot at the role himself.
  The Briard is an ideal companion for someone who wants a lovable, but not overly dependent, dog. A member of the Herding Group, he weighs in at around 75 pounds and lives comfortably in the country or city — as long as he's with his family and gets sufficient exercise.

Highlights
  • The Briard needs daily grooming. Although his coat is considered low- to non-shedding, it tangles and matts easily. If you do not have the time or patience for grooming, consider another breed.
  • The Briard is naturally independent, which is a wonderful quality if your puppy has been trained properly. However, without training, that independent, confident puppy can turn into an unmanageable adult.
  • The Briard must be socialized early to avoid aggression toward people or animals he doesn't know. Briards were bred to be guard dogs and still take this role seriously.
  • The Briard enjoys being with his owner. He does best when he is allowed to hang out with the people he loves.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • The Briard’s long coat can be any color except white. It is usually black, gray or tawny.
  • In France, the breed is called the Berger (bair-zhay) de Brie (bree).
  • The Briard’s tail is in the shape of a J, like a shepherd’s crook. It’s known as a crochet hook.
  • Briards can be found participating in herding, agility and obedience trials, as well as flyball competitions.
Breed standards
AKC group: Herding
UKC group: Herding Dog
Average lifespan: 10-12 years
Average size: 70 to 90 pounds
Coat appearance: Long and slightly wavy
Coloration: Uniform black, fawn, grey or blue
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles, houses with yards, farms/rural areas, watchdog
Temperament: Devoted, intelligent, protective, gentle
Comparable Breeds: Bearded Collie, Barbet

History
  The Briard has a long history in France as a herding breed and guard dog, protecting flocks from wolves and poachers. His reputation is that of a brave and heroic protector. In addition, the breed has been used to track and hunt game, as a sentinel in war time and as a pack dog to carry items.
  The breed probably descends from rough-coated sheepdogs that came to Europe in the Middle Ages. Dogs that resemble the Briard are depicted in eighth-century tapestries, and the dogs are mentioned in 12th-century records. A breed standard was written for the dogs in 1867, and a French breed club was formed in 1909.
Both Thomas Jefferson and the Marquis de Lafayette brought Briards to the United States, but it wasn’t until 1922 that a litter of Briards was registered with the American Kennel Club.   The AKC recognized the breed in 1928. The breed currently ranks 125th among the breeds registered by the AKC, down from 110th in 2000.



Personality
  They can be clowns or be serious, but the one thing in common that all Briards have is they want to please you. Known to have hearts of gold that are wrapped in fur, the Briard makes a perfect family pet for those who like to keep active. If they don’t get enough exercise, this breed can become destructive. To keep your home and garden in one piece, you’ll need to be committed to daily activity.
  Even though he will be generous with his affection with the family, your Briard may be wary of strangers. You can thank their flock-protecting instinct for that. This makes him an excellent watchdog. To keep him from becoming aggressive with strangers, you should start socialization from an early age and keep up this practice throughout his lifetime.
  The Briard will get along with most pets, but can often be aggressive with other dogs. If you already have pets in your house when you bring your Briard puppy home, you should be fine, be avoid adding new animals into the mix once he has been established in the household.

Health
  With such a large breed, you can expect hip dysplasia and bloat to be an issue with the Briard. As well, they may also suffer from cataracts, central progressive retinal atrophy, congenital stationary night blindness, hereditary retinal dystrophy of Briards, hypothyroidism and lymphoma.

Care
  The Briard's coat must be brushed regularly to prevent the hair from tangling. Herding is its favorite activity, but it can also be taken for long walks or jogs in order to meet its exercise requirements. And though it is adaptable to outdoor living, it is most often considered an indoor dog. Just make sure you take it to large fields and let it play frequently.

Living Conditions

  The Briard will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. They are moderately active indoors and will do best with at least an average-sized yard. This dog is totally not suited for life in a kennel. They are happiest in the home as part of the family, but they do love to be outdoors.

Trainability
  Briards are highly trainable dogs and thrive on mastering new tasks. Training should always be done with a confident but gentle hand, as this breed is highly sensitive and boasts a long memory. A Briard isn't easy to forgive someone who treats him harshly. Establishing leadership should be done as early as possible, because Briards are dominant and will move quickly to take over the role of “pack leader” in the home, unless otherwise put in his place.
  This breed is fearless boasts excellent stamina. They can work all day alongside a farmer without losing steam and because of their versatility, trainability and endurance, Troops in WWI used Briards for a variety of tasks including, sentries, messengers and medic dogs.

Exercise 

  This is no dog for the lazy. This dog needs plenty of activity to keep him occupied – both physical and mental. Farms make an ideal environment for this breed, where he can herd sheep and protect against predators. If you don’t live on a farm, a large, fenced-in yard is necessary. Children will help tire him out, but playtime should always be supervised as he might herd the kids.
  Because they need a large area in which to move around, apartments and condos are not good living quarters for the Briard. They just won’t get the exercise they need in that small amount of space.

Grooming 
  The Briard's coat is long and very high-maintenance. While no stripping is required, two to three hours per week of brushing is required in order to keep their thick coats from matting.  When brushed properly, dirt and debris is easily removed from the coat. They shed lightly year round, but will blow their entire coat twice per year. The coat of a Briard can grow to about five inches in length, which is the acceptable standard, and in fact, clipping can lead to disqualification in the show ring. Retired Briards, or dogs who will not be shown, can have their coats trimmed in order to pear down the weekly maintenance schedule.
  As the Briard sheds, if the undercoat is not properly removed from the body, it will form mats.
  Briards need to be bathed about once every six weeks. Over-bathing this breed can lead to natural oils in the hair and skin being stripped away, causing skin irritation and even infection. The Briard's face and rear end may need to be washed more often, as their beards can hang into their food and water dishes, and their long hair can trap debris when the dog eliminates.
  In addition to brushing and bathing, Briards should have their ears cleaned on a weekly basis with a veterinarian-approved cleanser to keep harmful bacteria at bay. Weekly tooth brushing will keep teeth and gums healthy, and prevent bad breath.

Children And Other Pets
  A loving and playful companion, the Briard makes an excellent family dog. He is protective of the children in his family, and has been known to "defend" them when parents discipline.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party.
  Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  If the Briard is raised with other dogs and pets, and learns they are members of his pack, he gets along fairly well. However, his prey drive is strong, so training is necessary for him to learn not to chase the family cat or quarrel with your Beagle. Supervision is a good idea, as animals outside his immediate family are likely to trigger his instinct to give chase. Keep him on a leash when you are in public.

Is the Briard the Right Breed for you?

High Maintenance: Grooming should be performed often to keep the dog's coat in good shape. No trimming or stripping needed.
Moderate Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Moderately Easy Training: The Briard is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
Sam and Ralph clock

  Briards have made a variety of big and small-screen appearances, most notably in the series “Married With Children” and the soap opera “All My Children,” as well as the movies “Top Dog” and “Dennis the Menace.”

Briards in popular culture

  • Dennis the Menace - "Ruff"
  • Kiss Kiss Bang Bang - "Stevie"
  • Bachelor Father - "Jasper
  • Get Smart - Agent K-13 "Fang
  • Dharma & Greg - "Stinky"
  • Addams Family - "Them" 
  • Top Dog - "Reno"
  • Dennis the Menace (1993) - "Rosie"
  • The Karate Dog 2004
  • Tell No One 2006
  • Sam Sheepdog of Looney Tunes fame

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Wednesday, December 7, 2016

Everything about your Bluetick Coonhound

Everything about your Bluetick Coonhound
  The official state dog of Tennessee, the Bluetick Coonhound is a natural hunting dog. Bred from the French Staghound and English Foxhound, the Bluetick was created for slow and steady hunting. Named after their blue coat with small black ticks, these dogs loves to hunt raccoons and other small animals. Cold-nosed dogs, these pups are in need of a working man's schedule.

Overview
  Like many Coonhounds, the Bluetick gets its name from its coat, which is covered in black hairs that give it the mottled, or “ticked” pattern for which it is named. This is a medium-sized, sturdy, athletic animal that was bred to trail and tree raccoons and other small game.   Today, in addition to its hunting talents, the Bluetick Coonhound is competitive in the conformation and performance show rings and excels in many active outdoor canine sports. It also has become a beloved family companion. The American Kennel Club admitted the Bluetick Coonhound for full registration in 2009, as a member of its Hound Group.

Other Quick Facts
  • The Bluetick is one of the breeds that can claim to be “made in the USA.”
  • A bluetick coat is a thickly mottled dark blue with black spots on the back, ears and sides. The head and ears are mostly black, and there are tan markings above the eyes and on the cheeks, and dark-red ticking on the feet, lower legs, chest and beneath the tail.
  • The Bluetick is a cold-nosed dog, meaning he’s good at finding and following an old, or “cold,” trail.
  • The Bluetick’s bark on the trail is described as a bawl.
Breed standards
AKC group: Hound

UKC group: Sighthound

Average lifespan: 11 - 12 years
Average size: 45 - 80 pounds
Coat appearance: Short and glossy
Coloration: Blue, blue with black ticks
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Stout, muscular body; dark brown, round, wide-set eyes; squared muzzle and broad head; black, cold nose; thin, low ears. high, curved tail with straight athletic legs
Possible alterations: Possible tricoloration, short howl
Comparable Breeds: Black and Tan Coonhound, American Blue Gascon

History
  The Bluetick Coonhound, which originated in Louisiana, was developed from the Bleu de Gascogne hound of southwest France, as well as the English Foxhound, the cur dog, the American Foxhound, and the Black And Tan Virginia Foxhound. Originally, Bluetick Coonhounds were registered in the United Kennel Club under the English Foxhound and Coonhound, but were recognized by the club as a separate breed in 1946. 
  Bluetick Coonhounds are also recognized by the Australian National Kennel Council and the New Zealand Kennel Club. In April 2009 the breed was accepted by the American Kennel Club and in December 2009 they became eligible to compete in AKC coonhound events. The American Blue Gascon is a subgroup of Bluetick Coonhounds that is larger, heavier, and more "houndy" looking than the standard Bluetick. American Blue Gascons are often referred to as "old-fashioned" Blueticks. This is due to their appearance and "colder" nose, or slower style of tracking, compared to other modern coonhound breeds.

Temperament
  Bluetick Coonhounds are bred to be hunting dogs. They are athletic, hardy, and need a full-time job or activity such as hunting, obedience, or agility to stay happy. They can be challenging to train and they should be monitored around cats or other small animals. They are, like their hound counterparts, very intelligent breeds, with an uncanny knack for problem-solving.
  Once trained, the members of the breed are very mindful of their owner. Something first time owners should be aware of is the daunting task of "voice-training" these dogs. They tend to be relentlessly loud barkers and/or howlers. If properly socialized from a young age, they can make a great family pet. These dogs were bred to be working/hunting dogs.
  In normal conditions, this dog is excellent around children. They are mindful and friendly dogs. However their noses will keep them in trouble, so food and garbage should never be left out unattended. The breed is often mistaken for being aggressive as the breed will "greet" strangers with its signature howl and will sniff the subject until satisfied. Usually, this is just the way the breed gets to know its subjects. Since Blueticks are driven by their strong sense of smell, they make excellent hunting/tracking dogs. If allowed, they will tree almost any animal smaller than them. Blueticks are generally easier to handle in the field than some other coon hounds.

Health Problems
  The Bluetick Coonhound is a fairly healthy breed, but it is prone to hip dysplasia, cataracts, and Krabbes disease.

Grooming

  The coat of the Bluetick Coonhound is fairly easy to care for. They only require an occasional brushing to keep their coats clean and glossy. Blueticks are not heavy-shedders. Their large, long ears should be cleaned and checked regularly for any signs of infection. They only need to be bathed when dirt or odor become especially noticeable.


Living Conditions
  The Bluetick is not recommended for apartment life. They are relatively inactive indoors and will do best with at least a large yard. Do not let this breed run free off of its lead unless in a safe, secure area. Coonhounds have a tendency to follow their noses, and if they catch wind of a scent, they may wander off for hours following it.

Training
  The Bluetick Coondog is a hunting dog, so expect some challenges in the training and housebreaking department. Always following its nose, the Bluetick Coondog is easily distracted by smells. Be firm when training, as this breed will ignore you if you are too lenient and gentle.
  But remember – the Bluetick Coonhound is sensitive to harsh words, so being firm can prove to be difficult. Don’t be discouraged because this breed is intelligent and perform trailing exercises very well. If you are not a seasoned pet owner, the Bluetick Coonhound will be a bit difficult to navigate, training wise.

Exercise Requirements
  Get off the couch, because your Bluetick Coonhound needs daily vigorous exercise. If your Bluetick Coonhound doesn’t get a long, brisk daily walk, it may become high strung and destructive. Bred for physical exercise, the Bluetick Coonhound is an anxious and energetic dog. Natural hunters, the Bluetick Coonhound has a tendency to run off and hunt if it is not kept in a fenced-in area.

Grooming
  Weekly brushing with a hound mitt or rubber curry brush will keep your Bluetick’s handsome coat clean and shiny. He’ll shed some -all dogs do - but regular brushing will remove dead hair so it doesn’t land on your floor, furniture or clothing.
  Bathe your Coonhound as needed. He may have a bit of a “houndy” odor, which some people love and others hate. Bathing can help reduce the smell if you don’t like it, but it won’t take it away completely or permanently.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails every few weeks. Keep those droopy ears clean and dry so bacterial and yeast infections don’t take hold. Brush the teeth for good overall health and fresh breath.

Is this breed right for you?
  Especially good with older children, the Bluetick Coonhound will do well with a family that lives on a larger piece of fenced-in land and enjoys to hunt. An athletic dog, hunters like his sturdy body and loyal personality. Alert and attentive, this breed works well in all terrains and weather, and has especially good vision at night.

Famous Bluetick Coonhounds
  • Smokey, the mascot of the University of Tennessee, is a Bluetick.
  • A Bluetick Coonhound named Tet was the companion of Stringfellow Hawke, the main character of the popular 1980s television show Airwolf.
  • Old Blue, a Bluetick Coonhound, was in the 1960 Elia Kazan film, Wild River.
  • Old Blue was a Bluetick Coonhound belonging to the Pritchard boys in the novel Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls.
  • A female Bluetick Coonhound is mentioned in the George Jones song "Ol' Red" which was later covered by Blake Shelton.
  • Huckleberry Hound is a Bluetick.
  • Savage Sam, the sequel to Old Yeller, is about a Bluetick Coonhound.
  • Lillian's dog, Gideon, is a Bluetick Coonhound in the song "Red Dirt Girl" written by Emmylou Harris.
  • A Bluetick Coonhound is referenced in the song "Long Haired Country Boy" written by Charlie Daniels.
  • A Bluetick hound is referred to in the 2016 song "Church Bells," written by Zach Crowell, Brett James and Hillary Lindsey, and sung by Carrie Underwood.
Did You Know?
  The Bluetick can be found in various forms of pop culture. Emmylou Harris mentions a Bluetick named Gideon in her song “Red Dirt Girl,” the University of Tennessee mascot is a Bluetick Coonhound named Smokey, and a Bluetick stars in a commercial for Miracle Whip.

A dream day in the life of a Bluetick Coonhound
  Up bright and early with his owner, the Bluetick Coonhound is ready for a hard day's work. On the trail, regardless of the weather, he's in search of prey. Likely to jump into a river or climb a tree if need be, he'll get whatever he's been tasked with. Back home, he'll chow down on dinner and be ready for another run outside. He enjoys being part of the gang and will follow his family wherever they go, from sun up to sun down.

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Everything about your Plott

Everything about your Plott
  The Plott is first and foremost a hunting dog who specializes in big game or anything else you want him to go after. For the person who can satisfy his desire to hunt and be active, he can be a wonderful companion and watchdog, well suited to family life. His short coat is easy to groom, but it sheds.

Overview
  The Plott Hound is one of only four dog breeds developed exclusively in America; and although not previously in existence as a unique type prior to the 18th century, the Plott Hound can trace its ancestry to an archaic breed of dog called the Hanoverian Hound.  The Hanoverian Hound was developed in Germany and is believed to have originally descended from medieval Bloodhound breeds.  This lineage therefore, makes the Plott Hound undeniably ancient in its pedigree, and the only Coonhound breed not claiming British roots.

Highlights
  • Plott Hounds generally get along well with other dogs since they are a pack breed and many do best in homes where they are not an only dog.
  • Socialization is a must for this breed. They can be very dominant and should be socialized outside the home to avoid aggressive behavior.
  • Plott Hounds must have training at an early age. They are generally eager to please but without training dominance and aggression problems can arise.
  • Although they do well with older children who understand how to treat dogs, they are not recommended for homes with smaller children. They can become very possessive of food dishes and such. Even the best-trained or socialized dog should not be left alone with a young child.
  • The Plott Hound is an uncommon breed and there may be long waiting lists for a puppy. If you do not wish to adopt an older dog, please be prepared to wait and do not go to irresponsible breeders for a shorter wait.
  • Plott Hounds require at least an hour a day of walking or other exercise. They are not suited to living in apartments.
  • Plott Hounds require weekly brushing as well as other regular grooming care, such as nail trimming and tooth brushing.
  • Plott Hounds are not the best breed for an inexperienced or timid dog owner. Although they are very easy to train, they do have a dominant personality and will disregard an owner that is less sure of him or herself.
  • Plott Hounds should have a fenced yard or be kept on leash since they have a tendency to wander off in pursuit of an interesting scent. They do not have any road sense and will wander into oncoming traffic if their path takes them there.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • The Plott is an aggressive, bold, fearless hunter who is loyal, intelligent, and alert.
  • The Plott’s skin is not as loose and droopy as that of some scenthounds, and his ears aren’t as long.
  • The Plott has a distinctive “chop” — a loud, staccato, ringing bark that lets the hunter know he is on the trail of or has treed his prey.
  • The Plott is the dog of choice for big-game hunters in search of bears, cougars, or hogs. They are also used to tree raccoons, and many farmers like to keep them as all-purpose dogs.
  • The Plott’s smooth, fine coat can be any shade of brindle, black with brindle trim, solid black, or buckskin, which ranges from red fawn through sandy red, light cream, yellow ochre, dark fawn or golden tan.
Breed standards
AKC group: Hound
UKC group: Scenthound
Average lifespan: 12-14 years
Average size: 40-60 pounds
Coat appearance: Glossy, smooth, and fine
Coloration: Blue brindle, brown brindle, red brindle, black brindle
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: A medium-sized muscular and strong body, black lips and nose, black-rimmed brown or hazel eyes, tight skin around face, square-shaped muzzle, hanging ears that are medium in length, webbed toes, and long tail
Possible alterations: May be all black in color and have saddle markings. Dog has a "chop" sound when he has successfully hunted down his prey.
Comparable Breeds: Black and Tan Coonhound, Redbone Coonhound

History
  The Plott Hound descends from five Hanoverian Schweisshunds brought to North Carolina in 1750 by German immigrant Johannes Georg Plott. In Germany the dogs had been used as boarhounds, but North Carolina had bears, and that's what Plott trained his dogs to hunt. Plott's descendants continued to breed the dogs, and they became known as Plott's hounds.
Von Plott (left), a descendent of the original developers
 of the Plott hound breed in Haywood County, NC,
with a group of hounds at Lake Waccamaw, NC;
man on right is probably Von’s brother John Plott.
Circa early 1950s.
  They spread throughout the Smoky Mountains, with each hunter adding his own touch to the breed, and eventually returned to their roots by being used to hunt wild boar in addition to bear. They were also used to hunt mountain lions and, with judicious crosses to add better treeing ability, raccoons.
  In the early 1900s, a cross with some black-and-tan hounds owned by a man named Blevins brought the Plotts additional scenting talent as well as the black-saddled brindle pattern. Today, most Plott Hounds trace their pedigrees back to the two legendary hounds that resulted from this cross: Tige and Boss.
  The breed began to be registered by the United Kennel Club in 1946. The Plott Hound became the official dog of North Carolina in 1989. He's also registered by the American Kennel Club and is starting to make his way in the show ring.
  He is still relatively rare, however, and is most often found in the mountains of Appalachia, the Smokies, and other wild parts of the country where his hunting skills are appreciated.

Personality
  Plott Hounds originated in the Hills of North Carolina where they were used to hunt bear and wild boar. This makes them sturdy, fearless hunting companions and excellent family watchdogs. Plotts need to live in an active household with people who love the outdoors.   They enjoy hiking, running and romping in the yard, and hunters still use them in the field to hunt large game. Plott Hounds are pack dogs and are at their happiest in a home with multiple dogs for him to socialize with. Plotts are generally friendly toward strangers and enjoy the company of older, well-behaved children.

Health
  The Plott, which has an average lifespan of 11 to 13 years, is not prone to any major health concerns. However, some Plotts do succumb to canine hip dysplasia (CHD). To identify this condition early, a veterinarian may recommend hip exams for this breed of dog.

Care
  Although Plott Hounds have moderately low energy indoors, they are active outside. If you don't have a several fenced acres that they can explore and sniff, expect to give them about an hour of exercise daily. You can break it up into two or three walks or playtimes. The Plott is a walking companion, not a jogger. He likes to meander along and sniff out interesting trails.
  Plott Hounds should remain on leash when they are not in an enclosed area and they should have a fenced yard when they are left outside. They will wander away, and they have no road sense. They'll follow an interesting trail right into the path of a car. While a Plott needs a fenced yard for safety, he's not a yard dog. When you're home, he should be there with you.
  Plott Hounds are fairly easy to train due to their intelligence and eager to please temperament. They do have a dominant streak and are not suggested for inexperienced or timid dog owners who are unable to consistently enforce rules and commands. They do well with positive reinforcement, and corrections should never be harsh or cruel. That will only make your Plott become stubborn or sulky.
  Plott Hounds must be socialized to prevent any aggression problems. Many obedience schools offer puppy socialization classes and this is a great start. Also remember to gradually expose your puppy to various stimuli within the community and in your home.
  Plotts can be possessive of their food dishes and will attack other dogs and animals that nose around their food. Teaching your Plott Hound to allow people to handle and remove his food dishes is an important training step that cannot be missed.

Living Conditions
  The Plott Hound is not recommended for apartment life. It can live and sleep outdoors provided it has proper shelter. This breed has no road sense at all and should be kept in a safe area because it has a tendency to wander.

Trainability
  Plotts are a snap to train for experienced dog owners. If used in the field, they need virtually no training to work with a hunter. At home, obedience training goes quickly and smoothly if conducted early. This breed exhibits dominance, so it is imperative to teach them as puppies who exactly runs the household. Once leadership is established, everything else falls into place. Plotts are pack animals who instinctively respect the leader. Treats and positive reinforcement should be all you need to train a young Plott. Older Plotts who have developed bad habits may require a firmer hand, but this breed should never be treated harshly. If they aren't afraid to attack bears, they surely won't be scared to nip at you. Boundaries are important and rule enforcement should be done with absolute consistency.

Activity Requirements
  Plott Hounds need a lot of activity to maintain health and happiness. They can spend an entire day in the field tracking and penning prey, so companion Plotts should be allowed to run as much as possible during the day to burn off excess energy. They make excellent jogging companions and enjoy trotting alongside bike riders. They make excellent hiking and camping companions, acting as both comrade and protector.
  These are pure country dogs and do not do well in houses without yards or in apartments. Plotts need room to run and roam, and if penned inside all day will become rambunctious and destructive.

Grooming
  The Plott has a distinctive coat. It’s smooth and fine, but thick enough to protect the dog as he hunts in cold, wet or rough conditions. A few Plotts have a double coat: a short, soft, thick under coat topped by a longer, smoother, stiffer hairs.
  Caring for a Plott’s coat is easy. Groom it at least weekly with a rubber curry brush to remove dead hair and distribute skin oils. If your Plott spends a lot of time indoors, you might want to brush him more often to keep dead hair on the brush and off your furniture and clothing. Plotts with a double coat will shed more heavily and need to be brushed two or three times a week.
  Be aware that scenthounds such as the Plott can have what is often described as a musty odor. Regular baths can help keep the aroma under control, but it’s something you should be prepared to live with.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Keep the hanging ears clean and dry to prevent bacterial or yeast infections. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Plott Hounds do well in homes with children, although they're best suited to living with older children who understand how to interact with dogs. Plotts can be possessive of their food bowls, and this can pose a problem if a young child tries to snag a handful of kibble.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Plott Hounds can get along well with other dogs if they're introduced at a young age. If they raised with them, they can even learn to get along with cats, although they may tree cats they find outside.

Is this breed right for you?
  An outgoing and social breed, the Plott makes an excellent addition to a family with children. Loving and loyal, he does best with a home that includes a fenced-in yard. In need of a dedicated owner, he's fast to learn when given proper leadership. A natural-born athlete, this pup is in need of a lot of exercise and enjoys hunting and being outside. He's a good breed to keep inside or outside the home and is not recommended for apartment living. Only doing well with cats when raised with them, he will likely chase a cat that he doesn't know.

Did You Know?
  The mountains of western North Carolina are the birthplace of one of America’s few homegrown dogs.

A dream day in the life of a Plott
  Waking up early to hunt, the Plott will work from sunup to sundown. Returning home, he'll happily play with the family while running and chasing them outdoors. Inside, he'll engage in family time by following around those that he loves. With an afternoon walk including smelling a few scents, he'll be back in the home to spend quality time with his loving family.
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