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Showing posts with label exercise. Show all posts
Showing posts with label exercise. Show all posts

Monday, June 20, 2016

10 Most Dangerous Dog Breeds

10 Most Dangerous Dog Breeds
  Regardless of the breed, we can typically point to a puppy’s upbring to explain significant parts of its personality. However, certain breeds of dog have earned their terrible reputations, often labeled as vicious because of their apparent predisposition to violent interactions with other dogs and humans. Still, it has been suggested that training and domestication could iron out the kinks in the nature of an aggressive canine.
  So, almost any breed of dog can be a wonderful companion, but almost any breed of dog can kill. It’s true, though, that certain breeds are most susceptible to falling victim to a powerfully aggressive nature, and with a combination of improper care and the physical attributes and characteristics of a violent breed, these ten most dangerous breeds of dogs cause a higher number of injuries and fatalities than any other.

1. Pit Bull
  Pit Bull is one of the dangerous dog breeds in the world which types include Stafford shire bull terrier, American Pit Bull Terrier, and American Stafford shire terrier. The Pit Bull dog breed is very difficult to identify through its physical characteristics even experts may face difficulty to visually recognize the dog breeds. Pit Bull has various well known types having different behavior and temperament level towards their owners and strangers while some are both independent and stubborn and can’t be inexperienced dog owner may injure or kill other animals.
  Pit bulls often attract the worst kind of dog owners because of their power. Especially immoral people who are only interested in these dogs for fighting (which is unacceptable). While pit bulls were once considered especially non-aggressive to any people, their reputation has changed because of unscrupulous breeders and irresponsible owners. In fact, Pit bulls are commonly confident, people-oriented dogs that can develop a strong sense of dependence on their owners.

Facts About Pit Bulls: 
  • Though these dedicated companions love people more than anything but improper training can sometimes make them aggressive. They can even attack humans if not trained the right way. Otherwise, they won’t harm humans
  • 86.8% of American Pit Bull Terriers have passed their temperament tests
  • No matter what the task is, when pit bulls are committed to any task, they carry out it with full enthusiasm. It’s often the nature of pit bulls, which make us think that they have locking Jaws especially when they bite on something and refuse to release it that easily
  • Pitbulls are widely known for illegal sport of dog fighting
More about Pit Bull here...Everything about your Pit Bull


2.  Rottweilers
  Rottweilers are one of the most popular dog breeds in the world. They are powerful dogs with strong jaws, primarily meant to protect. They generally don’t like strangers and other dogs and if they think their owners are in danger, they can be very dangerous.
  This breed is often used as a police dog or guard dog. As an old breed dating as far back, according to historians, to the Roman Empire, Rottweilers have also been used as herding dogs.
  Many experts advise Rottweiler owners to seek professional training for their dogs as their strength is an inherent risk, particularly for children. If you choose to have one of these dogs, be sure it is properly socialized and always remain vigilant regarding its temperament.

Rottweiler Facts:
  • Rottweilers fall under “working dog breeds” category. It is one of the widely known Rottweiler facts
  • Life expectancy of this dangerous dog breed is around 12 to 14 years
  • After completing their first year, Rottweilers are considered as adults. 1 Rottweiler year is equivalent to 16 years of human age. After they complete 2 years, just add 5 years to find its equivalent human age
  • Generally, Rottweilers are considered unsuitable for family pet
More about Rottweiler here...Everything about your Rottweiler

3. Huskies
  Huskies is dog breed to pull sleds in northern regions which usually known for their fast pulling style mostly recognizable by its thickly furred double coat. Huskies are a very active, energetic, and resilient breed and one of dangerous dog breeds in the world because of their aggressive nature towards others. Huskies aren’t much violent but only few reasons made them vicious which can be reduced through positive reinforcement training program but consistency needed with these sessions and turned to be destructive without proper care. 

  However, they can be dangerous to smaller animals due to their strong predator instinct and are known for being destructive if they are bored.
  Huskies are very energetic and intelligent dogs. But their training is a complicated thing, and this dog is not recommended for beginning dog owners.

Husky Facts:
  • Although huskies have nabbed a spot in the list of most dangerous dog breeds, generally they are more friendly towards children, your visitors and other dogs. But again, you should train them properly
  • However, factors like improper training, poor socialization and bad social experiences can turn them aggressive
  • Due to its high shedding, huskies often don’t suit people who are allergic to dog hairs or want their home to be clean all the time
More about Husky here...Everything about your Siberian Husky

4.German Shepherds
  Famous K-9 dogs. They are known to be fearless and confident dogs. German Shepherds are in need of constant and serious physical activity though, and they seem to give preference to long walks and active games.
  The large-sized working dog breed German Shepherd developed originally for herding sheep stand among the top popular dog breeds in the United States and United Kingdom. The highly active and self assured dogs are keen to learn and eagerness to have a purpose proved as excellent guard dogs and best for search missions. German Shepherds are responsible for biting having a tendency to attack other breeds and human also became victims several times for which they are added among the most dangerous dog breeds in the world.
  The bite of a German Shepherd has a force of over 1,060 newtons, and some studies show that German Shepherds have a tendency to bite and attack smaller dogs.  German Shepherds are commonly used as police dogs today.



German Shepherd Facts:
  • Even though their aggressive nature had labeled them to be as one of the dangerous dogs but when they are trained properly, believe me — they are your best companion
  • By nature, German Shepherd is fond of food, fun and friends
  • These dogs show immense curiosity in exploring their surroundings. If you own one, you must have observed. This inquisitiveness behavior is apparently when he or she is a puppy
  • German shepherd can pick up great speed and at the same time can halt all of a sudden without stumbling on anything or its surroundings
  • German shepherd is an extreme hair shredder. Even if you brush its hair for every 15 minutes, you will still see hairs floating in air. So brush its hair every day if you want to keep your home hygiene
  • Though German Shepherds are subject to suffer from many different types of illnesses, most common one is “hip dysplasia”, which occurs due to poor breeding practices
More about German Shepherd here...Everything about your German Shepherd

5.Alaskan Malamutes
  A large breed of domestic dog Alaskan malamute is also among the top dangerous dog breeds in the world following their temperament and aggression if not trained and instructed well. Alaskan malamute can be described as more strong and sturdy compared to other dog breeds, very fond of people usually quiet dogs, seldom barking. These dogs can be dangerous or fatal for other human who are unknown to them only when they feel any danger for them and their owner or family member but other cases can be resolved through training sessions.


  Although some of these dogs are still used for mushing or sledding, most are employed as family pets where they tend to be beloved by their households.
Of course, these dogs, like other Arctic dogs, have a high prey drive. They must be watched with other small pets in the home. Due to their size, they should also be supervised around young children.
  As high-energy dogs, these animals are most likely to thrive and exhibit best traits when they have been properly socialized and have access to the exercise they need. It’s never good for Alaskan Malamutes to be caged or kept from mental stimulation.

Facts About Alaskan Malamutes:
  • Alaskan malamutes are slow learners. So you will need a lot of patience to train these dog breeds
  • These dogs are prolific hair shedders. Just bring Alaskan Malamutes to your home and watch how sooner your home is piled with whole lot of hairs
  • Alaskan Malamutes have the ability to make variety of sounds in order to convey their needs to you. As these dog breeds enjoy human company, you got to spend plenty of time with them to keep them happy
  • They need whole lot of energy, exercise, love and your attention too. Malamutes that lack exercises frequently misbehave & at times can turn dangerous too
  • They are ridiculously friendly with well-behaved kids
  • These dog breeds insist you to allow them to be a part of your family activities
More about Alaskan Malamutes here...Everything about your Alaskan Malamute

6. Doberman Pinschers
  Doberman Pinschers were once commonly used as police dogs, but this is less commonplace today. Dobermans can be often be aggressive towards strangers, but less frequently towards their owners. The breed’s reputation has improved in recent years, but their size and strength still makes them potentially dangerous. 
  Famed for their alertness, loyalty and intelligence, this breed of dogs is considered to be the best guard dog where they only attack if they are provoked or sense that their family and their property is in dangerAlthough once used as guard dogs or police dogs, they also exhibit aggressive behavior directed to strangers and other dogs, though owner-directed aggression is low. Their aggression due to their size and strength can also make them potentially dangerous.
  Trained properly, these dogs can become very loyal to their masters, but aggressive towards perceived threats to their owners. 

Doberman Pinschers Facts:
  • These intelligent dog breeds are often referred as “Dogs with a human brain”. Although Doberman pinchers serve you faithfully, you still have to train them properly with your leadership. Else, they assume they are the leaders
  • These dogs will do their best when they have something to do. They can even watch TV, help your business and suddenly can sit on your lap too. However, they are completely reserved with strangers.
  • Doberman pinchers can do self-estimations. So if your family is being threatened, you don’t have to utter a word. They will automatically sense and do everything to protect you
  •  As these dogs are highly intelligent and energetic, improper training can cause behavioral issues. This is why it has made my list of dangerous dog breeds.
  • These dog breeds are more sensitive to sounds. In fact, they can hear sounds 250 yards away
More about Doberman Pinschers here...Everything about your Doberman Pinscher

7. Chow Chows
  Some will be surprised seeing the Chow Chow in this ranking, but, nevertheless, this breed is one of the most aggressive dogs in the world. At first glance, Chow Chows are very attractive and cute fluffies, also the representatives of China. Before you buy this dog, you must remember that an adult Chow Chow cannot safely play with unfamiliar dogs and be left alone with children, because they are very irritable and defend their right to their food with a spiteful grin.
  Also Chow Chow are good guards, as they are very devoted to their owner, would not allow a stranger to approach to the master, and won’t not let anyone into their territory.  Better don’t try to get near a chow chow’s owner without his or her permission. Because chow chow is the one of the most aggressive dog breed in the world. They were bred for hunting and helping shepherds.
  They are usually held as pets, and due to their size they can be kept in apartments. The danger rests when they lack exercise or are just generally bored, and will sometimes lash out at strangers and even owners due to boredom.

Chow Chow Facts:
  • Chow Chow dog breed is the only dog breed that has purplish lips and tongue
  • Originating in China, Chow Chows are there since 4000 years. Therefore, they are believed to be one of the oldest dog breeds. Some experts believe that these dogs were the very ones to be evolved from wolves.
  • Chow Chows are usually stubborn. As they are more dominant, it’s good to train and socialize them when they are young
  • Once Chow Chows complete 1 year, they should be considered adults
More about Chow Chow here...Everything about your Chow Chow

8. Great Danes
  The large German breed of domestic dog Great Dane has enormous body and height known for looking physical affection from their owners. Great Dane are generally well disposed towards other pets including dogs and familiar human and not exhibit any extreme aggressiveness towards them but if not well trained or socialized can be very fearful and aggressive nature dog breed for unfamiliar human or any stranger happens towards them for which they have been added among the most dangerous dog breeds in the world.
  If trained properly then a Great Dane can be a gentle giant, but since these dogs are such large and imposing creatures they can prove to be very dangerous if improperly cared for.   Fully grown male Great Danes could well be killing machines, as they can weigh as much as 200 pounds and stand 86 cm tall. 

Facts About Great Danes:
  • “Giant George”, a Great Dane was measured 43-inches tall but it weighed only 245 pounds. It made a Guinness record for being the world’s tallest dog ever. There is a short sweet story about this gentle giant. You can read more about this here: “Top 10 Biggest Dog Breeds in the World”.
  • Apartment living is quite fine for this huge dog breed. Just half-an-hour walk a day can keep Great Danes fit
  • Great Danes grow rapidly. Within a year, it can grow 6 feet tall
  • These dog breeds barely eat their food
  • Great Danes are one among emotionally sensitive dog breeds. They won’t respond well to hard training methods. On the other hand, anxiety can easily kill this dog 
  • You can’t expect a poorly bred Great Dane to be a Scooby Doo friendly anyway
More about Great Danes here...Everything about your Great Dane

9. Boxer
  This dignified-looking dog is known for its distinctive head.
Revered for bravery and stamina, the boxer can make a great family pet; however, owners must be diligent when raising their boxer to be obedient and must also curb aggressive tendencies.
  The Boxer tends to be loyal and loving to its family; yet, again, proper socialization must be provided.
  Intelligent and generally tractable, the Boxer can make a great family pet, especially when positive reinforcement is employed during training.
  By nature, Boxers are not known to be vicious or overly aggressive as some breeds are. However, these negative tendencies may occur in neglected or mistreated dogs. For this reason, it’s important to get to know an adult Boxer well before introducing it to a family situation.
  Boxers are quite strong and may inflict serious injury if they choose to attack. Many trainers have insisted that Boxers boast above-average intelligence. They are very trainable and will reward their owners with loyal and even temperaments when induced. When obtaining a Boxer puppy, it’s important to provide adequate socialization.
  Though the breed was developed in Germany as a hunting dog, it is today typically employed as a companion or family dog. Some Boxers are used as guard dogs.

Facts About Boxers:
  • In United States, Boxers are the sixth most popular dog breeds
  • They became popular after WW-II when soldiers brought them home as their pets
  • One of the most funny facts about boxers is that they snore loud
  • In the past, you could have seen boxers in circus ring performances. The reason: they are intelligent and easily trainable. Thus, people used them to make money
  • Originally, these dog breeds were developed in Germany. There they are still used as police dogs
  • Boxers are loyal and die to please you. But if you punish them hardly for their wrong behaviors, they will turn worse
More about Boxer here... Everything about your Boxer

10. Akita
  Akitas are well known for their dominant temperament. Because they have a mind of their own, they can exhibit unruly behaviors which may make them risky in some situations.
  For this reason, the Akita requires a skilled owner who takes time to instill this dog with obedience.
  Akitas were originally bred to hunt deer and bears in their native Japan. They are bred for strength, endurance, and courage. As one of the world’s oldest native hunting breeds, the Akita still enjoys this pursuit and requires a good deal of exercise and mental stimulation to avoid boredom. A bored Akita is likely to find a negative pastime to occupy itself.
  Akitas boast thick double coats and don’t mind cold weather like other Spitz types of dogs such as the Siberian Husky. The breed is extremely territorial when it comes to its property. This is one reason why many people prefer the breed as it helps deter trespassers.
  Akitas can make excellent companions. Although they can be aggressive, with the right owner and family, they can make great pets. The idea is to provide an environment that allows them to thrive.

Facts About Akitas:
  • Akitas are loyal and fearless companion for your family
  • This dog breed would not back down from challenges in any situation and can’t be frightened so easily
  • If you don’t train and socialize them properly, this affectionate yet bold animal can screw up and turn into one of the most dangerous dog breeds
More about Akita here...Everything about your Akita


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Thursday, April 16, 2015

Why Your Dog is Good for You?

Why Your Dog is Good for You?
  Dogs offer more than just companionship. If you’ve got a furry friend already, you likely have quite a few reasons to thank your dog. If you’re considering getting a pooch, check out these surprising benefits of having a dog.

1. RESISTANCE TO ALLERGIES!


  While dogs can be one of the worst triggers for people with allergies, growing up in a house with a dog makes children less likely to develop allergies over the course of their lives. Even if you were just a fetus when your mother lived with a dog, you are still less likely to be bothered by animal hair and dander, or to develop eczema as an adult.

2. You’ll exercise more.

  Owning a dog can motivate you to exercise every day. On those days when it might be easy to skip a workout, looking at your dog standing by the door waiting to go for a walk can give you the push you need to get out there. Taking your dog for a 30 minute walk every day can greatly improve your health.

3. Dogs Boost Your Mood

  Dogs have long been known to make great companions, but did you know that they actually improve your mood? Research has shown that it only takes a mere 15–30 minutes with your pet to feel more relaxed and calm. Playing with your dog also raises your brain’s levels of dopamine and serotonin, which are neurotransmitters that are associated with pleasure and tranquility. Psychologists from Miami and St. Louis Universities found that the benefits of having a canine companion can be equivalent to having a human companion. Looks like pooches can get your tail wagging!

4. Your social life may improve.

  Not only does walking your dog help you to get exercise, it might also help you get a date. People are more likely to stop and talk with you when you’re walking a dog. Going to the dog park or taking your dogs to run errands can also lead to strangers striking up conversations with you about your dog.


5. Dogs Are Better Than Medicine

  In addition to boosting your mood, your dog is also great for your health. Your body reaps a lot of benefits from having your fur baby around. Dog owners have been found to have lower cholesterol, lower blood pressure, fewer heart attacks, and according to a study by the British Journal of Health (2004), dog owners also have the added benefit of having fewer medical problems than those without pets.

6. CANCER DETECTION!

  Your dog could save your life one day. It seems that our canine friends have the ability to smell cancer in the human body. Stories abound of owners whose dogs kept sniffing or licking a mole or lump on their body so they got it checked out, discovering it was cancerous. The anecdotal evidence was later backed up by scientific studies. Dogs are so good at this that some of them are trained to detect cancer, in as little as three hours.

7. You can grow old gracefully.

  Dog ownership benefits elderly people in many ways. Alzheimer’s patients have fewer outbursts when there is a dog in the home. Caregivers of elderly patients report less stress. Dogs offer wonderful companionship for the elderly as well.

8. Dogs Can Help Treat Rheumatoid Arthritis

  Clearly, dogs are extremely helpful in helping people deal with medical issues. Dogs have been found to be beneficial to people with various medical issues, but especially with those diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. Dogs help people with RA to move more often and encourage play as well as helping them get their mind off of their condition. Dogs are great motivators to get moving and they sure are good at distracting us from things!

9. You’ll feel safer.


  Dogs can be an effective home security system. Studies show that barking dogs deter burglars. Just knowing that you’ve got a dog who can use its keen sense of hearing to detect anyone prowling around can help increase your sense of security, which is good for both your mental and physical health.

10. BE HAPPIER!

  Dog owners are less likely to suffer from depression than non-pet owners. Even for those people who do become clinically depressed, having a pet to take care of can help them out of a depressive episode, in some cases more effectively even than medication. Since taking care of a dog requires a routine and forces you to stay at least a little active, it is harder to stay inside feeling down all the time. The interaction with and love received from a dog can also help people stay positive. Even the mere act of looking at your pet increases the amount of Oxytocin, the “feel good” chemical, in the brain.

Happy days with your dog!

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Saturday, July 19, 2014

Everything about your Saluki

Everything about your Saluki
  This sighthound is a living antiquity. Known as one of the first domesticated breeds, the Saluki hails from Egypt. Highly respected, they were actually mummified like the Pharaohs! Later brought to the Middle East to hunt down gazelles, these graceful-looking dogs have a lot of power built into them. Referred to as a reserved and quiet breed, the Saluki is sensitive and gentle.
  One of the oldest of dog breeds, Salukis were once considered a gift from Allah. They're fast as the wind, skinny as a supermodel, and quietly devoted to their people. A Saluki is easy to groom, challenging to train, and not to be trusted off leash.
  The Saluki is an elegant hunter with strong instincts to chase anything moving. He is a medium-size sighthound and can live happily in any environment, as long as he gets daily walks, maybe an opportunity to run a few times a week, and access to the sofa. His coat requires weekly brushing and sheds little. The Saluki is the world's oldest dog breed.

Overview
  The Saluki's origins are shrouded in the sands of time, but his history is believed to go back to antiquity. He is the very definition of grace and speed, well deserving of the name bestowed on him by his Arab breeders — The Noble. The Saluki is bred for speed, strength, and endurance, qualities that are evident in his long, narrow head and sleek yet muscular body.
  Beautiful but reserved, the Saluki is affectionate without being overly demonstrative. He's happy to prove his loyalty through quiet companionship. Not everyone is offered the gift of a Saluki's devoted friendship, but those happy few who receive it are appreciative of the honor.
Salukis are widely admired for their exotic appearance, but not everyone is well suited to live with this spirited and independent hunter. Any movement, be it a squirrel, cat, or radio-controlled car, will activate the Saluki's instinct to chase, and his speed has been clocked at 30 to 35 miles per hour.
  Unless he's protected by a strong human on the other end of the leash or a securely fenced yard, he's likely to meet his end beneath the wheels of a car. You might think that Salukis living in the country would have fewer issues, but they've been known to chase down and tangle with or kill goats, otters, foxes, raccoons, snakes, squirrels, and deer.
  To keep a Saluki safe and well exercised, provide him with 300 to 400 lateral feet of fenced area where he can run full out. If your yard isn't that large, you should have easy access to a fenced park, an enclosed sports field at a school, or a beach with no nearby road. On leash, the Saluki makes an excellent jogging companion — if you can keep up with him. He's also a good competitor in agility and lure coursing. Some Salukis participate in obedience and tracking as well.
  Indoors, the Saluki will make himself at home on your soft sofa or bed. He likes his comforts and needs cushioning for his somewhat bony body. Using his long, skinny muzzle, he'll surf your kitchen counters in search of anything edible.
  The calm and gentle Saluki can become timid and shy without early socialization and regular reinforcement through new experiences and introductions to many different people throughout his life. Generally quiet but alert, he's a good watchdog, but not a guard dog. Salukis are fearless in the hunt but otherwise unaggressive.
  Training a Saluki is possible, but don't expect the perfect obedience you might have from a Golden Retriever. Salukis think for themselves, and if something else is more interesting than what you're asking them to do, they're perfectly happy to ignore you. Use positive reinforcement techniques such as food rewards and praise, never harsh verbal or physical corrections.
  Salukis can make excellent companions for older children, but they aren't recommended for homes with young children. They're tolerant, but young Salukis can be too active for children younger than 8 years of age, and their thin skin and knobby bones make them vulnerable to injury if children aren't careful.
  While Salukis aren't overly demonstrative, they do become strongly attached to their people and dislike being left alone for long periods. Consider a Saluki if you have time to give to a devoted, graceful friend who can run like the wind.

Breed standards
AKC group: Hound
UKC group: Sighthound
Average lifespan: 11-12 years
Average size: 35-65 pounds
Coat appearance: Smooth or feathered
Coloration: White, cream, red, golden, tan, black and tan, tricolor
Hypoallergenic: No
Comparable Breeds: Borzoi, Greyhound
Other Quick Facts
  A Saluki is built of lines and curves, the very picture of grace and strength. He has a long, narrow head; long hanging ears covered in long silky hair; bright eyes that range from dark to hazel, with a far-seeing gaze; a long, supple, well-muscled neck; a deep but moderately narrow chest; long, straight legs; a broad back; strong hindquarters to power his ability to gallop and jump; moderately long feet with long, well-arched toes adorned with feathering; and a long tail feathered with silky hair and carried curved.

  Salukis have a smooth coat with a soft, silky texture and a slight amount of feathering on the legs, the back of the thighs and sometimes on the shoulder. Some Salukis have a smooth coat with no feathering. They come in the colors of the desert: white, cream, fawn, golden, red, grizzle and tan, tricolor (white, black and tan), and black and tan.

Highlights
  • Salukis love to run and need regular daily exercise.
  • They must be kept on leash whenever they're not in a securely fenced area. They have a strong prey drive and will pursue anything furry and in motion, heedless of their owner's commands.
  • Salukis are a reserved breed although they're devoted to their people.
  • Early and ongoing socialization is important for this breed to prevent shyness and skittishness.
  • Salukis are not recommended for apartments. They require a large fenced yard where they can run safely. Underground electronic fencing is not recommended; their prey drive is so strong they'll push past it.
  • It is important to provide comfortable bedding for a Saluki since he doesn't have enough body fat to provide padding.
  • Salukis should not live outdoors. They thrive on human companionship and will become depressed if left alone for long periods.
  • Although these dogs can make gentle and calm companions for older children, they are not recommended for homes with small children.
  • Salukis are generally quiet dogs.
  • When training a Saluki, be consistent, and use only positive reinforcement techniques such as food rewards and praise, since the breed is so sensitive.
  • Salukis are fastidious and like to be clean. They shed little and require only weekly brushing.
  • Salukis should not reside in homes that have small pets. Even with the best training, a Saluki will view small pets as prey and will try to hunt them.
  • Salukis prefer the companionship of other Salukis, but they can get along with other dogs that do not have dominant natures.
  • Salukis can be picky eaters.
  • Never buy a Saluki from a puppy mill, a pet store, or a breeder who doesn't provide health clearances or guarantees. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies and who breeds for sound temperaments.
History
  Once known as the Persian Greyhound or the gazelle hound, the Saluki has long been considered one of the most ancient of breeds. Recent genetic evidence confirms this to be the case.
  Scientists speculate that Salukis and other ancient breeds descend from the first dogs and made their way through the world with their nomadic owners. Depictions of dogs resembling Salukis — with a Greyhoundlike body and feathering on the ears, tail, and legs — appear on Egyptian tombs dating to 2100 B.C.E., some 4,000 years ago. Even older are carvings from the Sumerian empire (7,000-6,000 B.C.E.) that show dogs with a striking resemblance to the Saluki.
  Pharaohs hunted gazelles and hares with Salukis, which often worked in partnership with falcons. The dogs were frequently honored with mummification after death. Nomadic Muslims, who generally despised dogs as unclean animals, considered Salukis a gift from Allah and referred to the dogs by the honorific El Hor, meaning The Noble.
Salukis were the only dogs permitted to sleep inside the tents. The breed may take its name from the ancient city of Saluk, in Yemen, or perhaps from the city of Seleukia in Syria. Another theory suggests that the name is a transliteration of the Arabic word for hound.
Salukis were widespread in the Middle East and could be found in Persia (modern-day Iran), Syria, Egypt, Palestine, Anatolia, Mesopotamia, and Arabia. The first documented case of Salukis arriving in Britain was in 1840, but it wasn't until after World War I, when many British officers returned with them from the Middle East, that the breed became established in Great Britain.
  Interest in the Saluki was slower to take hold in the United States. The Saluki Club of America was founded in 1927, the same year the breed was recognized by the American Kennel Club. The first Saluki registered by the AKC was Jinniyat of Grevel in 1929. Today the Saluki is a rare treasure, ranking 116th among the 155 breeds and varieties recognized by the AKC.

Personality


  The Saluki is an aloof dog, but one who's devoted to his family. He's gentle and thrives on quiet companionship. He has a tendency to bond with a single person, which can lead to separation anxiety.

  With strangers, Salukis are reserved, and they can be shy if they're not socialized at an early age. Socialization should continue throughout their life. They generally get along with other dogs, but prefer other Salukis, or at least other sighthounds. They're sensitive dogs and will pick up on and become stressed by tensions in the home.
  Salukis love comfort and enjoy being pampered with soft bedding and access to furniture. Like cats, they're fastidious about personal cleanliness.
  Like every dog, Salukis need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Saluki puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

Health
  Hip dysplasia is uncommon in Salukis, with the breed ranking joint lowest in a survey by the British Veterinary Association in 2003. The breed scored an average of 5 points, with a score of 0 being low, while 106 is high. In a 2006 breed specific survey conducted by The Kennel Club and the British Small Animal Veterinary Association Scientific Committee, responses highlighted several health issues. The primary cause of death identified was that of cancer, being responsible for 35.6% of deaths, with the most common forms being that of liver cancer or lymphoma. The secondary cause of death was cardiac related, with forms such as heart failure, or unspecified heart defects. Old age is listed as the third most frequent cause of death.
  Cardiomyopathy, heart murmur and other cardiac issues were present in 17.2% of responses while dermatolic conditions such as dermatitis or alopecia were reported by 10.8% of responses. Salukis have an average lifespan of 12 to 14 years.


Living Conditions
  The Saluki is not recommended for apartment life. These dogs are relatively inactive indoors and will do best with acreage. This breed should sleep indoors. They prefer warm temperatures over cold ones.

Exercise
  The Saluki is a natural athlete that needs a lot of exercise, including a daily, long, brisk walk or run. They are happiest when running, however many are lost or killed when they are allowed to get free and they spot a small animal to chase. This very independent dog can never be off its lead except in an isolated, scouted area. These dogs hunt on sight. They will pay no attention to their handler's calls if they are chasing something. In some countries they are not permitted to be left off of their lead at all. Salukis run at top speeds of 55km/h or more with their feet barely touching the ground. These top speeds are reached in short spurts, but they also have exceptional endurance. An excellent way to exercise your Salukis is to let it trot alongside your bike.

Care
  Salukis are not suited for apartment life. They need a home with a large, securely fenced yard where they can run flat out. The ideal running area for a Saluki is 300 to 400 feet in length or width. Fences should be at least five to six feet high or a Saluki will easily jump them. Underground electronic fencing will not contain a Saluki, nor will it protect him from other animals that might enter your yard.
  Keep your Saluki on leash whenever he's not in an enclosed area. A Saluki was bred for hunting and has a strong prey drive. If he sees anything fast and furry, he'll pursuit it for as long as he can, disregarding any commands to come or stop.
  Salukis are indoor dogs and require soft, cushioned bedding to prevent calluses from forming. Place food well out of reach of the Saluki's inquiring nose. That means behind closed doors or up about seven feet.
  Salukis are intelligent and learn quickly, but they're also independent and can be stubborn, which makes training a challenge. To hold your Saluki's attention, keep training sessions short, fun, and interesting. If a Saluki becomes bored, he will choose not to learn. Use positive reinforcement, never harsh verbal or physical corrections.

Grooming
  The Saluki comes in two coat types: smooth and feathered. Brush the smooth coat weekly, but if you have the feathered variety, comb the feathering on the ears, tail, legs and feet at least a couple of times a week to prevent or remove mats and tangles, and bathe him as needed. At mealtime, you’ll probably want to put his ears up in a snood to keep them from dragging in his food dish. A water bowl with sides that slope inward at the top will help prevent the ears from getting wet when he drinks.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Keep the ears clean and dry. Check them weekly for redness or a bad odor that might indicate infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball moistened with a mild pH-balanced cleanser recommended by your veterinarian. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath. Introduce your Saluki puppy to grooming from an early age so that he learns to accept it with little fuss.

Is this breed right for you?
  Loving and extremely loyal, the Saluki can be a family pet; however, he may only attach himself to one owner. Not prone to roughhousing, it's best that the Saluki is paired with families that have older children and someone that he can choose as his human. A great watchdog, the breed does not do well with animals that are not dogs. An athletic breed in need of large amounts of exercise, he's not suited for apartment life and will make a great companion to a runner and biker.

Children and other pets
  Salukis can make excellent companions for older children, but they aren't recommended for homes with young children. They're tolerant, but young Salukis can be too active for children younger than 8 years of age, and their thin skin and knobby bones make them vulnerable to injury if children aren't careful.
  They generally get along with other dogs, but prefer other Salukis, or at least other sighthounds. They won't chase small dogs or cats in their own household, but other animals, such as pet birds, mice, rabbits, or hamsters could prove too much of a temptation.


Did You Know?
According to the Guinness Book of World Records the Saluki is the world's oldest dog breed. They are believed to have originated in Egypt around 329 BC.

A dream day in the life of a Saluki
The Saluki will love to wake up to exercise. After a great run, he's fine with being left alone at home for the day. Guarding the home is his No. 1 priority as he strolls the house and catnaps in his dog bed. After dinner, he's ready to run alongside during a bike ride with his favorite human. He'll enjoy ending his night with a treat and a bit of cuddling with his loving family.

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Saturday, July 12, 2014

Summer Safety for Dogs

Summer Safety for Dogs
  The summer months can be uncomfortable—even dangerous—for pets and people. It's difficult enough simply to cope with rising temperatures, let alone thick humidity, but things really get tough in areas that are hit with the double blow of intense heat and storm-caused power outages, sometimes with tragic results.
  Summer is a terrific time to be a dog owner. It lets you run, swim, and play with your dog in nicer weather than any other time of the year. However, summer also brings unique risks to your dog's health that you should keep in mind throughout the season. 
  The warm summer months are the perfect time to take your dog with you for outdoor, family fun. But with the rising temperatures, dogs can easily get overheated in the summer, causing them to become dehydrated and sick.  Not only is it important to keep dogs safe in hot weather, it’s also important to keep them clear from hazardous chemicals and certain foods. 


1. Never, ever, EVER leave your pet in a hot car.
  It can take minutes – yes, MINUTES – for a pet to develop heat stroke and suffocate in a car.
  Temperatures in cars can rise quickly so make sure to take your dog with you when you get out of the car. If you must leave your dog in the car, be sure to leave the windows down, which will allow the air to circulate and keep your dog safe.
  Most people don’t realize how hot it gets in parked cars. On a 78 degree day, for instance, temperatures in a car can reach 90 degrees in the shade and top 160 degrees if parked directly in the sun! Your best bet is to leave your pet home on warm days. If you’re driving around with your dog or cat in the car, bring water and a water dish and take your pet with you when you leave the car.


2. Outdoor Play
  Steer clear of long walks and strenuous exercise on hot, sunny days. Avoid prolonged sun exposure. Not only is there a risk of heat stroke - dogs can get sunburns, too. Consider sunscreen for your dog. If you are planning to spend time outdoors with your dog, find a shady spot and provide plenty of fresh, cool water. Try to take leisurely walks during the cooler times of the day, like the morning or evening hours. Remember to protect your dog's feet from getting scorched by hot pavement. Sunscreen for dogs can help protect your dog as well.

3. Make sure your pet is protected from parasites like fleas, ticks, and mosquitoes.
  If not protected, your pet is at risk for heartworm, Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and a host of other nasty and dangerous conditions. And don’t forget, many of these diseases can be caught by people, too!


4. Events
  It might be best to leave your dog at home when going to large outdoor festivals or parties. A large crowd can be overwhelming and it increases the chances of injury, dehydration and exhaustion. Plus, there's bound to be a lot of unhealthy or even toxic food and trash on the ground that your dog might try to eat. Also remember that fireworks and other loud noises can frighten dogs into running away or otherwise injuring themselves. If you do bring your dog to events, keep her close by and watch out for potential hazards.

5. Keep the paws in mind.
  When the sun is cooking, surfaces like asphalt or metal can get really hot! Try to keep your pet off of hot asphalt; not only can it burn paws, but it can also increase body temperature and lead to overheating. Also, it’s not a good idea to drive around with your dog in the bed of a truck – the hot metal can burn paws quickly (and they can fall out or be injured or killed in an accident). 

6. Limit exercise on hot days
  Take care when exercising your pet. Adjust intensity and duration of exercise in accordance with the temperature. On very hot days, limit exercise to early morning or evening hours, and be especially careful with pets with white-colored ears, who are more susceptible to skin cancer, and short-nosed pets, who typically have difficulty breathing. Asphalt gets very hot and can burn your pet's paws, so walk your dog on the grass if possible. Always carry water with you to keep your dog from dehydrating.

7. Bring extra water
  Bring a bowl and plenty of water to keep your dog well hydrated while away from home. Bring double the amount that you think you may need to ensure that your dog has continual access to fresh water to cool off.

8. Keep up grooming
  Make sure to keep your dog’s fur and nails trimmed during the summer months. Too much fur can make it easier for dogs to overheat, for fur to become matted, and for bugs to stake a claim in the furry confines of your dog’s coat. Keeping your dog’s nails trimmed will help limit torn nails, which can easily become infected.


9. If your dog loves to swim, give him his very own "kiddy pool."
  Dogs who love the water love it even more in the hot months and getting wet keeps them cool. Providing a small, kid-sized pool will also keep them safe.

10. Just because dogs instinctively know how to swim doesn’t mean they’re good swimmers.
  And if they jump in your swimming pool, they might not be able to get out without help and could easily drown. Make sure your dog can’t get into your swimming pool without you around. And if that’s not possible, make sure he can get out on his own.

11. Leave pets at home for firework displays
  If you’re headed out to watch the fireworks display it’s best to leave your dog at home. The loud noises mixed with the nighttime away from home can cause your dog to become disorientated.

12. Steer clear of fertilizers
  Some fertilizers and lawn care products can cause an allergic reaction in dogs. Speak with your vet about what types of lawn care products are best to use.  Always keep chemical bottles off the ground to keep dogs from accidentally ingesting them and becoming sick.


13. Believe it or not, dogs can sunburn, especially those with short or light-colored coats.
  And just like for people, sunburns can be painful for a dog and overexposure to the sun can lead to skin cancer. Talk to your veterinarian about sunscreens for your pet (don’t assume a sunscreen for people is appropriate for your dog).

14. If you can’t trust your dog 100% to come when called, keep him on a leash. Summertime means all sorts of exciting sights, scents, critters running around, and new and exciting places to explore. You never want to lose your pet because he she became distracted in an unfamiliar environment and was lost or harmed in an accident. And remember, not every dog is meant to be off-leash; some dogs just can never be fully trusted to come when called. Make sure you understand your dog’s tendencies and err on the side of being overly-cautious.

15. After a long winter, many dogs put on a few extra pounds
  Summer is the perfect time to increase his level of exercise and get in tip-top shape. A pet that maintains a healthy weight throughout his lifetime will live, on average, 2-3 years longer than an overweight pet! Just make sure not to over-exert your dog – give him or her adequate rest and if  your dog is especially overweight, make sure you ease him or her into physical activity.

  However, summer also brings unique risks to your dog's health that you should keep in mind throughout the season. These summer dangers include:
  Heat stroke occurs when your dog’s body temperature rises dangerously high. It is most common when dogs are left in a car for too long, or when they exercise in the heat. Never leave your dog in the car in hot weather, and always remember that a cracked window is not enough to cool a car. Your dog always needs access to shade outside. Muzzling interferes with a dog's ability to cool itself by panting and should be avoided.
  Sunburn. Dogs can burn in the sun just like people can. White, light-colored, and thinly coated dogs have an increased risk of sunburn. Sunburn causes pain, itching, peeling, and other problems. To prevent sunburn, apply a waterproof sunscreen formulated for babies or pets. Be sure to cover the tips of your dog’s ears and nose, the skin around its mouth, and its back.
  Burned Foot Pads. Sidewalk, patio, street, sand. and other surfaces can burn your dog’s footpads. Walk your dog in the morning and at night when outdoor surfaces are coolest. Press your hand onto surfaces for 30 seconds to test them before allowing your dog to walk on them. If it is painful for you, it will be painful for your dog.
  Dehydration. Prevent dehydration by providing your dog with unrestricted access to fresh and cool water both indoors and outside. Ice cubes and frozen chicken or beef broth encourage your dog to take in more fluids and help keep it cool. You can also feed your dog wet dog food during the summer to increase its fluid intake.

Campfires and Barbecues. Your dog may try to take burning sticks from the fire, which are hard to retrieve since they think that you are playing when you chase them. Food that is stuck to barbecues after cooking can tempt your dog to lick the barbecue and burn its tongue or mouth. Lighter fluid is a poison and should not be left where your dog can reach it. Keep your dog away from barbecues and campfires unless it is on a very short leash.

  Chemicals in the Water. It is no secret that most dogs love to swim. Swimming can be fun for you and your dog and helps prevent heat stroke. However, chlorine can irritate a dog's skin and upset its stomach. Rinse your dog with fresh water after swimming in a pool and do not let it drink more than a small amount of pool water. Standing water, such as puddles, can also be dangerous for dogs to drink due to the presence of antifreeze or other chemicals. Provide your dog with fresh water to drink whenever possible.
  Seasonal Allergies. Fleas, mold, flowers, and other potential allergens are common during summer. Allergies cause itching (and with it, excessive scratching), coughing, sneezing, discomfort, and other problems for your dog. Keep your dog away from allergy triggers when possible, especially if you know it has a particular allergy. Ask your veterinarian about whether your pet would benefit from a canine antihistamine or other medication.
  Keeping Your Dog Safe! Bottom line: keep an eye on your dog. Don't leave her unattended. It's important to always exercise common sense and proceed with caution to help keep your dog safe, regardless of the season. Summertime comes with its own set of hazards, so make sure you are familiar with the risks. Learn what warning signs mean trouble. When in doubt, call your vet right away. When all is said and done, it will be much easier for you and your dog to enjoy the summer.

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