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Showing posts with label english. Show all posts
Showing posts with label english. Show all posts

Thursday, December 28, 2017

Everything about your English Cocker Spaniel

Everything about your English Cocker Spaniel
  English Cockers are a medium-size dog breed with long ears and a happy disposition. The name Cocker comes from their use to hunt woodcock in England, although English Cockers have been used to hunt many other types of birds as well. They make great companion dogs for people who can give them the exercise they need.

Overview
  The English cocker must be able to find, flush and retrieve upland game birds for a full day of hunting. It must be small enough to penetrate dense cover, but of sufficient size to retrieve larger game. The broad muzzle helps when retrieving. The dog is slightly taller than long, compactly built and short coupled. This breed loves to hunt and shows it by the wagging of its tail when on the job. The English cocker has a driving, powerful gait that covers ground effortlessly. The coat is of medium length, silky in texture and either flat or slightly wavy. The feathering should not be so profuse that it becomes a hindrance in the field, but it should be long enough to protect the underside of the dog. The expression is soft and melting, yet dignified.
  The English Cocker Spaniel is merry, affectionate and even-tempered. They are easily-trained, are willing workers and excellent companions. They exhibit enthusiasm in the field, accompanied by an incessant action of the tail. Dogs exhibiting sluggish or hyper-active temperaments are to be faulted. They exhibit balance, both in motion and while standing. The head is especially characteristic of the breed, having a brainy appearance indicating high intelligence. The muzzle is also distinctive. The whole is always to be of primary consideration rather than any of the parts. Exaggeration of any of the parts is to be faulted.

Highlights
  • English Cocker Spaniels can be difficult to housetrain. Crate-training is recommended.
  • English Cockers are eager to please and like to be close to their families. But they are hunting dogs and might start chasing birds or small animals when outside. Be sure to keep your English Cocker on a leash whenever you aren't in a fenced area. Teach him to come to you when you call.
  • Cockers have a "soft" personality. Harsh training methods may make them fearful or shut down altogether. Be sure to use gentle, consistent training to get the best results.
  • If your English Cocker doesn't get enough exercise, he may become obese and destructive.
Other Quick Facts
  • What’s in a name? In Britain, what Americans call the “English” Cocker is the Cocker, and the American dog is the American Cocker.
  • The term spaniel used to be applied to any dog that hunted and flushed game birds. They were usually differentiated by size or the way they worked.
Breed standards
AKC group: Sporting
UKC group:  Gun Dog
Average lifespan: 12 to 14 years
Average size: 26 to 34 pounds
Coat appearance: medium-long coats that are flat or slightly wavy, with a silky texture
Coloration: parti-color (white with black, liver, or shades of red); solid black, liver, or shades of red; black and tan; and liver and tan
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, houses with yards
Temperament: Cheerful, energetic, loving, devoted
Comparable Breeds: Bichon FriseCavalier King Charles Spaniel


History
  The term spaniel used to be applied to any dog that hunted and flushed game birds. They were usually differentiated by size or the way they worked. For instance, there were land spaniels and water spaniels. Dogs that hunted woodcock became known as Cockers, while larger spaniels that “sprang” game from cover by flushing it became known as Springers. At one time, different types could be born in the same litter, but eventually they were separated into breeds: Cocker Spaniels and Springer Spaniels.
  In the United States and Britain, Cockers developed different looks, so much so that they began to be considered separate breeds. The English Cocker Spaniel Club of America was formed in 1935 for people who appreciated the different look and abilities of the English Cocker. The American Kennel Club recognized it as an individual breed in 1946. The American Cocker became more popular, but fanciers of the English Cocker consider their dogs a well-kept secret. Today, the English Cocker ranks 66th among the breeds registered by the AKC.

Personality
  The English Cocker is described as merry and affectionate with an equable disposition. He's playful, trainable, and friendly toward people (although sometimes reserved with strangers) and other dogs. English Cockers will bark to let you know someone's approaching, so they're good watchdogs, but as typical spaniels they'll happily show the burglar where the silver is.
  Like every dog, English Cocker Spaniels need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your English Cocker puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.



Health
  The English Cocker Spaniel has an average life expectancy of 11 to 12 years. Breed health problems can include a number of cardiovascular conditions, skin disorders, musculoskeletal disorders, immune-mediated hematological / immunological disorders and infectious conditions.

Care
  The English Cocker Spaniel should be taken on long walks, preferably for hours. This will give it the necessary daily exercise. Running and playing will be good physical exercise for the breed as well. Although the English Cocker Spaniel can survive outside in temperate weather, it is best to keep the dog at home with access to a yard.
  One should check its ears regularly to remove dirt, while its coat should be combed and brushed two to three times a week. Trimming the fur at the tail and feet is necessary every two months, and head and ears are to be clipped properly at regular intervals.

Living Conditions
  The English Cocker Spaniel will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. They do best with at least an average-sized yard.

Trainability
  Cockers are easy to train, especially when the reward system involves food. This breed is incredibly sensitive and takes it personally when someone treats them harshly, which results in avoidance behaviors, or in some cases, retaliation. Positive reinforcement is always the best road to take when training a Cocker Spaniel.

Exercise Requirements
  There is no such thing as too much exercise for the English Cocker Spaniel. This breed needs daily exercise, so take it for a walk or run, or even train it for dog competitions. The English Cocker Spaniels excels at hunting, retrieving and agility competitions.

Grooming
  Brush the English Cocker’s medium-length coat two or three times a week to prevent or remove mats and tangles. You may also need to trim it for neatness every couple of months. A bath every six weeks or so doesn’t go amiss. The coat sheds moderately, but regular brushing will help keep loose hair from floating onto your floor, furniture, and clothing.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every couple of weeks. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath. Most important, keep the ears clean and dry to prevent bacterial or yeast infections from driving your dog into a state of itchy madness.

Children And Other Pets
  English Cockers are friendly, fun-loving, and gentle family dogs who do well with children, especially if they're brought up with them. Adult English Cockers who aren't familiar with children may do best in a home with older children who understand how to interact with dogs.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  English Cockers enjoy the company of other dogs and can also get along fine with cats, especially if they're introduced at an early age.

Is the English Cocker Spaniel the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape. Professional trimming or stripping needed.
Moderate Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Easy Training: The English Cocker Spaniel is known to listen to commands and obey its owner. Expect fewer repetitions when training this breed.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  In comparison to the Cocker Spaniel, the English Cocker is taller, has a less abundant coat, and does not come in the popular buff color so often seen in the Cocker. Instead, he sports a silky, lightly feathered coat in black, liver, red, black and tan, liver and tan, or any of these colors on a white background.

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Friday, December 22, 2017

Everything about your English Setter

Everything about your English Setter
  The English Setter, also known as the Lawerack or the Laverack, is a breed of dog in the Sporting Group. This beautiful and graceful breed is known for their agility, intelligence, and athletic feats, but they are also famous for their extremely sweet and gentle temperaments. The English Setter was recognized by the AKC in 1884 and AKC approved in 1986.

Overview
  The English setter is an elegant and athletic hunting dog with the ability to run tirelessly at a good pace. Its trot is ground-covering and effortless, with the head held proudly and a lively tail. The coat is flat, with feathering on the ears, underside, backs of legs, underside of thighs, and tail. Its markings are distinctive, consisting of flecks of color, sometimes with patches, on a white background. The combination of good looks and hunting ability make the English setter a perfect gentleman's hunting companion. The Laveracks tend to be larger, carry more feathering, often have deeper muzzles and usually hold their tails nearly level when on point. The Llewellins tend to be smaller and faster, with less coat and often larger patches of color. They tend to hold their tails straight up when on point.
  Bred to cover a lot of area when hunting, the English setter is a lively dog that loves to hunt and run. This is especially true of dogs from field lines. If not given sufficient exercise, they can be overly lively inside. With daily exertion, however, they are calm and tractable house dogs. Those from conformation lines are particularly laid-back and gentle and excel with children and less active adults. This is an amiable, easygoing breed that gets along well with children, strangers and other dogs.

Highlights
  • English Setters can become nuisance barkers, so discourage this habit when they are young.
  • English Setters gain weight easily, so measure their food and cut back some if they appear to be getting pudgy.
  • A fenced yard is essential; English Setters can't be trusted to stay in a yard without fencing.
  • English Setters have great digging and jumping abilities, make sure they have a secure fence.
  • They can be difficult to potty train, so start early and be consistent.
Other Quick Facts

  • The English Setter’s coat is white with intermingling darker hairs, a pattern known as belton. The coat can be blue belton (black and white), tricolor (blue belton with tan patches), orange belton (orange and white), lemon belton (lemon and white), and liver belton (liver and white). Lemon and liver are not often seen.
  • Some English Setters have a tendency to drool, especially if they’re watching you eat or waiting for a treat.
Breed standards
AKC group: Sporting
UKC group: Gun Dog
Average lifespan: 11 to 15 years
Average size: 45 to 80 pounds
Coat appearance: short to medium length, lies flat and has a silky texture
Coloration: Blue Belton, Blue Belton & Tan (Tri-Color), Lemon Belton, Liver Belton, Orange Belton
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, houses with yards, rural/farm areas
Temperament: Easygoing, lively, dependable
Comparable Breeds: Gordon Setter, Irish Setter

History
  Setters as a type of hunting dog were known in England as long as 400 years ago. They were probably a cross of several types of hunting dogs, including pointers and spaniels. The modern English Setter was developed in the 19th century by Englishman Edward Laverack and Welshman R.L. Purcell Llewellin.
  Laverack purchased his first two dogs, Ponto and Old Moll, from Rev. A. Harrison in 1825, and they became the foundation of the breed. Laverack concentrated on developing a Setter that was gentle and companionable. He probably added Pointer and Irish Setter to his lines and produced dogs that did well in the show ring but poorly in field trials.
  Llewellin started with Laverack-type dogs but worked to improve their performance in the field. He crossed them with Gordon Setters and other breeds to improve their scenting ability and speed.
Rodfield's Pride, an English Setter from the Llewellin bloodline
  Both types of English Setters came to America in the late 1800s. Laverack's line became the foundation for the show setters of today and Llewellin's line for the field dogs.
Setters today have a unique appearance, with their sculpted heads, athletic bodies, and long feathery tails. The show dogs tend to be a bit larger than the field dogs. They have a more luxurious coat and differ slightly in coat pattern.
  Patches of color are often seen in field English Setters, but they aren't desirable for show dogs. Of course, they don't make a bit of difference if your English Setter is a family companion. The show dogs are capable of hunting, but the field dogs tend to have a keener nose and greater speed.
  English Setters are rare, ranking 98th among the breeds registered by the American Kennel Club, so if you'd like to share your life with one of these happy, lively dogs, be prepared to spend some time on a waiting list before a puppy is available.



Personality
  The English Setter is a true family dog. Mild-mannered and sweet, the English Setter loves people of all ages and can be trusted around children. They have a knack for remembering things and people, often greeting someone they haven't seen in a long time as if they were old friends. English Setters are sociable creatures who crave the company of humans. They will want to be included in all family activities, are small enough to travel well in the car, and athletic enough to keep up on jogs and hikes. English Setters love all people and are far too laid back to be a reliable guard dog.

Health Problems
  A relatively healthy dog that is simply prone to a few problems relating to large dogs – such as hip dysplasia – this dog doesn’t really suffer from many genetic or hereditary diseases.

Care
  The English Setter should be kept inside with access to the outdoors. To rid its coat of dead hair, comb it once every two or three days. Its daily exercise routine should be about one hour in length.

Living Conditions
  Not recommended for apartment living and does best with at least an average-sized yard.


Trainability
  English Setters may love people, but they are more stubborn than you might think. The desire to please isn't strong in them. They are actually quite manipulative, and consistency is key to raising an obedient Setter. A gentle hand is also important when training, as they are sensitive dogs with long memories. They will not forget someone who treats them poorly. Their long memory also means that it can be hard to break English Setters of bad behavior, so early training is very important to keep bad habits from becoming permanent.

Exercise Requirements
  With plenty to do and a task at hand, the English Setter is at home. You can walk them, but you might find that this isn’t enough – they make excellent play companions who love to get out in the open.

Grooming
  The English Setter has a long coat with feathering on the ears, chest, belly, back of the legs, and tail. Plan on combing it out at least a couple of times a week or any time your dog has been in the field to remove tangles. A bath every two to three weeks will keep him clean. Unless you show your dog, you can always trim his coat for easier upkeep. English Setters shed moderately, but regular brushing will help keep loose hair from floating onto your floor, furniture, and clothing.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  It's often more common to need to protect an adult English Setter from children than the other way around. He's tolerant and mellow and will put up with a lot — although he shouldn't have to!
  Because puppies and toddlers are both in the process of being civilized, they need close supervision to prevent any ear pulling or tail tugging on the part of either party. Many breeders prefer to sell puppies to homes where children are at least six years old and more able to control their actions. They recommend adult English Setters for homes with younger children.
  Whatever your situation, always teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  English Setters can do well with other dogs and animals, especially if they are raised with them. They are birdy, however, and you should protect pet birds until you're sure your Setter understands they're off limits. Some dogs can learn that fact, if they're taught from puppyhood, but don't assume that it will happen with every dog. You may always need to keep the two separated, if only so your Setter doesn't pull your parakeet's tail or your parrot take a bite out of your Setter's sensitive nose.

Is the English Setter the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape. Professional trimming or stripping needed.
Moderate Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Moderately Easy Training: The English Setter is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
The English Setter is smaller than the Irish Setter and the Gordon Setter.
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Friday, November 24, 2017

Everything about your Pointer

Everything about your Pointer
  He’s one of the earliest Sporting breeds, used as far back as the 17th century to point hares and later birds for the new 18th century sport of “wing shooting.” The lithe and muscular Pointer is full of “hunt,” and he has a competitive spirit that makes him tops in field trials. He’s handsome, dressed in a short, smooth coat of liver, lemon, black or orange, with or without white.

Overview
  The Pointer is instantly recognizable. From long head to finely pointed tail, his entire body suggests his purpose: to point game for the hunter. When a Pointer scents game birds he stands tall and still, one foot raised off the ground, pointing the hunter in the right direction. Before the development of guns, this was an essential skill, as birds were netted rather than shot. When shooting birds became popular, the Pointer was still needed to point and then retrieve them.
  Today, the Pointer is known as the Cadillac of bird dogs, prized for his speed, ability to go all day in the field, "stand steady to wing and shot" — meaning that he holds his position as birds rise into the sky and the guns go off — and his personable nature. His love of people and short, easy-care coat make him an excellent candidate as family companion as well.
  Thanks to his sporting dog heritage, the Pointer runs hard and fast and is a super companion for a runner or cyclist. His competitive nature also makes the Pointer a natural at dog sports such as field trials, obedience, rally, and agility. This is a dog who loves to perform in public. His flashy looks and love of attention make him an excellent show dog as well.

Highlights
  • Pointers are very active and require vigorous exercise every day. If you do not have the time or energy to exercise your Pointer at least one hour each day, then you should not purchase a Pointer.
  • Pointers can be very destructive when they are bored or don't get enough exercise, especially when young. This can result in chewing, digging, and many other negative behaviors that can lead to expensive vet bills and replacement costs.
  • Pointers are wonderful family dogs who thrive when they can spend time with their people. A Pointer should not live outdoors but should enjoy the same comforts as his family.
  • Pointers are not suited for apartment dwellings; they do much better in homes with a large fenced yard where they can expend some of their energy.
  • Pointers generally do well with other dogs and other pets, especially if they're raised with them. They may, however, be very interested in pet birds, and the two should be protected from each other. You don't want your Pointer injured by a parrot's beak, and you don't want him trying to retrieve your parrot, canary or finch.
  • Pointers are strong and energetic with a mind of their own. They're not a good choice for first-time dog owners or people who aren't strong enough to handle them and give them the exercise they need.
  • Training is a must with this breed because he has a will of his own. Training can take time, but once the foundation is there, there is no limit to how far Pointers can go in various dog competitions.
  • Pointers are average shedders and require only minimal grooming.
Other Quick Facts
  • Three Pointers have won Best in Show at Westminster: Ch. Governor Moscow in 1925, Ch. Nancolleth Markable in 1932 and Ch. Marjetta National Acclaim in 1986.
  • The Pointer’s coat comes in liver, lemon, black, or orange and can be solid or combined with white. The breed standard says that a good Pointer cannot be a bad color.
  • A Pointer’s hunting instincts develop early, and he retains what he learns throughout his life.
Breed standards
AKC group: Sporting
UKC group: Gun Dogs
Average lifespan: 11-14 years
Average size: 45 to 75 pounds
Coat appearance: Dense and Short
Coloration: They are generally white with either liver, lemon, orange or black markings
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, hunters, active singles, houses with yard, farms/rural areas
Temperament: Affectionate, friendly, energetic, protective

History
  The history of the Pointer, like many breeds, is a reasonably debatable topic.Records of Pointers in England trace as far back as 1650. According to one source, the Pointer came to be in the 16th and 17th centuries, when pointing breeds, including the Old Spanish and Portuguese pointer, were brought from the European mainland to England.
  Through both history and anatomical evaluation, at least four breeds appear to have been instrumental in Pointer crosses: Greyhounds, Foxhounds, Bloodhounds, and Bull Terriers. Each of these were established breeds with unique qualities the Pointer could use to do its job.
  Pointers were brought to the United States, where the breed flourished in the abundant open hunting land. At that time (late 1800s), the Setter was considered to be the bird-hunting dog and pointers were not even permitted to compete in field trials with setters.   Around 1910, however, the Pointer began to beat the Setter at its own game. The Pointer has dominated the pointing breed field trials since then.
  One of the earliest dogs to exert influence on the breed in the US was a dog imported from England in 1876 – "Sensation". He is well known as the dog on the emblem of the Westminster Kennel Club.
  One modern American kennel, established in 1936, and known for breeding large quantities of Pointers, Elhew Kennels produced a popular and successful line of gun dogs. Elhew pointers were well-known competitors at field trials for several decades.
  In the southern United States, where the dog is so dominant it is often simply referred to as the "bird dog," Pointers are found in abundance. The bobwhite quail is the primary game bird there, and is considered classic English Pointer game, as the bobwhite will hold well for a pointing dog. Pointers also work game birds such as the pheasant, grouse, and woodcock with success.


Temperament
  The English Pointer is an active and friendly breed that is affectionate with family. The Pointer is an active and friendly breed that is affectionate with family. These dogs love to spend time with family and they typically do very well with children when they are raised together from a young age. It is important to note, however, that Pointers can be rambunctious so supervision around children is recommended. 
  This breed is not suited for apartment-style or urban living because they require a great deal of daily exercise and plenty of time outdoors. English Pointers generally get along well with other dogs and household pets when raised together, though they may be a little too interested in pet birds so keep the two apart.

Health
  The Pointer has a lifespan of about 12 to 15 years. It is prone to tail-tip injuries and will occasionally suffer from deafness and cataracts. Some minor health conditions affecting Pointers are hypothyroidism and canine hip dysplasia (CHD), while entropion is a major health issue which can affect the breed. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may run hip, thyroid, and exams on the dog.

Care
  Pointers enjoy the great outdoors, and they enjoy being with their families. They should not live outside but instead should enjoy the same comforts as their families. They do well in active homes where hiking, camping, and other outdoor activities are enjoyed by all. They do need a large fenced yard where they can run. When they're given the exercise and training they need, they are quiet and mannerly house dogs.
  The Pointer is an active, intelligent dog who needs daily exercise and stimulation. He was developed to be a hunting dog who could work all day long, and his exercise needs don't change just because he's a family companion. Give him at least an hour of exercise per day and more if possible. A vigorous walk isn't enough. Take him running, teach him to run alongside your bicycle, play Frisbee in the backyard, or train him for agility, flyball, or other dog sports.
  A Pointer puppy is still growing and doesn't need the hard exercise that an adult can take. Let him play and nap on his own schedule throughout the day, and restrict jumping until he's reached his full growth at about 18 months of age. Jumping and running on hard surfaces at an early age can stress his joints and cause orthopedic problems.

Living Conditions
  These dogs are not recommended for apartment life. They are moderately active indoors and do best with acreage.
  A fenced yard is essential.Keep your Pointer inside a securely fenced yard or dog run for his safety and your peace of mind. Some Pointers have been known to do well with underground electronic fencing as long as training isn't rushed, but keep in mind that these fences don't keep out other animals or human intruders.

Trainability
  The English Pointer can be somewhat strong-willed, so it is important that you start training from an early age. Pointers are very smart, so they pick up on training quickly but they may test your resolve from time to time. The Pointer breed can be trained for pointing, honor, and retrieving though, in reality, they will enjoy any sport or game you teach them.
  House training a Pointer is a long process and many breeders and trainers recommend crating a Pointer until he gets the hang of it, which can unfortunately be several months.

Exercise Requirements
  Because the Pointer was bred for hunting, it is a naturally high-energy dog that requires a good deal of daily exercise. A simple walk will not do for this breed – they require vigorous exercise on a daily basis or they will become destructive in the home. Other behavioral problems may develop as a result of insufficient exercise.
  English Pointers are rowdy and rambunctious and need a lot of exercise; and just when you think they've had enough, they'll probably want more. This breed was not designed to be a household pet, but rather to be a sturdy, reliable hunting companion in the field, and the modern Pointer has not lost this desire. For owners who do not hunt, a commitment should be made to enroll their pointer in tracking or agility activities in order to satisfy their need to run and think. If a Pointer does not get enough exercise, they will resort to barking and chewing which may develop severe anxiety.

Grooming
  A Pointer has a short, dense, smooth, shiny coat. There’s just about nothing easier to groom. Give him a quick going over weekly with a rubber curry brush or hound mitt to remove dead hair and distribute skin oils. A rubdown with a chamois brings out shine. 
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two, or less often if your Pointer wears down his nails naturally with all the exercise he gets. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Pointers are usually good with children and other animals, particularly if they are raised with them. Teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Pointers can also get along well with other pets, including cats, if they're raised with them, although they may be a little too fond of birds, if you know what I mean.

Is the Pointer the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep. No trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Moderately Easy Training: The Pointer is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Not Good for New Owners: This breed is best for those who have previous experience with dog ownership.
Judy on the deck of HMS Grasshopper
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  The emblem of the Westminster Kennel Club is a Pointer named Sensation, who was imported from England by club members in 1876. He was a handsome lemon and white dog who lives on as the cover dog for the WKC’s show catalog.

Famous pointers
  • Judy, awarded the Dickin Medal
  • The first Pointer was entered at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show in 1877. Three Pointers have won "Best in Show" there, the first being Ch. Governor Moscow in 1925, second being Ch. Nancolleth Markable,  and the most recent being Ch. Marjetta's National Acclaim in 1986.



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Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Everything about your Airedale Terrier

Everything about your Airedale Terrier
  Known as the “King of Terriers,” the Airedale is indeed the largest of all terriers. The dog breed originated in the Aire Valley of Yorkshire, and was created to catch otters and rats in the region between the Aire and Wharfe Rivers. An able sporting dog, he became an ideal working dog as well, proving his worth during World War I. Intelligent, outgoing, and confident, the Airedale possesses a wonderful playful streak that delights his owners.

Overview
  Of all the terriers, there may be none that so embody what we imagine this type of dog to be than the Airedale Terrier. An authentic English terrier finds its home in a specific place – Airedale, of all places – but is just as happy to make its home with and your family. Like many terriers, you will find that this dog is capable of a lot of love, a lot of companionship, and can even make an excellent playmate. Its overall attractive coat is hard to resist for the younger members of your family and you’ll find there’s nothing quite like petting a terrier.   There’s a reason, after all, they call Airedale Terriers the so-called king of terriers.
  But is the Airedale Terrier for you? Depending on the type of “dog person” you are, your answer will vary. Each dog breed has its own strengths and weaknesses, and these strengths and weaknesses mean specific breeds can be more suitable to certain types of dog owners. As we learn about the Airedale Terrier, we’ll also learn about the terrier group as a whole and hopefully you’ll just find a little something out about the types of dogs you’d prefer to bring home. Let’s find out more about the Airedale Terrier.

Highlights
  • Like all Terriers, Airedales have a natural inclination for digging , chasing small animals, and barking.
  • The Airedale Terrier is an active collector of human memorabilia. He will pick up just about anything  to add to his stash of treasures.
  • Being a high-energy working dog, the Airedale Terrier needs daily exercise. In general, the he remains active and full of energy throughout his life. He is not suited to apartment life, and needs a home with a large, fenced yard.
  • Chewing is another favorite Airedale habit. He will chew anything, and should be left in a crate or secure kennel with sturdy toys when you are away from home.
  • The Airedale is an independent dog, but he enjoys being a member of a family. He is happiest when inside with his owners, and is not meant to be a backyard dog.
  • Airedale Terriers are very good with children and are fondly called reliable babysitters. However, children and dogs should never be left unsupervised.
  • Grooming is necessary, so plan on paying a professional groomer or learn to groom your Airedale yourself.
  • Training and socialization is essential to teach the Airedale proper canine manners. If he is not used to other dogs and people, he can be quarrelsome.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • The Airedale has a long, flat skull, V-shaped ears that fold over, small dark eyes full of terrier keenness and intelligence, a black nose, and a muscular, squarish body. The tail is carried up but not over the back.
  • The Airedale’s coat is hard, dense and wiry, with a softer undercoat, and comes in both tan and black and tan and grizzle.
Breed standards
AKC group: Terrier
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 10 to 13 years
Average size: 40 to 65 pounds
Coat appearance: Dense and Wire
Coloration: black mixed with gray and white,speckling of red in the black and a small white star on the chest
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Families with older children, active singles and seniors, experienced dog handlers, houses with yards
Temperament: Protective, intelligent, loyal, sensitive
Comparable Breeds: Rat Terrier, Wire Fox Terrier

History
Airedale Terrier circa 1915

  Airedale Terriers are a relatively young breed, created in the 19th century by the working class rather than by aristocrats in the industrial Aire River Valley region of northern England. Their exact origin is not well-documented, but the Otterhound , the Irish and Bull Terriers  and the now-extinct Old English Rough Coated Black-and-Tan or Rat-Catcher Terrier  are considered to be prominent in their development. Other contributors include assorted setters and retrievers, sheepdogs such as the Yorkshire Collie, and Bedlington Terriers
  What we know today as the Airedale Terrier first emerged around 1840 and was bred to hunt otter, duck, weasel, badger, fox, water rat and other small game. The breed’s intelligence, agility and strength, combined with almost boundless energy, made them equally valued as guard dogs and personal companions. These unique terriers have been used as rat-killers, duck-catchers, deer-trackers, working dogs, war dogs, hunting dogs, guard and police dogs, gun dogs, army-messenger dogs and all-around sporting dogs. They were used in both World Wars to locate the wounded and to carry messages and medical supplies. They have also been used to hunt large game.


Personality
  The Airedale is a hard-working, independent, and athletic dog with a lot of drive, energy, and stamina. He is prone to digging, chasing, and barking — behaviors that come naturally to terrier breeds. These traits can be frustrating to owners unfamiliar with the Airedale personality.
  The Airedale is a lively breed, and he needs plenty of activity. Don't leave him alone for long periods of time, or he is likely to become bored, which leads to the aforementioned destructive behaviors. Keep training interesting and fresh — repetitive exercises will become a bore to the Airedale. He is best motivated by treats and other positive reinforcement methods; drill-and-jerk training methods should be avoided.
  A reliable watchdog, the Airedale takes pride in protecting his family. He can be a fierce guardian, but is friendly with his family and friends.
  Like every dog, the Airedale needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Airedale puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

Health
  The Airedale Terrier, which has an average lifespan of 10 to 13 years, sometimes suffers from colonic disease. Other serious health issues this breed is prone to include canine hip dysplasia (CHD), gastric torsion, and hypothyroidism. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may run thyroid and hip exams on the dog.

Care
  The Airedale Terrier is a working dog, and has the energy and stamina that goes with it. He needs regular exercise — at least one walk a day, although two is preferable, coupled with a good romp in the backyard. The Airedale loves to retrieve, play, swim, and goof around. He is a great jogging companion, and in many cases, will tire out his owner.
  Training and socialization are essential for the Airedale, beginning with puppy classes. Incorporate socialization with training by taking your Airedale with you to many different places — the pet supply store, outdoor events, long walks in busy parks. Anywhere there are a lot of people to meet and sights to see is a good place to take an Airedale.
  Crate training is also strongly recommended with the Airedale Terrier. Not only does it aid in housetraining, it also provides him a safe den in which to settle down and relax. In general, Airedales do very well with most training as long as you remember that they have a mind of their own. Ask him to sit or stay in full sunlight in the middle of the summer and it's very likely he'll decide he'd prefer to do so in the shade.
  Positive reinforcement is the best way to teach an Airedale. If you approach training with a positive, fun attitude, and you have a lot of patience and flexibility, there's an excellent chance you will have freethinking Airedale who is also well trained.

Living Conditions
  The Airedale Terrier is not recommended for apartment life. They are very active indoors and will do best with at least an average-sized yard.

Trainability
  The Airedale is a thinking breed – in addition to keeping his physical activity high, he will require mental stimulation as well. Basic obedience should be conducted with confidence and positive reinforcement. This breed likes to be the Alpha Dog, so it is important to establish who is in charge from an early age, and always be consistent, because Airedales will take a mile if given an inch. They excel in advanced obedience, tricks and agility training, thanks to their high intelligence.
  Training should be conducted with treats, and a drill-style of repeat tasks works best to keep an Airedale Terrier's attention.

Exercise Requirements
  Regular walking and play is recommended – and, in fact, regular discipline with exercise should be considered mandatory for dogs of this size. They can handle a lot and love getting outside and exploring their agility and instincts.
  Airedale Terriers are a high-energy, thinking breed. They need as much mental activity as they need physical activity, and apartments are not the right living situation for them. Families with large, fenced yards are ideal, as the Airedale needs plenty of room to run during the day. They enjoy chasing and hunting, so fetching and hide-and-seek games are among an Airedale's favorite activities.

Grooming
  Airedales need a weekly brushing and professional grooming every two months or so to look their best. That is all they need – unless you’re planning to show your dog, in which case you’ll need to be doing a great deal more laborious work on that wiry coat.
  The family Airedale doesn’t have to be trimmed, but many owners do have him groomed by a professional groomer three to four times a year to give him a neat appearance . The coat is either trimmed with clippers or by stripping, a process by which coat is thinned and shortened with a stripping knife, a sharp, comb-like tool, or a combination of both. 
  The Airedale Terrier is not known for extreme shedding, but he does shed certain times of the year. Regular brushing with a slicker brush once or twice a week keeps the coat in good condition. Bathe the Airedale only when he’s dirty. Bathing him too often softens the coarse terrier coat.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Keep the ears clean and dry to prevent infections. Check them weekly for redness or a bad odor that might indicate infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball moistened with a mild pH-balanced cleanser recommended by your veterinarian. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.
  It is important to begin grooming the Airedale when he is very young. An early introduction teaches the independent Airedale that grooming is a normal part of his life, and teaches him to patiently accept the handling and fuss of the grooming process.  

Children And Other Pets
  The fun-loving Airedale makes a good family pet. In some cases, he may even become protective of the children in the home, but his large size and high activity level may prove too intense for extremely young kids.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  The Airedale gets along well with other dogs in his household, as long as he is properly socialized and trained. He can be aggressive, however, with strange dogs that he perceives as threatening. And given the Airedale's reputation as a hunter, he is very likely to chase animals he perceives as prey, including cats, rabbits, gerbils, and hamsters.

Did You Know?
  The Airedale is the largest of the terrier breeds and was one of the first breeds trained for police work in Germany and Great Britain. In World War I, he worked as a guard and messenger dog.

Is the Airedale Terrier the Right Breed for you?
High Maintenance: Grooming should be performed often to keep the dog's coat in good shape. Professional trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Moderately Easy Training: The Airedale Terrier is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Not Good for New Owners: This breed is best for those who have previous experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.
  
Notable Airedales
The memorial fountain for Paddy the Wanderer, Wellington

  • Laddie Boy- (July 26, 1920 – January 23, 1929) was an Airedale Terrier owned by US President Warren G. Harding. He was born in Toledo, Ohio. His father was Champion Tintern Tip Top. He was presented to US President Warren G. Harding by Charles Quetschke of Caswell Kennels and became a celebrity during the Harding administration.
  • Paddy the Wanderer- was an Airedale Terrier who roamed the streets of Wellington, New Zealand, during the Great Depression. He was a friend of cabbies, workers, and seamen alike, who took turns at paying his dog licence every year.Paddy was known for greeting sailors in the Wellington Harbour and accompanying them, as a stowaway,on their coastal steamers.



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