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Showing posts with label energy. Show all posts
Showing posts with label energy. Show all posts

Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Everything about your Border Terrier

Everything about your Border Terrier
  Although he’s not as flashy in appearance as some of his terrier relatives, the Border Terrier is still pure terrier, living life with great gusto, whether out and about with people or digging a hole in a flowerbed. Frankly, it’s a bit surprising that he isn’t more popular, given that he’s one of the healthier purebred dogs, is less driven to hunt than most other terriers, and is fairly flexible about exercise. He’s robust, sturdy, and great with children, making him one of the top terrier contenders for a family pet.

Overview
  The Border Terrier is one of the oldest and smallest of the working terrier breeds that originated in Great Britain. Earlier names for this breed include the Reedwater Terrier, Ullswater Terrier and Coquetdale Terrier. They are well-known for their scruffy face and beard and their friendly, welcoming disposition. They are active, agile and sturdy little dogs, said to be “hard as nails” and “as game as they come.” This breed thrives on human companionship and does well around children. However, they should not be in homes with other small animals such as birds, hamsters or mice, and they always will be inclined to chase cats. Border Terriers are friendly to everyone, including strangers, but will sound an alarm when something new or unfamiliar appears in their home territory.

Highlights
  • The Border Terrier is characterized by his rough coat, “otter”-shaped head, and an “at the alert” attitude.
  • As a breed, the Border Terrier has changed little over the years, aside from becoming more consistent in appearance.
  • Border Terriers have thick, loose skin, which protects them from adversary bites.Border Terriers become overweight easily, so be sure to measure your Border's food and give him at least a half hour of vigorous exercise each day.
  • Border Terriers thrive when they're with their people and aren't meant to live outdoors with little human interaction. When left to their own devices, they can be noisy and destructive.
  • These escape artists will find the way out of a fenced yard if given the time and opportunity. They've been known to climb over and dig under fences, and once they get out they have little street sense to keep them from dashing out in front of cars.
  • Border Terriers have a high threshold for pain. If your dog's sick, the only sign may be a behavioral change, such as the dog becoming withdrawn or quiet.
  • Border Terriers have a natural instinct to dig. Rather than fighting it, give your Border Terrier a place of his own to dig or put his digging drive to work with fun games.
  • Border Terriers are active and bouncy. They love jumping up on people to greet them.
  • Border Terriers aren't yappy, but they'll bark to alert you of anything unusual, and they can become nuisance barkers if they get bored.
  • Border Terriers have a high prey drive and will chase, attack, and even kill neighborhood cats, squirrels or other small animals. They'll also go after small pets such as rabbits, mice, or gerbils. Because of their tendency to chase, make sure your yard is securely fenced, and don't let your Border off leash in an unfenced area.
  • Border Terriers do well with other dogs and with family cats if the cat is raised with the Border Terrier or lived in the home before the Border Terrier.
  • Border Terriers can make excellent companions for kids, but they can be rambunctious, especially when young, and can unintentionally hurt small children.
Breed standards
AKC group: Terriers

UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 12 - 14 years
Average size: 11.5 to 15.5 pounds
Coat appearance: Dense, Harsh and Rough, Thick, and Wire
Coloration: Red, wheaten, grizzle and tan, or blue and tan.
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Families with children, singles, seniors, apartments, houses with/without yards
Temperament: Calm, friendly, curious, independent
Comparable Breeds: Irish Terrier, Kerry Blue Terrier

History
  The Border Terrier was developed in Great Britain, where it originally was bred to hunt and kill the powerful hill foxes that threatened the stock of farmers along the borders of Scotland and England. They had to be active, stout and tireless to perform this task. Their legs had to be long enough to keep up with horses and the accompanying foxhounds, while at the same time they needed to be low enough to the ground so that they could follow and corner foxes, even flushing them from their dens. It is thought that the Border Terrier, Bedlington Terrier and Dandie Dinmont share common ancestors. 
  The breed’s popularity surged after it was officially recognized by the English Kennel Club as a distinct breed, and following formation of the British Border Terrier Club, in 1920. True terrier fanciers feared that recognition of Border Terriers as show dogs might “prettify” and soften the breed, but that has not proven true. The breed was well-established long before it became a show dog in the 1920s and retains is rough-and-tumbled looks and sound working character to this day. Border Terriers were first registered with the American Kennel Club in 1930 and are part of its Terrier Group. The Border Terrier Club of America was founded in 1949.



Temperament
  Though sometimes stubborn and strong willed, border terriers are, on the whole sound dogs, and are friendly and rarely aggressive. They are very good with children, but may chase cats and any other small pets.
  Borders do well in task-oriented activities and have a surprising ability to jump high and run fast given the size of their legs. The breed has excelled in agility training, but they are quicker to learn jumps and see-saws than weaving poles. They take training for tasks very well, and are extremely trainable, and capable of learning tricks quickly and competently.   The border in recent years has been bred to harbor a more subtle character so are more adaptable to apartment living if properly exercised.
  They are intelligent and eager to please, but they retain the capacity for independent thinking and initiative that were bred into them for working rats and fox underground. Their love of people and even temperament make them fine therapy dogs, especially for children and the elderly, and they are occasionally used to aid the blind or deaf. From a young age they should be trained on command.
  Borders can adapt to different environments and situations well, and are able to deal with temporary change well. They will get along well with cats that they have been raised with, but may chase other cats and small animals such as mice, birds, rabbits, squirrels, rats, and guinea pigs.
  Borders are very independent and loyal. Some borders are known to be territorial and will protect their homes. They have a strong sense of smell and can tell when danger is near.
  Borders love to sit and watch what is going on. Walks with Borders will often involve them sitting and lying in the grass to observe the environment around them.

Health
  The Border Terrier, which has an average lifespan of 12 to 14 years, is prone to canine hip dysplasia (CHD) and heart defects. The breed may also suffer from minor health issues such as patellar luxation. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may conduct hip and cardiac exams on this breed of dog.

Care
  Even though it can live outside in cool climates, this terrier is better when it has access to the yard and the house. The harsh coat demands weekly brushing and dead hair should be stripped four times a year so that it looks tidy.
  As the Border Terrier enjoys activity, it should be provided with an adequate exercise routine such as a vigorous game, an off-leash expedition in a secure place, or a daily on-leash walk.

Living Conditions
  The Border Terrier will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. They are moderately inactive indoors and a small yard is sufficient.

Training
  You’ll find that it is fairly easy to train the smart and able Border Terrier.  An important note to remember is not to inadvertently teach this dog an unacceptable behavior, as Border Terriers have long memories. Once it is taught something is okay to do, it’s challenging to try to reverse the behavior. But on the positive side, if a Border Terrier is given love and attention for performing a command correctly, it will do it again and again.
  One of these reasons you see a lot of Border Terriers on TV and in the movies is because of its willingness to learn. This breed seems to really take to obedience training. This also means that the Border Terrier can be trained to work with disabled people.
  The Border Terrier likes to chew, reducing even the toughest of toys to piles of fluff with no effort. When training, set boundaries as to what is acceptable for chewing and what is not. It is a good idea to invest in chew toys that are geared toward safe, heavy duty chewing.
  Thanks to the irresistible combination of lovable, affectionate, and easygoing, the Border Terrier fits into just about any family or living environment. With the right training, you’ll be able to mold a perfect, well-behaved dog.

Activity Requirements
  Border Terriers can live happily in just about any environment be it an apartment, a house with lots of children, or a farm. They don't need an excessive amount of exercise, but should be allowed to walk several times a day and be allowed to run in a yard or park a few times a week. Yards should be fenced because Border Terriers will chase birds, squirrels and cats. Farmers like Border Terriers because they are very reliable ratters and keep foxes at bay.
  They enjoy challenges and new tasks, so they need lots of mental activity as well. Challenging toys or hide-and-seek games are right up the Border Terrier's alley.

Grooming
  The Border Terrier has a double coat composed of a short and dense undercoat and a wiry topcoat. His coat fits closely to the body, like a jacket, and comes in a few colors, including red, grizzle and tan, blue and tan, and wheaten. To keep his coat healthy, simply brush or comb him weekly. Even in the show ring, he only needs a little tidying of his head, neck, and feet, although most breeders “strip” the coat — pluck out dead hair by hand — for a less scruffy look. The Border Terrier Club of America offers advice on grooming through its website. The rest is routine care: Trim his nails every few weeks, and brush his teeth for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Border Terriers love kids and can match their energy levels all day long, but they're a little rambunctious for households with children under the age of 6 years.
  As with any dog, always teach children how to approach and touch your Border Terrier, and supervise all interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear pulling from either party.
  Border Terriers usually get along well with other dogs and cats, especially if they're introduced to them in puppyhood. They do best with dogs of the opposite sex. They're likely to chase outdoor cats as well as squirrels and other wildlife, and they shouldn't be trusted alone with pet birds or small, furry pets such as rabbits, hamsters, and gerbils.

Is the Border Terrier the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape. Occasional trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Moderately Easy Training: The Border Terrier is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Chomp in 102 Dalmatians
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
 Border Terriers hold more American Kennel Club Earthdog titles than any other breed.

Famous Border Terriers
  • Baxter in Anchorman
  • Brillo in Misfits episode "Four" as a street puppy eaten by new zombie Curtis
  • Hubble in Good Boy!
  • Lady Eccles in Coronation Street as Blanche Hunt's inheritance gift from her friend; belongs to her son-in-law Ken Barlow after her death in 2010
  • Monty and Rommel in Monarch of the Glen
  • Nancy in Unfabulous as Addie's pet dog
  • Oscar as Scotty the Dog in Ruby Sparks 2012 
  • Pard in High Sierra 
  • Pepper as Pinkybones in Another Happy Day
  • Puffy in There's Something About Mary
  • Seymour in Futurama episode Jurassic Bark
  • Shep Proudfoot, Greg Laswell's pet dog
  • Sickan in My Life as a Dog
  • Sorry in Seeking a Friend for the End of the World; Dodge's dog
  • Tansy as Toto from Return To Oz 1985 
  • Toots in Lassie




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Friday, April 21, 2017

Everything about your English Foxhound

Everything about your English Foxhound
  This pack hound has been bred for more than 150 years and is used primarily for fox hunting, but with plenty of exercise he can also make a fine family companion. His size and voice make him best suited to a rural home.

Overview
  Bred in England since the 1800s, English Foxhounds have been bred in over 250 packs. Coming to America in the 1900s, the breed is meant to hunt foxes on foot next to a hunter on horseback. With a strong nose and ability to run for miles, this breed is an active and gentle dog.
  The English Foxhound has a stately bearing, but beneath his classic good looks lies a dog who’s always ready to rock and roll. This is a dog bred to run full throttle over hill and dale, hot on the heels of a fox. Expect to provide him with lots of strenuous daily activity. A bored Foxhound with energy to burn will create his own entertainment, and you probably won’t like it. He’s also noisy, with a loud bay that carries long distances. It’s not a good idea to keep him in an urban environment.

Highlights
  • English Foxhounds need a large fenced yard and daily exercise of 30 to 60 minutes per day.
  • English Foxhounds are not recommended for apartment living. They are an active breed indoors, which makes them unsuitable for small dwellings.
  • Before you purchase your English Foxhound, research the breed and to talk to breeders. The English Foxhound is not the breed for everyone, and because the information about him is limited it is easy to purchase this breed while failing to properly understand its limitations and idiosyncrasies.
  • English Foxhounds need a strong owner who is fair and consistent. Obedience training is a must and should begin at an early age.
  • This breed does well with children, but English Foxhounds are quite active and bouncy when they are young. For that reason, they are not recommended for homes with small children.
  • Being pack dogs, English Foxhounds do well with other dogs and actually do better in homes where there are other dogs. They can become bored and destructive when they are the only dog in the home.
  • English Foxhounds are a rare breed and it may be difficult to find a responsible breeder. Breeders with puppies available may have a long waiting list.
  • Bred to pursue prey, the English Foxhound still possesses this drive. For this reason, they should have a fenced yard and should be walked on leash as they may not come back if they are in pursuit of something interesting.
  • The English Foxhound generally does well with other animals in the home, but it is important to understand that they are prey driven and may chase smaller animals.
  • English Foxhounds have a loud bark. This makes them wonderful watchdogs, but it may also make them unliked by neighbors.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The English Foxhound has a short coat that can be any hound color but is typically a tricolor of black, tan and white.
  • English Foxhounds are typically kept in packs by hunt clubs, but occasionally they are placed as companion dogs.
  • English Foxhounds are the rarest of the foxhound breeds.
  • English Foxhounds usually train for six months to a year before they are ready to go out with the pack.
  • The English Foxhound has a rich, deep, mellow voice.
  • One of the greatest English Foxhounds was a dog named Belvoir Gambler, who was admired for his beautiful proportions and rich color.
  • The English Foxhound is shorter and stouter than the American Foxhound.
  • Comparable Breeds: American Foxhound, Beagle


History
  The English Foxhound was created in the late 16th century, as a result of the perception of the depletion of deer in England. Nobles and royalty had hunted deer for both food and sport, using the Deerhound or Staghound for this purpose. During the reign of Henry VIII, it was perceived that a new prey was needed, and the fox was selected. The English Foxhound was then created by a careful mixing of the Greyhound, for speed, the Fox Terrier, for hunting instinct, and the Bulldog, for tenacity in the hunt.
English Foxhound circa 1915.
  During the British Raj, English Foxhounds were exported to India for the purpose of jackal coursing, though due to the comparatively hotter weather, they were rarely long lived. Foxhounds were preferred for this purpose over greyhounds, as the former was not as fast, and could thus provide a longer, more sporting chase.
  Studbooks for the English foxhound have been kept since the 18th century.Breeding lines and the work of people involved in breeding hounds is extremely important in the continual development of this working breed. Puppy shows are important events in the hunting calendar and allow the local hunt followers and visiting hound breeders examine the latest generation from the hound pack. The International Foxhound Association was created in 2012 for the promotion of the English Foxhound as a breed.

Personality
  Foxhounds are an excellent dog for an active family. They love being outdoors and have the endurance to stay active all day long. Foxhounds get along great with children and other animals, and in fact do best when they are part of a large pack (human or canine). They are versatile enough to spend all day hunting with dad, only to come home and romp around with children. Foxhounds are adaptable and easy going and are an excellent choice for rural families.

Health
  The average life expectancy of the English Foxhound is between 9 and 11 years. Breed health concerns may include epilepsy, hip dysplasia and kidney ailments. These are remarkably healthy dogs.


Care
  Bred to be a fast hunter with a great deal of stamina, the English Foxhound requires a substantial amount of exercise. If he can't hunt in a field as he was bred to do, take him on daily runs or provide other exercise that will help him burn off his natural energy.
  He's used to kennel life and can live outdoors if accompanied by another social dog and provided with appropriate shelter. If he's an only dog, however, he should live indoors with his human pack so he won't get lonely.
  It is important to crate train your English Foxhound puppy. Puppies explore, get into things they shouldn't, and chew things that can harm them. It can be expensive both in fixing or replacing destroyed items as well as the vet bills that could arise. Crate training ensures not only the safety of your puppy but also of your belongings.

Living Conditions

  English Foxhounds are not recommended for apartment life. They are very active indoors and do best with acreage.

Training
  Like most other hound breeds, English Foxhounds are highly independent and can sometimes be stubborn. Therefore they require firm, assertive leadership and consistent training. They are also bred to hunt in packs and require this firm leadership to be well-balanced. Obedience training can however take time and patience. Owners may experience trouble with the “come” command, especially when walking this dog without a leash. Their prey instincts are easily aroused and they can run off in pursuit of interesting ‘prey’ if walked off leash.

Activity Requirements
  Foxhounds need a lot of exercise, and their overall temperament is shaped by how much daily exercise they receive. A Foxhound who does not get enough daily activity can become reserved, anxious, or begin to exhibit dominance, whereas a Foxhound who gets plenty of exercise will be even tempered, social, and obedient. Expect to vigorously exercise this breed at least one hour per day. Those who are not hunters or who do not already jog, hike or bike daily should look to another breed, as should apartment or condo dwellers.
  Foxhounds are hard working hunting dogs and can be utilized as trackers in the field. They can move for hours on end without getting tired, and once they catch a scent they become 100% focused on tracking it. This trait can backfire in home life, so when Foxhounds aren't in the hunting field they should be kept on a leash or in a fenced-in area to keep them safe.
  Foxhounds do best in multiple-dog homes. While they enjoy the company of people, they only truly thrive around other dogs, so adopting two at a time would be the most ideal situation for a Foxhound.

Grooming
  The English Foxhound’s short, dense coat is easy to groom. Brush it weekly with a hound mitt or rubber curry brush to remove dead hairs and distribute skin oils. The dogs shed moderately, and regular brushing will help prevent loose hairs from settling on your floors, furniture and clothing. Bathe the dog as needed.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails every few weeks. Keep the rounded hanging ears clean and dry so bacterial and yeast infections don’t take hold. Brush the teeth for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  The English Foxhound is great with older children who are a match for his energetic and bouncy nature. He's not recommended for homes with small children simply because they're too easily knocked over by the swishing tail or enthusiastic antics of a rambunctious dog. Kind as they are, English Foxhounds, like all breeds, should never be left unsupervised with young children.
  Being pack dogs, they love the company of other dogs, especially other English Foxhounds, and they're quite comfortable around horses. They generally do well with other animals, but with their strong prey drive, they may chase smaller pets. Supervise interactions with cats, smaller dogs, or other animals until you're sure everyone gets along.

Is this breed right for you?
  If you're not a fox hunter, then this breed is perfect for someone with an active lifestyle. A great companion for running, biking, hiking and more, this dog needs a lot of activity in his life. If left bored, he may act out and break any rules given to him. Good with children, this dog does well with other pets and prefers the company of other dogs.

Did You Know?
  The typical quarry of the English Foxhound is the red or gray fox, but they are also used to hunt coyotes. But don’t worry: a hunt is all about the chase, not the kill, and the quarry lives to run another day.

A dream day in the life of an English Foxhound
  Ready for a hiking trip first thing in the morning, this pup will be up for any challenge regardless of the length. Following his master, he'll run the trail, picking up every scent he can. A strong animal, he loves to climb rocky terrain with you and other dogs or people too. Once the hike has ended, he'll be happy to chill out and socialize with his owner before hitting the dog bed.

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Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Everything about your Appenzeller Sennenhund

Everything about your Appenzeller Sennenhund
  The Appenzeller originated as an all-around farm dog breed, who stayed busy herding the livestock, guarding the farm, and pulling carts in his native Switzerland. Today’s Appenzellers have still got the energy, smarts, and self-confidence that makes for valuable working dogs — but they’re anything but low-maintenance. Dogs of this breed need lots of exercise, training, and a job to do.

Overview
  Also known as the Appenzeller Mountain Dog and Appenzell Cattle Dog, the Appenzeller Sennenhunde is the rarest of the four ancient Swiss mountain dog breeds. The breed gets its name from the Swiss herders known as the Senn and Appenzell region of the Swiss Alps to which this breed is native.
  Like its cousins the Entlebucher, the Greater Swiss Mountain Dog and the Bernese Mountain Dog, the Appenzeller is a well-muscled and powerfully built dog. Although a medium-sized dog, it is extremely strong and is capable of pulling small carts and trolleys and working as an all-purpose farm dog. Appenzeller’s have a thick double-coat that is black, brown and white in color and its ears are high set and floppy.
  Appenzellers are an extremely hard working breed and require a great deal of physical and mental exercise to remain happy and healthy. Although an excellent herder and guarder of livestock, their high maintenance and high exercise requirements have not made them overly popular in the United States.

Breed standards
Dog Breed Group: Herding Dogs
Height: 1 foot, 7 inches to 1 foot, 10 inches tall at the shoulder
Weight: 48 to 55 pounds
Life Span: 9 to 12 years
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles, houses with backyards, farms and rural areas
Temperament: Lively, self-assured, fearless, reliable
Comparable Breeds: Entlebucher Mountain Dog, Greater Swiss Mountain Dog

History 
  The Appenzeller Sennenhund is descended from the general Sennenhund type which may have existed in antiquity, or descended from "cattle dogs left there by the Romans", but the first breed club for the breed was founded and the stud book for the breed started in 1906 by Albert Heim and others, who wrote the first breed standard in 1916. An early reference to the breed's predecessors was made in an 1853 book, "Tierleben der Alpenwelt" (Animal Life in the Alps), referring to dogs in the Appenzell region. The Appenzeller Sennenhund was only recognised internationally as a separate breed in 1989.
  The Appenzeller Sennenhund was originally kept primarily as a cattle herding dog, and a flock guardian. It was also used as a draft dog, and general farm dog. The breed also was known for its affinity to both herd and guard with such devotion that they would give their life to protect their charge. Today the breed is primarily kept as a companion, and excels in agility/flyball competitions, obedience competitions and Schutzhund. They are also still used in many places as working cattle dogs even now. They are highly intelligent, and learn quickly.


Temperament
  The Appenzeller's working roots are still very obvious in today's dogs. Appenzeller Mountain Dogs are exuberant, willful, playful, intelligent and loyal. While they are wary of strangers, they are very affectionate with their families and make excellent guard dogs and family dogs.

Health Problems
  The Appenzeller is an extremely healthy breed of dog with little to no hereditary health issues. This is quite rare for a breed of this size.


Living Conditions
  The Appenzell Mountain Dog is not recommended for apartment life. They prefer to live outdoors and should have acreage where they can run free, such as a farm. Appenzells that do not have acreage need extra attention to their mental and physical exercise needs. They like to bark, so they are not suited for areas with close neighbors, however giving them the proper amount of leadership and exercise can lessen their urge to bark.

Training
  Appenzellers are an extremely intelligent breed and can learn new tasks quickly. However, they are also capable of independent thinking and require owners that can demonstrate loving but firm leadership, consistently. If an owner is meek or unsure, these dogs can quickly assume the role of the pack leader and start trying to dictate terms. This can be dangerous considering the dog’s size and strength. For this reason, Appenzellers are not recommended as a dog breed for first-time owners.
Exercise Requirements
  Appenzellers were bred to work hard throughout the day, and ensuring that they have enough physical and mental exercise is an important aspect of being a responsible Appenzeller owner. Like all working dogs, Appenzellers too require a ‘meaningful’ task that they can apply themselves to each day. When denied of such a job, they can often turn moody and neurotic and can develop various undesirable behaviors.

Grooming
  Appenzeller Sennenhunds are a generally low-maintenance breed.  They do not require professional grooming, only a regular brushing.  Other than that, only those routine maintenance procedures that every breed needs, such as nail clipping and teeth brushing, are necessary.  Appenzeller Sennenhunds do shed, and they can shed very, very heavily.   This shedding is usually worst when the seasons change and the dog changes coats.   Regular brushing will help reduce shedding, but this breed is still more than capable of covering clothes, furniture, and carpets with hair.
Is this breed right for you?
  If you love the great outdoors, enjoy physical activities like hiking, jogging and long games of fetch, and have previous experience with herding dogs, then the Appenzeller could be the perfect dog for you. These dogs are still rare in the States, so if you want your loyal companion to stand out from the crowd, bring an Appenzeller Mountain Dog home today.




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Friday, December 9, 2016

Everything about your Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever

Everything about your Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever
  An active and fun loving dog, the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever is not only favored by hunters but by energetic families as well. This well-rounded breed is always ready for retrieving ducks, hiking, swimming, playing fetch and snuggling on the couch with his loved ones. His affectionate, loving and patient nature makes the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever a wonderful companion for adults and children alike.

Overview
  Originally known as the Little River Duck Dog for its ability to lure ducks, the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever was bred in Canada, as its name suggests. Nicknamed the Toller, it was bred from retrievers and spaniels for supreme agility and gait when hunting. Still used as a hunter and retriever, the breed is an excellent swimmer, hunting partner and family dog.   The Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever prefers colder climates and the great outdoors.
The Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever is a rare breed that originated in the Little River district of Nova Scotia, a province on Canada's Atlantic coast. Originally known as Little River Duck Dogs, they were renamed the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever — a mouthful, even for a retriever, so most fans call them Tollers.
  This sporting breed has a lot going for it: personality, versatility, and an easy-care coat. They're the smallest of all the retriever breeds and share many of the same traits, such as a strong working drive, intelligence, and a happy nature. But the breed has some drawbacks as well. They can be strong willed and are not as eager to please as a Labrador or Golden Retriever. If allowed to, they will take control of a household.

Highlights
  • Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers are generally healthy, but because of the limited gene pool, some diseases have begun to occur. His red coat and flesh-colored nose mean the Toller may have a higher incidence of immune-mediated disease.
  • Although he has a medium length coat, the Toller's coat is fairly low maintenance and easy to care for.
  • Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers are moderately active sporting dogs and need roughly an hour a day of exercise. If not properly exercised, they will expend their energy in less positive ways, such as chewing and digging.
  • Tollers have a strong prey drive that will prompt them to chase cats or other small animals they see outdoors. Keep your Toller in a fenced yard to prevent him from running after prey.
  • If you live in an apartment, or noise controlled neighborhood, the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever may not be the dog for you. When he's excited, he's likely to emit a scream that's loud, high-pitched, and nerve wracking.
  • If you prefer a clean and tidy dog, the Toller may not be the breed for you. He sheds seasonally and enjoys rolling and frolicking in mud and dirt.
  • The Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever is not a miniature Golden Retriever; their temperaments are quite different.
  • The Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever is a rare breed and it may take time to locate a reputable breeder who has puppies available. Expect a wait of six months to a year or more for a puppy. To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • At 17 to 21 inches tall at the shoulder, the NSDTR is the smallest of the Retrievers.
  • True to his heritage, the NSDTR loves playing in water.
  • Fewer than 500 Tollers are registered with the American Kennel Club annually.
Breed standards
AKC group: Sporting Group
UKC group: Gun Dog
Average lifespan: 11 - 14 years
Average size: 37 - 52 pounds
Coat appearance: Soft, medium-length; straight, water-resistant double coat
Coloration: Gold, red, reddish-orange and copper; possible white markings on body
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Muscular body similar to a Golden Retriever; light-colored eyes and nose; triangular high-set ears; and long tail
Possible alterations: Coat may have small wave to it.
Comparable Breeds: Golden Retriever, Newfoundland

History
  The breed was developed in the community of Little River Harbour in Yarmouth County, Nova Scotia, around the beginning of the 19th century to toll waterfowl and as an all purpose hunting dog. The breed was originally known as the Little River Duck Dog or the Yarmouth Toller. Its exact origins are not known but it appears that some possibly spaniel and setter Pointer-type dogs, retriever-type dogs, and rabbit hounds. Farm collies also went into the mix as many became herding dogs as well as hunting dogs and family pets.
  The Toller was officially admitted to the Canadian Kennel Club in 1945. Declared the provincial dog of Nova Scotia in 1995, the breed gained national recognition in 1980, when two Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers were awarded Best in Show at championship events that included many breeds. On June 11, 2001, it was approved for admission into the Miscellaneous Class of the American Kennel Club and was granted full recognition into the Sporting Group on July 1, 2003.

Use in hunting
  Tollers are named for their ability to entice or lure waterfowl within gunshot range, called "tolling". The hunter stays hidden in a blind and sends the dog out to romp and play near the water, usually by tossing a ball or stick to be retrieved. The dog's appearance is similar to that of a fox. Its unusual activity and white markings pique the curiosity of ducks and geese, who swim over to investigate.
  When the birds are close, the hunter calls the dog back to the blind, then rises, putting the birds to flight, allowing him a shot. The Toller then retrieves any downed birds. They are particularly suited for retrieving in cold water climates because of their water-repellent double coat.



Personality
  The Nova Scotia Duck Trolling Retriever has a most interesting way of luring ducks within a hunter's range. They will frolic along the water's edge, hopping in and out of the water, chasing sticks and balls that the hunters throw from their blinds. Eventually, the water fowl will become curious, and move toward the happy dog, right into the hunter's trap.   These retrievers have a never-ending reserve of energy, making them a great companion for hunters and active families. They are easy going, happy dogs who love to play and are excellent around kids.

Health
  The Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever, which has an average lifespan of 11 to 13 years, is not prone to any major health concerns; however it may suffer from minor issues such as progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) and canine hip dysplasia (CHD). To identify these issues, a veterinarian may recommend hip and eye exams for the dog.

Genetic diversity
  A worldwide study of the Tollers' registration history in 17 countries shows that about 90% of the genetic diversity present in the founding population has been lost. Tollers born between 1999–2008 have an effective founder size of 9.8, realized effective population size of 18 and an average inbreeding coefficient of 0.26. Breeders are working to prevent losing heterozygosity and to maintain sufficient genetic variations, but high kinship value means the breed is not able to maintain a steady level of inbreeding in the long term.

Care
  The grooming requirements for the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever is fairly easy: a weekly combing. It is important that the dog receives plenty of exercise and access to water, if possible, as it loves to swim. It also enjoys retrieving objects.
  The Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever prefers to live indoors with its human companions, but it is adaptable to various climatic conditions and can survive outdoors.

Living Conditions
  The Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retriever will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. This breed does well in cold climates.

Training
  Always wanting to please their owners, Tollers are relatively easy to train. Positive training methods that include loads of praise and lots of treats work best for this breed. They are highly sensitive to harsh words and discipline so a calm and patient trainer is needed. Consistency in training is essential for the Toller to succeed in obedience.
  Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers do well in many forms of canine competition. Of course, they excel in obedience trials but they also do well on agility courses. Agility is a great way to bond with the Toller as well as let him get the exercise he needs to stay healthy.

Activity Requirements
  Trollers need a lot of vigorous activity to maintain health and happiness, and the biggest mistake people make with this breed is not exercising them enough. Simple walks around the block are not going to cut it for Trollers. They need time to run several hours a day, as they were bred for endurance. They had to be able to spend long hours working in the field, so their stamina is high. Those with active lifestyles will find their Troller makes an excellent jogging companion, can keep up with bike riders, and will never tire of hiking, especially if there is water nearby.
  Fetching is the Troller's favorite activity and they will fetch sticks and balls for as long as you are willing to toss them. They prefer you toss the sticks and balls into a lake or pond, as they are water dogs who love to swim. If you do not properly exercise your Troller, be prepared for destruction. These dogs will chew, chew, and chew some more when they are bored and have pent up energy to burn off, and you aren't likely to approve of the items they decide to chew in your absence.

Grooming
  The Toller is a wash-and-go dog. His medium-length water-repellent double coat requires only weekly brushing to remove loose hair and prevent mats or tangles. Brush him daily during spring and fall, when he sheds heavily. As with most dogs, there is a certain amount of shedding year-round. Bathe him only as needed, which shouldn’t be more than a few times a year unless he rolls in something stinky.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails regularly, usually every week or two. Keep the ears clean and dry, and brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Tollers love kids and make good playmates for active older children who'll play ball with them, teach them tricks, and otherwise keep them occupied. They may be too rambunctious for very young children.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Tollers enjoy the company of other dogs and get along just fine with cats, especially if they're raised with them.

Is this breed right for you?
  An intelligent and affectionate breed, the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever requires a lot of activity, and not just playing. The breed enjoys retrieving and obedience training, which is advised to avoid behavioral problems. Loving, it gets along well with children and other animals, but it will need a lot of socialization to maintain its happiness. Energetic, the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever does OK with apartment life if it is given daily walks, but it does best with a large yard with a body of water to roam, swim and play fetch in. Since it is an average shedder, it is easy to groom but should be given a regular dry shampoo bath to maintain the natural oils in its coat.

Did You Know?
  The Toller’s red or orange coat gives him a foxlike appearance and has even given rise to the idea that he’s the result of a fox-Retriever cross, but that’s a genetic impossibility.

A dream day in the life
  The Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever would adore to wake up with a nice pat down and session with its owner. Running outside to romp around in the yard, it'll run inside for an affectionate hour of playtime with the kid. After its long daily walk, this breed will go for a swim in the backyard pool or be happy with a game of fetch. In the evening, it'll settle in with its family, running outside to burn off energy whenever it feels the need.


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Wednesday, December 7, 2016

Everything about your Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen

Everything about your Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen
  The Petit Basset Griffon Vendéen is a small scent hound who has won the hearts of millions. Although the dog breed appears to be designed for winsome cuteness, in actuality, PBGVs are tough hunters who were developed for a specific purpose: to hunt small game in the rough terrain of the Vendeen region of France. The breed is known for a merry and outgoing personality.

Overview
  Bred in France to hunt small game such as rabbits, the name Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen means "small Basset with wiry hair from the Vendee district of France." Dating back to the 16th Century, this breed is an active Scenthound. An independent and over-confident breed, he's small with a large ego.
  This short, long-backed rabbit hunter is a merry soul who loves to dig and bark. He's terrific in performance sports like agility. The PGBV is charming, stubborn, active, and wildly enthusiastic about everything, especially you. He would rather hunt than come to you, though.

Highlights
  • PBGVs are charming and strong-headed. Consistent, patient training is essential.
  • PBGVs can be stubborn and difficult to housebreak. Crate training is recommended.
  • This breed likes to bark. Don't be surprised by the PBGV that has plenty to say.
  • PBGVs have a lot of energy and stamina. They need exercise every day. They enjoy a good long walk, but don't turn them off leash because you never know when their hunting instincts will kick in.
  • PBGVs are escape artists!
  • The nose rules! Like all hounds, the PBGV is driven by his nose.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • The PBGV is not related to the Basset Hound. He is lighter, smaller boned, and more active and agile.
  • The PBGV is distinguished by a rough, unrefined outline and a head that is longer than it is wide. His face is protected from rough brush by a beard and mustache and long eyebrows help protect his large dark eyes. Taken together they give him an alert, friendly, intelligent expression. Long, narrow ears are covered with long hair and hang down, folding inward and ending in an oval shape. The medium-length tail has a slight curve and is carried like a saber. The coat is white with any combination of lemon, orange, black, sable, tricolor or grizzle markings, ensuring that he is easily seen in the field.
  • Comparable Breeds: Basset Hound, Grand Griffon Vendeen

History 
  The PBGV is a French breed, one of many small varieties of French hounds that have existed for centuries. He descends from the larger Griffon Vendeen and dates to the 16th century. The area where he was developed — the Vendeen — was harsh country with thick underbrush, rocky ground, and thorns and brambles. To hunt it called for a bold, tough, determined dog with a lot of stamina and excellent hunting ability. 
  French hunters developed different size dogs to hunt different types of prey. The PBGV was used to trail rabbit and hare and sometimes game birds. He is still a good hunting dog today.
  The Club du Basset Vendeen was formed in 1907. The first breed standard was written by Paul Dezamy, the club’s first president. The standard he wrote applied to both the PBGV and his big brother the Grand Basset Griffon Vendeen. At the time, both sizes could be born in the same litter, and the dogs could be interbred until as late as 1975, although the PBGV did get his own standard in the 1950s.
  The Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen Club of America was founded in 1984 at the American Kennel Club Centennial Dog Show. The AKC recognized the breed in 1991. The PBGV ranks 129th among the dogs registered by the AKC.

Personality
  The Petit Bassset Griffon Vendeen, or PBGV as enthusiasts call them, are happy little dogs that are often chosen to be family companions. Don't let their size or the “Basset” in their name fool you. These little hound dogs are spark plugs – full of energy and a zest for life that isn't matched by many other hound breeds. PBGVs are curious dogs, always sniffing around the house or yard to see what kind of mischief he can get into.

Health 
  The PBGV is generally a healthy and carefree breed. Hereditary eye abnormalities include persistent pupillary membranes and retinal folds, neither of which commonly effect vision. There have been a few cases of glaucoma recently reported, a condition which usually results in blindness. Some juvenile animals may suffer from an aseptic meningitis characterized by lethargy, fever and neck or back pain. This syndrome, known as PBGV pain syndrome, varies in severity among affected animals and in rare instances can be fatal. Seizure disorders and epilepsy are infrequently reported within the breed, as are hip dysplasia, patellar luxation and elbow dysplasia. Hypothyroidism, food allergies and skin allergies have also been reported.

Care
  They should have daily walks to burn off excess energy. They need to be brushed regularly, but not daily, to avoid matting and tangles. To keep the coat well groomed it must be stripped. Hairs must be pulled out of the coat using either a special stripping tool or the finger and thumb. The coat is shallow rooted and is made to come out if trapped, so this grooming method causes no pain. They need regular ear cleanings to prevent yeast infections and clipping of the claws is normally needed once or twice a month.
Part of the charm of a PBGV is its tousled, unkempt appearance.

Living Conditions
  Will do okay in an apartment if sufficiently exercised. They are very active indoors and prefer cooler weather, but will do okay in warmer weather. This is one breed that should not be allowed to be off lead. The hunting instinct is too strong. All that is needed is one small scent and your hunter will be off on the chase. Having a secure, fenced-in yard is a very good idea. The PBGV like to dig and can be great escape artists. Watch for small holes and/or signs of interest along the fence line. He would as soon go under as he would to go over.

Trainability
  PBGVs are classic hounds dogs, which can make them a challenge to train. They are willful and stubborn and don't like to be told what to do, but like other hounds will do almost anything for a treat. Training should begin early to establish leadership, and sessions should be kept short to accommodate the PBGVs often short attention span. Consistency is important, as they will walk all over a trainer who bends the rules, even once.
  PBGVs can not be trusted off leash in an unfenced yard. These little guys will take off after squirrels or rabbits and will completely ignore your calls to return home. Even the most obedient PBGV has a one-track mind once he's spotted. Once basic obedience has been mastered, PBGV's should graduate on to agility training. This activity can burn off excess energy while allowing the dog to use his mind, which is important to this thinking breed.

Activity Requirement
  Petit Basset Griffon Vendeens are small, but they are active dogs who require vigorous exercise to maintain health, happiness and an even temperament. Daily walks and the opportunity to run and stretch their legs are a minimum. Their size makes them appealing to apartment dwellers, but a commitment needs to be made to exercise your PBGV extensively.
  Mental stimulation is also important to the PBGV's temperament. When bored or lonely, they will find ways to entertain themselves, which usually involves destructive behavior. It is important to give your PBGV interesting things to do during the day. Advanced training on the agility course can also help keep their minds active while also providing physical exercise.

Grooming
 The PBGV’s rough coat has a harsh texture and a thick, short undercoat. It is long, but not excessively so. The result is a dog with a natural, casual, tousled appearance.
  The PBGV’s coat needs a minimum of grooming. Brush it weekly to remove any dead hair and tangles, and neaten stray hairs in front of the eyes as needed. Other than that, just keep his ears clean, his teeth brushed and his nails trimmed. He's definitely meant to be a no-fuss dog, but it doesn’t hurt to wipe his beard after he eats or drinks to help keep it clean.   And because he likes to dig and run through brush and otherwise get dirty, you may find yourself bathing him on a pretty regular basis.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually once a month. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.   Check the ears weekly for dirt, redness or a bad odor that can indicate an infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with a gentle, pH-balanced ear cleaner recommended by your veterinarian. You may also have to pluck hair from the ear canals to allow air to circulate and make it easier to remove wax and dirt. Start grooming a PBGV puppy at an early age so he becomes used to it and accepts it willingly.

Children And Other Pets
  The friendly PBGV loves children. He enjoys the noise and activity associated with children. Adults should always supervise interactions between children and pets; this is especially important with the PBGV is ensure that gates or doors are not left open, giving him an opportunity to escape.
  The PBV can be trustworthy with other pets, given proper training and socialization. He especially enjoys the companionship of other dogs. He is a hunter at heart, though, and is likely to chase small animals that run away.

Is this breed right for you?
  Best for families with older children, this breed needs a lot of activity and exercise. Known for hunting and trailing, this dog does best with a house and a fenced-in yard. Although he may do well in an apartment due to his size, he can be loud if he doesn't have enough to keep him busy. Overconfident with a knack for digging, he'll need an owner that provides him with a strict home and good leadership skills. A smart pup, he'll train well and will soon have a desire to please his master.

Did You Know?
  The word “Griffon” is French and is applied to dogs with shaggy or wiry coats. Taken altogether the breed’s name describes him exactly: Petit (small), Basset (low to the ground), Griffon (rough-coated) Vendeen (the area of France where he originated). For short, he is variously called the PBGV, Petit, Griff or Roughie.

Crufts 2013
Soletrader Peek A Boo, winner of Crufts 2013
  Winner of the world's biggest dog show, Crufts, in 2013, the four-year-old Soletrader Peek A Boo ("Jilly") beat more than twenty thousand dogs to take the coveted title. She won the Hound Group on the first day of the show and then proceeded to win Best of Show on the fourth day. Jilly was previously Reserve Best of Show at Crufts in 2011.

A dream day in the life of a Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen
  Beginning his day with a sniff around the home, he'll inspect every element of the house before going down to greet his master. Confidently strolling into the kitchen, he'll happily sit in front of his bowl as he awaits his first meal of the day. After a brisk walk, a sniff of the terrain and happily leading his master along, he'll return home to show the family who's boss. Playing with his favorite rope toy and stuffed animal while you're away, he'll go into the yard to dig up the smell of game. After a nap in the sun, he'll know that you'll soon be home to greet and praise him for a day well spent.



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