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Showing posts with label energic. Show all posts
Showing posts with label energic. Show all posts

Wednesday, December 27, 2017

Everything about your Alaskan Klee Kai

Everything about your Alaskan Klee Kai
  The Alaskan Klee Kai was developed fairly recently by a woman in Alaska who took a strong interest in a small dog resembling a Husky. Over time other breeders became interested in furthering the development of the Alaskan Klee Kai; however, it is still considered a rare breed.

Overview
  Small, smart, and energetic, the Alaskan Klee Kai is a relatively new breed that looks like a smaller version of the Siberian Husky, and even the name “Klee Kai” comes from an Inuit term meaning “small dog.” While Alaskan Klee Kais may resemble larger Husky breeds, they have some key differences, especially when it comes to temperament, that distinguish it from its ancestor working class dogs of the north. 
  This breed is more suited to the life of a companion, though the Alaskan Klee Kai shares the high energy of the Huskies and demands plenty of exercise. They also tend to be shy around strangers and are prone to expressing their emotions with whines and barks. An inexperienced owner would find it difficult to take on the challenge of caring for an Alaskan Klee Kai, but for an owner that keeps up with training and physical activity, this breed is sweet, loyal, and happy to shower loved ones with affection.

Highlights
  • The words "Klee Kai" come from an Inuit term meaning "small dog," which is appropriate for this breed that is a smaller version of its Husky ancestors.
  • The breed hails from Alaska where it was developed in the 1970s and 1980s to be a companion dog, rather than a working sled dog.
  • Although it is not recognized by the American Kennel Club, Alaskan Klee Kais are a recognized breed in the United Kennel Club and the American Rare Breed Association among others.
  • Solid white Alaskan Klee Kais do exist, but breed standards do not include this coat color.
  • Although they can shed a lot, Alaskan Klee Kais do not require much grooming and mostly take care of themselves.
  • Because they are skittish around strangers, these dogs require early socialization training that should last for the rest of their lives if they are to be friendly to unfamiliar faces.
  • The high prey drive of the Alaskan Klee Kai may make them ill suited for homes with other small pets such as cats, rabbits, hamsters, etc. Though they love their human families, small children that are not taught how to interact with dogs may inadvertently hurt Alaskan Klee Kais during play or provoke them to nip or snap.
Breed standards

Dog Breed Group: Companion Dogs
UKC group: Northern Breed
Average lifespan: 12-15 years
Average size: 10 to 15 pounds
Coat appearance: Double coat
Coloration: red and white, black and white, or gray and white, though solid white 
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: families with older children, apartment, houses with/without yards, active singles and seniors
Temperament: Intelligent, energetic, loyal, curious
Comparable Breeds: Siberian Husky, American Eskimo Dog

History
  The breed was developed in Wasilla, Alaska, from the early 1970s to 1988 by Linda S. Spurlin and her family. The breed was developed with Siberian and Alaskan Huskies, using Schipperke and American Eskimo Dog to bring down the size without dwarfism. She bred these dogs in private until she released them to the general public in 1988. Originally called the Klee Kai, the breed split into Alaskan Klee Kai and Klee Kai for political reasons in 1995. 
  The breed consolidated as its current name in 2002. Though a relatively new breed the Alaskan Klee Kai has a rich history. They are extremely energetic and intelligent, and their northern heritage is evident in their appearance. In contrast to Siberian Huskies, which were originally bred as sled dogs, the Alaskan Klee Kai were bred as companion dogs. The Alaskan Klee Kai was officially recognized by the American Rare Breed Association  in 1995 and by the United Kennel Club  on January 1, 1997.



Personality
  Alaskan Klee Kais are intelligent, energetic, and loving to their families. They don't much care for strangers and require lifelong socialization training if they are to be friendly to new people. Their wariness of new faces does, however, make them excellent watchdogs. When it comes to training, Alaskan Klee Kais are quick to pick up on basic commands and may even find themselves at the top of the class. 
  They are eager to please and highly food motivated, and they are more than capable of taking on agility training, which can help burn off some of their high energy throughout the day. Once they have at least a good, long walk and a healthy play session, they're usually happy to spend the rest of the day being couch potatoes, but neglect their exercise needs, and they may become bored, anxious, and destructive. Be careful on walks, as these dogs have a high prey drive that may cause them to bolt if they see wildlife. Alaskan Klee Kais love to be the centers of attention in their families, but they will also be vocal when their needs are not being met. Though they do not tend to be overly mouthy and are generally quieter than their Husky forbears, they will bark and whine to express their displeasure, and they can be sensitive.

Health
  The Alaskan Klee Kai is considered to be quite a healthy breed with few genetic problems. However, owners should be aware that the breed is predisposed to certain conditions that they should keep an eye out for, including luxating patella, thyroid disease, heart conditions, liver shunts, factor VII deficiency, and cataracts. They may also keep their baby teeth, which can cause problems when adult teeth grow in. They may need to have these teeth removed.

Care
  When it comes to Alaskan Klee Kai care, it is very important to make sure their exercise needs are met, as they may become high strung and anxious if they do not have an outlet to burn off energy. Like any dog breed, they require regular teeth brushings, nail clippings, and ear cleanings. You should ask your veterinarian about your dog's specific needs.

Living Conditions
  Because of their size, these dogs can live in an apartment, but a house with at least a small yard is recommended.

Training
  Due to its high intelligence, the Alaskan Klee Klai typically responds well to training. These dogs are quick learners and they enjoy being given a task to complete. For this reason, Alaskan Klee Klais excel in obedience training as well as agility – agility training also gives the dog a way to exercise its brain as well as its body. Because this breed is prone to developing Small Dog Syndrome, it is essential that you start training early and that you maintain a firm and consistent hand.

Exercise Requirements
  The Alaskan Klee Klai is a very active and energetic breed that requires a significant amount of daily exercise. This breed can be adaptable to apartment life but you will need to take the dog for a long walk on a daily basis. Regular playtime is also encouraged to help this breed work off its energy.

Grooming
  Unlike many other breeds, Alaskan Klee Kais do not usually develop a dog odor, and they generally like to groom themselves, so they may not need to bathe as frequently as some other dogs. They will likely need regular brushing during the seasons in which their coats blow out, which happens before summer and winter. During this time, they tend to shed profusely, while they only shed moderately the rest of the year.

Children And Other Pets
  The Alaskan Klee Kai is a dedicated family dog that loves its humans, even children. However, they are small dogs, and children that are very young are not always taught how to interact with animals. They may injure or provoke Alaskan Klee Kais to nip. Children should always be supervised when playing with dogs, and the Alaskan Klee Kai is no exception to that rule. 
  Alaskan Klee Kais are usually good with other dogs, especially if they have been socialized early on, though they have a high prey drive. This makes them ill suited for homes that have smaller pets unless they are specifically trained to live with them.

Is the Alaskan Klee Kai the Right Breed for you?
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Moderately Easy Training: The Alaskan Klee Kai is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.
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Monday, July 31, 2017

Everything about your French Spaniel

Everything about your French Spaniel
  French Spaniels very much enjoy the company of their owners. They are gentle with children, making great pets. Rustic looking, relatively tall and powerfully built, the French Spaniel trains well but is easily intimidated; training should be gentle, firm and consistent. They need human companionship and lots of exercise.

Overview
  The French Spaniel is one of the two tallest spaniel breeds, being taller than the English Springer Spaniel. Males can range in height from 22–24 inches, and females are about an inch shorter. Dogs can range in weight from 45–60 pounds . A normal dog has a muscular appearance with a deep chest and strong legs. The French Spaniel has eyes of a dark amber colour, and a thick tail that tapers towards the tip. The hair is medium, dense, with long feathers on the ears, backs of the legs and tail. It has some waviness on the chest and otherwise lies flat on the body. The normal colour of a French Spaniel's coat is white with brown markings rather in shade from a light cinnamon to dark liver.
  The French Spaniel has a friendly and outgoing personality and is well balanced and patient. It is not a naturally aggressive dog, is eager to please and thus can be trained easily. A dog of this breed will form a strong bond with its master, being typically a working dog. It has a high level of stamina and requires vigorous exercise.

Breed standards
AKC group: FSS. The AKC Foundation Stock Service (FSS) is an optional recording service for purebred dogs that are not yet eligible for AKC registration.
UKC group: Gun Dog
Average lifespan: 10-12 years
Average size:  45 to 60 lbs
Coat appearance: Fine, Long, Short, Silky, and Wavy
Coloration: Liver & White
Hypoallergenic: No
Temperament: Energetic, Intelligent, Loving

History
  Spaniels were first mentioned in France during the 14th century in Gaston III of Foix-Béarn's work Livre de chasse, later translated into English as The Master of Game.They were speculated to have originated during the Crusades of the 11th century.The French Spaniel was referred to as a specific type of Spaniel by 1660 and was noted as being distinctive from the King Charles Spaniel of the Holland type.
A drawing of a French Spaniel
being used to hunt Mallards from 1805.

  The breed was popular during the Middle Ages with it used for falconry and as a settling dog for net hunting. They became a favourite of French Royalty and Kings and Princes at the royal courts of Versailles favored them over other breeds of hunting dogs. In addition, Catherine I of Russia (1684–1727) was known to have owned a French Spaniel named Babe. During this period, the French Spaniel was known to have split into several regional types.
  The Sporting Magazine wrote of the French Spaniel and the hunting of mallards in 1805, "The rough French Spaniel has been found the best companion on these occasions: he watches the conduct of the sportsman, and, with a velocity unequalled, darts on the wounded prey, presents it with all possible speed at the feet of his master." In the 1850s, the Brittany (formerly known as Brittany Spaniel) was developed from crossing French Spaniels with English Setters.
  James de Connick established the first breed standard for the French Spaniel in 1891. At the turn of the 20th century, the numbers of French Spaniels dropped so low that they nearly became extinct due to competition from foreign sporting dogs, in particular as French hunters chose to hunt particularly with English breeds of hunting dogs. A French priest named Father Fournier undertook the task of gathering the remaining French Spaniels in his Saint Hillaire kennels in order to preserve the breed. There he built the lineages that are representatives of those we now have. The French Spaniel Club was founded in 1921, with Father Fournier as the president of the association.
  The modern French Spaniel is one of a group of recognised French Spaniels, including the Brittany, Picardy and Blue Picardy.



Temperament
  Calm, even-tempered and intelligent, French Spaniels very much enjoy the company of their owners. They are gentle with children, making great pets. Rustic looking, relatively tall and powerfully built, the French Spaniel trains well but is easily intimidated; training should be gentle, firm and consistent. They need human companionship and lots of exercise. Known and appreciated for its hunting skills, the French Spaniel works very well on rugged terrain and in the water as a flusher. French Spaniels are one of the best retrievers and point very precisely. Hunting at a gallop or extended trot, the French Spaniel has an excellent nose, but has less speed and a more limited search range than the Brittany Spaniel.
  They are enthusiastic hunting dogs, persistent, hardy and courageous. This breed gets along well with other dogs. It is important owners are even-tempered, but firm and consistent with the rules set upon the dog. It is also equally important, when the dog is not hunting, that he receives daily pack walks where he heels beside the handler during the walk. When a dog is lacking in either leadership and or proper mental/physical exercise it causes separation anxiety.

Health

  The breed is robustly healthy with few issues and adapts well to wet weather conditions. A dermatological condition known as acral mutilation and analgesia may affect French Spaniels. It is a newly recognised disorder, with symptoms becoming apparent between three and a half months and a year of age. 
  It was first reported in thirteen dogs in Canada and shares symptoms with the acral mutilation syndromes of the German Shorthaired Pointer, English Pointer and English Springer Spaniels. Dogs who are affected will lick, bite and mutilate their extremities resulting in ulcers with secondary bacterial infections. Self amputation of claws, digits and footpads can happen in extreme cases. The majority of the initial dogs identified were euthanised within days to months of being diagnosed.

Care and Grooming
  The French Spaniel is an easy to groom breed, it is best to brush the dog twice a week in order to maintain its good look. Regular brushing twice a week of the medium-length, flat coat is really all that is needed to keep it in good condition. Bathe or dry shampoo when necessary. It is generally a low-maintenance dog. Check the ears carefully, especially when the dog has been out in rough or brushy terrain. This breed is a light shedder.

Living Conditions
 The French Spaniel is not recommended for apartment life. They are very active indoors and will do best with acreage. This breed is resistant to cold and damp conditions.

Training
  Though, being intelligent it will rather easy to train, but sometimes can be intimidating, so it shall require very consistent and firm training. It may highly energetic, courageous, non aggressive and eager to please the owner, so it learns obediently. But training should be firm, moderate and consistent. It is very active and vigorous dog that will need an active and potent owner.

Exercise
  Not a breed for apartment livings, it is highly energetic and active indoor so it can do well in a large yards or rural settings with ample areas to run or to do a job. Being a working dog, it likes the daily exercise in order to maintain its best health and fitness. It has a great stamina; therefore, they need ample amount of exercises for their mental and physical satisfaction. Daily exercises include run, jog and long walks with owners.

French Spaniel with children and other pets
  Naturally, it is a non- aggressive breed, but it can intimidating, so it should well trained to resolve the intimidating. It can get along with other dogs. Mild, calm and friendly to the children, thus it forms a wonderful family dog.

Things You Should Know
  This people-oriented breed may suffer from separation anxiety, which can be resolved with patience and training. Keep in mind this dog’s gentle nature, and use positive reinforcement techniques with lots of praise. However, you must still establish yourself as the kind but firm alpha.

Is the French Spaniel Right For You?
  French Spaniels very much enjoy the company of their owners. They are gentle with children, making great pets. Rustic looking, relatively tall and powerfully built, the French Spaniel trains well but is easily intimidated; training should be gentle, firm and consistent
  French Spaniels tend to live indoors but are not suitable for small homes such as apartments. Indoors they tend to be very active but thrive with outdoor space and are resistant to cold and damp conditions. They need daily exercise and have great staminaand endurance, and so make great hiking companions.


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Friday, July 7, 2017

Everything about your Yorkipoo

Everything about your Yorkipoo
  A Yorkipoo is a mix of a Yorkshire Terrier and a Toy Poodle or Miniature Poodle, or more rarely the offspring of two Yorkie/Poodle mixes. At his best, the Yorkipoo is friendly, playful, smart, and cute as all get out. His small stature makes him best suited to a home with adults or older children.

Overview
  The Yorkipoo loves people and fun, not necessarily in that order. He will delight his family and is always willing to perform tricks or show off for any visitor. His confidence keeps him from being overly snappy or aggressive; he's happy in his own skin. The Yorkipoo can be an excellent companion to anyone looking for a small, confident dog with ample energy and even greater love.
  Like most of the Poodle hybrids, the Yorkipoo was originally designed to be a companion dog who could reside with allergy sufferers. 
  The Yorkipoo has low-dander, a low-shedding coat, and the small size of a toy breed. He's happy in many different types of homes and can make an excellent companion for the elderly. With his gentle and loving disposition, the Yorkipoo has proven that he can be a successful therapy dog.
  The Yorkipoo enjoys barking just a little too much  and generally makes an excellent watchdog. He'll alert bark when someone comes to the door or when he sees anything suspicious. Some Yorkipoos can be trained to only bark once or twice, but many cannot.

Highlights
  • The Yorkipoo is a designer dog and is the result of Yorkshire Terrier to Toy or Miniature Poodle breedings. There's been an increase in multigenerational breeding (Yorkipoo to Yorkipoo), and also in Yorkipoo to Poodle or Yorkipoo to Yorkshire Terrier breeding; but many litters are first generation, the result of breeding two purebred parents.
  • A Yorkipoo is active and energetic, as are both Poodles and Yorkies. He requires daily exercise and does well with a good walk or romp in the yard.
  • Barking is a favorite pastime. Occasionally a Yorkipoo can be trained to bark less, but expect to hear the noise whenever someone comes to the door. He has no clue that his bark doesn't terrify anyone.
  • He is a non- to low-shedder and can make an excellent companion for people with allergies.
  • Daily brushing is needed to keep his fine, silky coat free of tangles and mats.
  • Loving and gentle, the Yorkipoo can make an excellent companion to older, more considerate children. Like most toy breeds, he's not recommended for homes with very young children.
  • He's easy to train if you use positive reinforcement. He's got a stubborn streak, though, so expect some occasional resistance.
  • The Yorkipoo can live very happily in an apartment.
  • A companion dog, he may suffer from separation anxiety when left alone for long periods at a time.
Other Quick Facts

  • Yorkipoos can be many different colors and patterns, from the blue and gold of the Yorkie to the many solid colors of the Poodle to a color plus white, known as particolor.
Breed standards
AKC group, UKC group: Not Applicable,Not recognized as a standardized breed by any major kennel club.
Average lifespan: 12-15 years
Weight: 8 to 15 pounds
Coat appearance: Medium, Silky, and Slightly Wavy
Coloration: Varies
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Families with children, singles and seniors, apartments, houses with/without yards
Temperament: Energetic, lively, playful, good-natured
Comparable Breeds: Poodle, Yorkshire Terrier

History
  Like many designer breeds, the Yorkipoo is quite a young hybrid — he's been popular for about a decade. He was originally developed to create a toy-sized dog who had a hypoallergenic coat and was free of the genetic disorders that affected the parent breeds, the Yorkshire Terrier and the Toy or Miniature Poodle.
The success of crossing the Poodle with the Yorkshire Terrier has had mixed results, as with any hybrid; but the popularity of the Yorkipoo has grown. Today, most Yorkipoo litters are still the result of first-generation breeding, but some breeders have concentrated on multigenerational crosses in an effort to see the Yorkipoo produce offspring who confirm more consistently to the desired traits.
  There are no breed groups or registries for the Yorkipoo, but efforts have begun to create a direction for all Yorkipoo breeders.

Temperament
  If bred from parents of sound temperament and adequately socialized in puppyhood, the yorkipoo is likely to be a confident, loving, playful companion combining terrier boldness and poodle intelligence. Yorkipoos require mental stimulation and social interaction, and enjoy activities like dog agility and learning tricks.
  For their size, yorkipoos are rather energetic. However, their energy is easily expended within the confines of an apartment. Therefore, they do not require the sort of exercise regime that larger dogs need. Yorkipoos are very social dogs. Unlike yorkies and other purebred toys, however, they do not long for constant physical contact. Yorkipoos have no objections to cuddling up on a lap but are also content to simply be nearby. Yorkipoos are generally not aggressive and tend to "greet strangers as if they were long lost friends."
  Yorkipoos are smart enough to be trained and take marked pride in learning new commands. They respond best to positive reinforcement, as opposed to negative reinforcement or punishment. When faced with negative reinforcement or punishment, yorkipoos respond with stubbornness. The greatest hurdle to training a yorkipoo is barking.   Although they do not tend to sit and yip for no reason, they will almost unfailingly bark when someone knocks at the door. It is unknown if this is to warn that someone is approaching or out of sheer glee to encounter another person.

Heath 
  A newly developed crossbreed, the Yorkiepoo is predisposed to the health problems that effect both Yorkshire Terriers and Poodles. These can include cataracts, retinal detachment, dry eye, corneal dystrophy, keratitis, hypoglycemia, progressive retinal atrophy and endocardiosis.

Care
  The Yorkipoo is equally at home in a house or an apartment. He's far too small to live outside; he must live indoors for both his physical and emotional well-being. He requires daily exercise, since he has a surprising amount of energy . A daily walk or romp in the yard will provide enough exercise to keep him healthy and happy. The Yorkipoo can also burn off steam by playing a game of fetch down a hallway.
  Crate training benefits every dog and is a kind way to ensure that your Yorkipoo doesn't have accidents in the house or get into things he shouldn't. A crate is also a place where he can retreat for a nap. Crate training at a young age will help your Yorkipoo accept confinement if he ever needs to be boarded or hospitalized.
  Never stick your Yorkipoo in a crate all day long, however. It's not a jail, and he shouldn't spend more than a few hours at a time in it except when he's sleeping at night. Yorkipoos are people dogs, and they aren't meant to spend their lives locked up in a crate or kennel.

Training
  An easily trainable dog, the Yorkiepoo is eager to please his owners. Positive training methods should always be used while working with this crossbreed. Excided praise and delectable tidbits will produce better results than harsh words or aggressive methods.   Yorkie-Poos can quickly learn basic commands but can also learn typical parlor tricks such as crawl, play dead and dance. His enthusiasm and desire to entertain will keep your family and friends entertained and laughing!
  This crossbreed has the potential to become great obedience prospects as well as agility and therapy dogs. There is no doubt that the Yorkie-Poo can be highly competitive in a variety of dog sports.

Exercise Requirements
  Yorkie-Poos do not require an excessive amount of exercise. They are lively and are happy to play but a brisk walk around the block is really all he needs to keep him fit, trim and healthy. A fenced yard is also great and the Yorkie-Poo will happily chase a ball or other toy and run like a little maniac! His minimal need for exercise makes this crossbreed an excellent pet for many living situations.

Grooming
  Yorkipoos usually have a slightly scruffy coat, although it can also, like the Poodle’s coat, be curly. A Yorkipoo’s grooming needs will vary depending on his coat, but all Yorkipoos need regular, even daily, brushing. Those with the curlier Poodle coat require grooming every four to six weeks. Some owners learn to use the clippers and do the job themselves, but most rely on professional groomers. Either way, it’s essential to take proper care of the coat, because without regular grooming it will quickly become a matted mess that can cause painful skin infections at the roots of the hair.
  Your Yorkipoo’s ears need to be kept clean and dry to help minimize wax, so clean them regularly with an ear cleaning solution recommended by your veterinarian. The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  The Yorkipoo is a gentle and loving dog who can do well with children. He's not recommended for homes with very young children, since he can be easily injured when improperly handled. A Yorkipoo can make an excellent companion for an older, more considerate child.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  In general, he does well with other dogs and pets. He may display prey drive due to his Yorkie parent, however. That may lead him to chase smaller pets and cats, but usually it's in good fun.

Is the Yorkiepoo the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  Crossbred puppies like the Yorkipoo — even within the same litter — can look very different from each other and can look the same as or different from their parents. The Yorkipoo is usually extremely small, but his size, color, coat, temperament, activity level, and health risks can vary depending on the traits an individual puppy inherited from his parents.




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Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Everything about your Bearded Collie

Everything about your Bearded Collie
  Lovingly referred to as the Beardie, the Bearded Collie is an intelligent, curious-looking dog breed that loves to play with children. Thought to be originally from Britain, it later spent some time in Scotland as a sheep and cattle herder before coming to America. The Bearded Collie is now mostly bred for dog shows, though it makes an excellent family companion.

Overview
  The Bearded Collie is one of Scotland furriest and loyal imports.  Cheerful and happy-go-lucky, the Beardie, as this breed is affectionately called, is affectionate, playful and lively. A wonderful playmate for children and a friend for life, the Bearded Collie loves to be near its family. Smart, strong and focused, this breed is still a staple on Great Britain farms as it puts in a solid day’s work and never complains .
  One of the things you’ll notice about the Beardie is that it has a bounce in its step, which can no doubt be attributed to its exuberant and high-energy personality. But even though this dog is bubbly and boisterous, it can also be stubborn and strong-willed as well. Read on to learn if the Bearded Collie is the right fit for your lifestyle.

Highlights
  • Beardies don't like to be confined and may become nuisance barkers if frequently left alone.
  • Beardies require about an hour of exercise daily in a fenced area where they can run.
  • Beardies can be headstrong, so obedience training is a must. Start early!
  • Bearded Collies will bark to let you know people are approaching, but they are not guard dogs of any kind.
  • A bored Beardie is an excellent escape artist!
  • The Bearded Collie coat requires weekly brushing, more during their annual shedding season.
  • Some Beardies can react to monthly heartworm preventive. Discuss this with your veterinarian to decide whether a daily preventive is a better choice.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from a backyard breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Beardie is a medium-size dog with a rectangular body and a shaggy coat that can be black, blue, brown or fawn, with or without white markings.
  • A Beardie’s eyes are the same tone as his coat color, so black and brown dogs have brown eyes while blue dogs have grayish-blue eyes. Fawn-colored Beardies have an unusual light-brown eye with a touch of hazel or lavender.
Breed standards
AKC Classification: Herding
UKC Classification: Herding Dog 
Energy Level: Very Energetic
Longevity Range: 12-14 yrs.
Height: 20-26 inches
Weight: 40-60 pounds
Coat:  long double coat with furnishings
Color: black, blue, brown, or fawn with white or tan markings.
Comparable Breeds: Briard, Old English Sheepdog

History
  The Bearded Collie's history is a combination of fact and legend. Kazimierz Grabski, a Polish merchant, reportedly traded a shipment of grain for sheep in Scotland in 1514 and brought six Polish Lowland Sheepdogs to move them. A Scottish shepherd was so impressed with the herding ability of the dogs that he traded several sheep for several dogs. The Polish sheepdogs were bred with local Scottish dogs to produce the Bearded Collie.
  It is generally agreed that Mrs. G. Olive Willison founded the modern Bearded Collie in 1944 with her brown bitch, Jeannie of Bothkennar. Jeannie was supposedly a Shetland Sheepdog, but Mrs. Willison received a Bearded Collie by accident. She was so fascinated by the dog that she wanted to begin breeding, so she began searching for a dog for Jeannie. While walking along the beach, Mrs. Willison met a man who was emigrating from Scotland; she became the owner of his grey dog, David, who became Bailie of Bothkennar.
  Bailie and Jeannie of Bothkennar are the founders of the modern breed; there are only a few other registrable blood lines, preserved in large part by the perseverance of Mr. Nicolas Broadbridge  and Mrs. Betty Foster. These are based on Turnbull's Blue—a Bearded Collie from pure working stock, registered in ISDS when ISDS still registered non-Border Collies. He sired three litters of registerable Bearded Collies.
  The breed became popular during the last half of the 20th century—propelled, in part, by Potterdale Classic at Moonhill, a Bearded Collie who won Best in Show at Crufts in 1989. The Bearded Collie Club celebrated its Golden Jubilee in 2005.The bearded collie is also very good natured and is good as a family pet and a working dog and a show dog.

Personality
  A Beardie is smart, resourceful, and confident. His bouncy, bubbly personality makes him fun to be with, but when it comes to training he can be an independent thinker who likes to have his own way. He's a boisterous playmate for children and has a sense of humor that makes him a joy to be around.
  When choosing a Beardie puppy, remember that temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner.
  Temperament varies in individual dogs. Some Beardies are sweet and quiet, while others are loud and enthusiastic. Tell the breeder what you're looking for in a dog, and she can help you choose the puppy that will fit your personality and lifestyle.
  Always meet at least one of the parents to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.

Health
  Although the Bearded Collie is a healthy breed, some problems owners may be faced with may include Addison’s disease, allergies, autoimmune disorders, cerebrovascular disease, congenital elbow luxation, eye issues, hip dysplasia and hypothyroidism.

Care
  The Beardie is an indoor/outdoor dog. He needs to live inside with his people with access to a yard or fenced acreage where he can run. He's not suited to apartment life. Beardies enjoy being with their people, whether they're indoors or outdoors. They'll be satisfied with a couple of half-hour walks or play sessions with a ball daily.
  Obedience training is a must if you are going to establish order and discipline in your dog's life. Make learning fun, and teach them with positive reinforcement techniques such as food rewards, play, and praise. Bearded Collies do not learn under abusive or harsh conditions. Begin training early and you will obtain excellent results. To ensure that he doesn't accidentally knock over a toddler or older person, teach him to sit for attention.

Living Conditions
  The Bearded Collie is not recommended for apartment life. They are fairly active indoors and will do best with at least an average-sized yard. Beardies can sleep outdoors and make excellent farm dogs. They are also good in windy, rugged or wet areas since the dogs will go out in all weather conditions. It does not like to be confined and should have a place to run off of its lead. The Beardie prefers to be outdoors.

Trainability
  Bearded Collies are trainable and thrive with obedience, agility, herding, utility and/or other performance tasks. Their enthusiastic personality makes them stand out in the conformation show ring as well. Obedience training can be a wonderful performance activity for both owner and dog. However, Beardies do have an independent spirit that can make them challenging to train. They are easily bored, so keeping the training interesting is important.   When done with patience and good attitude, the results of training Bearded Collies can be incredibly rewarding.

Exercise 
  This is a herding dog, so the Bearded Collie needs to be active. It’s what the breed was developed to do, so they need to be put to work. Because it needs to be kept busy, this breed wouldn’t be the best choice for an apartment – the Beardie would do best in a large yard or even in a farming environment.
  Smart and energetic, you’ll want to keep your Bearded Collie happy by keeping it busy. There are plenty of ways to do that. This breed loves the outdoors, so brink it along on a long walk, jog, hike or bike ride. Or take training up a notch and get your dog into agility competitions. Or put your Bearded Collie to work in a way that benefits the community and train it as a therapy dog, a job well suited from this breed. The Beardie has had much success in hospitals, nursing homes and rehabilitation centers.

Grooming
  The glory of the Bearded Collie is his coat. The most difficult part of caring for a Beardie is also his coat. Expect to half an hour to an hour weekly grooming it. Brushing and combing with a pin brush or slicker brush and stainless steel comb will keep his double coat tangle-free. Mist the coat with water or anti-tangle spray before brushing so you don’t damage the hair. It’s a good idea to have the breeder show you how to brush the coat of an adult dog. Bathe your Beardie every six to eight weeks or more often, particularly if (or when) his furry hindquarters become soiled with feces.
  Along with time devoted to coat care, be prepared for dirt, mud and debris tracked in on the dog’s furry feet. A light trim may lessen the mess a bit and gives the feet a neat appearance.
If you groom him regularly, the Beardie shouldn’t shed much, but he goes through a heavier shed each year that lasts two to four weeks. They also shed heavily during a two- to three-month period when their puppy coat is coming out and their adult coat is coming in.     Grooming a puppy takes very little time at all, but you want to start early so he can become accustomed to sitting still while you work on his coat.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually once a month. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath. Check the ears weekly for dirt, redness or a bad odor that can indicate an infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with a gentle ear cleaner recommended by your veterinarian.

Children And Other Pets
  Full of bounce, humor, and energy, Beardies are excellent playmates for kids. Of course, it's important to teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Beardies get along well with other dogs and cats if they're introduced to them early, although they can be possessive of their toys. "Mine, all mine" is their motto. They always enjoy a game of chase, so they do best with cats that stand their ground rather than turn tail and run.

Did You Know?
  Beardie puppies are born dark, and it’s not always clear what color they will be when they grow up. The coat lightens as they mature and then starts to darken again when they are 12 to 18 months old. The coat may not reach its final color until the dog is four years or older.

In popular culture
  • The role of Nana in the original production of the James Barrie play Peter Pan was performed by a Bearded Collie.
  • Cole, is a Bearded Collie and is featured in the 2006 film, The Shaggy Dog.
  • A Bearded Collie is also featured in the 2009 film, Hotel for Dogs.

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Friday, May 2, 2014

Everything about your Miniature Schnauzer

Everything about your Miniature Schnauzer
  Known for his distinguished, handsome appearance, the Miniature Schnauzer is characterized by its whiskers and double coat, which has a hard, wiry outer coat and close, soft undercoat.   Coat colors can be salt and pepper, black and silver and solid black.  Despite his small stature, the Miniature Schnauzer can give an alarm just as well as a larger dog.  That, combined with his naturally protective nature, makes him an excellent watchdog.   He is also the most popular of the three Schnauzer breeds, which include the Giant and the Standard.
  He a dog breed who's got it all in one small package: intelligence, affection, an extroverted temperament, humor, and a personality that's twice as big as he is. Throw in that walrus moustache and quivering enthusiasm, and he'll make you laugh every day. With a Miniature Schnauzer in the house, you'll never be alone, not even when you go to the bathroom. He's got personality-plus, and whether he's bounding around ahead of you or curled up snoozing on your lap, you'll never be bored with him around.

Overview
 The miniature schnauzer is a robust, sturdily built terrier of nearly square proportion. It was developed as a ratter and is quick and tough. Its gait displays good reach and drive. Its coat is double, with a close undercoat, and hard, wiry, outer coat which is longer on the legs, muzzle and eyebrows. Its facial furnishings add to its keen expression. 
  The miniature schnauzer deserves its place as one of the most popular terrier pets. It is playful, inquisitive, alert, spunky and companionable. It is a well-mannered house dog that also enjoys being in the middle of activities. It is less domineering than the larger schnauzers and less dog-aggressive than most terriers. It is also better with other animals than most terriers, although it will gladly give chase. It is clever and can be stubborn, but it is generally biddable. It enjoys children. Some may bark a lot.

Breed standards
AKC group: Terrier
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 12-15 years
Average size: 13-15 lbs
Coat appearance: Hard, wiry, glossy
Coloration: Black, gray, silver
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Other identifiers: Square body frame; small and compact build; outer coat longer on the legs, muzzle and eyebrows.
Comparable Breeds: Airedale Terrier, Giant Schnauzer
Other Quick Facts
  Miniature Schnauzers shed only a tiny bit, and might be a good choice for some people who are typically allergic to dogs. However, it's not a dog’s hair that triggers allergies, but dander (dead skin flakes) and saliva. There’s no escaping any of those when you live with a dog, no matter what breed it is. The best advice for an allergic person is to spend some up-close and personal time around the breed to assure themselves that there won't be a problem living with them.

  Despite his small stature, the Miniature Schnauzer is not a lap dog. He’s athletic and energetic, and needs more daily exercise than just going around the block.



Highlights
  • The Miniature Schnauzer is people-oriented and wants nothing more than to hang out with you. He's incredibly affectionate.
  • A Miniature Schnauzer is intelligent, mischievous, and often stubborn. He's full of life.
  • He's low-shedding, but high-maintenance in terms of grooming. He needs to be clipped every five to eight weeks or so.
  • He's noisy. Protective of home and family, he'll bark even at slight noises.
  • He's good with kids and other dogs, but not to be trusted around small mammals.
  • Always keep your Miniature Schnauzer on a leash when you're not in a fenced area. If he sees something and wants to chase it, he will likely ignore your calls.
  • A bored Miniature Schnauzer is an unhappy Miniature Schnauzer. Because he's intelligent and energetic, he thrives on varied activities and exercise. Make sure that you give him both, or he'll become destructive and ill-tempered.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Is this breed right for you?
  Miniature Schnauzers are highly versatile and known to fit in well in most environments. Whether they are part of a big family with lots of kids or in an apartment with one or two owners, this breed simply loves companionship of any sort. Apartment dwellers should be aware that this is a very vocal breed, and unless training starts early on, you may have barking issues to work through. This highly intelligent breed does very well with training, from basic commands to more advanced teachings. Owners must dedicate ample time and money toward grooming this breed's unique and high-maintenance coat.


Did You Know?
  Miniature Schnauzers can only be shown in American Kennel Club conformation shows in salt and pepper - by far the most common color - black and silver, or black. White Miniature Schnauzers cannot be shown in conformation in the U.S., although they can in some other countries.

History
  Miniature Schnauzers were originally bred to be ratters and guard dogs on farms. They were developed in the mid-to-late 19th century in Germany by crossbreeding the Standard Schnauzer with smaller breeds, such as the Miniature Pinscher, Affenpinscher, and perhaps the Poodle or Pomeranian. In Germany, he's known as the Zwergschnauzer (zwerg means "dwarf").
  There aren't any records on how the Miniature Schnauzer was developed, but it's clear the intent was to create a smaller version of the well-established Standard Schnauzer. The earliest record of a Miniature Schnauzer was a black female named Findel, born in October 1888. In 1895, the first breed club was formed in Cologne, Germany, although it accepted several types of dogs.
  World Wars I and II were hard on dog breeding, particularly in Europe, where some breeds were nearly lost. But interest in Miniature Schnauzers boomed after WWI, and the dog's popularity has never waned since.
  One aspect that has changed since the early days is the preferred colors. You used to be able to find a Schnauzer of almost any size in red, black and tan, yellow, or parti-color — but not today, when shades of black and silver are the rage. Just as feelings about ear cropping shift with the times, the Miniature Schnauzer's look may change again.
  An interesting aside: While the Miniature Schnauzer is considered a Terrier by the AKC, the Standard Schnauzer is classified as a member of the Working group.

Personality
  A Miniature Schnauzer is full of life. An extrovert, he loves to be in the thick of the family action. He may even run up to you while you're sitting down and throw his paws around your neck. He wants to touch you and be next to you all the time, and you can bet he'll want to sleep plastered to your side.
  A bit of a spitfire, the Miniature Schnauzer is a terrier , that means he's full of himself. He's a feisty type A and his work involves amusing himself. He is not aloof or independent but needs to be with people, and what's more, he wants to be in close physical contact. 
  He's very intelligent, which makes training easy, but it also means he's a master of manipulation. That combined with his stubbornness will keep you on your toes. He's not as feisty as some terriers, however, nor as dog-aggressive.
  As with every dog, the Miniature Schnauzer needs early socialization,exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences , when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Miniature Schnauzer puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

Children and other pets
  The Miniature Schnauzer likes hanging out with his people — he lives for it, as a matter of fact. He's good with children, particularly if he's raised with them. He'll play with them and protect them and they'll help each other burn off steam: kids and Miniature Schnauzers are a great combination.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  A Miniature Schnauzer usually plays well with other dogs — he isn't one of those terriers who can't play nicely with others. He typically isn't as aggressive toward other dogs as many other Terriers are, but he is brave and fearless around large dogs, a trait that can get him into trouble. He is large and in charge, at least in his own mind.
  Small mammals such as rats and gerbils, however, aren't good matches for the Miniature Schnauzer, who is hardwired to kill them. Training won't change that; that's what he's bred for.

Health
  The Miniature Schnauzer, with a lifespan of 12 to 14 years, sometimes suffers from health problems like mycobacterium avium infection, cataract and retinal dysplasia. Other major health issues that may affect it are urolithiasis and progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), while some minor health problems include von Willebrand's disease (vWD), myotonia congenita, Schnauzer comedo syndrome, and allergies. A veterinarian may run DNA or eye exams to identify some of these issues.

Care
  The Miniature Schnauzer is active when inside the house, playing with toys and following you from room to room. He loves to have a yard to play in, but he'll do well without one if you give him a long walk every day. He needs 45 minutes of daily exercise — remember, a tired Miniature Schnauzer is a good Miniature Schnauzer.
  Crate training benefits every dog and is a kind way to ensure that your Schnauzer doesn't have accidents in the house or get into things he shouldn't. A crate is also a place where he can retreat for a nap. Crate training at a young age will help your Miniature Schnauzer accept confinement if he ever needs to be boarded or hospitalized.
  Never stick your dog in a crate all day long, however. It's not a jail, and he shouldn't spend more than a few hours at a time in it except when he's sleeping at night.

Grooming
  The Miniature Schnauzer’s grooming needs are fairly extensive. He needs regular clipping or hand stripping. Pets are usually clipped because hand stripping is a time-consuming effort typically reserved for show dogs. Clipping will soften the coat, though, so if you like the hard texture, resign yourself to stripping it.
  Miniature Schnauzers have a double coat. The undercoat is soft and the top coat is wiry. They can either be shaved with an electric clipper by you or a professional, or plucked (hand stripped), which is a labor-intensive process that is best done while he's on your lap watching television.  Most hand strippers do it one section at a time, and do it throughout the year. For some, hand stripping takes too long to be affordable at a professional groomer's. Fortunately, it's not hard to learn to use a clipper, and you can buy the equipment for the equivalent of a few grooming sessions. If you want to learn how to get a typical Miniature Schnauzer cut, check out the AMSC grooming chart.
  Because he’s small, his dental needs can be significant unless care is taken to brush his teeth regularly with a vet-approved pet toothpaste, and schedule dental cleanings with your veterinarian.

A dream day in the life
  This happy go lucky breed is content doing just about anything that involves being with you. The perfect size for a tag-a-long companion, you can bring this friendly pooch just about anywhere. Whether it's at the park playing with other dogs, at a training class learning new tricks or simply snuggling on a cozy lap, the Miniature Schnauzer is easy to please. To keep it extra happy, each day should involve a light coat brushing to prevent uncomfortable mats in its double-coated fur.
  
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