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Showing posts with label dogs breeds. Show all posts
Showing posts with label dogs breeds. Show all posts

Wednesday, December 20, 2017

Everything about your Peruvian Inca Orchid

Everything about your Peruvian Inca Orchid
  The Peruvian Inca Orchid is an exotic blossom from the Andes: a sighthound that comes in hairless and coated varieties. The breed’s name in Quechua, the language of the Incas, translates to “dog without vestments,” or naked dog.

Overview
  The Peruvian Inca Orchid is a breed of dog native to Peru, and although the breed is most famous for being hairless, some breed members are born with a full coat of hair.  A truly ancient dog, Peruvian Inca Orchids were already well-established in their homeland prior to the expansion of the Inca Empire.  The Inca and some of their descendants believed that their hairless dogs possessed spiritual powers, and maintained the breed for many centuries.  
  Although still rarely seen outside of Peru, the dog has been attracting an increasing following in the West, including the United States.  The Peruvian Inca Orchid has been declared a National Patrimony by the government of Peru and is widely considered the country’s national dog.  Like the better known Xoloitzcuintli of Mexico, the Peruvian Inca Orchid comes in three sizes; small, medium and large. 

Other Quick Facts
  • The PIO’s skin or fur can be any color, including black, brown, gray, pink, tan, or white.
  • The PIO is a medium-size sighthound. Hairless and coated dogs can be born in the same litter and differ only in ear carriage, with the coated dogs having semiprick ears.
Breed standards

AKC group: Miscellaneous (The AKC Miscellaneous class is for breeds working towards full AKC recognition.)
UKC group: Sighthound & Pariah
Average lifespan: 11-12 years
Average size: 25-50 lb
Coat appearance: short hair on top of its head, on its feet, and on the tip of its tail
Coloration: chocolate-brown, elephant grey, copper, or mottled
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, apartments, houses with/without backyards
Temperament: Lively, protective, intelligent, affectionate
Comparable Breeds: Xoloitzcuintli, Chinese Crested



History
  This is an ancient breed. Although it is often perceived to be an Incan dog because it is known to have been kept during the Inca Empire , they were also kept as pets in pre-Inca cultures from the Peruvian coastal zone. Ceramic hairless dogs from the Chimú, Moche, and Vicus culture are well known. Depictions of Peruvian hairless dogs appear around 750 A.D. on Moche ceramic vessels and continue in later Andean ceramic traditions.The main area of the Inca Empire (the mountains) is too cold for the natural existence of hairless dogs. While they were commonly eaten in ancient times in the northern coastal areas of Peru the Inca prohibited the consumption of dogs when they conquered that region.
The Spanish conquest of Peru nearly caused the extinction of the breed. The dogs survived in rural areas where the people believed that they held a mystical value, and because of their reputation to treat arthritis.
  In recent years, the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) accepted the breed and adopted an official breed standard. Before that time, in the United States, some enthusiasts created another type of Peruvian hairless dog, the Peruvian Inca Orchid. The Peruvian Inca Orchid is recognized by the AKC, and all recognized dogs are descendants of 13 dogs brought from Peru in the early 20th century. The club UKC also recognized the breed in recent years.

Temperament
  The Peruvian Inca Orchid, also called the “PIO,” is a lively, alert, inquisitive sighthound that plays well with other dogs and is easy to live with. The PIO’s temperament is similar to that of a Whippet. They are loyal and affectionate to their family members and make excellent companions. These are sensitive dogs that are best suited for homes with adults and older children. They are instinctively protective and defensive around unfamiliar people and dogs. Because they are suspicious of strangers, PIOs make good watch dogs and guard dogs. They don’t appreciate being left alone for long periods of time and do best having at least one other canine friend in the family. These are active, agile, athletic animals that probably aren’t the best choice for first-time dog owners. However, with experienced owners, they can be alert guardians and friendly companions all in one package. It is very important to start socializing and training PIOs at an early age, so that they grow into stable, reliable adults. Mature PIOs are generally calm, quiet, smart and somewhat independent. They are devoted to their owners, reserved with strangers, but rarely aggressive.

Health 
  Like other hairless breeds, the Peruvian Inca Orchid can sometimes suffer from various dental issues. This is a result of the hairless gene that sometimes causes the dog to have fewer teeth than other breeds. They also sometimes suffer from epilepsy and pancreas inflammations.
  Peruvian Inca Orchids, like all hairless dogs, are extremely prone to cuts, bruises and skin irritations. Therefore care should be taken to moisturize the dog’s skin regularly to keep it soft and supple.

Living Conditions
  The PIO will do OK in an apartment. A fenced-in yard is recommended as the PIO is a sighthound and may take off chasing a small animal at any time. This breed should live indoors and be protected from the elements. The PIO sunburns very quickly. It should have a sweater in the winter and be kept at a comfortable temperature in the summer. Keep in mind this breed does not have hair to protect it from the weather and is basically naked.

Trainability
  PIOs are smart, alert, attentive and trainable. They usually learn standard obedience commands and household manners fairly easily. They can be a bit rambunctious, but still typically are fast learners, especially when trained with reward-based positive reinforcement techniques rather than harsh, loud verbal or physical corrections. PIOs do best with multiple short, fun training sessions instead of single long training sessions, to prevent boredom, distraction and loss of interest. They can be quite protective of toys, food and people. Consistent training from a young age is necessary to teach PIOs proper doggy etiquette.

Exercise Requirements
  Like any hunting breed, Peruvian Inca Orchids require a great deal of rigorous exercise. They can often run at extremely high speeds for long distances. Responsible owners should make sure that their dogs get enough physical activity each day to drain their energy levels. A failure to do so can often result in an unhappy and sometimes destructive dog.

Grooming 
  The grooming requirements of the Peruvian Inca Orchid are minimal, but there are some special considerations for this hairless breed. If he has furnishings, brush weekly with a very soft brush. Wipe the skin daily with cloth dampened with warm water to remove dirt. A bath with a mild dog shampoo once a week or every few weeks helps keep the skin blemish free. Apply moisturizing lotion daily, or as needed, depending on skin condition and climate. Some hairless breeds are sensitive to lanolin, so ask the breeder what lotion she uses on her dogs.
  His ears need to be checked every week and cleaned if needed, and toenails trimmed every few weeks. Regular tooth brushing with a soft toothbrush and doggie toothpaste keep the teeth and gums healthy. Hairless breeds are prone to sunburn so apply sunscreen  or dress him in a doggie T-shirt.

Is the Peruvian Inca Orchid the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep. No trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Easy Training: The Peruvian Inca Orchid is known to listen to commands and obey its owner. Expect fewer repetitions when training this breed.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  The Spanish conquistadors, who are said to have found these dogs living amidst orchids in Inca homes, called them “perros flora”: flower dogs. They are also sometimes called moonflower dogs, Inca hairless dogs, and Peruvian hairless dogs.

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Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Everything about your Airedale Terrier

Everything about your Airedale Terrier
  Known as the “King of Terriers,” the Airedale is indeed the largest of all terriers. The dog breed originated in the Aire Valley of Yorkshire, and was created to catch otters and rats in the region between the Aire and Wharfe Rivers. An able sporting dog, he became an ideal working dog as well, proving his worth during World War I. Intelligent, outgoing, and confident, the Airedale possesses a wonderful playful streak that delights his owners.

Overview
  Of all the terriers, there may be none that so embody what we imagine this type of dog to be than the Airedale Terrier. An authentic English terrier finds its home in a specific place – Airedale, of all places – but is just as happy to make its home with and your family. Like many terriers, you will find that this dog is capable of a lot of love, a lot of companionship, and can even make an excellent playmate. Its overall attractive coat is hard to resist for the younger members of your family and you’ll find there’s nothing quite like petting a terrier.   There’s a reason, after all, they call Airedale Terriers the so-called king of terriers.
  But is the Airedale Terrier for you? Depending on the type of “dog person” you are, your answer will vary. Each dog breed has its own strengths and weaknesses, and these strengths and weaknesses mean specific breeds can be more suitable to certain types of dog owners. As we learn about the Airedale Terrier, we’ll also learn about the terrier group as a whole and hopefully you’ll just find a little something out about the types of dogs you’d prefer to bring home. Let’s find out more about the Airedale Terrier.

Highlights
  • Like all Terriers, Airedales have a natural inclination for digging , chasing small animals, and barking.
  • The Airedale Terrier is an active collector of human memorabilia. He will pick up just about anything  to add to his stash of treasures.
  • Being a high-energy working dog, the Airedale Terrier needs daily exercise. In general, the he remains active and full of energy throughout his life. He is not suited to apartment life, and needs a home with a large, fenced yard.
  • Chewing is another favorite Airedale habit. He will chew anything, and should be left in a crate or secure kennel with sturdy toys when you are away from home.
  • The Airedale is an independent dog, but he enjoys being a member of a family. He is happiest when inside with his owners, and is not meant to be a backyard dog.
  • Airedale Terriers are very good with children and are fondly called reliable babysitters. However, children and dogs should never be left unsupervised.
  • Grooming is necessary, so plan on paying a professional groomer or learn to groom your Airedale yourself.
  • Training and socialization is essential to teach the Airedale proper canine manners. If he is not used to other dogs and people, he can be quarrelsome.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • The Airedale has a long, flat skull, V-shaped ears that fold over, small dark eyes full of terrier keenness and intelligence, a black nose, and a muscular, squarish body. The tail is carried up but not over the back.
  • The Airedale’s coat is hard, dense and wiry, with a softer undercoat, and comes in both tan and black and tan and grizzle.
Breed standards
AKC group: Terrier
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 10 to 13 years
Average size: 40 to 65 pounds
Coat appearance: Dense and Wire
Coloration: black mixed with gray and white,speckling of red in the black and a small white star on the chest
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Families with older children, active singles and seniors, experienced dog handlers, houses with yards
Temperament: Protective, intelligent, loyal, sensitive
Comparable Breeds: Rat Terrier, Wire Fox Terrier

History
Airedale Terrier circa 1915

  Airedale Terriers are a relatively young breed, created in the 19th century by the working class rather than by aristocrats in the industrial Aire River Valley region of northern England. Their exact origin is not well-documented, but the Otterhound , the Irish and Bull Terriers  and the now-extinct Old English Rough Coated Black-and-Tan or Rat-Catcher Terrier  are considered to be prominent in their development. Other contributors include assorted setters and retrievers, sheepdogs such as the Yorkshire Collie, and Bedlington Terriers
  What we know today as the Airedale Terrier first emerged around 1840 and was bred to hunt otter, duck, weasel, badger, fox, water rat and other small game. The breed’s intelligence, agility and strength, combined with almost boundless energy, made them equally valued as guard dogs and personal companions. These unique terriers have been used as rat-killers, duck-catchers, deer-trackers, working dogs, war dogs, hunting dogs, guard and police dogs, gun dogs, army-messenger dogs and all-around sporting dogs. They were used in both World Wars to locate the wounded and to carry messages and medical supplies. They have also been used to hunt large game.


Personality
  The Airedale is a hard-working, independent, and athletic dog with a lot of drive, energy, and stamina. He is prone to digging, chasing, and barking — behaviors that come naturally to terrier breeds. These traits can be frustrating to owners unfamiliar with the Airedale personality.
  The Airedale is a lively breed, and he needs plenty of activity. Don't leave him alone for long periods of time, or he is likely to become bored, which leads to the aforementioned destructive behaviors. Keep training interesting and fresh — repetitive exercises will become a bore to the Airedale. He is best motivated by treats and other positive reinforcement methods; drill-and-jerk training methods should be avoided.
  A reliable watchdog, the Airedale takes pride in protecting his family. He can be a fierce guardian, but is friendly with his family and friends.
  Like every dog, the Airedale needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Airedale puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

Health
  The Airedale Terrier, which has an average lifespan of 10 to 13 years, sometimes suffers from colonic disease. Other serious health issues this breed is prone to include canine hip dysplasia (CHD), gastric torsion, and hypothyroidism. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may run thyroid and hip exams on the dog.

Care
  The Airedale Terrier is a working dog, and has the energy and stamina that goes with it. He needs regular exercise — at least one walk a day, although two is preferable, coupled with a good romp in the backyard. The Airedale loves to retrieve, play, swim, and goof around. He is a great jogging companion, and in many cases, will tire out his owner.
  Training and socialization are essential for the Airedale, beginning with puppy classes. Incorporate socialization with training by taking your Airedale with you to many different places — the pet supply store, outdoor events, long walks in busy parks. Anywhere there are a lot of people to meet and sights to see is a good place to take an Airedale.
  Crate training is also strongly recommended with the Airedale Terrier. Not only does it aid in housetraining, it also provides him a safe den in which to settle down and relax. In general, Airedales do very well with most training as long as you remember that they have a mind of their own. Ask him to sit or stay in full sunlight in the middle of the summer and it's very likely he'll decide he'd prefer to do so in the shade.
  Positive reinforcement is the best way to teach an Airedale. If you approach training with a positive, fun attitude, and you have a lot of patience and flexibility, there's an excellent chance you will have freethinking Airedale who is also well trained.

Living Conditions
  The Airedale Terrier is not recommended for apartment life. They are very active indoors and will do best with at least an average-sized yard.

Trainability
  The Airedale is a thinking breed – in addition to keeping his physical activity high, he will require mental stimulation as well. Basic obedience should be conducted with confidence and positive reinforcement. This breed likes to be the Alpha Dog, so it is important to establish who is in charge from an early age, and always be consistent, because Airedales will take a mile if given an inch. They excel in advanced obedience, tricks and agility training, thanks to their high intelligence.
  Training should be conducted with treats, and a drill-style of repeat tasks works best to keep an Airedale Terrier's attention.

Exercise Requirements
  Regular walking and play is recommended – and, in fact, regular discipline with exercise should be considered mandatory for dogs of this size. They can handle a lot and love getting outside and exploring their agility and instincts.
  Airedale Terriers are a high-energy, thinking breed. They need as much mental activity as they need physical activity, and apartments are not the right living situation for them. Families with large, fenced yards are ideal, as the Airedale needs plenty of room to run during the day. They enjoy chasing and hunting, so fetching and hide-and-seek games are among an Airedale's favorite activities.

Grooming
  Airedales need a weekly brushing and professional grooming every two months or so to look their best. That is all they need – unless you’re planning to show your dog, in which case you’ll need to be doing a great deal more laborious work on that wiry coat.
  The family Airedale doesn’t have to be trimmed, but many owners do have him groomed by a professional groomer three to four times a year to give him a neat appearance . The coat is either trimmed with clippers or by stripping, a process by which coat is thinned and shortened with a stripping knife, a sharp, comb-like tool, or a combination of both. 
  The Airedale Terrier is not known for extreme shedding, but he does shed certain times of the year. Regular brushing with a slicker brush once or twice a week keeps the coat in good condition. Bathe the Airedale only when he’s dirty. Bathing him too often softens the coarse terrier coat.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Keep the ears clean and dry to prevent infections. Check them weekly for redness or a bad odor that might indicate infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball moistened with a mild pH-balanced cleanser recommended by your veterinarian. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.
  It is important to begin grooming the Airedale when he is very young. An early introduction teaches the independent Airedale that grooming is a normal part of his life, and teaches him to patiently accept the handling and fuss of the grooming process.  

Children And Other Pets
  The fun-loving Airedale makes a good family pet. In some cases, he may even become protective of the children in the home, but his large size and high activity level may prove too intense for extremely young kids.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  The Airedale gets along well with other dogs in his household, as long as he is properly socialized and trained. He can be aggressive, however, with strange dogs that he perceives as threatening. And given the Airedale's reputation as a hunter, he is very likely to chase animals he perceives as prey, including cats, rabbits, gerbils, and hamsters.

Did You Know?
  The Airedale is the largest of the terrier breeds and was one of the first breeds trained for police work in Germany and Great Britain. In World War I, he worked as a guard and messenger dog.

Is the Airedale Terrier the Right Breed for you?
High Maintenance: Grooming should be performed often to keep the dog's coat in good shape. Professional trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Moderately Easy Training: The Airedale Terrier is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Not Good for New Owners: This breed is best for those who have previous experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.
  
Notable Airedales
The memorial fountain for Paddy the Wanderer, Wellington

  • Laddie Boy- (July 26, 1920 – January 23, 1929) was an Airedale Terrier owned by US President Warren G. Harding. He was born in Toledo, Ohio. His father was Champion Tintern Tip Top. He was presented to US President Warren G. Harding by Charles Quetschke of Caswell Kennels and became a celebrity during the Harding administration.
  • Paddy the Wanderer- was an Airedale Terrier who roamed the streets of Wellington, New Zealand, during the Great Depression. He was a friend of cabbies, workers, and seamen alike, who took turns at paying his dog licence every year.Paddy was known for greeting sailors in the Wellington Harbour and accompanying them, as a stowaway,on their coastal steamers.



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Thursday, September 8, 2016

Top 10 Black Dogs Breeds

Top 10 Black Dogs Breeds
  Black colored dogs are usually rarer than the other color varieties. From all dog coat colors, the black color is also the most fascinating and one of the few ones that has been purposely bred for a specific function. In the Northern countries for example, the Black Norwegian Elkhound was bred as a separate breed since 1877 because its distinctive color helps the hunter see his dog in the snowy landscape.
  There's no doubt that black dogs have a bad reputation. According to the ASPCA, they are the last to be adopted and the first to be euthanized. What's worse is that many people perceive them as less lovable because they are harder to see, and have been negatively portrayed in the media. In celebration of black dogs, we've rounded up 10 of the most popular black dog breeds that are giving it their all to proudly represent their coat color.

1. Great Dane
  The Great Dane was originally bred to hunt wild boar, but he probably wouldn't be very good at it today. The ferociousness necessary to track down such a large, wily animal was eventually bred out of the Great Dane. He's now a gentle soul who generally gets along well with other dogs, animals, and humans.
AKC standard for Black Great Danes: The color shall be a glossy black. White markings at the chest and toes are not desirable.  Any variance in color or markings as described above shall be faulted to the extent of the deviation. Any Great Dane which does not fall within the above color classifications must be disqualified.

2. Rottweiler
  Rottweiler dogs are sturdy build rectangular proportioned energetic dog which is a little longer in length than in height. The body structure is heavy boned with powerful muscle and dense substantial physique. Great stamina to drive cattle throughout the day, Rottweiler is not ignorant in its duty of herding. The powerful and elegant gait of the dog is full of confidence, signifies good drive and approach. The coat of Rottweiler is dense and straight but moderately rough; collectively expression projects a keen, alert responsive and confident investigator.
  "Rottweiler breeders aim at a dog of abundant strength, black coated with clearly defined rich tan markings, whose powerful appearance does not lack nobility and which is exceptionally well suited to being a companion, service and working dog."This breed is all about balance, endurance, proportionality, intelligence and strength. The various standards in place for the Rottweiler's physical appearance specify these characteristics.

3.Cane Corso
  The black breed Cane Corso originates from Italy. They are a large Italian breed of dog that is also known as Italian mastiffs. This breed is reserved, calm, quiet and evenly tempered. They are also very well muscled and less bulky than other mastiff dogs. Cane Corsos are closely related to Neapolitan mastiffs and have many similarities with them. Most of the Cane Corso assist in guarding big properties and hunt big wild boars. For many people, they are the favourite black dog breed.
  Majestic look Cane Corso is a muscular dog with massive build. The look is furious rather dreadful to warn intruder without any action by dog. Cane Cosro can spring into action with astonishing speeds to pin culprits. This is a versatile breed domesticate able to a variety of applications starting from hunting, guardian, watchdog , general working dog besides trustworthy companion. Its short coat is coarser; some could be near to smooth while dense to offer resistance to water and other climatic severe effects. Favourite color is Black to achieve formidable expression.

4. Doberman Pinscher
  Doberman pinscher, popularly known as Doberman is a medium large sized domestic dog. They originate from Germany and in the early 19th century, they were used as guard dogs. They are a mix breed of Rottweiler, Black Terriers and German Pinscher. Dobermans are strong and sometimes they can also be stubborn. Height of a male Doberman is around 66-72 cm whereas females are around 61-68 cm. A Male Doberman weighs around 34-45 kg and female ones weigh 27-41 kgs. They are highly energetic and intelligent dogs, best used for police and military work.
  The Doberman is compactly built, muscular, powerful and square-proportioned. It combines elegance and strength with speed and endurance. Its carriage is proud and alert, and its gait is free and vigorous. Its coat is short, smooth and hard, showing off the exceptionally clean-cut lines of this athletic breed.
  The Doberman pinscher is an intelligent capable guardian, ever on the alert and ready to protect its family or home. It is also a loyal and adventurous companion. It likes to be mentally challenged and is a gifted obedience pupil. It is sensitive and very responsive to its owner's wishes, though some can be domineering. It is generally reserved with strangers. It can be aggressive with strange dogs.

5. Newfoundland
  Newfoundland is one of the strongest breeds of dog which is perfect for being a lifeguard. He was originally used as a working dog for pulling nets for fishermen and haul wood from the forest. The breed Newfoundland originates from Canada. It is well suited for working on both land as well as water. It is known for its giant size, calm dispositions, loyalty and also forbeing anexcellent swimmer.
  Brown, black, gray and black with white are the recognized Newfoundland colors. Solid colors and white with black may have white on the chest, chin, toes and on the tip of the tail. A tinge of bronze may appear on a gray or black coat and lighter furnishings may appear on a brown or gray coat. Facial and muzzle hair is short and fine. The back legs are feathered for the entire length. The hair on the tail is long and dense.

6. Portuguese Water Dog

  Classified as a working dog, the Portuguese Water Dog is a hard worker and a loyal companion. It has been appreciated for its strength, soundness and spirtit for centuries along the coast of Portugal. This robust breed has a waterproof coat, giving it the ability to swim for hours. Called a Cao de Aqua, or dog of water in Portugal, the dog was bred as a working dog for fisherman on boats. The breed has dove for fish, retrieved broken nets, carried messages back to shore and guarded his master's boats while in foreign ports.
  The Water Dog has a thick coat of strong hair. It covers the body evenly except where the forearm joins the groin area where it is thinner. Some coats are curly and lusterless. Other coats are more wavy than curly with a slight sheen. 
  Coat color is white, black or tones of brown. The coat may also be a combination of brown, black and white. Water Dogs with white, black or black and white coats have bluish skin.

7.Neapolitan Mastiff 

  With its massive size made even more imposing by its abundant loose skin and dewlap, the Neapolitan Mastiff may have the most alarming appearance of any dog, and some say this look was purposefully bred in order to scare away intruders without the dog having to act. However, when forced to act, the Neo can spring into action with surprising speed. Its massive muscular body can knock down almost any intruder. Its huge head with short, powerful jaws and large teeth can crush or hold an opponent. The skin is tough and hanging, adding to the imposing impression of size as well as formidable expression.
  The Neapolitan Mastiff was bred for centuries to guard its family. As such, it is incredibly loyal and devoted to its family, watchful and suspicious of strangers, and tolerant of acquaintances. It is a stay-at-home-type dog. Although it is loving toward children, its sheer size can make accidents possible. It may not get along well with other dogs, especially domineering-type dogs. Because of its size, it should be carefully socialized at an early age.
  The Neo is short-haired with straight hairs that are one inch long or shorter. The coat is dense with hair uniform in length, giving a smooth appearance all over the body. There are no tufts or fringed hair anywhere. 
  Solid colors for coats include light and dark shades of black, gray-blue, tawny and mahogany. The AKC allows some brindling in all colors if the brindling is tan. This is known as reverse brindling. Some may have white markings on the chest, throat, underside of the body or on the toes. White hairs behind the wrists are accepted by the AKC.

8. Havanese
  Known for being the “National Dog of Cuba” and the only dog breed native to the island country, the Havanese is a small dog breed known for its silky coat that protects it against the harsh heat of the tropics. As a trainable and intelligent dog that possesses a naturally friendly and affectionate disposition, the Havanese is currently ranked as the 28th most popular dog breed in the United States by the American Kennel Club. If you are wondering whether the Havanese is the perfect match for you, the following is a complete description on this energetic toy breed.
  The abundant coat of the Havanese is acceptable in all coat colors, with white, fawn, red, cream brown, beige, orange, black, blue, chocolate, and silver being quite common. While the coat may be one solid color, others will have markings that create sable, brindle, black and tan, Irish piebald, part-colored, piebald, beige black, and more color patterns.
  Sometimes referred to as “Havana Silk Dogs,” the Havanese is a double-coated breed with soft, wavy, and silky lightweight hair on both the outer coat and undercoat. Reaching six to eight inches in length if never clipped or altered, the profuse coat is extremely light and insulating with a sheen appearance.

9.Yorkshire Terrier
  Affectionately referred to as “Yorkies” by their loyal owners, Yorkshire Terriers are members of the Toy Group that offer big personalities in a small package. As a portable pooch prized for its compact size and luxurious long-haired coat, the Yorkshire Terrier is currently ranked as the 6th most popular breed in the United States by the American Kennel Club. Read on to find a full breed description on the Yorkshire Terrier to determine whether the active dog will be an ideal match for your family’s lifestyle.
  Since the breed is often defined by its color, the breed standard indicates that the only acceptable coloring for the Yorkshire Terrier is steel blue and tan. While the body and tail are typically blue, the remainder of the dog’s body is tan. Puppies are often tan, black, and brown with white markings, but the pups will usually reach its final coloring by their third birthday.

10. Affenpinscher
  The Affenpinscher is a terrier type breed that originated in Central Europe, specifically Munich, Germany and France. The name Affenpinscher translates from German into Monkey Terrier. It is one of the oldest breeds in the Toy Group. During the 17th century they were kept on farms and stores to serve as ratters and in the home to keep mice out of the mistresses' boudoirs. It is an energetic little dog with the face and impishness of a monkey. They strut around with all the confidence of a larger dog. Their small size makes them a good dog for city and apartment dwellers. They are active indoors and can most of their exercise inside.
  The Affenpinscher's coat hair is thick and rough and about one-inch in length on the shoulders and body. The hair may be shorter on the backside and the tail. The hair on the head, chest, neck, stomach and legs is a little longer and softer. An adult will have a cape of sturdy hair that blends into the back coat near the withers. Longer hair on the head, beard and eyebrows frames the face to form the monkey-like expression. 
  Coat colors include black, red, silver, gray, black and tan or belge (a mixture of black and reddish brown.) Dogs with a black coat may have a few silver or white areas mixed in or may have a rusty cast. Reds vary from orange-tan to brownish red. The belge color coats have black, brown and/or white mixed in the red. Some dogs may have a small white spot on the chest. This is not penalized by kennel clubs but large white patches are not desirable.


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