LUV My dogs: dogs

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Showing posts with label dogs. Show all posts
Showing posts with label dogs. Show all posts

Friday, January 13, 2017

15 Dog Breeds That Love The Snow

15 Dog Breeds That Love The Snow
  Winter is on its way here. It’s time to bring out the doggy boots, coats, and cold-weather gear to keep your pup from being miserable on those chilly walks. But some breeds aren’t miserable in the snowy weather at all. To them, it’s the most wonderful time of the year. They’re happy to eat snowflakes, chase snowballs, and make snow angel-dogs while you stand there freezing. Here are ten dog breeds who love the snow.

1. Alaskan Malamute
  The Alaskan Malamute is a descendent of the Arctic wolf, and with its thick double coat and large, tough paws, it can handle the snowiest of days. Known for pulling sleds through the snow and having a love for being outdoors, the Alaskan Malamute is a terrific companion for your polar adventures.

2. Akita
  An Akita is truly a royal pup—hailing from Japan, this breed was once only owned by the Imperial family. Statues of the Akita were also given as gifts to new parents to bring health, happiness, and a long life. This dog, originally bred as a cold-weather hunting companion with a dense undercoat and harsh outer coat, can often be independent and stubborn, but will remain protective and loyal to its family.

3. Pembroke Welsh Corgi
  Pembroke Welsh Corgis are believed to be descended from Vallhunds–Swedish cattle dogs brought by the Vikings to Wales–so you know they’re tough. They have a double coat, the undercoat being thick and covered by the longer topcoat. And they shed pretty consistently throughout the year, especially when the weather changes. This makes them well-prepared for romps in the snow, which they’ll most likely love.

4. Bernese Mountain Dog
  Originally from Switzerland, the Bernese Mountain Dog is a loyal, sweet breed that would love nothing more than to go on a nice long walk through a winter wonderland. Its cheerful attitude will definitely put on a smile on anyone's face.

5. Siberian Husky
  Famous for his sledding prowess, the Siberian Husky wears a thick double coat that makes him well-suited for snow and harsh weather. If the Siberian could have his way, his owner would love snow just as much as he does. The breed tends to thrive at winter dog sports, but he’ll usually be happy to try other sports, too. Either way, he needs plenty of exercise all year round.

6. Old English Sheepdog
  The Old English Sheepdog is known for its shaggy coat. In fact, you’ll probably have to spend lots of time grooming an Old English Sheepdog if you want to keep their fur from matting. In the warm months, they can get overheated pretty quickly, so they’ll be much happier in the winter months when their fur coats don’t make them so hot. Be careful to wipe them down before bringing them in from the snow or you’ll have lots of puddles around the house later on.

7. Newfoundland
  The Newfoundland, often referred to as a Gentle Giant, would be crushed if you headed out for a snowy hike without it. Its double, thick coat and super-sweet disposition makes it the perfect candidate to go on a winter hike. And if you happen to get a bit chilly, it would love nothing more than to snuggle up tight and warm you right up! Keep in mind that this breed sheds and drools a lot, even in the winter, so if you're a neat freak, this breed may not be for you.

8. Tibetan Mastiff
  As their name suggests, the Tibetan Mastiff is from Tibet where it is, of course, very cold. They have a thick coat suited for surviving freezing temperatures, which makes them more than able to stand up to most winter walks you’ll be taking them on. They aren’t able to handle the hot months very well, though. They are able to handle a certain level of dry heat provided they have shade and water, but these pups will be happiest when the temperature drops.

9. Pomeranian
  Pomeranians are descended from ancient breeds of the far north, which makes them a bit like a small version of the American Eskimo Dog or the Samoyed. Their undercoat is soft and fluffy, and it’s quite thick. Some owners groom the fur completely to the undercoat, which gives the Pomeranian a stuffed animal-like appearance. They do have an overcoat, too. It’s straight and shiny, and it’s a little harsh to the touch, but it protects them well from cold weather. Pomeranians can overheat easily, which means they’re right at home in the snow.

10. Labrador Retriever
  This popular family pet’s thick, water-repellant coat is ideal for keeping him dry when retrieving water fowl from frigid lakes during fall hunting season. His stocky build and short, dense double coat provides him with an effective barrier to cold weather and icy conditions however if your pooch is typically an indoor dog wintery weather should be experienced in moderation.

11. Samoyed
  The Samoyed, like the Siberian Husky, is from Siberia where it was a valuable companion for the Samoyede people. It was bred to hunt, haul sledges, herd reindeer, and cuddle up for warmth on cold nights. Their double coat is very thick and sheds constantly. With all that thick fur, they won’t want to be out in the heat for too long, but you might have trouble bringing them back inside in the winter. Especially because their white fur blends in with the snow so well, it may be hard to spot them.

12. American Eskimo Dog
  Originating from Germany, the American Eskimo was originally called the White German Spitz but was renamed after World War II, most likely for its white coat--not for any connection with Eskimos. Though this playful and compact and used to perform indoors with the Barnum and Bailey Circus, outdoor activity suits it much better; its coat resists soaking and thick ears stay warm in low temperatures.

13. Chow Chow
  Considered one of the oldest dog breeds, the Chow Chow’s thick, furry coat will keep it warm for hours during a winter excursion, and its strong, loyal personality will keep you on your toes for many years. This breed is considered a heavy shedder in certain months, so be sure to have your brushes handy.

14. German Shepherd
  The breed's popularity grew with Rin Tin Tin, the abandoned German Shepherd pup found during WWI who went on to star in TV shows and movies. Known for their herding, guarding, and police work, German Shepherds are strong, agile, hard workers that have a lot of energy and learn quickly. This breed commonly suffers from hip dysplasia, which can likely be avoided by buying from a credible breeder.

15. Kuvasz
  To be considered a true Kuvasz, this dog must always sport white fur, according to the American Kennel Club. Originating in Tibet, the Kuvasz—which means "armed guard of nobility" in Turkish—was later owned by the royal family in Hungary before finding a more "common" lifestyle as a light-footed hunter and herder. The Kuvasz's double coat makes it a perfect mountain dog, and its trainability and fearless protective instincts provide a perfect four-legged companion. A fenced-in, open yard works best for this energetic, yet possibly destructive, breed.
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Thursday, December 8, 2016

Everything about your English Toy Spaniel

Everything about your English Toy Spaniel
  A true lapdog, the English Toy Spaniel is dedicated to becoming the world’s best couch potato. This breed does like to play too but he prefers doing so on the living room carpet as opposed to outside in the dirt and grass. After all, the dirt and grass could make his beautiful, silky coat dirty! English Toy Spaniels love being spoiled and absolutely enjoy living in the lap of luxury. To them, luxury doesn’t have to be an English estate. It could very well be a small and cozy apartment providing the dog is with the people he loves.

Overview
  Originally bred as a woodcock hunter, the English Toy Spaniel was loved by royalty as a constant companion and foot and lap warmer. Very similar to the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, the two are often confused with each other and bred together as well. A preferred lap dog, he's a good companion that gets along well with school-aged children and other animals. Not prone to barking, he does need regular grooming and a push for regular exercise.
  English Toy Spaniels (nicknamed Charlies or ETs) are not as well known as their Cavalier King Charles Spaniel cousins, and that’s too bad. People who know them appreciate their small size and calm, devoted nature. Even though his ancestors lived in palaces, the ET is the perfect roommate for an apartment dweller. If you're allowed to bring a dog to work, he’s a good cubicle pal, too. And if you like to travel? Well, he fits perfectly in a carrier beneath your seat.

Highlights
  • Socialization is important with this breed because they can be timid when they are exposed to new people or situations.
  • Considered to be an average shedder, the English Toy Spaniel should be brushed every week to remove loose hair and to keep the coat from tangling.
  • For the dog's own safety, the English Toy Spaniel should be kept on leash whenever they are walked and they should also have a fully fenced yard.
  • English Toy Spaniels do well in apartments.
  • English Toy Spaniels do not handle heat very well and need to be monitored on hot days to ensure that they do not overexert themselves. It is recommended that the dogs reside in an air-conditioned dwelling.
  • English Toy Spaniels have low energy levels and low exercise requirements. They are happy spending their days sitting on your knee, and a leisurely walk around the neighborhood will meet their exercise needs. They make excellent companions for older owners.
  • English Toy Spaniels are loving dogs that usually do well with children, but they are not the ideal breed for a home with busy children since they can become overwhelmed by the noise and excitement children make.
  • English Toy Spaniels are companion dogs and thrive when they are with the people they love. They should not live outside or in a kennel away from their family.
  • Separation anxiety is a common problem in the English Toy Spaniel and they can become destructive when they are separated from their owners for a period of time.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store.
Other Quick Facts

  • The most recognizable feature of the English Toy Spaniel is his head, with its domed skull, large eyes, black nose, and soft, intelligent expression.
  • The English Toy Spaniel comes in four colors or patterns: Blenheim (red and white), Ruby (solid red), Prince Charles (tricolor), and King Charles (black and tan). In dog shows, the Blenheim and the Prince Charles compete in one class and the King Charles and the Ruby in another.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 10 - 12 years
Average size: 8 - 14 pounds
Coat appearance: Silky, medium-length
Coloration: Tricolored (beige, white and black), black and tan, red and white
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Dark eyes and dark-eyed rims; well-proportioned body; scissor-bite teeth; long ears with feathering and medium-to long-length wavy coat; soft expression
Possible alterations: Coat may be straight
Comparable Breeds: Japanese Chin, Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

History
  Little spaniels probably descend from dogs that were popular in Chinese and Japanese imperial courts. They may share an ancient ancestor with the Pekingese and the Japanese
Portrait of Queen Mary I and King Philip of England
 by Hans Eworth (1558)
Chin. At some point, they made their way to Europe and became prized as companion dogs. Johannes Caius mentioned toy spaniels in his book, Of English Dogges, which was published in 1574. Mary, Queen of Scots had at least one toy spaniel, and it’s said that her son, King James I, received a litter in 1613 as a gift from the Emperor of Japan.
  In England, this breed is known as the King Charles Spaniel, because both Charles I and Charles II were very fond of the little dog. Because they were popular with royalty, they were also popular with everyone else, and it wasn’t unusual to see one pictured with the family in a portrait painted by Gainsborough, Rubens, Rembrandt, or Van Dyck. After the death of Charles II and the ouster of his brother, James II, Charles’ niece Mary and her husband William ascended to England’s throne. They brought their own favorite dogs with them: Pugs. Some people bred the toy spaniels and the Pugs together, eventually changing the look of the breed. The body became wider, the face flatter, and the skull more domed.
  The American Kennel Club recognized the English Toy Spaniel as a member of the Toy Group in 1886. Today, the ET ranks 126th among the breeds registered by the AKC.

Personality
  The sweet and lovable English Toy Spaniel is a true companion dog. He has an aristocratic bearing, but he's not a snob at all; picture instead a happy, devoted, quiet dog. He enjoys spending time with the people he loves and will fit himself into their lives. The ET requires little exercise and is happiest perched on his owner's knee. He does well with other dogs and cats if socialized to them and is gentle and loving to children although he's not best suited to living with them. He can become overwhelmed by excitement and can be shy and timid when he meets new people or is exposed to new situations.

Health
  The English Toy Spaniel, which has an average lifespan of 10 to 12 years, is susceptible to major health conditions like patellar luxation, and minor issues like early tooth loss, and "lazy tongue," a condition which causes the tongue to protrude from the mouth. A veterinarian may recommend regular knee tests for the dog.
  Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), hydrocephalus, and fused toes are also seen in some English Toy Spaniels, as well as a soft spot in the dog's skull due to an incomplete fontanel closure. Some English Toy Spaniels react adversely to anesthesia.

Care
  Even though the English Toy Spaniel is not very active, it enjoys a fun indoor or outdoor game or a good on-leash walk. Hot weather does not suit it and, by nature, it cannot live outdoors, away from the comfort of its family. It has a long coat that requires combing twice a week.

Living Conditions
  They are good for apartment life, relatively inactive indoors, and will do okay without a yard if they are sufficiently exercised. English Toy Spaniels do not do well in temperature extremes.

Training
  English Toy Spaniels are pretty bright dogs. They have a strong desire to please their owners however; they have a short attention span. To keep this breed interested during training sessions, delectable treats are necessary. Charlies love tasty treats so this will keep him focused and be his reward for working hard during the session.
  This breed makes a wonderful therapy dog. Their small size and love for riding in the car make traveling to hospitals and nursing home facilities easy. Patients enjoy allowing this cute little dog to sit on their laps while stroking their soft coats. Everybody feels better with an English Toy Spaniel around!

Exercise Requirements
  English Toy Spaniels are not fans of exercise. They would much rather chill on the couch than to chase a ball in the yard. Although this breed does not require a lot of activity, he does need some exercise to stay healthy and fit. Regular walks are important, but the occasional brisk trot will be beneficial to the Charlie. He might not like it; but it is needed.
  This breed is easily enticed with tasty treats. Puzzle toys which hide a treat within tend to keep the English Toy Spaniel intrigued and active inside of the house. Those that have a fenced yard for the dog to play in will find that the Charlie’s playfulness will have him chasing balls and other toys around the yard. Though not the most energetic breed of dog, the English Toy Spaniel will happily spend time playing with kids. That is, until he becomes bored and needs a nap.

Grooming
  The English Toy Spaniel has a long, silky coat that is usually straight but can be slightly wavy. Despite his long coat, this is a wash-and-go dog. Comb him out weekly to prevent mats and tangles, especially those that form behind the ears, elbows, and back legs. A bath every two to four weeks will keep him smelling good, and it doesn’t hurt to wash his face daily — mainly to prevent him from doing it himself by rubbing it on your furniture.
  Otherwise, simply clean the ears, trim the toenails, and brush the teeth frequently. The latter is especially important with toy breeds, which are often prone to dental disease. Charlies often have fused toes, which are a normal characteristic of the breed and not something to be concerned about.

Children And Other Pets
  English Toy Spaniels can be loving toward children, but they can become overwhelmed by the noise and stimulation young children create. This can lead to biting if they are handled roughly. English Toy Spaniels do very well with other pets, especially if they are raised with them.

Is this breed right for you?
  Although the English Toy Spaniel enjoys engaging in play and walks, it is necessary that he lives indoors with his family. Good with school-aged children, the breed is completely content sitting on his owner's lap all day. In need of regular companionship, he will need to be with a family that is home and available to him constantly.

Did You Know?
  English Toy Spaniels used to have their tails docked, and some still do, but this practice is becoming less common. Tail docking is done at an early age, so if you want a puppy with a natural tail, let the breeder know before the pups are born.

Urban myth
Portrait of a King Charles Spaniel,
 by Jean-Baptiste Huet 1778
  An urban legend claims that Charles II issued a special decree granting King Charles Spaniels permission to enter any establishment in the UK,overriding "no dog except guide dogs" rules. A variant of this myth relates specifically to the Houses of Parliament. This myth is sometimes instead applied to the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel.
  The UK Parliament website states: "Contrary to popular rumour, there is no Act of Parliament referring to King Charles spaniels being allowed anywhere in the Palace of Westminster. We are often asked this question and have thoroughly researched it." Similarly, there is no proof of any such law covering the wider UK. A spokesman for the Kennel Club said: "This law has been quoted from time to time. It is alleged in books that King Charles made this decree but our research hasn't tracked it down."

A dream day in the life of the English Toy Spaniel
  The English Toy Spaniel will be in no rush to wake up in the morning. Perfectly happy staying in bed with his family members, he will follow you to breakfast once you finally move from your comfort zone. Fill up his bowl to allow him to leisurely eat for the remainder of the day. Engage in a bit of play with his favorite toys, take him for a short walk and end the day with your English Toy Spaniel on your lap.

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Tuesday, July 19, 2016

5 Signs Your Dog Loves You

5 Signs Your Dog Loves You
  We love our dogs as if they are members of our families – because to us they are! We show our dogs we love them in so many ways outside of just their regular care and maintenance, by doing things like buying them special treats and toys. But how do our dogs tell us they love us too? Sometimes it might feel like a one-sided relationship, but dogs love us just as much as we love them!

1. He Makes Eye Contact


  In the human world, we usually make eye contact to show that we’re engaged and paying attention. That’s not the case in the dog world. When dogs lock eyes with each other, it’s often considered rude or aggressive. And yet, when dogs stare at their favorite humans, it’s usually out of love, not war. When you look into your pup’s eyes and he gazes back with relaxed eyes showing little to no white, it usually means he’s happy and comfortable with you.

2. Sleeping With You

  Dogs are pack animals, and in the wild wolves and other canids sleep huddled together in packs. This helps keep them warm and help them feel safe. It’s also a way for your dog to show you he cares. He wants to be near you, and this is his natural way of showing you he feels comfortable and sees you as family.

3. Gift Giving

  If you’re hanging out and your pup brings you their favorite toy, take it as a compliment. But, more importantly, take it and toss it out for them to fetch. Bringing you the gift is a sign of their love and desire to play.

4. Licking your face

  Dogs lick people’s faces for a few different reasons, but in many cases it’s a sign of love and affection. Puppies typically lick faces even more than adult dogs. This behavior comes from wolf cubs, who lick their mothers’ faces to signal hunger so they will be fed. Dogs don’t feed their young the same way wolves do, but the licking instinct remains. A dog may also lick you in a submissive way, to let you know that it is not a threat. And of course, your licking dog may also simply be grooming you. Dogs groom each other as a gesture of intimacy when a solid bond is in place, so you can definitely take grooming as a sign of love from your dog.


5. He Wags His Tail

  Tail wagging may seem like an obvious sign of love, but this behavior is more complex than you may think. A tail wag can have a lot of different meanings — and they’re not always friendly. Thankfully, when your dog gives a full-body wag with the tail held at mid-height, accompanied by other signs of positive body language, the message is pretty clear: He’s happy and excited to see you. Now, if your dog’s tail wags more to the right side of his rear, it just might be an even better sign he loves you. An Italian neuroscientist and two veterinarians discovered this by using cameras to track the tail-wag angles of 30 pet dogs as they were each shown their owner, a person they didn’t know, a cat and an unfamiliar dog. When the pups saw their owners, their tails wagged most strongly to the right side of the body. 


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Thursday, February 25, 2016

Everything about your Irish Setter

Everything about your Irish Setter
  When you bring an Irish Setter into your home, prepare for a downright giddy housemate. Full of boisterous energy and love, Irish Setters will want to be involved in everything you do. They love family time, whether indoors or out, and they get along famously with children.

Overview
  This charming Irish redhead is known for its carefree personality and rocket-launcher energy. “Tireless” and “enthusiastic” are the two words frequently used to describe the breed. The Irish Setter loves to run, but given an ample daily quota of exercise, he's a calm, fun-loving companion. The Irish Setter can be a good choice for families with older children, but he’s probably too rambunctious to be set loose with toddlers. He also gets along well with other pets such as cats if he’s raised with them. Irish Setters are alert and will loudly and excitedly announce when someone is approaching.
  Choose an Irish Setter if you are an active person who can give him the exercise he needs. A long walk or run of an hour or so will do, or you can take him hiking or run him alongside your bicycle. He’s also a super competitor in dog sports such as agility, obedience, and rally and can be an excellent therapy dog. Be warned: if you don’t give him an outlet for his energy, he will become frustrated. A frustrated Irish Setter is a destructive Irish Setter.
  As with so many sporting breeds, there are differences between Irish Setters bred for the field and those bred for the show ring. Field-bred dogs are smaller with a lighter coat and have much more hunting instinct than their show-ring siblings, but both types make good companions.
  Last but not least, it should go without saying that a people-loving dog like the Irish Setter needs to live in the house

Highlights
  • Irish Setters become very attached to the people in their lives and can suffer from serious separation anxiety. They become very unhappy when they are left alone for more than a few hours and this unhappiness usually results in destructive behavior. Irish Setters do not make good outdoor dogs and need to stay inside, close to their family.
  • The high-energy, athletic Irish Setter needs room to run and the best place for him to do that is in a large, fenced yard.
  • Irish Setters need lots of exercise and should be exercised twice a day for at least half an hour each time.
  • Irish Setters need obedience training to channel their mischievous and sometimes stubborn nature.
  • Irish Setters do very well with other animals and children. It is important, however, to properly socialize your puppy regardless of the breed's temperament or your living situation. You might not have children or other pets now, but that could change. Lack of socialization can cause many difficulties.
  • Irish Setters need to be groomed daily or every other day to keep their long, silky coats from becoming tangled. They are moderate shedders, so you will have some hair in your house, especially during shedding seasons.
  • Irish Setters do not mature quickly. Some dogs settle down by the age of 2, but others remain puppylike their entire lives.
  • Irish Setters are inquisitive by nature and will get into anything they can find or reach. This trait can also make training more difficult because they generally have a hard time staying focused. If you can keep them interested in training, they learn quickly.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Irish Setter’s stunning, medium-length coat is mahogany or rich chestnut red with no black. He may have a small amount of white on the chest, throat, or toes, or a narrow streak of white on the head.
  • The Irish Setter’s head is long and lean with a delicately chiseled appearance. The head is framed by long ears and set off by dark eyes that show intelligence and good humor.
Breed Standards
  • AKC Group: Sporting
  • UKC Group: Gundog
  • Average Life span:10 to 11 years
  • Weight: 24 to 27 inches at the shoulder
  • Height: 35 to 70 pounds
  • Coat : The Irish Setter’s deep reddish distinctive coat can be characterized as long and silky, and you’ll want to make sure it’s properly groomed in order to ensure your animal is comfortable and healthy.
  • Comparable Breeds: Golden Retriever, Labrador Retriever
History
  It's not surprising that this handsome redhead comes from Ireland, which is famous for fine and beautiful dogs. The Irish Setter appears to have been developed there in the 18th century, probably the result of combining English Setters, spaniels, pointers, and Gordon Setters.
  Those first Irish Setters were sometimes called red spaniels — a clue to their heritage, perhaps — or modder rhu, Gaelic for "red dog." Often, they were white and red instead of the solid dark red we see today. Some, described as "shower of hail" dogs, had red coats sprinkled with small white spots. The Irish Earl of Enniskillen may have started the fad for solid red dogs. By 1812, he would have no other kind in his kennels. Other Irish breeders of the time who preferred the red dogs were Jason Hazzard of Timaskea in County Fermanagh and Sir St. George Gore. 
  A dog named Elcho was the first Irish Setter imported to the United States. He arrived in 1875 and became a star not only in the show ring but also in the field. The first Irish Setter registered by the American Kennel Club was Admiral, in 1878.
  They quickly became one of the most popular breeds in America and a favorite in the show ring. Between 1874 and 1948, 760 Irish Setters became conformation champions, while only five became field champions. This sparked alarm for some fanciers of the original breed, and in 1940 the magazine Field and Stream called for a resurrection of the breed as a working dog. Today, it's not unusual to see two types: the larger, heavier show dog, and the lighter, sleeker field dog.
  The Irish Setter's popularity soared in the 1960s and 1970s, thanks to the books and movie featuring an Irish Setter named Big Red, as well as the presence of Irish Setter King Timahoe at the White House during the Nixon administration. Today, the Irish Setter ranks 68th among the 155 breeds and varieties recognized by the AKC.



Temperament
  People rarely have a negative thing to say about the temperament of Irish Setters, being friendly to adults, children, other animals and strangers alike. This easy going nature will not, of course, make them a good guard dog, however, you will have a playful, affectionate and loyal member of the family if you choose an Irish Setter to share your home. One thing to be slightly wary of with Setters is the hunting instinct which is still alive and kicking and as a result, it is advisable to supervise them around small animals you may have in the household such as rabbits, birds, hamsters etc.
  They are a very active and alert dog, and enjoy long daily walks and runs. Due to their highly trainable nature, they are usually good off the lead, provided you have trained them with a reliable recall. This of course may vary according to the dogs personality as some Irish Setters are so playful they may develop selective hearing when called back to go home!
  This is a breed of dog which does not relish being alone for long periods of time and inactivity may lead to separation anxiety, boredom and destructive behaviour. 
  Due to their pliable and gentle nature Irish Setters are often used as PAT dogs in schools, hospitals and hospices where they will receive the attention and affection with pleasure.

Health
  Irish Setters tend to be a very healthy breed. Problems that have been noted in Irish Setters include: Hip dysplasia, cancer, progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), epilepsy, entropion, hypothyroidism, hyperosteodystrophy, bloat (a.k.a. gastric torsion), osteosarcoma, Von Willebrand's disease, patent ductus arteriosus, canine Leukocyte adhesion deficiency (CLAD) and celiac disease.
  It should be noted that Irish Setters are now one of the few breeds for which genetic tests have been developed to detect the presence of both CLAD and PRA (RCD-1).

Activity Requirements
  Irish Setters require a lot of activity to maintain an even temperament. Prospective owners should be prepared to dedicate at least one hour per day to a Setter's physical activity requirements. Brisk walks are good, but they should be allowed to run several times per week. Irish Setters are country dogs, they require wide open space and room to roam.
  Agility training is often a good outlet for Irish Setters as it works the mind and the body. Though they aren't as reliable as a Golden Retriever and may not win agility championships, Irish Setters enjoy the activity and appreciate the bonding time.

Care
  Irish Setters require regular brushing to prevent matting of the coat; even more so in the winter, when the under coat is thicker. Even without a show standard trim, this breed looks its best when it is given an occasional trimming. A thorough round of exercise for at least an hour a day is a must for this breed. Irish Setters cannot bear cold climates, preferring temperate weather.

Living Conditions
  The Irish Setter is not recommended for apartment life unless the owners are active daily joggers or bikers and plan on taking the dog along with them. This breed does best with a large yard.

Trainability
  Irish Setters need very little training when it comes to hunting birds, but household obedience is a different story. Don't let the long hair fool you – this is not a Golden Retriever. Training and Irish Setter requires patience, consistency and a calm-assertive attitude. This breed develops habits quickly, and bad habits can be nearly impossible to break, so the earlier you begin training a Setter, the better.
  Irish Setters can be rambunctious well after puppyhood passes and even if they receive adequate exercise. It is very important to teach your setter proper manners and not to jump on people, no matter how excited he may be to see them.

Grooming
  This Irish redhead has a coat that’s moderately long on the body and short and fine on the head and front legs, with long, silky feathering on the ears, the backs of the legs, the chest, the belly, and the tail.
  The coat needs brushing and combing two or three times a week to prevent or remove mats and tangles. A bath every two to four weeks or so doesn’t go amiss. Tips on grooming and the best tools to use are available from this Irish Setter breeder.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath. Keep the long, hanging ears clean and dry to help prevent bacterial or yeast infections from developing.

Children And Other Pets
  Irish Setters are good friends for active older children, but they can be too rambunctious for toddlers. It's all too easy for an Irish Setter to accidentally knock a child down.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Irish Setters are also good with other dogs in the household, as well as cats, especially if they're raised with them, but they might see pet birds as prey since those are what they are bred to hunt.

Did You Know?
  • The 1962 Disney movie “Big Red” gave the breed’s popularity a big boost, as did the White House presence of King Timahoe, President Richard Nixon’s Irish Setter.
  • Bus √Čireann, the national bus company in Ireland, uses the Irish Setter as its corporate logo.
  • Alex the Dog from the Stroh's beer commercials (half Irish Setter, half Golden Retriever)
  • Chauncey, fictional dog of Duck Phillips in Mad Men
  • Garry Owen, pet of Maine Governor Percival Proctor Baxter
  • King Timahoe (1968–1979), pet of Richard Nixon, a 56th birthday gift from his White House staff in January 1969.
  • Kojak, fictional dog in the Stephen King novel The Stand
  • Mike, pet of US President Harry Truman
  • Milord, a red Setter which was Alexander II, Tsar of Russia's favourite dog
  • Plunkett, the only Irish setter depicted in George Earl's mythical painting of "A Field Trial in the Eighties"
  • Shannon, pet of Beach Boy Carl Wilson, whose death became the subject of the 1976 song by a friend, Henry Gross
  • T-Bone, mascot for the Pace University Setters sports teams
  • Thunder, first mascot for the University of British Columbia Thunderbirds sports teams
  • Seamus, owned by Mitt Romney.
  • Redbeard, owned by younger Sherlock Holmes in Sherlock
  • Sasha La Fleur, Charlie's love interest in All Dogs Go to Heaven 2.


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Monday, November 30, 2015

10 reasons a dog is the best investment you will ever make

10 reasons a dog is the best investment you will ever make
Are you tired of being let down by life? We feel your pain. 

There is one thing in life, though, that will never disappoint you.


A dog.


1. Imagine being greeted by this when you come home. EVERY DAY. 

2. Imagine never feeling unloved again. 
3. Making people happy makes dogs happy. It's like having your own personal happiness machine.
4. Let's put it this way. You'll never find a cat doing something like this, will you?
5. A dog, on the other hand, will be there for you when you need him most.
6. They care about your health, so they'll go out of their way to get you up and outside.
7. They never judge. They just love.
8. And when they say they'll love you forever, they mean it.
9. A dog can teach you everything you need to know about how to enjoy life.
10. You'll never eat alone again.

Of course. There can be more than 100 reasons to investment in a dog, but we said here 10 funny reasons, but all of them are one hundred percent real! 


Don't be sad if you don't have a dog. Buy one!


You have no money? Adopt one! 


You will see your life with other eyes. I promise!



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Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Your Dog is Your Best Friend

Your Dog is Your Best Friend
  Dogs have been our constant companions for thousands of years. The history of dogs is closely tied to our own history, and no other animal on Earth shares as close a relationship with humans as dogs do. Dogs and humans understand each other, and it’s because of the undying love they show us that we keep them by our sides.
  It’s not that having a human BFF is a bad thing. It’s just that your dog makes it clear, every second, that you matter more than anyone else in the world.
  And we’re not saying you’re needy, either. But your dog is in awe of you. You feed his soul with food, walks, sleep, and play. If he could build you a shrine, he would.
  In case you’re still on the fence about whether your dog, or that friend you’ve had since you were five, is your true bestie.



He Never, Ever, Leaves Me Alone

  Buddy’s friendship means I never have to feel alone again. He makes it clear I will never have to take even one step without him. Whether I walk to the computer or across the living room, he is closer than a shadow. So close I have to be careful not to step on his paws.

 You don’t mind doing even the most mundane of activities together.



He Is My Bathroom Hero

  He watches over my safety in the bathroom. He has taught me not to close the door tightly or he’ll throw his body against it and begin frantically scratching. He knows he can’t save me if I’m not in his line of vision. My hero has made it clear to leave the door open a crack. That way he can use his nose to push the door all the way open, smile at me, and wag his tail like a metronome on speed.

You don’t even need anyone but each other to have fun.


Just having each other around brings a smile to your face.

He Loves Sharing Meals

  He shares food. My food. When I’m seated at the table the Budster comes over and rests his chin on my lap. If that doesn’t work in one millisecond, his head burrows through and pops up in the space under my arm when I’m about to bite into a sandwich. And, no matter how many people look at me disapprovingly he scoffs at them and lets me feed him bites. I’ve learned to make the food bits small because he never chews, only gulps. When the meal is over he lazily lets his head flop back in my lap with a snorty sigh of approval.


You do everything together.

Time Means Nothing to Him

  I can’t wait to run home for one of his dopamine filled hugs even if it’s only been 20 minutes since I saw him last. He can’t wait either. When he hears my keys he runs up to wait at the door. When I open it he stands up on his hind legs, and reaches his front paws towards me for a hug. He does that even if it’s only been five minutes.

You’re there for each other, even when no one else is.


He Isn’t Afraid of Feet

  He takes excellent care of my feet. After a long walk in the morning I get in the bathtub and he trots in after me (You know, in case I slip or something). I dangle my foot over the side of the tub and he rushes to lick it. And lick it. And lick it.

I Can Read Him With a Look

  He has taught me a secret language. If he gnashes his teeth together like a snapping turtle it means he’d like me to look up so he can gaze into my eyes. If he sits perched at my feet and lets out a long, slow whimper he is merely looking out for me. He’s saying I’ve been working too many hours and will feel much better if I take a break and scratch behind his ears.

You always go everywhere together (as long as it’s not the vet).

He Is Never too Shy to Make a Fuss

  He whips his tail in circles like a propeller when he sees me. If Buddy is walking my husband Steve, and then spots me approaching on the street he stands at alert, and thrashes his tail as he bursts into song. People look at us because they think he is in pain. They don’t understand that caterwauling is the Bud’s happy voice.

You can only get to sleep when you’re together.


He Respects My Sleep

  Buddy doesn’t wake me up. He waits until I stir from sleep before he pounces on my chest, leans into my face, and smothers me with slobbery kisses because he knows it’s good for me.

You help make each other’s dreams come true.

He Keeps Me Warm

  He keeps Steve and me warm in the winter. By plastering his body against us he saves us from having to buy a heating pad. When Steve gets up to make coffee Buddy moves over to Steve’s spot on the bed and curls up like a pill worm. When Steve comes back with our mugs of java Buddy slides closer to me thus presenting Steve with his gift – a warm spot on the bed.

You’ll always make time to listen to each other’s feelings.

He Wears a Cape

Buddy sacrifices to make my Halloweens joyful. He consents to wearing a Superman cape because he knows it makes me happy. Of course, I understand that he cannot tolerate booties, coats, hats, or sweaters, and because I respect his boundaries, he indulges me.

You can’t hide anything from each other.




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