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Friday, May 2, 2014

Everything about your Siberian Husky

Everything about your Siberian Husky
  The Siberian Husky is a beautiful dog breed with a thick coat that comes in a multitude of colors and markings. Their blue or multi-colored eyes and striking facial masks only add to the appeal of this breed, which originated in Siberia. It is easy to see why many are drawn to the Siberian's wolf-like looks, but be aware that this athletic, intelligent dog can be independent and challenging for first-time dog owners. Huskies also put the "H" in Houdini and need a fenced yard that is sunk in the ground to prevent escapes.

Overview
  The Siberian husky combines power, speed and endurance, enabling it to carry a light load at moderate speed over a great distance. It is moderately compact, slightly longer than it is tall, and of definite Northern heritage. It is quick and light on its feet, with a smooth and effortless stride exhibiting both good reach and drive. It has a double coat of medium length, with a soft, dense undercoat and a straight, somewhat flat-lying outer coat. Its expression is keen but friendly, interested and even mischievous. 
  Fun-loving, adventurous, alert, independent, clever, stubborn, mischievous and obstinate — all describe the Siberian husky. This breed loves to run and will roam if given the chance. It may be aggressive toward strange dogs, but it is generally good with other household dogs. In fact, it is a very social dog that must have human or canine companionship. It may chase strange cats or livestock. Some howl, dig and chew.


Breed standards
AKC group: Working
UKC group: Standard
Average lifespan: 12 - 14 years
Average size: 35 - 60 pounds
Coat appearance: Thick and dense, can withstand -58 to -76 degrees F
Coloration: Black to pure white, variety of markings
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Strong, compact body; head proportionate to body; erect, triangular ears; oval-shaped eyes vary between blue, hazel and brown depending on coat color; nose is black or pinkish depending on coat color; curved tail; snowshoe paws have hair in between pads for protection from cold
Possible alterations: May have a long-haired, wooly coat; some dogs have one blue eye and one brown
Comparable Breeds: Akita, Alaskan Malamute
Highlights
  • Depending on your climate, Siberian Huskies are generally low shedders except during the times of year when they blow their coat, meaning they drop large amounts of hair all at once. This happens roughly twice a year, more if you live in warmer climates, and when it does, the breed becomes a heavy shedder for about a three-week stretch.
  • Siberian Huskies are not recommended for apartment living, but some do quite well in apartments if they are properly trained and exercised.
  • Siberian Huskies are known escape artists and have been known to wander away and disappear. They can jump fences, break tie-out chains, slip collars and find any other way to escape. They need a high fenced yard and the fence should also be buried several inches below ground to prevent the Husky from digging his way out.
  • Siberian Huskies can be very destructive both inside and out. If they are left uncrated inside, the breed can destroy a house and cause a wide variety of damage. Outside, they enjoy digging and will dig up yards and flower gardens alike. A dog that is given a place to dig in the yard is much happier and so are you.
  • While they enjoy howling, Siberian Huskies rarely bark and they will not alert bark if someone comes onto your property. This makes them an unsuitable watchdog. The rap on Huskies is that they would aid a burglar before posing any threat.
  • Siberian Huskies are not a breed for the new or timid owner. They need a strong owner who will maintain an alpha position in the home. They need obedience training from a young age and can be a difficult and stubborn breed to train.
  • Siberian Huskies are very curious and can become injured or lost while they are exploring something new.
  • Affectionate and good natured describes the Siberian Husky. Generally, they do well with children although young children should never be left alone with any breed. They also get along with people and do well in homes with multiple dogs.
  • Siberian Huskies were bred to need very little food to survive. This still applies today and the Siberian Husky does not need a high level of calories per day. It is important to ask your Siberian Husky's breeder what they recommended for a serving helping and to follow their advice.
  • Huskies cannot be allowed to run off leash during walks. They will run away and will also chase other small animals.
  • Due to their beauty, Siberian Huskies are one of the most wrongly purchased breeds around. Many do not take into consideration their temperaments and particular quirks and are often left with an unruly, albeit beautiful, dog. Many Siberian Huskies are either lost, killed, or given to shelters due to uninformed owners. If you are thinking of purchasing a Siberian Husky, take a lot of time learning about the breed. Visit some Siberian Husky breeders or shelter dogs, read books, talk to other owners and possibly foster if you feel you can. If after all your experiences, you feel you still want a Siberian Husky, take the time to decide on whether you should adopt a rescue or a puppy. Follow your breeder's advice and remember that this beautiful dog will make your life an adventure and not always a good one.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Did You Know?
  The Disney adventure movie “Eight Below” is based on the true story of the 1957 Japanese expedition to the South Pole and stars six Siberian Huskies.



Is this breed right for you?
  Sweet by nature and friendly to all people, the Siberian Husky isn't much of a watchdog, but he is a gentle soul. Requiring cool weather due to his winter coat, it's best that he does not live in warm climates. Shedding only twice a year, the Siberian Husky makes for a good inside dog. He requires a good amount of physical activity and does best with a larger fenced-in yard. Doing best with specialized training, he requires a master that is firm with him. Needing a lot of attention and socialization, a lonely Siberian Husky is known to howl and become destructive. Avoid any such issues by partaking in physical activity prior to leaving him alone. Excelling with other Siberian Huskies around, he can learn to enjoy other breeds if he is raised with them.


History  
  The Siberian Husky is not a dog-wolf hybrid. The original dog was developed about half a million years ago by the Chukchi people in Siberia. He was a working dog who pulled heavy sleds over long distances. The Chukchi tribe lived inland and had to travel to the sea to hunt. They needed a way to get a full sled of walrus meat back home. A sledding dog was just the answer. The Chukchi women took care of the dogs, so the dogs were always around children.
  In the early 1900s, the dogs were brought to Alaska to compete in long-distance races, notably the All-Alaska Sweepstakes. Known as Siberians after their homeland, they gained fame for their sledding capabilities and began to be used to deliver mail as well as race.
  The Siberian Husky’s greatest feat came in 1925 when people in Nome, Alaska, suffered a diphtheria epidemic in the middle of winter. Antitoxin was needed desperately. A long-range relay of about 20 mushers brought the antitoxin from Anchorage to Nome in six days, nearly 700 miles in temperatures that hovered around 40 degrees below zero. The run brought fame to the breed.
  Siberian Huskies were used on the Byrd Antarctic Expeditions, as well as in the U.S. Army’s arctic search-and-rescue efforts during World War II. Many Siberian Huskies were assembled and trained at Chinook Kennels in New Hampshire for use on the Byrd Antarctic Expedition beginning in 1928. Siberians also performed gallantly in the Army during World War II as part of the Air Transport Command’s Arctic Search and Rescue Unit.
  Today the Siberian is still famous as a great sled dog who can win races, but he’s also a terrific family pet and companion. He ranks 18th among the breeds registered by the American Kennel Club.

Personality
  Siberian Huskies are pack dogs, and they need an owner who is the clear leader of the pack. This makes training easier because you will find that your dog respects you, but don't be surprised if he tests the limits of your position in the pack and tries to take control from time to time.
  When this happens, it's important not to give into their pushiness. Assert yourself as leader — not by bullying or hitting — but by confirming the ground rules with clarity and consistency.
  Making your dog wait to eat is one of the best ways to establish your leadership role. The Husky will view you as the keeper of all valuable resources — food, treats, toys and other canine assets.
  This high-energy breed can be destructive both indoors and out — especially when bored or not given adequate exercise. They will demolish a house if they are left alone and there has even been a case of a Siberian Husky chewing through a cement wall.
  They will dig up flower gardens and yards alike, but they can be trained to dig in a specific spot in the yard. It is better for everyone if you merely teach your dog to dig in one spot instead of trying to break him of that habit.
  Nonetheless, they can be quite charming with their mischievous and playful nature. They are also quite social and love to show off their talents.
  Siberian Huskies do not bark — that's the good news. Here's the bad: they do enjoy howling, which can be very frustrating for your neighbors. Unless you have a properly trained and well-exercised Siberian Husky, they do not make ideal pets for apartments.
  Another caution: although Huskies are adored for being friendly and gentle, they make lousy watchdogs. Unfortunately, they are not overly suspicious of strangers, including burglars. The fact is that they tend to love everybody.
  Temperament doesn't occur in a vacuum. It's affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner.
  Always meet at least one of the parents — usually the mother is the one who's available — to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.
  Like every dog, Siberian Huskies need early exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Siberian puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.
  Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.

Children and other pets
  Huskies make great pets for households with children. They can be very tolerant of children, but like all other dogs, should be supervised when around young children.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Siberian Huskies do get along with other dogs but it is still important to take your puppy to socialization classes. This gets them used to other dogs and also to people, although they are also very affectionate to strangers. Socialization teaches puppies how to behave and greet other dogs and their owners.
  Keep in mind the history of this breed. The harsh conditions in Siberia created a strong prey drive in this breed because food was often hard to find. As a result, many Huskies today maintain that prey drive toward small animals such as squirrels, rabbits, and cats. Some Huskies, however, thrive in multi-pet households, especially when they are raised with other pets from puppyhood.

Health
  A 1999 ASPCA publication gives the life span of the Siberian Husky as 12 to 14 years. Health issues in the breed are mainly genetic, such as seizures and defects of the eye (juvenile cataracts, corneal dystrophy, canine glaucoma and progressive retinal atrophy) and congenital laryngeal paralysis. Hip dysplasia is not often found in this breed; however, as with many medium or larger-sized canines, it can occur. The Orthopedic Foundation for Animals currently has the Siberian Husky ranked 155th out of a possible 160 breeds at risk for hip dysplasia, with only two percent of tested Siberian Huskies showing dysplasia.
  Siberian Huskies used for sled racing may also be prone to other ailments, such as gastric disease, bronchitis or bronchopulmonary ailments ("ski asthma"), and gastric erosions or ulcerations.
  Modern Siberian Huskies registered in the US are largely the descendants of the 1930 Siberia imports and of Leonhard Seppala’s dogs, particularly Balto. The limited number of registered foundational dogs has led to some discussion about their vulnerability to the founder effect.

Care
  Siberian Huskies need to be exercised 30 to 60 minutes daily to keep them from becoming bored. They make excellent jogging companions, but should not be exercised in hot weather. Surprisingly, they need only a small (but secure) backyard to expend their energy.
  Bottom line: Siberian Huskies need to be working to stay happy. Usually just maintaining your own active life through hiking and other outdoor sports will keep you Siberian Husky healthy, happy and out of trouble.
  As mentioned earlier, training is a must with this breed and you may want to invest in more advanced obedience classes. This can be difficult for many owners and trainers as the breed is very intelligent and will determine the difference between classes and home.
  They will behave wonderfully at class, following all instructions and commands, but at home they may revert back to the stubborn dog that stole your heart. This can be frustrating, but you will find that patience, time, and a little of your own stubbornness will pay off.
  Crate training is an important tool that is often recommended by breeders. It keeps you dog and puppy safe and also gives them their own safe haven to retreat to when they are feeling overwhelmed or tired. A crate should never be used as a punishment.
  Leash training is also a must as Siberian Huskies should never be left off leash when they are not in a fenced area. They love to run and will do so without any thought of how far away you are. You can easily lose your Siberian Husky if he decides to chase something or simply enjoy a heartfelt run. Siberian Huskies do have a high prey drive and that is another reason why they should be leashed during walks.

Grooming
  The Siberian should look “well furred” according to the breed standard, and indeed he does. He has a medium-length double coat. The soft, dense undercoat is topped with straight guard hairs that lie smooth. That double coat means that the Siberian sheds. Oh, yes, he sheds. He sheds throughout the year; once or twice a year he undergoes a process called “blowing coat,” which is just what it sounds like. During this period you may feel that it is snowing gray and white hair. A shedding blade or coat rake will become your best ally.
  That said, the Siberian is actually pretty easy to groom. Outside of shedding season, brush him occasionally with a slicker brush to remove dead hair. Trim the hair between the foot pads. That’s all. A bath is almost never necessary. The Siberian is a very clean dog with little to no odor.
  The rest is basic care. Trim his nails as needed, usually every week or two if he doesn’t wear them down naturally with all his running around. Brush his teeth regularly with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Famous Siberians
  Siberians gained in popularity with the story of the "Great Race of Mercy," the 1925 serum run to Nome, which made dogs Balto and Togo famous. Though Balto is the more famous of the two, and was the dog to deliver the serum to Nome after running the final 53-mile leg, it was Togo who made the longest run of the relay, guiding his musher Leonhard Seppala on a 91-mile journey that included crossing the deadly Norton Sound to Golovin.
  Several purebred Siberian Huskies portrayed Diefenbaker, the "half-wolf" companion to RCMP Constable Benton Fraser, in the CBS/Alliance Atlantis TV series Due South.
  In 1960, the US Army undertook a project to construct an under the ice facility for defense and space research, Camp Century, part of Project Iceworm involved a 150+ crew who also brought with them an unofficial mascot, a Siberian Husky named Mukluk.
  Siberian Huskies are the mascots of the athletic teams of several schools and colleges, including Northern Illinois University (Northern Illinois Huskies), the University of Connecticut (Connecticut Huskies, Jonathan) and University of Washington (Washington Huskies, Harry).

A dream day in the life of a Siberian Husky
  The Siberian Husky loves to wake up at the crack of dawn ready for action. Bred to work, he's ready to pull sleighs and tromp in the snow for hours on end. Needing only a moderate amount of food, he'll continue engaging in play or running with his master until the day has ended. Visiting with neighbors and anyone who comes to the house, the Siberian Husky enjoys socialization. Ending his day cuddled at the foot of the bed, he'll be happy to have spent his day with his master.

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Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Everything about your Dalmatian

Everything about your Dalmatian
  Consider this breed if you are an active person who can provide plenty of training, socialization, and opportunities for hearty exercise.
  The Dalmatian we know today comes from a long line of “coach dogs,” bred to chase horse-drawn carriages day and night. They are tough, dependable and have an incredible stamina. If you’re a cross-country runner or daily jogger, you may have met your match: Dalmatians can keep up with the most intense runners. And for those who live on a ranch or farm, Dalmatians have an instinctive calming effect on horses that goes back to their carriage-guarding days.
  Best known as the star of Disney's 101 Dalmatians, this sleek and athletic dog breed has a history that goes back several hundred years. He started out as a coach dog but has also served in many other capacities, including hunter, firehouse dog, and circus performer. As charming in life as in film, he goes from gallant to goofy to gallant again in the blink of an eye, and loves to be a part of everything his family does.
  Unique spots are the Dalmatian’s calling card, but his running ability is what made him famous. Bred to be a coaching dog, he ran alongside carriages or horseback riders for miles, discouraging stray dogs from interfering with the horses, alerting the coachman to the presence of approaching highwaymen, and guarding the carriage at rest stops. No fashionable lord or lady went driving without a pair of the flashy dogs by their side, and later the Dalmatian’s talents were adapted by firemen, who kept the dogs to clear paths through town for their horse-drawn fire engines.
  The Dalmatian has a romantic and exciting history — not to mention those spots! — but he has health and temperament issues that must be taken into account.

Overview
  One of the most recognizable breeds, the Dalmatian is the only spotted breed. Its exact origin is unknown. The modern Dalmatian was recognized in the 1800s as a carriage dog in the U.K. Now he is well-known as a firehouse mascot, circus performer, hunter, patriotic symbol and all-around great catch. Active and enjoying anything to do with running, this breed is a lovable pet for a family that can keep up with his energetic lifestyle.
  Well-trained and socialized Dalmatians can prove to be both gentle and gentlemanly, displaying good manners and a quiet demeanor, even around strangers. However, they do have a boisterous side that comes from their incredible energy and stamina. For this reason, they may not be the best pets around very small children. But their intentions are always good and they make superb playmates for older children. They also have keen protective instincts that make them very effective guard dogs.

Other Quick Facts
  • Because of their heritage as coaching dogs, Dalmatians get along well with horses and make good companions for riders.
  • The Dalmatian’s spots may be the result of a mutation in a gene for a ticked coat, but no one is really sure where they come from. The spots today are now larger and less ragged around the edges than those seen in pictures of early Dalmatians.
  • One of the British nicknames for the Dalmatian is Plum Pudding Dog, because his spots look like the plums in a Christmas pudding.
  • The Dalmatian is prone to inherited deafness and urinary stones.
  • The Dalmatian was once a popular circus dog.
History
  The Dalmatian's origins are unknown. The spotted dogs are known to have traveled with the nomadic bands of Romanies, sometimes called gypsies, and it's unclear where they may have first appeared. The Dalmatian obtained his name during his stay in Dalmatia, a province on the eastern shore of the Adriatic Sea, the area that is now known as Croatia.

  Dalmatians have been utilized for a variety of jobs during their long history, never specializing in one area. They were used as guard dogs in Dalmatia, shepherds, ratters, retrievers, circus dogs, and coaching dogs.

  It was in England that the Dalmatian was developed as the definitive coaching dog. He was used to clear a path before the horses, run alongside the coach or under the coach between the axels. He guarded the horses and coach when they were at rest. To this day the Dalmatian has a natural affinity for horses.
  This affinity took the Dalmatian on a different career path in the United States. Here he became a firehouse dog, running with the horses to the fire, watching over the equipment during a fire, and sometimes even rescuing people from burning buildings. When the excitement was over, they accompanied the fire wagons back to the station and resumed their duty as watchdog. Today most Dalmatians are companions and family members but many firehouses across the country still have Dalmatians as mascots.

Breed at a glance
  • Black spots
  • Energetic
  • Devoted
  • Protective
  • Intelligent
Breed standards
AKC group: Non-sporting
UKC group: Companion
Average lifespan: 11 -14 years
Average size: 50 - 55 pounds
Coat appearance: Velvety and soft
Coloration: White with black spots
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Athletic, squarish body; deep chest; strong, upright and tapered tail; black or dark-colored nose; toenails are white or black
Possible alterations: Born white, spots develop later; spots can vary in color from brown to brindle; 10 - 15 percent are born deaf and require special training
Comparable Breeds: Brittany, Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
Is this breed right for you?
  A hyperactive and devoted breed, the athletic Dalmatian requires a home equipped with a large yard. Due to his playful nature, he will need firm training and leadership to avoid acting out. Attached to his owner, the Dalmatian needs a lot of companionship and love to maintain his happiness. Enjoying running, it's advised the breed be run for long periods of time, daily. If not given the proper amount of exercise, he will display erratic behavior with family members. Due to this, it's advised that he is brought into a family with older children. A great watchdog, any owner that can handle his energetic personality will find a lot of love in having a Dalmatian as a family pet.

The Look of a Dalmatian
  Dalmatians are lean, medium-sized, well-proportioned dogs with distinctive black spots on white. Their muzzles are strong, eyes deeply set and their soft ears are set somewhat high. They have strong, arched necks, deep chests and level backs. Their tails extend out from their backs and curl up slightly without carrying over their backs, and they have long, well-muscled legs with round feet. Their coats are short, dense and sleek. Puppies are born solid white and develop black spots as they get older. Overall, Dalmatians have a dignified, powerful and alert posture with a steady gait.

Personality
  Born to run, the Dalmatian is a high-energy dog with an endless capacity for exercise. He loves attention and has a strong desire to please, making him easy to train through positive reinforcement such as food rewards, praise, and play.
  He's a smart dog with a sly sense of humor, and will do his best to make you laugh. The Dalmatian is alert and interested in everything that goes on around him and makes an excellent watchdog.
  Like every dog, the Dalmatian needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Dalmatian puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

Care
 The Dalmatian is a very active dog and needs plenty of exercise. He's a fast runner with a great deal of stamina. If left to his own devices a Dalmatian will head cross country on a jaunt that could last several days, so always exercise him on leash or in a secure area. Dalmatians thrive with human companionship and do not do well if relegated to the backyard. They should have plenty of time with their family or they will pine.
  Because of his unique uric acid metabolism, it's important to observe whether your Dalmatian is urinating regularly. For the same reason, be sure to provide him with easy access to fresh water all the time.

Health
  All dogs have the potential to develop genetic health problems, just as all people have the potential to inherit disease. Run from any breeder who does not offer a health guarantee on puppies, who tells you that the breed has no known problems, or who tells you that her puppies are isolated from the main part of the household for health reasons. A reputable breeder will be honest and open about health problems in the breed and the incidence with which they occur.
  Among the health problems in Dalmatians is a unique uric acid metabolism that predisposes them to stones anywhere in the urinary tract. The stones can cause urinary blockages, most commonly in males. It’s essential to notice whether a Dalmatian is urinating regularly and to provide him with plenty of fresh water at all times. Dalmatians are also prone to genetic deafness. All puppies should be BAER (Brainstem Auditory Evoked Response) tested to make sure they can hear. The Dalmatian Club of America has a foundation that sponsors grants and activities to aid research to reduce deafness and find a solution for the uric acid stone problem.
  Dalmations are also prone to allergies, skin conditions, eye problems and laryngeal paralysis.
  Not all of these conditions are detectable in a growing puppy, and it is impossible to predict whether an animal will be free of these maladies, which is why you must find a reputable breeder who is committed to breeding the healthiest animals possible.  They should be able to produce independent certification that the parents of the dog (and grandparents, etc.) have been screened for common defects and deemed healthy for breeding.
  Remember that after you’ve taken a new puppy into your home, you have the power to protect him from one of the most common health problems: obesity. Keeping a Dalmatian at an appropriate weight is one of the easiest ways to extend his life. Make the most of your preventive abilities to help ensure a healthier dog for life.

The Basics of Dalmatian Grooming
  On the plus side, the Dalmatian’s short, fine, velvety-smooth coat is easy to groom. Brush it several times a week with a bristle brush, rubber curry brush, hound mitt, or pumice stone to strip out the dead hair and keep the coat gleaming.
  On the down side, the coat sheds day and night according to many experienced Dalmatian owners. Be prepared to live with dog hair if you choose this breed.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Keep the hanging ears clean and dry to prevent bacterial or yeast infections from setting in. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children and other pets
  Just about every kid recognizes a Dalmatian on sight. His love of activity makes the Dalmatian a great playmate for older children, but his rambunctious nature and swishing tail may be overwhelming to toddlers and young children. With early socialization, Dalmatians can get along fine with other dogs and cats.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.

In popular culture
"Firehouse dog"
  Particularly in the United States, the use of Dalmatians as carriage dogs was transferred to horse-drawn fire engines, although it is unclear why this link was not made in other countries. Today, the Dalmatian serves as a firehouse mascot and is sometimes used to educate the public in fire safety, but in the days of horse-drawn fire carts, they provided a valuable service, having a natural affinity to horses. They would run alongside the horses, or beneath the cart axles. The horses have long since gone, but the Dalmatians, by tradition, have stayed. As a result, in the United States, Dalmatians are commonly known as firehouse dogs. Dalmatians are still chosen by many firefighters as pets, in honor of their heroism in the past. The Dalmatian is also the mascot of the Pi Kappa Alpha International Fraternity. In the past, Pi Kappa Alpha has been known as the firefighters fraternity, and this is why they both share the dalmatian as a mascot.

"Anheuser-Busch dog"
  The Dalmatian is also associated, particularly in the United States, with Budweiser beer and the Busch Gardens theme parks, since the Anheuser-Busch company's iconic beer wagon, drawn by a team of Clydesdale horses, is always accompanied by a Dalmatian carriage dog. The company maintains several teams at various locations, which tour extensively. According to Anheuser-Busch's website, Dalmatians were historically used by brewers to guard the wagon while the driver was making deliveries.

101 Dalmatians
  The Dalmatian breed experienced a massive surge in popularity as a result of the 1956 novel The Hundred and One Dalmatians written by British author Dodie Smith, and later due to the two Walt Disney films based on the book. The Disney animated classic released in 1961, later spawned a 1996 live-action remake, 101 Dalmatians. In the years following the release of the second movie, the Dalmatian breed suffered greatly at the hands of irresponsible breeders and inexperienced owners. Many well-meaning enthusiasts purchased Dalmatians—often for their children—without educating themselves on the breed and the responsibilities that come with owning such a high-energy dog breed. Dalmatians were abandoned in large numbers by their original owners and left with animal shelters. As a result, Dalmatian rescue organizations sprang up to care for the unwanted dogs and find them new homes. AKC registrations of Dalmatians decreased 90% during the 2000–2010 period.

A dream day in the life of a Dalmatian
  The Dalmatian loves to wake up in the bedroom of his owner. Up and ready for his day, he'll run outside for an action-filled romp in the yard before coming inside to greet the family. After a nice long run, he'll await his next command. Running back and forth indoors and out, the Dalmatian will alternate standing guard and chasing random yard vermin. Barking at any strangers, he'll also enjoy human companionship from his family throughout the day. Once night falls, the Dalmatian will happily snuggle close to his family.


                              


                       Enjoy that  Dalmatian!




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