LUV My dogs: cuptea dogs

LUV My dogs

Everything about your dog!

Showing posts with label cuptea dogs. Show all posts
Showing posts with label cuptea dogs. Show all posts

Thursday, August 4, 2016

Everything about your Japanese Chin

Everything about your Japanese Chin
  The Japanese Chin dog breed hails from Asia, where he has been prized as a companion for more than a thousand years. He was a popular member of Chinese and Japanese imperial courts, and it was in Japan that his distinctive look was developed. This breed is elegant and dainty, mild-mannered and playful.
  The Japanese Chin is a sensitive and intelligent breed whose only purpose is to serve man as a companion. Agile and playful, they can be taught to perform tricks and like to show off to an audience of friends. They are extremely cat-like in nature, smart when they want to be and coy when it suits them. Very loyal and loving, treat them right and you have a best friend for life; treat them wrong and you have lost your best friend forever!

Overview
  Despite his name, the Japanese Chin originates from China. Bred for the sole purpose of becoming a companion dog, the breed was originally referred to as the Japanese Spaniel. Eventually moving to Japan and other parts of Europe, the dog was given as a royal and meaningful gift. Playful and intelligent, the Japanese Chin is a good fit for any person or family.

Highlights
  • The Japanese Chin is catlike in many ways. The breed is commonly seen grooming itself by licking its paws and wiping its head. Also, they enjoy being up high and will perch on the back of couches and on tables.
  • Considered to be an average shedder, the Japanese Chin requires a few minutes of brushing each day to remove loose hair and to keep the coat from tangling.
  • Japanese Chin do not handle heat very well and need to be monitored on hot days to ensure that they don't overexert themselves.
  • Due to the breed's flat face, Japanese Chin will often snort, sniffle, or reverse sneeze. Generally, a Japanese Chin is still able to breathe through this, but if the attack becomes severe, you can try gently stroke his neck.
  • Japanese Chin do well in apartments.
  • Although Japanese Chin are intelligent and eager to please, they require interesting, fun-filled training sessions. Otherwise, they get bored and will turn their attention to something more entertaining.
  • Japanese Chin do very well with older children but are not recommended for homes with smaller children due to their small size. They can be seriously injured with minimal force.
  • Japanese Chin are companion dogs who thrive when they are with the people they love. They should not live outside or in a kennel away from their family.
  • Japanese Chin require a lower amount of exercise compared to other breeds but they do enjoy a daily walk or play in the yard.
  • Japanese Chin don't like being parted from their people, and separation anxiety is a common problem in the breed.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • In Japan, the Chin is considered a higher being than other dogs.
  • Chin love to go for walks, but they’re not fond of inclement weather. It’s a good idea to papertrain a Chin if you live in an area with a lot of rain or snow.
  • When the Chin isn’t playing, he’s perching on a high point, observing everything going on around him.
  • The Chin’s happy, cheerful nature, adaptability and range of sizes make him suited to almost any home. Chin who weigh eight or nine pounds are best for families with children, but they must still be handled carefully.
  • The Chin’s abundant silky coat comes in black and white, red and white, or black and white with tan points (tricolor).
  • Because of his acrobatic nature, climbing ability, and tendency to clean himself, the Chin has been described as a cat in a dog suit.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy
UKC group: Companion/Spaniel
Average lifespan: 12 - 14 years
Average size: 4 - 7 pounds
Coat appearance: Silky, straight and luxurious
Coloration: White with black patches, ruby and white
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Body is same length as height; wide-set, large eyes; small V-shaped ears covered with hair; typical black nose with like-colored markings; straight legs; tail set high with feathering
Possible alterations: Patches of color may be red, brindle, orange and other similar colors; markings will match the coloration of the nose
Comparable Breeds: Pekingese, Shih Tzu, Pug

History
  The Japanese Chin is an ancient breed that probably originated in the Chinese imperial court. Highly prized, he was often given as a gift to emissaries from other lands, and it was probably as a gift to the emperor of Japan that he made his way to that island nation which gave him his name. In Japan, the Chin was regarded not as a dog (inu) but as a separate being (chin). There, he was probably crossed with small spaniel-type dogs and eventually achieved the look he has today.
  The Japanese Chin remained unknown to the outside world until 1853 when Commodore Matthew Perry sailed into Uraga Harbor near Edo — now modern-day Tokyo — and introduced Japan to international trade. The Japanese Chin became a popular commodity and many were imported into Britain and the United States.
  Among the first American owners of the breed were President Franklin Pierce, then-Secretary-of-War Jefferson Davis, and Perry's daughter, Caroline Perry Belmont. They became popular with people of wealth and nobility. In the United States, the Japanese Chin was known as the Japanese Spaniel and he kept that name until 1977.

Temperament
  This breed is considered one of the most cat-like of the dog breeds in attitude: it is alert, intelligent, and independent, and it uses its paws to wash and wipe its face. Other cat-like traits include their preference for resting on high surfaces, their good sense of balance, and their tendency to hide in unexpected places. Japanese Chin are loyal to their owners and are typically a friendly breed. While Japanese Chin prefer familiar surroundings, they also do well in new situations. This, alongside their friendly demeanor, makes them good therapy dogs. Early socialization of Japanese Chin puppies leads to a more emotionally well-balanced Chin that is more accepting of different situations and people.
  Japanese Chin are defensive animals and thus although they are usually quiet, they will bark to alert the arrival of a visitor or to draw attention to something out of the ordinary.
  Japanese Chin were also bred for the purpose of entertaining their owners. While typically calm, they are well known for performing many tricks such as the "Chin Spin", in which they turn around in rapid circles; dancing on their hind legs while pawing their front feet, clasped together, in the air; and some even "sing", a noise that can range from a low trill to a higher, almost operatic noise.

Health
  The Japanese Chin, with an average lifespan of 10 to 12 years, is prone to minor ailments like patellar luxation, cataract, heart murmur, Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca (KCS), and entropion. Achondroplasia, portacaval shunt, and epilepsy are sometimes seen in this breed. The Japanese Chin is also susceptible to corneal abrasions and cannot tolerate anesthesia or heat. Knee and eye tests are recommended for this breed.

Care
  Japanese Chin require very little exercise. They are happy with a daily walk or a nice play session but they tend to require little else. Training can be slightly difficult since they have a mind of their own and become bored with repetitious training. When they like you, however, they'll work hard to please you. When they do wrong, a firm tone of voice is all you need to set them straight. Stronger corrections will only backfire and cause your Chin to stubbornly stand his ground.
  They can be difficult to housetrain but with patience and consistency, you can generally expect them to be housetrained by 4 months of age.
  Japanese Chin are companion dogs and should not live outdoors or in kennels. They become very attached to their people, and many suffer from separation anxiety. With their low exercise needs, Japanese Chin make wonderful apartment residents.
  The neck of the Japanese Chin is very delicate and it is strongly suggested that you use a harness instead of a collar when walking him.

Living Conditions
  The Japanese Chin is a good dog for apartment life. They are moderately active indoors and will do okay without a yard. This breed is somewhat sensitive to temperature extremes.

Trainability
  Japanese Chins have spaniel roots, making them easier to train than other small breeds. Training should be done with nothing but positive reinforcement, as harsh treatment will bruise their sensitive egos and they will simply stop listening. The daily training routine should be mixed up to keep the Chin interested, as he is easily bored with repetitive activities. Once basic obedience is mastered, teaching your Chin do to parlor tricks is a breeze, and he'll love the attention that gets lavished upon him when guests see him perform.

Exercise
  Chins do not require a great deal of exercise, however they do need to be taken on a daily walk. They will enjoy the opportunity to play in an open yard.

Grooming
  The Chin might look like he needs a lot of grooming, but he’s a wash-and-go dog. His silky, abundant coat is easy to care for and rarely mats, with the occasional exception of the ear fringes. Brush him weekly with a pin brush to keep the hair from flying around the house (yes, the Chin sheds), and bathe him once a month to keep him smelling nice. After a bath, towel him off until he’s almost dry, brush the coat upward and outward with the pin brush, then smooth it down. You’re done!
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Toy breeds are especially prone to periodontal disease, so brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Although the Japanese Chin is a gentle dog, he is not recommended for homes where there are young children. He can be easily hurt by an overexuberant child. The breed does well with older children who understand how to properly handle a dog.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Japanese Chin get along well with other dogs and cats, but they must be protected from larger dogs who could accidentally injure them in play. A cat's claws can injure their large eyes, so it's important to make sure everyone plays nicely together.

Is this breed right for you?
  Very friendly, the Japanese Chin fits in well with any family. Due to his delicate nature, it is best that children are taught how to handle the small breed. Good with other animals, he's an indoor dog that can live well in an apartment. Needing only moderate exercise, he'll be content with short walks around the neighborhood. The Japanese Chin is easily trained, enjoys playtime and is best kept out of the heat for a prolonged period of time. His luxurious coat will need to be groomed twice a week and it's best to socialize and train him to know that you are master to avoid any potential behavioral problems.

Did You Know?
  A Japanese Chin makes a cameo appearance in the 1984 Woody Allen film "Broadway Danny Rose."


A dream day in the life of a Japanese Chin
The Japanese Chin will ideally wake up in the bed of his master. Following the family wherever they may go, he may stop for a trick or two while awaiting his meal. After a bit of TV time with his master, the dog will enjoy a quick stroll around the neighborhood. Upon returning home, he'll be happy to hang out with the little ones of the house until bedtime, where he'll contentedly snuggle up to his humans.

Read More

Everything about your Affenpinscher

Everything about your Affenpinscher
   The Affenpinscher’s apish look has been described many ways. They’ve been called “monkey dogs” and “ape terriers.” The French say “diablotin moustachu” (mustached little devil), and "Star Wars" fans argue whether they look more like Wookies or Ewoks. But Affens are more than just a pretty face. Though standing less than a foot tall, these sturdy terrier-like dogs approach life with great confidence. As with all great comedians, it’s their apparent seriousness of purpose that makes Affen antics all the more amusing.

Overview
  Affenpinscher comes from the German word meaning "monkey dog/terrier." Living up to its name, the breed enjoys playing and monkeying around. With a Terrier-like personality, the Affenpinscher is bold, curious and very loving with people and other dogs. Requiring training, the dog will do well in apartment life and with children if handled properly.

Highlights
  • Like many toy dog breeds, the Affenpinscher can be difficult to housetrain. Crate training is recommended.
  • While the fur of an Affenpinscher is wiry and is often considered hypoallergenic, this is not to be mistaken with "non-shedding." All dogs shed or produce dander.
  • Because of their heritage as ratters, Affenpinschers tend to not do well with rodent pets such as hamsters, ferrets, gerbils, etc. They do, however, tend to get along with fellow dogs in the household and can learn to get along with cats, especially if they're raised with them.
  • Affenpinschers are generally not recommended for households with toddlers or small children--it is not a breed that is naturally inclined to like children. The Affenpinscher is loyal to his adult family members and can be a great companion for a family with older children.
  • The Affenpinscher is a rare breed. Be prepared to spend time on a waiting list if you're interested in acquiring one.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The German word Affenpinscher means “monkeylike terrier,” not necessarily because they resembled monkeys but because they often performed with organ grinders in much the same way as an organ grinder’s monkey might have done.
  • The Affenpinscher is distinguished by a beard and mustache, bushy eyebrows, a stiff wiry coat, ears that can be cropped or natural, and a tail that can be docked or natural.
  • The preferred color in Affenpinschers is black, but the dogs can also be black and tan, silver-gray, red, and mixtures of these colors.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 12 - 14 years
Average size: 7 - 8 pounds
Coat appearance: Shaggy and wiry
Coloration: Black, gray, silver, red, tan and black
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Other identifiers: Square body; deep chest; longer hair on face than rest of the body; round, black eyes; short, small nose; undershot jaw; tail is carried high at 2/3 length and ears are pointed upward; slightly curly undercoat
Possible alterations: Ears and tail may point down depending on breeder
Comparable Breeds: Brussels Griffon, Pomeranian

History
  The breed is German in origin and dates back to the seventeenth century. The name is derived from the German Affe (ape, monkey). The breed predates and is ancestral to the Brussels Griffon and Miniature Schnauzer.
  Dogs of the Affenpinscher type have been known since about 1600, but these were somewhat larger, about 12 to 13 inches, and came in colors of gray, fawn, black and tan and also red. White feet and chest were also common. The breed was created to be a ratter, working to remove rodents from kitchens, granaries, and stables.
  Banana Joe V Tani Kazari (AKA Joe), a five-year-old Affenpinscher, was named Best in Show at the 2013 Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show in New York City. This win is notable since it is the first time this breed has won Best in Show at Westminster.

Personality
  Affenpinschers are tiny, but they have large personalities. They take themselves very seriously, and require everyone else to take them seriously as well, resulting in humorous interactions with people. Their terrier blood makes them spunky and sassy, and many owners wonder if these tiny toy dogs know just how small they really are. Mostly seen as “purse dogs” by ladies around the world, the Affen is a lovely travel companion, easy-going and accepting of new situations. Just keep an eye on the Affenpinscher about town, this breed can be mischievous.

Health
  The Affenpinscher, which has an average lifespan of 12 to 14 years, has a tendency to suffer from minor diseases like patellar luxation and corneal ulcers. Respiratory difficulties, patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), and open fontanel are sometimes seen in this breed as well. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may run knee and cardiac tests on the dog.

Care
  The Affenpinscher is an ideal dog for apartment living, especially if you have neighbors who don't mind occasional barking. Short, brisk walks or a suitable length of time in the backyard is enough exercise for this sturdy but only moderately active dog.
  Because he's so small, the Affenpinscher should be a full-time housedog, with access only to a fully fenced backyard when not supervised. These dogs won't hesitate to confront animals much larger than themselves, an encounter that could result in tragedy.
  Like many toy breeds, the Affenpinscher can be difficult to housetrain. Be patient and consistent. Crate training is recommended.
  The key to training an Affenpinscher is to always keep training fun. Use lots of praise and motivation!

Living Conditions
  The Affenpinscher is good for apartment life. They are very active indoors and will do okay without a yard. These dogs are sensitive to temperature extremes. Overly warm living conditions are damaging to the coat.

Trainability
  Affens are generally people-pleasers but can be stubborn, so early training is key to having an obedient dog. They respond best to positive reinforcement, with lots of treats and affection. Consistency and a gentle hand are required to prevent the Affen from becoming distrusting of people.
  This tiny dog, with a penchant for mischief makes a good therapy dog. They travel well, adapt well in new environments and make people laugh, making them an ideal visitor for lifting the spirits of the elderly or the sick.

Exercise
  The Affenpinscher needs a daily walk. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as in a dog's mind the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human. Play will take care of a lot of their exercise needs, however, as with all breeds, play will not fulfill their primal instinct to walk. Dogs that do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display behavior problems. They will also enjoy a good romp in a safe open area off lead, such as a large fenced-in yard. Teach them to enter and exit door and gateways after the humans.

Grooming
  The Affen has a wiry coat that can be rough or smooth, but the words “smooth” and “rough” can be misleading. A smooth Affen has some feathering on the legs and a ruff on the neck. Dogs with a rough coat have hair with a slightly softer texture and heavier feathering. Some Affens have a coat that falls somewhere in between. Whatever type of coat he has, the typical Affen looks neat but a bit shaggy. You can be sure he’ll have leaves and twigs stuck in his coat after he’s been outdoors, so he does need regular grooming to maintain his appearance.
   Tools you’ll need are a slicker brush, a stainless steel Greyhound comb, a stripping knife, blunt-tipped scissors and thinning shears. Plucking dead hairs, called “stripping” the coat, is part of the package when living with an Affen. The Affenpinscher Club of America has an illustrated guide to grooming the dog to get the look just right.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Small breeds are prone to periodontal disease, so brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Affenpinschers don't like aggressive behavior such as hitting, unwanted squeezing or hugging, or chasing to catch them or cornering them to hold in a lap. If they can't escape, they will defend themselves by growling or snapping. For these reasons, they are not good choices for homes with young children. Often young children don't understand that a cute little Affenpinscher might not want "love and kisses."
  It's a good idea to socialize any puppy to young children, even if he won't be living with them, but you should always supervise their interactions. Never let young children pick up a puppy or small dog. Instead, make them sit on the floor with the dog in their lap. Pay attention to the dog's body language, and put him safely in his crate if he appears to be unhappy or uncomfortable with the child's attention.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Affenpinschers usually get along well with other dogs and cats in the family, but like most toy breeds they are completely unaware of their size and will take on dogs much bigger than themselves. Be prepared to protect them from themselves.

Is this breed right for you?
  A smaller breed that enjoys being around his family, the Affenpinscher will need consistent training in the home. Getting along well with other dogs and cats when raised with them, he'll become loving and affectionate with children if both the dog and children are raised together. Spunky and confident, he loves to play outside and will need a yard or daily walks if living in smaller spaces. Because of his wiry coat, he doesn't shed and will only require special grooming once or twice a year.

Did You Know?
  At some point in the 18th or early 19th century, someone had the bright idea of breeding the Affenpinscher down in size, allowing them to move up in the world by becoming companions to ladies.

A dream day in the life of an Affenpinscher
  Waking up to a quick cuddle session with his family, the Affenpinscher loves to start his morning with a nice walk around the neighborhood. Giving in to his curious nature, he'll smell every nook and cranny the lovely street has to offer him. On returning home, he'll take a quick nap before retreating to his toy area to play with the other animals and family members of the home. He'll end his day just as it started, by cozying up with his favorite humans.
Read More