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Showing posts with label crossbread. Show all posts
Showing posts with label crossbread. Show all posts

Thursday, June 28, 2018

Everything about your Weimapeake

Everything about your Weimapeake
  The Weimapeake is a deliberate cross between the purebred Weimaraner and the purebred Chesapeake Bay Retriever. Bred to have the ‘die hard’ retriever instinct known only to the Chessie and the close working prey drive the Weimaraner is known for.  This mix makes an excellent all year hunting companion. The webbed feet and heavier coat from the Chessie allow the Weimapeake to hunt waterfowl with ease. The Weim birdiness and the Chessie retrieval instinct make the Weimapeake an outstanding upland hunter with little training needed.  Weimapeakes tend not to have the smelly, oily coat known to other retriever breeds.  Our weimapeakes are very easy to train, are close working in the field and are excellent retrievers.  They have great dispositions and are great family pets.

Overview
  They may look like your typical Labrador Retriever at first, but the Weimapeake is a unique breed all its own.
  This cross between a Chesapeake Bay Retriever and a Weimaraner has a natural retriever instinct and prey drive, but you can also expect that these attractive, large dogs will make great family pets who are loyal and protective of the humans they love.
  Whether or not you hunt, the Weimapeake could be the ideal pet for your family, but to be absolutely sure that this designer dog breed will be the right fit, get the facts below.

Breed standards
Dog Breed Group: Mixed Breed Dogs
Average lifespan: 10-12 years
Average size: 60-90 lb
Coat appearance:  short but thick
Coloration:  grayish-brown  to chocolate brown and black.
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Singles, families with children and other pets, and those living in homes with yards
Temperament: Calm, protective, playful, loyal, intelligent, and loving
Comparable Breeds: Chesapeake Bay Retriever, Weimaraner

History 
  As a fairly new hybrid, not a lot is known about the Weimapeake.  This breed is a mix of the Weimaraner and the Chesapeake Bay Retriever who are both recognised by the American Kennel Club.  The Chessie is skilled at retrieving birds and its genetics can be traced back to 1807.  It was recognized as a breed by the American Kennel Club in 1878 and sources claim that the breed descended from the English Otterhound and the curly-coated Retriever, but the Newfoundland breed is also its ancestor. The Weimaraner was recognized by the AKC much later, in 1943. This breed originated from Germany and was created in the early 19th century by the Weimar court. The Bloodhound is part of its ancestral make-up, and some sources believe that it is in fact, a direct descendant.  The Weimapeake was originally created to try and get the best of both breeds.  It was the intention to create an ideal hunting dog that possessed speed, agility, courage, and intelligence.  
  The American Kennel Club recognizes both parental breeds as a sporting breed, as they are known for their hunting skills both in the woods and in water.  The Weimapeake inherits its webbed feet from both parent breeds which makes swimming and wading easy.  
  Sources say that the Weimapeake has been bred in mid-west America for decades, but the exact dates and whereabouts are unknown.  Although the Weimapeake is not recognized by the American Kennel Club, it is recognized by both the International Designer Canine Registry and the Designer Breed Registry as a hybrid breed. 


Temperament
  The Weimapeake requires proper socialization at an early age. The Weimapeake gets along with dogs and other household pets. The Weimapeake is friendly towards people of all ages if socialized properly. The calm, yet playful nature of the Weimapeake makes it an excellent family dog. The Weimapeake is often reserved with strangers and will protect its family if threatened.

Health 
  As a hybrid breed, the Weimapeake could potentially inherit the diseases that its parents, the Weimaraner and Chesapeake Bay Retriever, are prone to. However, there is no way to predict an individual dog’s health, and he may never develop any of the common problems associated with his parents’ breeds.
  Weimapeakes have the Weimaraner ear, which features a wide ear canal and a large opening, so it can become dirty quite easily. You should take extra care to ensure that water doesn’t become trapped within your dog’s ear canal when bathing or swimming, as that could result in infection.

Care
The short hair of the Weimapeake makes it an easy keep.  Periodically brush to remove dead hairs. Normal ear cleaning, nail clipping and bathing will help keep the Weimapeake in top condition.

Living Conditions
  The Weimapeake can do okay in small house or apartment only if they are walked and exercised at least 2 to 3 times a day. If you don't have a large yard, access to a fenced in area or dog park would be great because they need to run.


Training
  You should expect that housetraining your Weimapeake could potentially take a couple of months, so persistence is key. With this breed, it is all about consistent and short training sessions, and every session should end on a positive note.
  These dogs are really eager to please, and they are intelligent, so they will learn quickly. However, they can be stubborn. Establish yourself as the pack leader, and be gentle yet firm in order to make training your dog easier and to prevent your dog from becoming your boss. Once trained, this multi-talented pooch will make you proud.

Exercise
  The Weimapeake must be walked at least twice a day or have a large yard to run in. Like all sporting breeds the Weimapeake is an active dog which needs regular ‘off leash’ exercise. Without an outlet for pent-up energy the Weimapeake can become destructive and behavior problems can arise.
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Everything about your Labrador Husky

Everything about your Labrador Husky
  Though the name of this breed might suggest that it is a cross between the Labrador Retriever and the Siberian Husky, the Labrador Husky is actually a completely separate breed. This dog looks remarkably like a wolf, having the same double coat and wild appearance. The dog is still a largely unknown breed but if you are lucky enough to meet one you will never forget the experience.

Overview
  The Labrador Husky has a similar temperament to other Northern breeds which means that they can often be unfriendly or even aggressive with strangers.  However, they can be good if socialized, and they often do well with children.  Being with other dogs always makes them happy, because they are bred to work well in a pack and actually many people believe they should be bought in pairs.  Small animals do not usually do well with Nordic dogs but if they are raised together it should be fine.  Training is easy and fun for them because they naturally learns things well.  However, sometimes stubbornness will prevent them from learning silly tricks or other useless commands.  Intelligence can be their gift but can be your nightmare if they are bored.

Breed standards
Dog Breed Group: Mixed Breed Dogs
Average lifespan: 10-13 years
Average size: 60 - 100 pounds
Coat appearance: Thick double coat - thick undercoat and soft outer coat
Coloration: Solid white, solid black, black and white, red and white, and grey and white
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active families, active singles, house with a yard
Temperament: Friendly, good-natured, intelligent, quiet
Comparable Breeds: Siberian Husky, Canadian Eskimo Dog

History
  In order to best understand the history of the Labrador Husky, an explanation of the people that these dogs live alongside and serve is necessary. The Thule Inuit people developed along the coast of Alaska sometime after 200 B.C. These people migrated east across Canada, along with their dogs, and occupied the Labrador region by 1300 A.D. The Dorset people originally inhabited this region, but due in part to their lack of canine use for travel, hunting, and companionship, they were driven to extinction by the Inuit. The Inuit brought Husky dogs with them , and over time, bred these dogs with wolves to improve their strength and endurance. As these people became indigenous to the Labrador region, this breed developed independently from the aforementioned Spitz dogs, and became distinct.
  The Labrador Huskies were used for transportation as sled dogs. Prior to the advent of the snowmobile, sleds were the only viable means of transportation across large swaths of land. The dogs contributed to the hunting success of the Inuit people, allowing them to travel further and hunt in a wider geographical range. In addition, the dogs helped keep their human companions warm in encampments. After the snowmobile was invented, these dogs were not needed as sled dogs, except in sled races, but have been utilised as companions and as search-and-rescue canines. In addition, due to their intelligence, they have also been used in bomb or narcotic detection.


Temperament
  The Labrador Husky is an unknown and often misunderstood breed. It is not a mix between a Labrador and a Husky, but a purebred dog native of coastal Labrador. It is similar in a lot of ways to the wolf. It does not bark, but can howl like a wolf. The objective in training this dog is to achieve pack leader status. It is a natural instinct for a dog to have an order in its pack. When we humans live with dogs, we become their pack. 
  The entire pack cooperates under a single leader. Lines are clearly defined and rules are set. Because a dog communicates his displeasure with growling and eventually biting, all other humans MUST be higher up in the order than the dog. The humans must be the ones making the decisions, not the dogs. That is the only way your relationship with your dog can be a complete success.

Health
  The Labrador Husky is fairly unknown so not much information is available about genetic disorders or their life expectancy.  However, special care has been taken in their breeding which could suggest that few health problems exist.

Care
  The Labrador Husky probably needs plenty of brushing as any double coated breed would.  Plus, they shed once a year and during that time they should be brushed every day to make sure the loose hair gets cleaned from their coat.  Exercise is, of course, essential to this sled dog.  A large yard to run in and long walks will help keep them calm.  However, they should also have some sort of work to do such as agility or fly ball which will keep them calm and happy.

Training
  The Labrador Husky is an intelligent breed so it should respond well to training. These dogs are likely to learn quickly as long as you maintain a firm and consistent hand in training. Positive reinforcement training methods are recommended for this breed and you should keep your training sessions short and fun to ensure that your dog doesn’t lose interest and stop paying attention. Because this breed is so smart it needs plenty of mental and physical stimulation to prevent it from becoming bored and developing destructive behaviors.

Exercise
  This breed needs to be taken on a daily long walk or jog. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as in a dog's mind the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human.

Grooming
  Labrador Huskies require extensive grooming during all parts of the year. Its extremely thick and durable coat, also known as a double coat. was made to be able to withstand harsh winters in Labrador Canada. Daily brushing is required to maintain the coat. A bath is sometimes the best way to fully groom and clean the dog. Bathing the dog does not have to be done on a regular basis, but is important in order to ensure a clean and well-groomed dog. It is also vital that the owner of a Labrador Husky checks for fleas and ticks during the warmer months. 
  Because this dog has such a thick coat, it is the perfect place for a tick or flea to nestle in. Not checking for these things can lead to serious problems such as Lyme disease, which can be life-threatening to the dog. The Labrador Husky sheds constantly throughout the year, so it is important to keep up with its grooming.




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Thursday, December 28, 2017

Everything about your Lhasapoo

Everything about your Lhasapoo
  The Lhasapoo is a cross or mixed breed the offspring of a Poodle  and a Lhasa Apso. She has a life span of 10 to 15 years and is talented in areas such as agility, rally and obedience. She is sometimes called Lhasadoodle and is an adaptable and playful and affectionate small dog.

Overview
  Small and cuddly, the Lhasapoo makes a wonderful companion for singles, couples, seniors and families alike. Gentle in nature and extremely playful, this dog would make a  great addition any growing family, as they do well with both children and other dogs . A mix of Poodle and Lhasa Apso, this designer breed is gaining in popularity. It is also a protective breed, most noticeably will its favorite human, and may bark at strangers – they are small, but mighty!
  If you’re not incredibly active, the Lhasapoo will forgive you. A trip to the park here, some vigorous playtime, and running around in the yard should be plenty for their daily dose of exercise. Due to its moderate activity requirements and small size, the Lhasapoo would do just fine in an apartment, so long as he goes outside everyday.

Other Quick Facts
  • Lhasapoos come in many coat colors and patterns, depending on the genes they inherit.
  • Most Lhasapoos are best suited to homes with older children who understand how to behave around dogs.
Breed standards
Breed Type: Crossbreed

Group: Companion dog, watch dog, toy dog, lap dog

Average lifespan: 10-15 years

Average size: 10 to 20 pounds
Coat appearance: Long, dense, straight, curly
Coloration: White, black, brown, cream, apricot or combinations
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Singles, couples, seniors or families living in an apartment or house
Temperament: Intelligent, sweet, active, protective
Comparable Breeds: Poodle, Lhasa Apso

History
  The Lhasapoo is a designer breed; he is growing quite popular as of late. However, there is not a great deal of information about how the hybrid breed came to be. So, in order to learn about the Lhasapoo, we must take a look at the parent breeds. The Lhasa Apso hails from Tibet. He was a dog that was owned by nobility, and he was the guard dog of the Tibetan monasteries. 
  The only way that anyone was able to own a Lhasa Apso was if the Dalai Lama gifted a Lhasa to that person. This happened sporadically; the Dalai Lama gifted Lhasas to Chinese nobility. In the 1930s, the Dalai Lama gifted a pair of Lhasas to a naturalist and renowned traveller, C. Suydam Cutting. Cutting returned to his kennels in New Jersey and began developing the Lhasa we know today. The Poodle is also a breed that has been around for centuries. Experts believe that he is a mixture of several European water dogs and the North African Barbet, a dog that is now extinct. Eventually, the breed we know as the Poodle ended up in Germany, where he was utilized for his hunting abilities. The Poodle's exact date of origin is not known; there are Poodle-like dogs depicted on Egyptian and Roman artwork. 
  The dogs portrayed are generally retrieving game or herding animals. The Standard Poodle is traditionally used for duck hunting, and smaller Poodles were used to sniff out truffles in the woods. Eventually, travelling performers learned that the Poodle is an adept show dog. Poodles were not very populous in the United States until after World War II. However, for a number of decades, the Poodle was the most popular breed in the U.S.



Temperament 
  These intelligently smart and affectionate dogs with dignity and pride tend to please their owners picking up tricks easily and taking part in games/shows, and being an alert watchdog. They are adaptable by nature and seek for attention and love from its family. If socialized from puppyhood, they would be good to other dogs, pets and children, provided the kids are also well-behaved.

Health Problems
  Before you introduce a Lhasapoo puppy into your home, remember to see a certificate of health from your reputable breeder. As a cross-bred dog, these pups can experience health issues from either Poodle of Lhasa Apso breeds. The most common are eye problems, patellar luxation, SA, kidney problems, Addison’s disease, Cushings Disease, epilepsy, Hypothyroidism, Legg-Parthes Disease, Von Willebrand’s disease, hip dysplasia as well as allergies.

Care
  The Lhasapoo is a breed with an average energy level. It will get most of the exercise it needs when it resides indoors. However, it will appreciate the opportunity to accompany its owner on a short or long walk. The Lhasapoo is an indoor breed. It will remain active while living indoors. The breed also loves being close to its family. Any color is acceptable for the coat of the Lhasapoo. While the Lhasapoo does not shed, it does require frequent trips to the groomer for haircuts every 6-8 weeks. They will become badly matted especially under wet or snowy conditions unless their fur is kept short.

Living Conditions
  The Ideal Environment for a Lhasa-Poo is being close to the family and getting a lot of attention. Since they are a small breed they can live in apartments if given enough exercise.

Training
  Early training methods are best to ensure the Lhasapoo learns as much as s/he can as early on as possible. Although they can be a little harder to train as puppies than as adults, this will make for a more socialized, obedient dog overall. They are an intelligent breed, but are known to be a bit stubborn at times. This designer breed requires a trainer who is patient, calm and keeps a positive attitude. Remember to always reward good behavior with plenty of treats and you’ll be on the right track in no time.

Activity Requirements
  The Lhasapoo is energetic, but he is not overly active. Keep in mine that his Poodle parent breed is notorious for being destructive if he becomes bored. Give your Lhasapoo plenty of chew toys, and take him on short, brisk walks to work off any nervous energy. He will also enjoy playtime with you indoors. The key is making sure he has regular activity, even for short spurts throughout the day. He will also make friends at the dog park, and he may surprise you by hopping from couch-to-couch. Observers often say it appears the Lhasapoo is "flying" when he does so.

Grooming
  Lhasapoos can have different types of fur, including soft, tight curls; big looping curls; loose waves; or straight hair. Most have a curly or wavy coat with a minority having either the typical Poodle coat or the straight Lhasa coat. Curly or straight, it’s always soft. A Lhasapoo coat looks its best with professional grooming every four to six weeks, and it requires brushing or combing every two to three days to prevent mats or tangles, as well as regular bathing between appointments with the groomer.
  Lhasapoos are among the breeds that commonly develop reddish-brown tear stains beneath their eyes. Your best bet is to wash the face daily, carefully wiping beneath the eyes, to prevent stains from setting.
  Your Lhasapoo doesn’t need a bikini wax, but you do need to trim the genital area for cleanliness or have the groomer shave the lower belly area.
  The rest is basic care. Trim his nails every week or two, and keep his ears clean and dry. Small dogs are especially prone to periodontal disease, so brush his teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children and other animals
  She does better with older children but with early socialization and training, and being raised with them she can also be good with younger ones as long as they are supervised in case they start tugging or pulling at her when she doesn't want it. She also does better with other animals when raised with them.

Did You Know?
  A Lhasapoo’s fur can be tightly curled, loosely curled, wavy, or straight. But whatever else it is, it’s always soft.
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Everything about your Irish Doodle

Everything about your Irish Doodle
  The Irish Doodle is a medium to large hybrid or mixed breed that crosses the Irish Setter with the Standard Poodle. She has a life span of 12 to 15 years and has talents in guarding. She is sometimes also called the Irish Doodle Setter or an Irish Setter/Poodle hybrid. She is known for being very lighthearted and is also a devoted dog.

Overview
  Also known as the Irish Doodle Setter, Irish Poo Setter, Irish Setterdoodle, and Irish Setterpoo, the Irish Doodle is a super cute, friendly, and light-hearted medium-sized crossbreed. A mix of Irish Setter and Poodle, it’s ideal for anyone seeking a dog who won’t shed a lot and who will be loyal, social, and intelligent. This dog rarely barks and will even get along great with children and pets.
  If the Irish Doodle sounds too good to be true, rest assured that it isn’t. Combing adorable looks and an equally loveable attitude, this crossbreed is becoming hugely popular. To find out if this dog would be the right fit for your family, check out some quick facts below.

Breed standards
Breed Type: Crossbreed
Breed Group: Watchdog, Sporting Dog, Guard Dog
Average lifespan: 10 to 13 years
Average size: 40-70 pounds
Coat appearance: Long, soft, wavy
Coloration: Apricot, black, white, black and tan, brown
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Singles, families with children and other pets, seniors, and those living in apartments or houses with or without yards
Temperament: Loyal, devoted, quiet, social, intelligent, friendly
Comparable Breeds: Irish Setter, Poodle

History
  The Irish Doodle is a hybrid canine, a cross between two very different breeds of hunting dog; a German retrieving dog, the Poodle, and an elegant red field hunting dog called the Irish Setter. The Poodle is often associated with France but it was actually developed in Germany, where it was known as a Pudlehund; Pudle meaning to splash around, and hund meaning dog.
  Poodles today are still sometimes employed to retrieve waterfowl, although the modern hunter is more likely to clip them short all over to prevent tangling in the brush and weeds. The Irish Setter was developed in Ireland, at some point in the 1700s as a field hunting dog and by the early 1800s, the breed was popular not just in Ireland, but also throughout the British Isles. Most experts believe that the Irish Setter is an ancestor of breeds such as the Irish Water Spaniel, the Gordon Setter, and the Irish Terrier, but written records from the time are nonexistent. The earliest Irish Setters were bred to be able to search out birds then hold their position, preventing them from entering the line of fire and they often came in either red and white or yellow and white, but in the mid-1800s their characteristic deep red color became the ideal. 
  They were imported into the United States as gun dogs and retrievers that specialized in retrieving gamebirds during the mid-1800s as well and were recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1878. Although the Irish Setter could be crossed with a Miniature or Toy Poodle, the most commonly included Poodle for this hybrid is the Standard Poodle.


Temperament
  These dogs are loving and affectionate, and are characterized by loyalty and devotion. They are eager to please and have significant native intelligence inherited from their parents. It is their intelligent mind and careful disposition that have made them equally good with kids and other family pets. This makes them an excellent family dog ideal for apartment life. Not do they just love the members of their families, but they are also comfortable meeting strangers.
  These dogs, especially the puppies, love attention until they’re well along in years. Though, it is alert and attentive. If it happens to come across anything suspicious, it would immediately alert its family.

Health
  She is generally a healthy dog and whether or not you believe in the idea of hybrid vigor there is still the possibility a puppy might inherit conditions one or both its parents are at risk of. For the Irish Doodle these include Addison's Disease, Bloat, Cushing's disease, epilepsy, Hypothyroidism, Legg-Perthes, Patellar Luxation, SA , Von Willebrand's Disease, OCD, CAD, HOD, Joint dysplasia, eye problems and Panosteitis. To avoid getting a dog with health problems you can improve the odds by only buying after seeing health clearances for both parents.

Care
  Bathing need not be a frequent occurrence with these canines, usually just a few times a year, but thorough brushing and styling will generally be needed on a regular basis. They type of grooming implements that will be required for this animal can vary a bit, depending on which parent breed they most resemble, although most will need clipping or trimming of some sort on a regular basis. 
  Crossbreeds that inherit the single-layer Poodle coat are less likely to shed and in some cases, may even be low shedding enough to be considered hypoallergenic, however, the coat of the Irish Setter is decidedly not hypoallergenic, and the full composition of the coat may not reveal itself until your Irish Doodle has reached maturity. It is also quite important to check and clean this dog’s ears on a regular basis as they can be prone to internal and external infections.

Training
  The trainability of the Irish doodle is unpredictable. The standard poodle is a happy-go-lucky and easily trainable dog. But the Irish setters are not always so, but would rather get bored easily. Those Irish doodles that take after their setter parents sometimes demand commitment and patience from their trainers. But once the training process is successfully over, your Irish doodle will be the best trained dog in the neighborhood.
  Begin obedience and pack leader trainings from an early age. Train them to socialize and get accustomed to meeting new faces. Like their parents, the Irish doodles are naturally clean, and hence, are easy to be housetrained.

Exercise Requirements
  The Irish Doodle doesn’t need a lot of exercise. Instead, a moderate amount of daily activity, through games like fetch and a walk or jog, will help keep your dog happy and in great shape. If you do have an enclosed, safe yard, you can even let your pooch play freely outside when the weather permits.

Grooming 
  She does not shed much and is hypoallergenic so is good for those with allergies. She should be brushed at least twice a week still to remove mats and tangles and keep the coat looking bright and healthy. Use a solid bristle brush and you should find her coat easy to brush. She will need to have a bath as and when she gets dirty enough to need one! Check her ears once a week and wipe them clean and clip her nails if they grow too long.

Children and other animals
  When training and early socialization is completed she is very good with children and other pets. They will be happy to play and affectionate towards them. Children should be taught how to play nicely with any dog, and that things like ear or tail pulling or messing around with their food at feeding time is not acceptable.

Is the Irish Doodle the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Difficult Training: The Irish Doodle isn't deal for a first time dog owner. Patience and perseverance are required to adequately train it.
Slightly Active: Not much exercise is required to keep this dog in shape. Owners who are frequently away or busy might find this breed suitable for their lifestyle.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.
The Irish Setter is a more energetic dog, but when combined with the Poodle, the puppies settle down a great deal. However, I recommend these pups for more active people and families with more energetic children. They will be perfect for the person wanting a devoted running companion, as well as a therapy dog
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Wednesday, December 27, 2017

Everything about your Jack Chi

Everything about your Jack Chi
  The breed Jack Chi has been produced by crossing between the Jack Russell Terrier and the Chihuahua. They are small to medium-sized dogs with a dense coat, short neck, elongated muscular body, large eyes, and a triangular head. Their ears either erect like that of the Chihuahua, or with a curl-over like the terrier parent. This dog typically has a long nose like its Jack parent, and so is the built-up of its body, including the color patterns.   However, its coat and the length of its legs are quite similar to that of a Chihuahua. It’s not uncommon for this dog to be shorter than 10 inches at its shoulders. Like the Chihuahua, its muzzle can at times be thinner than the Jack Russell.

Overview
  Also known as the Jackuahua, the Jack Chi is a little dog with boundless energy. If you are ready to share your home with a canine that requires plenty of exercise and mental stimulation, but is intelligent, friendly, and ready to snuggle too, this designer breed could be an ideal choice.
  The Jack Chi can be a bit of a challenge, despite its many fantastic qualities and its absolutely adorable appearance, so read on to learn more about this breed and to find out if this small dog with a big heart is right for you.

Breed standards
Type: Designer dog
Group (of Breed): Crossbreed
Average lifespan: 13-18 years
Average size: 8 to 18 pounds
Coat appearance: Short, dense, wiry or can be longer if the parent Chihuahua is the long haired version
Coloration: Black, White, Brown, Chocolate, Cream, Golden, Fawn, Black & Brown, Black & White, Black and Tan, Brown & White, Dark Brown, Light Brown, Tricolor
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Singles, as well as families with children and other pets, living in a house or apartment, with or without a yard
Temperament: Energetic, alert, friendly, affectionate, playful, sweet
Comparable Breeds: Chihuahua, Jack Russell Terrier

History
  Your Jack Chi hybrid family member is the product of the breeding of a Chihuahua and a Jack Russell Terrier for what appears to be the sole purpose of family and individual companionship.  This is a fairly new hybrid and, as such, there is little history about it beyond the fact that it was developed in the United States.  
  One can only assume that its approximate date of origin falls into the past two to three decades, a time of regeneration of crossing and mixing a variety of purebreds to create these “designer” or hybrid canine breeds.  While there is little historical information about the Jack Chi hybrid itself, there is plenty of information available on the parent breeds, the Chihuahua and the Jack Russell Terrier.  
  The Chihuahua breed hails from Mexico and can be traced back to the 9th century where images of a dog resembling the Chihuahua have been found in artwork, written works and other artifacts.  Though the history of the origination of the Chihuahua remains shrouded in folklore, it is most commonly believed to have been developed in ancient Mexico as a dwarf pet canine. This parent breed made its appearance in the United States in about 1850 and has been firmly implanted ever since.  The Jack Russell Terrier originated in the United Kingdom in the early 1800’s for hunting and tracking purposes. 
  The small size and compact build of the Jack Russell made him perfect as he was large enough to keep up with the foxhounds but small enough to “go to ground” and rout the foxes from their dens.  Today, while their noses remain ever vigilant for those unusual and interesting scents, they are primarily utilized as family pets and companion dogs.  The Jack Chi hybrid is recognized by these organizations: American Canine Hybrid Club, Designer Dogs Kennel Club, Dog Registry of America, Inc. and the International Designer Canine Registry.

Temperaments
  The Jack Chi is a friendly and playful dog who is also very affectionate and has a lot of energy. She tends to bond more closely to one owner and is quite protective. She is alert and fairly intelligent and her love of fun can make her very entertaining with acrobatics she jumps high and runs fast. She has a curious nature but those playful moments are often mixed with calm moments when she likes to cuddle and burrow in her blankets – or yours. She loves getting lots of attention and is friendly to other people. Some can be hyper though and can become overly nervous all the time.

Health Problems
  Because the Jack Chi is a hybrid dog breed, it could be prone to health conditions that affect its parents, the Jack Russell Terrier and the Chihuahua. Despite that, however, this is a hardy breed overall.
  Keep an eye out for allergic reactions to food ingredients like soy or to environmental allergens like grass. Also, your dog’s skin may be sensitive to insects and insect bites, such as fleas and mosquitoes, and he may also suffer with teary eyes.


Care
  Your Jack Chi is considered to be hypoallergenic but that doesn’t mean he won’t shed because he is also in the moderate category of shedding.  Brushing once or twice a week should help to remove loose, dead hair, parasites and debris from his coat.  He needs bathing only as necessary.  Your furry family friend will need to have his ears checked and cleaned regularly to avoid infections and keeping up with dental examinations and teeth cleaning will help to reduce the potential for periodontal disease development, which is common among canines.  Eye examinations should be done to assess and monitor any of the variety of eye problems, both internal as well as external, which are known to afflict the parent breeds.

Training
 When it comes to training your Jack Chi, be prepared to remain patient and consistent, as these dogs may not be easy to train. First-time dog owners and those with little experience training dogs may find a Jack Chi difficult, and if you do not properly train and socialize your dog from puppyhood, issues like separation anxiety and spatial aggression could occur. It’s best to be strict and assertive while focusing on positive reinforcement in order to establish yourself as the pack leader, as this little dog can be pretty tough.

Activity Requirements
  Your Jack Chi hybrid is an energetic bundle of love and playfulness.  This energy will need to be spent daily to keep him  healthy and happy, the need to avoid boredom being great.  
  Taking your Jack Chi for long walks a couple of times a day, letting him play in the dog park, run loose in your high-walled, well-fenced yard, games of fetch, frisbee and hide and seek with his toys will help achieve this. It should be said, here, that you should always keep your Jack Chi on leash when outside as his tracking and hunting nose never stops seeking those oh so interesting scents which he will happily try to investigate.  Also, because your Jack Chi is so intelligent, the hide and seek games will keep your furry family member from becoming bored and avoid the development of those annoying chewing, digging and destructive behaviors that all dog owners resent. 
  Because of his small size, he is perfectly suited for apartment or condo living, but remember that his exercise needs must be met on a daily basis.  He is friendly with everyone, his human family, other pets and even strangers, so a family home with or without the fenced yard is also good for him.  It is important to note that, because of the traits inherited from the Jack Russell side, he will need to be well-fenced in with a high-walled fence that will be difficult for him to jump.  Care must also be taken to prevent digging for an escape route.  It is also noted that the typical electric fence may not be suited for this frisky little escape artist.  He can live in urban or rural settings and can tolerate most climates, provided he is given additional protection from extremes of heat and cold weather.

Grooming 
  If she is short haired grooming is fairly easy, she will need a brush a couple of times a week. Longer hair means more tangles can happen so brush it more often. Wiry hair means she may need trips to a groomers every couple of months. She does shed a moderate amount and that can be worse around seasonal shedding times. Give her a bath just when she is dirty and is needing one so that you do not damage her skin's natural oils. Her nails will need to be trimmed when they get too long. 
  Dog nails have live nerves in them so take care or have it done by a groomer. Her ears should be cleaned by wiping them carefully once a week, and just check them for infection signs. Her teeth should also be kept clean by brushing with dog toothpaste and brush at least twice a week.

Children and other animals
  She can be good with children, she likes to play with them and run around and have fun. She can also be gentle and affectionate towards them. She can be good with other pets too but with smaller animals she may be inclined to chase them as prey to hunt. Socialization will help this and how she gets along with other dogs as she can be bossy and does not care she is so much smaller than most of them.


Is the Jack Chi the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep.
Difficult Training: The Jack Chi isn't deal for a first time dog owner. Patience and perseverance are required to adequately train it.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.
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