LUV My dogs: companion

LUV My dogs

Everything about your dog!

Showing posts with label companion. Show all posts
Showing posts with label companion. Show all posts

Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Everything about your Chesapeake Bay Retriever

Everything about your Chesapeake Bay Retriever
  The Chesapeake Bay Retriever dog breed originated as a water dog used to hunt and retrieve ducks in the chilly chop of Maryland’s Chesapeake Bay. The dog’s sturdy build, dense coat, stamina, and strength made him ideal for this purpose. Today, he’s still known as a fine hunting dog as well as a wonderful companion for active, experienced dog owners who can give him the structure and exercise he needs.

Overview
  The Chessie is possessed of a nature that is more protective and less welcoming to strangers than that of many sporting dogs, but that doesn’t make him bad-tempered. He is fond of and careful with children but will guard your home and hunting gear with alacrity. To a far greater degree than his more amiable cousins the Labrador and Golden Retrievers, the Chessie thinks for himself and does things the way he wants to do them. And really, who’s going to argue with him? That would be a waste of time. This is an assertive, confident dog who requires an owner with the diplomatic finesse and commanding presence of a Colin Powell.
  The Chessie is not the right dog for you if all you want is a companion. No matter how much exercise or training or dog sports or companionship you think you could give him, the Chessie is a hunting dog at heart. And not just any old hunting dog: he’s a waterfowling dog and lives to get wet in the quest to bring back his feathered quarry. Limiting a Chessie to life as a pet is like blasting away at a duck with a cannon. That doesn’t mean he can’t also be a therapy dog or jogging buddy or family friend, just that hunting is his first love.

Highlights
  • Chessies require a great deal of exercise, including swimming if possible. If they don't receive adequate exercise, they can become frustrated and destructive.
  • Chesapeake Bay Retrievers are not recommended for inexperienced or first-time dog owners.
  • They can be prone to dominance problems if not properly trained and socialized. You must provide strong leadership without being harsh.
  • Chessies can be more aggressive, willful, and reserved with strangers than other retrievers.
  • Chesapeake Bay Retrievers may be combative toward other dogs.
  • Chessies are strong dogs, slow to mature, with a tendency to be territorial. They need firm training and management.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from a backyard breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • The Chessie’s oily coat protects him in the water, but it also gives him a doggy odor.
  • Chessies enjoy spending time with their family and should not live outdoors with little human interaction.
  • Chessies are an uncommon breed. Expect to spend some months or even a year or more on a waiting list before a puppy is available.
Breed standards
AKC group: Sporting Group
UKC group: Gun dog
Average lifespan: 11 - 13 years
Average size: 55 - 80 pounds
Coat appearance: Thick, harsh and oily. Water runs off the coat similar to a duck.
Coloration: Red, brown and tan
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Muscular body, webbed toes, high-set hanging ears, medium-length tail, yellow or amber eyes, thin lips and brown nose
Possible alterations: White markings on body
Comparable Breeds: Golden Retriever, Labrador Retriever

History
A Chesapeake Bay Retriever circa 1915
  The Chesapeake Bay Retriever is one of the few breeds that can claim to be born in the USA. The breed is thought to descend from two Newfoundland dogs named Sailor and Canton who were traveling aboard a ship bound for England in 1807. The ship ran aground, but the crew and the two dogs Sailor, a dingy red male, and Canton, a black female, were rescued. Sailor found a home with John Mercer of West River and Canton with Dr. James Stewart of Sparrow's Point.
  Both dogs gained a reputation as excellent water dogs, especially when it came to duck hunting, and their puppies inherited their abilities — and their unusual yellowish or amber-colored eyes. There was no recorded mating of the two dogs, but seventy years later, when strains from both the eastern and western shores of Maryland met at the Poultry & Fanciers   Association show in Baltimore in 1877, their similarities were sufficient that they were recognized as one breed, "The Chesapeake Bay Ducking Dog." Records show that the offspring of Canton and Sailor were intermingled at the Carroll Island Kennels and spread from there throughout the region.
  By the time the American Kennel Club was established in 1884, a definite Chesapeake variety had been developed and was well known for its prowess in the rough, icy waters of the Chesapeake Bay. The American Chesapeake Club was formed in 1918. The American Chesapeake Club held the first licensed retriever trial in 1932. Fittingly, the front door of the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michael's, Maryland, is guarded by a pair of cast-iron statues of Chessies.

Personality
  The Chesapeake Bay Retriever has the strongest personality of all retrievers. They are not as easy-going as the other breeds, are more independent and are probably the hardest to train. Despite that, they are some of the most durable hunting dogs around. They love to swim and can handle an entire day of retrieving ducks or sticks from frigid waters. They are a true outdoorsperson's dog and will happily accompany people on hikes, bike trips, jogs or camping excursions.

Health
  The Chesapeake Bay Retriever, which has an average lifespan of 10 to 13 years, is prone to some major health issues such as gastric torsion and canine hip dysplasia (CHD), and minor concerns like hypothyroidism and progressive retinal atrophy (PRA). Some other potential issues affecting the breed include elbow dysplasia, entropion, cerebellar abiotrophy, and Osteochondrosis Dissecans (OCD). To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may recommend regular eye, hip, and thyroid exams for the dog.

Living Conditions
  Chesapeake Bay Retrievers are not recommended for apartment life. They are relatively inactive indoors and will do best with at least an average-sized yard. Chesapeake Bay Retrievers often enjoy sleeping outdoors if it is cooler outside, as they prefer cool climates.

Training
  In many ways, the Chesapeake Bay Retriever is a classic retriever when it comes to behavior and training. They are loyal, easy to get along with, and don’t mind being put to work. This breed especially has been bred for water retrieving and other similar activities, so helping them understand their role in your family can include those sporty activities.
Generally, a well-socialized Chesapeake Bay Retriever will be about as friendly as you can hope a big dog to get. Proper training and raising, as always, is important for any dog.

Activity Requirements
  Chesapeakes need a lot of exercise and a couple of walks around the block won't cut it. They are a hunting dog who loves to be outdoors – they can retrieve in cold water all day long (up to 200 ducks a day) and never tire of working alongside hunters. They also enjoy jogging, hiking, chasing sticks and catching frisbees. The Chesapeake Bay Retriever is by no means an apartment dog. They are rowdy and rambunctious well into adulthood, need a lot of exercise, and if they don't get it they can be quite destructive.

Grooming
  The Chessie has an oily, harsh outer coat atop a dense, fine, woolly undercoat. Dirt and debris brush out easily with a rubber curry brush. The undercoat sheds heavily in the spring, so be prepared to brush the dog more frequently during this time to keep loose hair from collecting on clothing and furniture.
  Give the Chessie a thorough freshwater rinse after he’s been in saltwater or swum through slime in a pond or lake, but to maintain the coat’s water resistance, avoid bathing him unless absolutely necessary. That can be as little as twice a year.
  The rest is basic care. Keep the ears clean and dry so they don’t get infected, and trim the nails as needed, usually every couple of weeks. Brush the teeth for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  In general, Chessies love kids but won't put up with a lot of harassment, instead preferring to walk away. They can, however, be possessive of food and toys, which can make them a poor match for homes with young children. They are protective of children but can misinterpret their play with their friends and react inappropriately. Many breeders won't sell   Chessie puppies to families with children younger than 8 years of age. An adult Chessie who's familiar with children is a better match for a family with young kids.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Chessies can be aggressive toward strange dogs, but should get along fine with other family dogs and cats if they're raised with them.

Is this breed right for you?
  Although a wonderful breed for the family life, the Chesapeake Bay Retriever requires an outdoor environment with a lot of activity to truly be happy. A natural retriever, it needs proper training and a confident owner to understand its own boundaries. While relatively inactive indoors, the Chessie is not at all recommended for apartment life and should have a very large yard, preferably with a swimming area for regular exercise. It will get along with cats if raised with them, but it may have an issue when introduced later in life and will most likely not get along with other dogs. Simple to groom, the Chesapeake Bay Retriever does require regular bathing to avoid smelling fowl.

Did You Know?
  The Chessie isn’t hardwired to be a companion; he’s a hunting dog, pure and simple. And not just any old hunting dog - he’s a waterfowling dog and lives to get wet in the quest to bring back his feathered quarry.

A dream day in the life
  The Chesapeake Bay Retriever will be happy waking inside or outside, so long as it's cool enough. Going for a quick dip, it'll easily shake off the water to enjoy some downtime in the house with its family members. After a nice long hunt or walk, the Chessie would love to practice some obedience training and engage in a bit of play before heading in for the night. Regardless of where it is, this breed will always be on the lookout to ensure the home is safe and sound from human and furry intruders.






Read More

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Everything about your American Bulldog

Everything about your American Bulldog
  It may have its roots in fighting and working, but the American Bulldog is a big old softie at heart. Now, you’ll find him as a much-loved companion in many households in North American and around the world. He’ll keep a watchful eye over the family and work his tail off all day, but he’s just as content to curl up at your feet on the couch.

Overview
  The American Bulldog, also known as the Old Country Bulldog, the Old Country White, the Old Time Bulldog, the Old English White, the English White, the White English, the Alabama and the Southern Bulldog, is known for its superb strength and fine character. It does not closely resemble the more familiar English Bulldog and is not yet recognized by the American Kennel Club. This breed is similar to the old, seventeenth-century bull-baiting dogs used to fight bulls for entertainment and supposedly to tenderize the meat for human consumption in Great Britain. The predecessors of this breed came to America in early colonial times, before the English Bulldog went through its transformations to become what that breed is today. This is a friendly, versatile dog that can do almost anything well. It is cherished as a hunting dog of large and small game, a guard dog, a guide dog and a beloved family companion. American Bulldogs form strong bonds with their people but if not properly socialized can be aggressive towards strangers and other animals.
  The American Bulldog is on average between 20 and 28 inches at the withers, with the females being on the smaller side of the range. They weigh between 60 and 125 pounds, again with females being lighter. Their short, shiny coat is low-maintenance. As these are working dogs, there is a wide variation in height and weight more so than in other breeds.

Other Quick Facts
  • American Bulldogs can vary in size, appearance and energy level, according to the line or strain from which they were bred. For instance, Scott-type American Bulldogs tend to be smaller than those from the Johnson line and larger than those from the Painter line.
  • The American Bulldog is usually white or white with patches of brindle, black or red/fawn. For showing purposes, it can be any color, pattern or combination of colors except for solid black, solid blue, merle or white with patches of black and tan (tricolor), according to the United Kennel Club.
  • An American Bulldog can have a docked tail, but a natural tail is preferred. The natural tail is thick at the base and tapers to a point. It’s sometimes described as resembling a pump handle. 
  • Comparable Breeds: Bulldog, Pitbull
History
  The Old English Bulldog was preserved by working class immigrants who brought their working dogs with them to the American South. Small farmers and ranchers used this all-around working dog for many tasks including farm guardians, stock dogs and catch dog. These dogs were not an actual breed as considered by today's standards but were a generic bulldog type. There were no recorded pedigrees or records and breeding decisions were dependent on the best working farm dogs despite breed or background. Several separate strains of the "bulldog" type dogs were kept by ranchers as utilitarian working dogs.
  Perhaps the most important role of the bulldog and the reason for its survival, and in fact why it thrived throughout the South, was because of the presence of feral pigs, introduced to the New World and without predators. The bulldogs were the settlers' only means of sufficiently dealing with the vermin. By World War II, the breed was near extinction until John D. Johnson and his father scoured the back roads of the South looking for the best specimens to revive the breed. During this time a young Alan Scott grew an interest in Johnson's dogs and began to work with him on the revitalization process. At some point, Alan Scott began infusing non-Johnson catch bulldogs from working Southern farms with John D. Johnson's line, creating the now Standard American Bulldog. At another point, Johnson began crossing his line with an atavistic English bulldog from the North that had maintained its genetic athletic vigor.
  American bulldogs are now safe from extinction and are enjoying a healthy increase in popularity, either as a working/protector dog or as a family pet. All over the world, they are used variously as "hog dogs" , as cattle drovers and as working or sport K-9s. American Bulldogs also successfully compete in several dog sports and in conformation dogs shows .

Personality
  With roots in the violent sport of bullbaiting, the American Bulldog was later developed as a farm dog and hunter's assistant, herding and protecting livestock and hunting everything from squirrels to bear. Today, the breed is a sturdy companion for families or farmers, keeping a watchful eye over his people and property. Active and playful, the American Bulldog loves people and craves constant attention, (though he may not be fond of other dogs and should be kept away from cats). He can work or play all day long, and will happily curl up at your feet for a nice belly rub at the end of the day.

Health
  The American Bulldog generally lives about 10 to 16 years and is considered a healthy breed. Some genetic issues common to the breed include neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (a nervous system disorders with swelling and/or changes in some retinal cells), disorders of the kidney and thyroid, ACL tears, hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia (another common form of dysplasia in larger breed dogs), cherry eye (or a mass that protrudes from the eyelid of a dog), entropion (a condition in which a portion of the eyelid is inverted or folded inward) and bone cancer.

Care
  The short, fine coat of the American Bulldog requires minimal grooming and care, however, similarly to the English Bulldog, the American Bulldog has been known to drool and slobber. With a history as an all-purpose working dog and fearless guard dog, the American Bulldog is a good indoor/outdoor dog but does require sufficient outdoor exercise and activity, especially if it lives in an apartment setting. 

Living Conditions
  The American Bulldog will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. They are relatively inactive indoors and will do best with at least an average-sized yard.

Trainability
  American Bulldogs are strong willed and can be a challenge to train until leadership is established. Not the best choice for a first-time dog owner, this breed will make his trainer prove who is in charge. Training requires absolute consistency – give an American Bulldog an inch and you'll find he's taken about six miles. A calm-assertive approach is best, with lots of positive reinforcement and treats for extra incentive.
  Once the initial hurdles are crossed, however, American Bulldogs can excel in advanced obedience and agility training.

Exercise Requirements
  If you have an active family, the American Bulldog will fit right in. Expect to give you dog about an hour or two of outside exercise per day. If you don’t deliver these exercise requirements, the American Bulldog will take it out on your home.    Activities can include walking, jogging, chasing balls, agility, farm work, and advanced obedience training.
  Unless you can fulfill the outdoor activity requirements, apartments and condo dwellers should stay away from this breed. Houses with fenced-in yards or farms/rural areas are best suited for the American Bulldog.

Grooming
  The American Bulldog has a short coat that may feel either soft or stiff. The breed sheds moderately year-round. Brush or comb the coat weekly to remove dead hair and distribute skin oils.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails every three to four weeks or as needed. Brush the teeth often — with a vet-approved pet toothpaste — for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  His amiable temperament and bulk make the American Bulldog an excellent companion for children, even young ones. A American Bulldog will put up with a lot from a child, although he shouldn't have to, and he'll walk away if he gets tired of being tormented.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  With their pacific nature, American Bulldogs also get along well with other pets, dogs and cats. They may be less sociable toward strange dogs, however.

Did You Know?
  The American Bulldog was bred to be what’s known as a “catch dog.” His job is to chase, catch and bring down free-ranging livestock.

American Bulldogs in popular culture
  • Spike and Tyke from the Tom and Jerry franchise.
  • The Deftones' video Bloody Cape featured a model walking an American Bulldog down the street. The American Bulldog was actually played by two separate dogs from the Norcal's American Bulldog Kennel. The names of the dogs were Big Trouble and Tory Hesta.
  • In Return to Me (2000), David Duchovny’s character’s dog, Mel, is played by an American Bulldog named Peetey.
  • In the 2001 film Kevin of the North, one of Kevin Manley's sled dogs is an American Bulldog named Snowflake.
  • Nedd ("Nasty Evil Dead Dog") in The Number 23 (2007)
  • In Tucker and Dale vs Evil (2010), Jangers, Tyler Labine's character’s dog, is played by an American Bulldog named Weezer.
  • An American Bulldog features prominently as the titular character's companion in the 2013 film Joe.
  • Since the 1990s, American Bulldogs have become more frequently used in films as family pets, replacing the previously popular Pit Bulls and Bull Terriers




Read More

Friday, April 21, 2017

Everything about your English Foxhound

Everything about your English Foxhound
  This pack hound has been bred for more than 150 years and is used primarily for fox hunting, but with plenty of exercise he can also make a fine family companion. His size and voice make him best suited to a rural home.

Overview
  Bred in England since the 1800s, English Foxhounds have been bred in over 250 packs. Coming to America in the 1900s, the breed is meant to hunt foxes on foot next to a hunter on horseback. With a strong nose and ability to run for miles, this breed is an active and gentle dog.
  The English Foxhound has a stately bearing, but beneath his classic good looks lies a dog who’s always ready to rock and roll. This is a dog bred to run full throttle over hill and dale, hot on the heels of a fox. Expect to provide him with lots of strenuous daily activity. A bored Foxhound with energy to burn will create his own entertainment, and you probably won’t like it. He’s also noisy, with a loud bay that carries long distances. It’s not a good idea to keep him in an urban environment.

Highlights
  • English Foxhounds need a large fenced yard and daily exercise of 30 to 60 minutes per day.
  • English Foxhounds are not recommended for apartment living. They are an active breed indoors, which makes them unsuitable for small dwellings.
  • Before you purchase your English Foxhound, research the breed and to talk to breeders. The English Foxhound is not the breed for everyone, and because the information about him is limited it is easy to purchase this breed while failing to properly understand its limitations and idiosyncrasies.
  • English Foxhounds need a strong owner who is fair and consistent. Obedience training is a must and should begin at an early age.
  • This breed does well with children, but English Foxhounds are quite active and bouncy when they are young. For that reason, they are not recommended for homes with small children.
  • Being pack dogs, English Foxhounds do well with other dogs and actually do better in homes where there are other dogs. They can become bored and destructive when they are the only dog in the home.
  • English Foxhounds are a rare breed and it may be difficult to find a responsible breeder. Breeders with puppies available may have a long waiting list.
  • Bred to pursue prey, the English Foxhound still possesses this drive. For this reason, they should have a fenced yard and should be walked on leash as they may not come back if they are in pursuit of something interesting.
  • The English Foxhound generally does well with other animals in the home, but it is important to understand that they are prey driven and may chase smaller animals.
  • English Foxhounds have a loud bark. This makes them wonderful watchdogs, but it may also make them unliked by neighbors.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The English Foxhound has a short coat that can be any hound color but is typically a tricolor of black, tan and white.
  • English Foxhounds are typically kept in packs by hunt clubs, but occasionally they are placed as companion dogs.
  • English Foxhounds are the rarest of the foxhound breeds.
  • English Foxhounds usually train for six months to a year before they are ready to go out with the pack.
  • The English Foxhound has a rich, deep, mellow voice.
  • One of the greatest English Foxhounds was a dog named Belvoir Gambler, who was admired for his beautiful proportions and rich color.
  • The English Foxhound is shorter and stouter than the American Foxhound.
  • Comparable Breeds: American Foxhound, Beagle


History
  The English Foxhound was created in the late 16th century, as a result of the perception of the depletion of deer in England. Nobles and royalty had hunted deer for both food and sport, using the Deerhound or Staghound for this purpose. During the reign of Henry VIII, it was perceived that a new prey was needed, and the fox was selected. The English Foxhound was then created by a careful mixing of the Greyhound, for speed, the Fox Terrier, for hunting instinct, and the Bulldog, for tenacity in the hunt.
English Foxhound circa 1915.
  During the British Raj, English Foxhounds were exported to India for the purpose of jackal coursing, though due to the comparatively hotter weather, they were rarely long lived. Foxhounds were preferred for this purpose over greyhounds, as the former was not as fast, and could thus provide a longer, more sporting chase.
  Studbooks for the English foxhound have been kept since the 18th century.Breeding lines and the work of people involved in breeding hounds is extremely important in the continual development of this working breed. Puppy shows are important events in the hunting calendar and allow the local hunt followers and visiting hound breeders examine the latest generation from the hound pack. The International Foxhound Association was created in 2012 for the promotion of the English Foxhound as a breed.

Personality
  Foxhounds are an excellent dog for an active family. They love being outdoors and have the endurance to stay active all day long. Foxhounds get along great with children and other animals, and in fact do best when they are part of a large pack (human or canine). They are versatile enough to spend all day hunting with dad, only to come home and romp around with children. Foxhounds are adaptable and easy going and are an excellent choice for rural families.

Health
  The average life expectancy of the English Foxhound is between 9 and 11 years. Breed health concerns may include epilepsy, hip dysplasia and kidney ailments. These are remarkably healthy dogs.


Care
  Bred to be a fast hunter with a great deal of stamina, the English Foxhound requires a substantial amount of exercise. If he can't hunt in a field as he was bred to do, take him on daily runs or provide other exercise that will help him burn off his natural energy.
  He's used to kennel life and can live outdoors if accompanied by another social dog and provided with appropriate shelter. If he's an only dog, however, he should live indoors with his human pack so he won't get lonely.
  It is important to crate train your English Foxhound puppy. Puppies explore, get into things they shouldn't, and chew things that can harm them. It can be expensive both in fixing or replacing destroyed items as well as the vet bills that could arise. Crate training ensures not only the safety of your puppy but also of your belongings.

Living Conditions

  English Foxhounds are not recommended for apartment life. They are very active indoors and do best with acreage.

Training
  Like most other hound breeds, English Foxhounds are highly independent and can sometimes be stubborn. Therefore they require firm, assertive leadership and consistent training. They are also bred to hunt in packs and require this firm leadership to be well-balanced. Obedience training can however take time and patience. Owners may experience trouble with the “come” command, especially when walking this dog without a leash. Their prey instincts are easily aroused and they can run off in pursuit of interesting ‘prey’ if walked off leash.

Activity Requirements
  Foxhounds need a lot of exercise, and their overall temperament is shaped by how much daily exercise they receive. A Foxhound who does not get enough daily activity can become reserved, anxious, or begin to exhibit dominance, whereas a Foxhound who gets plenty of exercise will be even tempered, social, and obedient. Expect to vigorously exercise this breed at least one hour per day. Those who are not hunters or who do not already jog, hike or bike daily should look to another breed, as should apartment or condo dwellers.
  Foxhounds are hard working hunting dogs and can be utilized as trackers in the field. They can move for hours on end without getting tired, and once they catch a scent they become 100% focused on tracking it. This trait can backfire in home life, so when Foxhounds aren't in the hunting field they should be kept on a leash or in a fenced-in area to keep them safe.
  Foxhounds do best in multiple-dog homes. While they enjoy the company of people, they only truly thrive around other dogs, so adopting two at a time would be the most ideal situation for a Foxhound.

Grooming
  The English Foxhound’s short, dense coat is easy to groom. Brush it weekly with a hound mitt or rubber curry brush to remove dead hairs and distribute skin oils. The dogs shed moderately, and regular brushing will help prevent loose hairs from settling on your floors, furniture and clothing. Bathe the dog as needed.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails every few weeks. Keep the rounded hanging ears clean and dry so bacterial and yeast infections don’t take hold. Brush the teeth for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  The English Foxhound is great with older children who are a match for his energetic and bouncy nature. He's not recommended for homes with small children simply because they're too easily knocked over by the swishing tail or enthusiastic antics of a rambunctious dog. Kind as they are, English Foxhounds, like all breeds, should never be left unsupervised with young children.
  Being pack dogs, they love the company of other dogs, especially other English Foxhounds, and they're quite comfortable around horses. They generally do well with other animals, but with their strong prey drive, they may chase smaller pets. Supervise interactions with cats, smaller dogs, or other animals until you're sure everyone gets along.

Is this breed right for you?
  If you're not a fox hunter, then this breed is perfect for someone with an active lifestyle. A great companion for running, biking, hiking and more, this dog needs a lot of activity in his life. If left bored, he may act out and break any rules given to him. Good with children, this dog does well with other pets and prefers the company of other dogs.

Did You Know?
  The typical quarry of the English Foxhound is the red or gray fox, but they are also used to hunt coyotes. But don’t worry: a hunt is all about the chase, not the kill, and the quarry lives to run another day.

A dream day in the life of an English Foxhound
  Ready for a hiking trip first thing in the morning, this pup will be up for any challenge regardless of the length. Following his master, he'll run the trail, picking up every scent he can. A strong animal, he loves to climb rocky terrain with you and other dogs or people too. Once the hike has ended, he'll be happy to chill out and socialize with his owner before hitting the dog bed.

Read More

Monday, April 10, 2017

Everything about your Toy Fox Terrier

Everything about your Toy Fox Terrier
   A wonderful combination of both a toy breed and a terrier breed, the Toy Fox Terrier can be a bit like the Napoleon of the dog world: small in stature, but full of confidence. Able to complete a number of tasks just like the Toy Fox Terrier, but coming in a little package, it’s hard to deny that this dog can be one of the most endearing breeds around. After all, it’s rare to find a toy breed so durable, sturdy, and generally outgoing. These qualities are a mark of the Toy Fox Terrier’s unique pedigree, which we’ll detail in this overview of the breed.

Overview
  Bred as a means to make the Fox Terrier smaller, the Toy Fox Terrier was created by breeding a standard-sized Fox Terrier with a Chihuahua, Miniature Pinscher, Manchester Terrier and Italian Greyhound. A natural-born hunter, the Toy Fox Terrier enjoys chasing and playing around the yard. Extremely intelligent, this dog can be trained to assist the physically handicapped and as a hearing dog for the deaf.
  His intense loyalty to his family can make him aloof with strangers, but socialization and training to accept strangers should help your dog to realize there is no danger from visitors you allow in your home.

Highlights
  • The Toy Fox Terrier is not a suitable companion for all children. While a sturdy little dog, they cannot tolerate excessive rough handling, especially as they are prone to broken legs.
  • Terrier instinct may cause it to chase small animals, and thereby will need close supervision if outdoors off-leash with out a fence. Your dog should never be off-leash in an area where you cannot contain him should the need arise.
  • Being terriers they may not do well with smaller pets in the household such as hamsters, mice and gerbils.
  • They are a small dog but do not realize this; they sometimes challenge other dogs much larger than themselves. Supervised interaction with larger dogs is advisable.
  • Beneath the cute exterior of your TFT puppy can reside the heart of a tyrant. Be sure to train your puppy early to be a responsible and well-behaved member of your family.
  • Most Toy Fox Terriers would prefer to share your bed with you. However, jumping from such heights, especially when a puppy, can cause broken bones. Teaching your TFT to sleep in his own bed on the floor is a safer route.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • With their thin skin, Toy Fox Terriers like their comforts. Besides cuddling in a lap or snuggling under bedding, they’ll want a sweater to keep them warm whenever they’re exposed to prolonged cool or cold temperatures.
  • A Toy Fox Terrier’s worst qualities are his love of barking and his belief that he’s capable of taking on dogs many times his size. You have to protect him from himself.
  • A TFT’s best quality is his loving nature. He bonds strongly to his family and loves being a lap dog and companion.
  • Toy Fox Terriers don’t like getting wet.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy
UKC group: Companion
Average lifespan: 13 - 15 years
Average size: 4 - 10 pounds
Coat appearance: Short, smooth and thick.
Coloration: White, tan, chocolate, tricolored, white and black, white and tan
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Healthy, athletic body; small muzzle; small black eyes; black nose; erect V-shaped ears and docked tail
Possible alterations: Chocolate-colored dogs have like-colored noses; tail may not be docked
Comparable Breeds: Chihuahua, Rat Terrier

History of the Toy Fox Terrier
  This small American-bred dog has been around for the better part of a century. He was first known as a little farm dog, whose job it was to clear rats and other small vermin from barns and granaries.
  The Toy Fox Terrier was developed by breeding small Smooth Fox Terriers with several toy breeds, including the Chihuahua and Manchester Terrier. Some of the Chihuahua and Manchester Terrier traits did not fit with the type that the developers of the breed were trying to achieve, so after the initial crosses to set the size for the new breed, later breedings involved only smaller Smooth Fox Terriers.
   The United Kennel Club registered its first Toy Fox Terrier in 1936, but the breed didn’t gain American Kennel Club recognition until 2003. The TFT ranks 99th among the breeds registered by the AKC, and his size and temperament are sure to bring him greater popularity in the future.



Temperament 
  Intelligent, obedient, willing to work, this is the kind of toy dog that people who really love “working” dogs can still enjoy. It’s small but with the personality of a regular terrier, in many ways, and will even show these instincts by hunting small rodents and pests around the house. Given good discipline, it will be a good companion and willing to obey commands. Because it’s a small dog, be sure to teach children how to handle it and not to be aggressive with it.


Health
  The average life span of the Toy Fox Terrier is 12 to 14 years. Breed health concerns may include Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, patellar luxation and Von Willebrand disease.

Care
  The Toy Fox Terrier loves a soft warm bed or a lap. Because it is not an outdoor breed, coat care remains simple. It should, however, be provided with a daily exercise routine and sufficient playmates. Fortunately, a small area and some toys make for an excellent playground. The dog tends to bark and dig when it does not get sufficient training, attention, and exercise.

Living Conditions
  The Toy Fox Terrier is good for apartment life. It is very active indoors and will do okay without a yard. It cannot tolerate cold weather. It should wear a coat in the winter to help keep it warm.

Trainability
  Toy Fox Terriers are highly trainable and catch on to new behaviors quickly and easily. All you need to train a Toy Fox are treats and lots of excited praise. These tiny dogs don't take kindly to being treated harshly and will mistrust you if you use physical corrections. Luckily, training them is a joy and they are naturally well-behaved, so they hardly ever test a person's patience.
  Toy Fox Terriers are a snap to house train, unlike almost every other terrier and toy breed. They are small enough to use pads of canine litter boxes in the house, which is an added benefit for elderly owners or for people who live in apartments or condos.

Exercise Requirements
  Play is important; a daily walk is, as well, and they love a good yard. Just make sure the yard or area is fenced in, as these little dogs can escape through cracks and holes fairly easily. As they are small dogs, remember that their small strides can mean extra work to keep up with you.

Grooming
  All it takes to groom a Toy Fox Terrier is a lick and a promise. Give his short coat a quick brushing once a week and you’re done. Baths are needed only rarely, maybe after he’s rolled in something stinky. He sheds a little, but he’s so small that the amount of hair floating around is manageable.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Small breeds are prone to periodontal disease, so brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  They can be active, fun loving companions for older children, but like most toy breeds, they are not recommended playmates for very young children. Their small size, tendency to break bones easily, and terrier tenacity can make a bad combination with very young children.
  They get along well with other dogs and cats in their home, although they may be territorial toward strange dogs passing or approaching their property.

Is this breed right for you?
  A friendly and playful breed, the active Toy Fox Terrier requires a lot of physical and mental stimulation. OK for apartment living, he'll need regular exercise and toys to play with. Doing well with a fenced-in yard of his own, he'll constantly be at the side of his owner. Trained easily and well, he can be taught to learn many new tricks. This dog does better with older children; he may lose patience with younger children who don't know how to handle him. Getting along with cats if raised with them, he's likely to chase smaller animals and vermin. Not a fan of cold weather, he'll need a sweater when venturing outdoors in cooler climates.

Did You Know?
  Toy Fox Terriers are active and agile. They have even been known to climb trees in pursuit of squirrels.



Read More

Everything about your Sealyham Terrier

Everything about your Sealyham Terrier
   The Sealyham Terrier dog breed was originally bred to hunt otters, foxes, and badgers. Today these clowns of the terrier family are primarily companion dogs and a good choice for the novice terrier owner.

Overview
  The Sealy peers out at the world from beneath bushy eyebrows, ever curious about the goings-on around him. Although he certainly has the look of a feisty terrier, the Sealyham Terrier doesn't have the typical attitude. He's a very mellow, laid-back dog, with modest exercise requirements and a clownish spirit. He even gets along well with other dogs. All these traits serve to make him a good pet for someone who loves the high-style look of a terrier but isn’t enamored with or capable of handling that in-your-face kind of dog.
  The Sealyham Terrier is all terrier on the outside, with the scruffy charm of his cousins and the white color of his ancestor, the West Highland White Terrier. But on the inside he's a very different dog.
  Originally bred to hunt badger, he's better described as a lover, not a fighter. He's a playful dog with a big sense of humor, and while he has a tendency to bark a bit more than most people might like, at only 20 to 25 pounds he is the perfect size for an apartment. He's a light shedder, inclined to be child-friendly and dog-friendly, and doesn't even have an overwhelming desire to chase cats.

Highlights
  • If your Sealyham Terrier becomes overweight, he can develop back problems. Be sure to monitor his food intake and give him regular exercise to keep him in shape.
  • Sealies are independent and can be stubborn when it comes to housetraining. Crate training is recommended.
  • They are reserved with strangers and make good watchdogs. Their bark is surprisingly loud and deep, but they can be trained to be quiet on command.
  • Sealies are fond of chasing rabbits, birds, and even other dogs and cats. Be sure to keep your Sealyham Terrier on leash when he's not in a secure area.
  • Because of their unusual looks and small size, they could be targets for dog thieves. Although Sealyham Terriers do well outdoors when it's cool (they don't like heat), they should be kept in your house when you can't supervise them.
  • Sealyham Terriers are a rare breed. It may be difficult to locate a reputable breeder, and even when you locate one, you may have to wait several months for a litter to be born.
  • Sealyham Terriers can be aggressive toward dogs they don't know, even dogs much larger than they are. Keep your Sealyham Terrier under control until you know that both he and the other dog are friendly to each other.
  • Although loyal and affectionate with their families, Sealyham Terriers can be a bit reserved around strangers.
  • Sealyham Terriers are happy little dogs, but they can have a dominant personality if not kept in check by a firm, consistent master.
  • Sealyham Terriers have an independent, stubborn streak. Successfully training them requires firm, consistent handling. They respond well to positive reinforcement techniques such as food rewards, praise, and play.
  • Never buy a Sealyham Terrier from a puppy mill, a pet store, or a breeder who doesn't provide health clearances or guarantees. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies and who breeds for sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • The Sealyham’s long, broad head and rectangular body are two of the features that differentiate him from other terriers.
  • The Sealyham’s double coat can be all white or white with lemon, tan or badger markings on the head and ears. “Badger” is a mixture of white, gray, brown and black hairs.
  • Comparable Breeds: Dandie Dinmont Terrier, West Highland White Terrier

History
  The Sealyham Terrier derives his name from Sealyham, the estate of Captain John Tucker Edwards, in Haverfordwest, Wales. Captain Edwards developed the breed in the mid-1800s to hunt for small but tough game such as badgers, otters, and foxes. He crossed various breeds and tested the offspring for gameness and hunting ability.
  As word got out about the little white terriers, they became popular in England. In 1903, the breed made an appearance in the show ring, and the first Sealyham Terrier club was formed in 1908. In 1910, the breed was officially recognized by England's Kennel Club. The breed's first champion in England was a dog named St. Brides Demon. He achieved his championship in 1911.
  Sealies were especially popular in the early 1900s. They stood out in the show ring, and show entries often were in the hundreds. At the Pembrokeshire Hunt Hound Puppy and Sealyham Terrier show in Slade, Pembrokeshire, in 1914, , there were 600 Sealyham   Terriers entered, with 71 in the Open Dog Class and 64 in the Open Bitch Class, numbers that have never been equalled since.
  Sealyham Terriers were also recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1911, shortly after the first Sealies were imported into the U.S. The American Sealyham Terrier Club was formed in 1913.
  Since their show debut in San Mateo, California, in 1911, they have remained a popular show dog. Among the breed's many honors, a Sealyham Terrier has won Best in Show at Westminster four times.
  They have not, however, ever become a very popular dog with the general public. Despite his excellent companion dog credentials, the Sealy today is a rare breed, ranking 149th among the 155 breeds and varieties recognized by the AKC.



Temperament
  An independent dog, the Sealy is perfectly fine with being left alone while his humans work but he is also thrilled to snuggle up on their laps when they get home. This breed does tend to be relentless barkers however; they are not quite as bad as other terrier breeds. Their personalities and clown-like antics will keep the family laughing for hours.
  The Sealy might be small but he doesn’t understand the concept of this. Because he can be food and toy aggressive, this breed is not appropriate for families with young children. Considering his strong instinct to chase, he should not live with cats or other small animals. If raised with another dog in the home, the Sealy will get along famously with it, but can be aggressive toward strange dogs.

Health
  This is a hardy breed with few breed specific health problems. The main hereditary problem highlighted by the American Sealyham Terrier Club is an eye condition called lens luxation, for which there are DNA tests. Lens luxation is a condition in which the lens slips out of position in the eyeball due to the weakening of the fibers that holds it in place.
  This in turn blocks the flow of fluids in the eye, leading to a painful increase in intra-ocular pressure glaucoma and often irreparable optic nerve damage, leading to visual field loss and eventual blindness.
  As of November 2011, the Kennel Club has not highlighted any specific concerns regarding the breed's health to conformation show judges. Due to the low numbers of the breed, two of the most prevalent problems facing the breed today is the popular sire effect and the general problem of genetic diversity within the breed.

Care
  The Sealyham Terrier's small size and robust build make him a good choice for city or country dwellers. He's relatively inactive indoors and can adapt to life without a yard as long as he's walked daily. If he does have a yard, it should be fenced to prevent him from chasing other animals or wandering off to go hunting.
  Sealyhams are rather low-key, not "busy" like most terriers. Due to their size, their loyalty to their families, and their preference for cool temperatures, they do best as housedogs.
Like most terriers, Sealies likes to dig and bark. This dog is an independent thinker and requires firm and consistent handling, but he responds well to training with positive reinforcement techniques such as food rewards, praise, and play.
  Sometimes Sealies can be difficult to housetrain, but patience and a regular schedule usually brings success. Crate-training is recommended.

Living Conditions
  Good for apartment living. They are relatively inactive indoors and will do okay without a yard. Prefer cool weather.

Training
  Sealyham Terriers are feisty and strong-willed dogs. They require an assertive but kind family that won’t let the dog walk all over them. The Sealy needs regular training sessions to keep him from misbehaving. Consistency, along with loads of praise and treats, is best when working with a Sealy. Training should begin from the time you get the new puppy. This should go on throughout the dog’s life to ensure that he never forgets his place within the family.
  Sealies were bred to hunt small animals so they do remarkably well at Earthdog competitions. Being the mellowest of the terriers, this breed can be wonderful therapy dogs as well as family companions. Of course, with a lot of hard work, the Sealy can do well in obedience trials as well as in the breed ring.

Exercise
  This breed needs a daily walk. Play will take care of a lot of their exercise needs, however, as with all breeds, play will not fulfill their primal instinct to walk. Dogs that do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display behavior problems. They will also enjoy a good romp in a safe, open area off lead, such as a large, fenced-in yard. The breed is a low-energy dog that makes a good walking companion. The overriding characteristic about Sealyhams is that they are low energy, couch potatoes. They are not "busy," not "active" and therefore make a low-key companion.

Grooming
  The Sealy has a long, weather-resistant double coat that doesn’t shed much but requires stripping or clipping in addition to regular brushing or combing with a slicker brush, pin brush, or stainless steel Greyhound comb. Be sure you brush or comb all the way down to the skin. The beard requires daily combing to keep it clean.
  The Sealy doesn’t shed much at all, but his hard terrier coat may need special care. If the show ring is in his future, the Sealyham's coat will have to be “hand-stripped,” a labor-intensive task that involves pulling out dead coat a little bit at a time, using a special tool.   Dogs whose career involves your sofa and garden will simply need to be kept brushed and occasionally clipped for neatness and to minimize shedding and matting of the coat. Clipping will soften the texture of the coat, so think about whether that’s important to you before you have it done.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  All Terriers are rambunctious, even the laidback Sealyham. This breed is best suited to families with older children who understand how to handle and interact with dogs.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how good-natured, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Sealies are generally good with other pets, including cats, especially if they're raised with them. They can be aggressive toward dogs they don't know.

Did You Know?
  The Sealyham is named after the estate of the man who developed the breed, Captain John Edwardes, who lived in Wales.



Read More