LUV My dogs: chinese

LUV My dogs

Everything about your dog!

Showing posts with label chinese. Show all posts
Showing posts with label chinese. Show all posts

Monday, December 11, 2017

Everything about your Chinese Foo

Everything about your Chinese Foo
  Named after the Chinese city Foochow , the Chinese Foo is an extant breed of Spitz-type dogsthat come with a compact, square-shaped body, broad head, pricked ears, deep chest, muscular loin, and a tail that is carried over their back.
  This Chinese breed is a loyal and lively dog that makes a loving companion. Although never confirmed, it is said that the Chinese Foo was a cross between the Chow Chow and European hunting dogs. Let's dig into the Chinese Foo Dog breed information and facts you need to know when determining if this is the dog for you.

Overviews
  The Chinese Foo Dog is found in three sizes: toy Chinese Foo Dog (10 inches or less), miniature Chinese Foo Dog (over 10 inches up to and including 15), and standard Chinese Foo Dog (over 15 inches). The Chinese Foo Dog breed can also be classified by weight, with small dogs weighing up to 20 pounds, medium dogs weighing 21 to 50 pounds, and large dogs weighing over 50 pounds. A typical Nordic-type dog, the head is broad, the ears are upright, and the eyes are dark. These dogs often have a dark blue tongue. The tail is set high and curled over the back. Some breeders dock the tail.
  The Chinese Foo Dog coat is double, with a thick, dense undercoat and an outer coat that is hard and stands away from the body. With the heavy coat, grooming is very much a part of life with these dogs. This breed needs brushing at least twice a week, although when the heavy undercoat is shed, daily brushing will help keep the hair in the house somewhat under control.
   Foo Dogs are moderately active. They enjoy a walk morning and evening and can be quite playful. Chinese Foo Dogs are appealing to the sense of humor and continue to be playful on into adulthood. One of the original uses of Chinese Foo Dog is as guard dogs, and the breed continues to be wary of strangers. However, unlike some other watchful breeds, this one does not bark unless there is a reason to do so.
  Early socialization and training is important, and teaching the dog to accept regular grooming should be a part of that. The Chinese Foo Dog is an affectionate, intelligent, playful breed. They are good with well-behaved children but will not tolerate disrespectful behavior. The breed is good with other dogs, although interactions with other pets should be supervised. This is a healthy breed with few problems.

Breed standards
AKC group: Working
UKC group: Hunting
Average lifespan: 10-12 years
Average size: 20 lb
Coat appearance:Thick, hard, weather-resistant, double-coated; straight-haired, coarse outer coat; soft, dense undercoat
Coloration: Blue, black, brown and blue, black and tan, red, orange, gray/silver, sable, cream, fawn
Hypoallergenic: No
Lion’s mane on long-haired version
Courageous nature
Guarding ability
Gentleness with children

History
  The Chinese Foo Dog is thought to be a mix between the ancient Chow Chow and European hunting dogs, or a link between the Chinese Wolf and the Chow. It is an ancient breed, possibly named after the Chinese city of Fuzhou . The Standard Chinese Foo Dog was originally bred to guard Buddhist temples. They were also used for hunting and sledding.
  Until the Chinese Foo Dog’s numbers began to increase in the 19th century, it was rare enough to be thought extinct. Today, the breed is still rare but growing in popularity in the U.S., as seen by the creation of the Chinese Foo Dog Club of America.

Temperament
  The Chinese Foo is an independent and highly intelligent breed, so it is perfect for the owner who does not want an overly attached pet. However, this independence often leads to a proud and even stubborn personality, which can make training challenging. The dog also has a tendency to be dominating, although not aggressive. Even though the Chinese Foo is big, the dog can stay calm when it is indoors, so it can be a good apartment dog.

Health
  They are immune to major health problems. Some members, however, are susceptible to cryptorchidism as well as problems with their bones and joints.

Living Conditions
  The Chinese Foo Dog will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is relatively inactive indoors and a small yard is sufficient. Sensitive to heat, can live in or outdoors in cooler weather.

Training
  Since the Chinese Foo can sometimes be stubborn and domineering, training could become a challenge for first-time dog owners.
  The Chinese Foo is not a recommended breed for a person or family getting their first dog. This pup can be domineering and a challenge to train. Even though the crossbreed is not vicious, socialization needs to be taken slowly and carefully, especially with young children and other pets. Although the dog is difficult to train, it does take to the training well once it learns. In many cases, it will make sense to seek out formal dog obedience training with this pup.


Ideal Human Companion
  • Apartment dwellers (Toy and Miniature; the Standard can be kept in a smaller space as well as long as it gets extra exercise)
  • Those looking for a good guard dog
  • Experienced dog owners
  • Those who would love a toy version of their Chow Chow
Activity Level
  The Chinese Foo is athletic and active. It needs a lot of exercise, especially when still young. A daily walk is an absolute must. Sports such as Frisbee, running and fetch are advised as well.


Exercise
  Foo Dogs need a moderate amount of daily activity including regular walking and jogging. Recreational sports such as fetching a ball and catching the Frisbee will give them a great workout. Since they are easily exhausted during warm weather, make sure that they are not overly exercised.

Grooming
  The Chinese Foo has an amazingly beautiful, thick coat of fur. In fact, the coat is so thick you can just throw that dog brush in the trash. You are going to need a long tooth comb to get at this hair. The dog should be brushed once or twice a week. Baths can be a battle with all the hair, so once a month is usually good enough and using a professional groomer is usually more than worth the cost. 

What They Are Like to Live With Chinese Foo Dog
  The Chinese Foo Dog lives up to its leonine appearance. They are bold, courageous, and king of the castle. They can also make friendly family dogs as long as they are socialized early.
  Chinese Foo Dogs are known for their gentleness with children and make quiet and dignified companions. The Chinese Foo Dog can be overly independent, so consider a different breed if you’re looking for a constant, interactive pet.
  The Chinese Foo Dog needs regular daily exercise and brushing. Be prepared to have fur everywhere in your living space.


Things You Should Know
  The Chinese Foo Dog is also known as the Chinese Celestial Dog, the Chinese Dragon Dog, and the Happiness Dog. Its ancient skill as a guard dog is still prevalent. This means you will have a well-guarded home, but it also means a dog who may be averse to strangers. This is a stubborn breed, so early obedience training is a must for all three versions.

  The Chinese Foo Dog has no known health issues.




Read More

Thursday, December 8, 2016

Everything about your Chinese Shar-Pei

Everything about your Chinese Shar-Pei
  Though the Chinese Shar-Pei is the 134th breed recognized by the American Kennel Club, the dog breed has been around for hundreds of years. He was developed to guard, hunt, herd, and later, fight, and is known for his characteristic short, bristly coat, loose, wrinkled skin, and devotion to his family. Today, the Shar-Pei mostly enjoys life as a beloved companion.

Overview
  The Chinese Shar-Pei, also known as the Chinese Fighting Dog or simply the Shar Pei, is an ancient breed that has existed for centuries in the southern provinces of China. “Shar-Pei” literally translates as “sand skin” but more loosely means “rough, sandy coat” or “draping sandpaper-like skin.” In addition to their strange wrinkled appearance, they have a characteristic solid blue-black tongue, a feature shared only with another ancient Chinese breed, the Chow Chow. The Chinese Shar-Pei was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1988 as a non-sporting dog and fully approved in 1992.
  The average Chinese Shar-Pei stands 18 to 20 inches at the withers and weighs between 45 and 60 pounds, with females typically being smaller than males. Their extremely rough, short, wrinkled coat is unique to the breed. It should be neither shiny nor lustrous and comes in solid colors and sable. It should be brushed regularly, and the folds of skin should be cleaned and checked frequently to avoid moistness, irritation and infection. Shar-Peis are compact and sturdy, and they normally do not bark unless they are threatened or feel the need to alert their owners.

Highlights
  • The Shar-Pei was once a guard dog and pit fighter. Today he is primarily a companion, though he retains fighting toughness. He can be aggressive toward other dogs or people, so it's imperative that he be socialized and trained from an early age.
  • Due to his short nose, the Shar-Pei is prone to overheating. Keep him inside with fans or air conditioning during hot summer months. Like other short-nosed breeds, he tends to snore and wheeze, and makes a terrible jogger.
  • Like the Chow, the Shar-Pei has a dark tongue. This is considered normal, even desirable, by dog show enthusiasts.
  • Frequent bathing isn't necessary for the Shar-Pei, but when you do bathe him, dry him thoroughly. The wrinkles and skin folds are an ideal breeding ground for fungal infections.
  • Though devoted to his family, the Shar-Pei can be willful and stubborn. He must learn right away who the pack leader is or he's likely to compete for the job.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The name Shar-Pei means "sand-skin" but translated more as “sand-paper-like coat.”  No other breed shares the short, rough coat of the Shar-Pei.
  • A Shar-Pei is a poor choice for a novice dog owner.
  • A Shar-Pei housetrains earlier than most breeds because of his natural cleanliness and ease of training. 
  • The Shar-Pei enjoys and does well in obedience, agility, herding and tracking. He would rather be with people than other dogs.
  • Those famous wrinkles need to be looked after carefully to prevent skin infections. They should be wiped out with a damp cloth and dried well to prevent infection.
  • Like other flat-faced breeds, the Shar-Pei can easily overheat.
Breed standards

AKC group: Non-sporting Group
UKC group: Northern Breed Group
Average lifespan: 9 - 11 years
Average size: 45 - 60 pounds
Coat appearance: Horse or brush-coat
Coloration: Sandy with black muzzle
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Large with wrinkled skin; blue-black tongue; dark, almond-shaped eyes; rounded, triangular ears; large muzzle with dark coloration; thick tail
Possible alterations: May have lighter eyes based on coloration
Comparable Breeds: Chow Chow, Great Pyrenees

History
  The Chinese Shar-Pei originated in the southern provinces of China where he was valued as a hunter, herder, guardian, and fighter. Some historians believe the Shar-Pei is an ancient breed, though there is no definitive evidence to prove this. Statues that look a lot like the Shar-Pei have been dated to the Han Dynasty (200 B.C.), though these statues also resemble the Chow and Pug.
  Following the creation of the People's Republic of China, the dog population in the country was practically wiped out. A few Shar-Peis, however, were bred in Hong Kong and Taiwan. If not for the efforts of one man, Matgo Law, of Down-Homes Kennels in Hong Kong, the Shar-Pei might be extinct.
  Thanks to him, a small number of Shar-Peis were brought to the United States in 1973 and breed fanciers formed the Chinese Shar-Pei Club of America, Inc., in 1974. The first National Specialty show was held in 1978. The Shar-Pei was accepted in the American Kennel Club Miscellaneous Class in 1988, and recognized by the AKC in 1991 as a member of the Non-Sporting Group.



Personality
  The large head and wrinkled face of the Chinese Shar-Pei has oven been compared to the head of a hippopotamus. They are independent and willful dogs, but when exposed to confident, consistent leadership are respectful companions and clean housemates. Their ever-present scowl coupled with their alert nature, makes them an imposing looking guard dog. The Shar-Pei's tenency toward independence them good companions for single people or working families with older children. They don't require much attention or exercise to keep them happy, and can entertain themselves with lots of chew toys or sun to bathe in.

Health
  The Chinese Shar-Pei, which has an average lifespan of 8 to 10 years, suffers from minor health issues like lip and skin fold pyodermas, otitis externa, hypothyroidism, patellar luxation, allergies, and amyloidosis, and minor problems such as entropion and canine hip dysplasia (CHD). To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may run hip, eye, knee, elbow, and thyroid tests on the dog.
  Megaesophagus is sometimes seen in this breed. The Shar-Pei is also prone to fevers, and although its cause is unknown, it often occurs with Shar-Peis suffering from swollen hocks .

Care
  The Shar-Pei lives comfortably in the city or country. He does well in a limited space, such as an apartment or condo, as long as he gets daily exercise. A backyard is not required, but he does appreciate getting out and stretching his legs. In general, the Shar-Pei is fairly happy just hanging out with his owner, wherever he may be.
  Begin training and socializing your Sharpei the day you bring him home, and commit to continuing the process all his life. He'll need the constant reinforcement since he's not naturally friendly to other dogs. He can also be stubborn and owners must be consistent and firm in order to establish leadership. He is generally eager to please, though, and responsive to training.
  The best kind of socialization exercise is to take your Shar-Pei with you everywhere — to puppy classes, outdoor events, busy parks, friends' homes — and as often as possible. This will help prevent him from becoming overly shy or overprotective. Since this breed can be aggressive toward other dogs, the Shar-Pei should be kept leashed in public.
  The Shar-Pei is classified as a short-nosed, or brachycephalic breed, similar to the Bulldog, Boxer, Pug. Their short noses make them highly sensitive to heat, which means they make lousy jogging companions. To prevent heat stroke, these dogs should be kept inside with fans or air conditioning in hot weather.

Living Conditions
  The Chinese Shar-Pei will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is moderately active indoors and will do okay without a yard.
  The Shar-Pei is sensitive to warm weather, partly due to the wrinkles on its head holding in the heat.
  On hot days shade should always be provided. Water should be available at all times. Provided they get enough exercise, they will be very peaceful indoors.

Training
  The proper training and socialization of a Chinese Shar-Pei from a young age is very crucial in its development. Because it can have a higher propensity to territorial aggression and can be a little worried around strangers, it should get used to the idea of other humans and should be able to realize that being around them is safe. Training will also require a good degree of patience. If you’re a first-time dog trainer, the Chinese Shar-Pei is not the ideal dog to “cut your teeth” on.

Activity Requirements
  Despite their large size, the Chinese Shar-Pei does not need a lot of vigorous exercise to maintain good health. Several walks a day will suffice, making them good city dogs. It is recommended Shar-Peis, despite their watchdog capabilities, not be raised on a farm. Their natural instinct to hunt means they can take off into the wild blue yonder after deer or other wild animals.

Grooming
  Grooming requirements depend on the individual Shar-Pei. Weekly brushing can meet the needs of both the “horse-coated”  variety and the “brush-coated” type , but some Shar-Pei of either type can be prone to skin problems. Shar-Pei with skin problems may need weekly bathing and daily brushing.
  All Shar-Pei need regular wrinkle care. The wrinkles must be wiped out with a damp cloth and then dried thoroughly to prevent infection. Do not oil the skin.
  Shar-Pei have small, tight, triangular ears that predispose them to chronic ear problems because there isn’t enough air circulating in the narrow ear canal. Although it’s not as easy to clean the ears of a Shar-Pei as it is for most breeds, regular cleaning should be done to help prevent recurrent yeast or bacterial infections.
  Bathe the Shar-Pei as you desire or only when he gets dirty. With the gentle dog shampoos available now, you can bathe a Shar-Pei weekly if you want without harming his coat.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Brush the teeth for overall good health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  The Shar-Pei is a devoted family dog who is protective of his family, including children. To best teach him to get along with kids, he should be raised with them; if he doesn't live with them, he should be exposed to children as he grows up. Because he is such an independent breed, he's best suited to families with children 10 and older who know how to treat a pet respectfully.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  In order to provide the best chances for getting along with other dogs and animals, the Shar-Pei should be raised with them from an early age. Since he tends to be aggressive with other canines, supervision is essential.

Is this breed right for you?
  A good guard dog, the Shar-Pei does not require much space, making him a great fit for apartment life. For exercise, a daily walk will suit this pet just fine. Doing well with children and cats if raised with them, this breed bonds well with any and all immediate family members. Aloof and rude to strangers, he will need to be socialized well. In need of a dominant master, the Chinese Shar-Pei requires a good leader to avoid any untoward behavior. A clean breed, he doesn't shed often and requires only brushing and regular bathing.

Did You Know?
  After teetering on the brink of extinction, the Chinese Shar-Pei made a comback: in 1983, the Neiman Marcus catalog chose the dog as its his-and-hers fantasy gift, offering a pair of Shar-Pei puppies for $2,000 each.

A dream day in the life of a Chinese Shar-Pei
  A simple breed, the Chinese Shar-Pei will be happy to wake up in the comfort of his own home, surrounded by family members. Enjoying a nice, brisk morning walk, the Shar-Pei will return ready to guard his home from any possible dangers or strangers. Partaking in a bit of play and yard-romping, the breed will end his day sleeping at the foot of his master.


Read More