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Showing posts with label childred. Show all posts
Showing posts with label childred. Show all posts

Thursday, November 9, 2017

Everything about your Bull Terrier

Everything about your Bull Terrier
  Whenever you hear the word “Bull,” you probably imagine a frightening thing indeed. Who can blame you? Bulls can be scary – people run away from them as a sport in Pamplona, Spain. Bullfrogs are big, giant versions of frogs that we associate with big, loud noises. 
  Well, take one good look at the Bull Terrier and you’ll probably find out why it’s more terrier than bulldog. The rough name can be a little misleading, but as it turns out Bull Terriers can make loyal, energetic, and even fun pets that the entire family can enjoy – or can work as a great companion even if you’re the only member of your household. 

Overview
  There’s no mistaking the Bull Terrier for any other breed. With his football-shaped head, muscular body and unmatched swagger, this is a dog that commands attention anywhere he goes. He’s an icon, seen at the side of owners from General Patton to Princess Anne, and in advertising campaigns for beer - the famous Spuds McKenzie -- and department stores. He's a high-energy tough guy with a soft heart, crazy about kids and strongly attached to his family.
  The Bull Terrier is sometimes considered one of the breeds known as a " pit bull." Before getting one of these dogs, it is important to realize that there is much misinformation around the natures of pit bulls and there are campaigns to out-law the dogs. Check into local ordinances carefully to be sure that you can legally own one of these dogs in your town.  Also do your own research so you can help educate friends and neighbors about the merits of this breed.
  On the plus side, grooming is a breeze with a Bull Terrier; just brush him a couple of times a week to keep shedding to a minimum, and make sure his nails are trimmed and his ears are clean.
   The Bull Terrier is an indoor dog. Besides having a short coat unsuited to cold or wet weather, he’s the kind of dog who thrives on companionship and needs to be with his family when they are home.

Highlights
  • Bull Terriers thrive in the company of their people, and should live indoors with their human family. They don't do well when left alone for long periods and will wreak destruction when bored.
  • Bull Terriers aren't suited for cold, damp climates. Keep your Bull Terrier warm with a coat or sweater in winter.
  • These aren't high maintenance dogs, grooming-wise. A weekly brushing and occasional wipe-down with a damp cloth is usually all it takes to keeps them clean, although they must be brushed more frequently during twice-yearly shedding periods.
  • Ownership of Bull Terriers is restricted or banned in some cities, states, and provinces. Research your local dog laws before you get one; banned dogs may be seized and euthanized.
  • The Bull Terrier is strong-willed and can be difficult to train. He's not recommended for timid or first-time dog owners.
  • Without early socialization and training, Bull Terriers can be aggressive toward other dogs, animals, and people he doesn't know.
  • Bull Terriers are too rough and rambunctious for homes with young children, but they're tireless playmates for active older kids who've been taught how to interact with dogs.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Bull Terrier comes in two varieties: white and colored. They are exhibited in separate classes at dog shows but are otherwise the same breed. A colored Bull Terrier named Rufus won Best In Show at Westminster in 2006, the first of his variety to do so.
  • When you look at a Bull Terrier, you see a strong, muscular dog with a long oval head that resembles an egg . Small thin ears point upward, and small dark eyes with a piercing glint are sunken into the head. A short tail, thick at the root and tapering to a fine point, is carried horizontally
  • Bull Terriers have appeared in hundreds of films, ranging from "101 Dalmatians" and "Best in Show" to "The Mask" and "The Wizard of Oz."

Breed standards

AKC group: Terrier
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 11-14 years
Average size: 45-50 lbs
Coat appearance: Sleek, smooth, short
Coloration: White, brown and black
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Triangular eyes; egg-shaped skull; round, muscular body.
Possible alterations: Coat coloring varies and can be seen in a variety of colors and combinations.
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, apartments, houses with/without yards
Temperament: Independent, energetic, affectionate
Comparable Breeds: French Bulldog, Bullmastiff

History
  The family tree of the Bulldog is massive with many branches. One of those branches holds the bull-and-terrier breeds, the various results of 18 th-century crosses between bulldogs and terriers. Those crosses were made with the intent of producing a dog with the strength and tenacity of the bulldog and the intensity, alertness, agility and “game” nature of the terrier.
James Hinks Bullterrier
  The earliest Bull Terriers came in a variety of sizes. Some were as small as four to seven pounds and were considered toy breeds. Others were medium-size at 15 pounds and some ranged up to 45 to 60 pounds, close to the size of the modern Bull Terrier. They had an arched back, bent legs and an undershot jaw, all features that were reminiscent of the breed’s bulldog heritage.
  James Hinks of Birmingham, England, was a well-known breeder of Bull Terriers in the 1860s, and it was he who started them on the road to the more refined look they have today: the longer head and the more symmetrical body that was predominantly or completely white. To create them he used existing bull-and-terriers, his white Bulldog Madman, and white English Terriers, which are now extinct.
  Nicknamed White Cavaliers, they became fashionable accessories for gentlemen about town and could be soon sitting alongside them as they drove their carriages through the park. A rhyme of the time tells the story of the breed succinctly, saying that Hinks “Found a Bull Terrier a tattered old bum; Made him a dog for a gentleman’s chum.”
  The fad spread to the United States. The American Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1885, and the Bull Terrier Club of America was founded in 1897. A new variety of Bull Terrier was invented in the early 20 th century when some breeders crossed them with Staffordshire Bull Terriers, adding color to the coat. The “Colored” variety of Bull Terrier was recognized in 1936. Today the Bull Terrier ranks 53 rd among the breeds registered by the AKC.



Personality
  Once upon a time Bull Terriers were bred to fight. Crossing a terrier and a bulldog produced a breed with fearlessness, tenacity and strength that made them natural gladiators. The fighting branches of the Bull Terrier's family tree have since withered away, and the modern breed is a loving, loyal, clown of a dog who makes an excellent family companion for those with active lifestyles. They love being with people and want to be included in all family activities whether it's a ride in the car, a neighborhood stroll or a romp in the park.

Health 
  Many dogs have certain propensities toward health problems, and Bull Terriers are no different, showing an inclination toward skin conditions and allergies. This can often be a good thing because it presents a problem that can be spotted, but it’s important to make sure that you take your Bull Terrier for regular checkups anyway.
  The Bull Terrier, which has an average lifespan of 11 to 14 years, may suffer from patellar luxation. It is also prone to minor health problems like heart complication, allergies and compulsive behavior, and more serious conditions such as kidney failure and deafness. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may run cardiac, thyroid, hearing and urine protein:urine creatinine ratio tests on the dog. 

Care
  A Bull Terrier needs half an hour to an hour of physical and mental exercise daily. He'll enjoy going for walks, chasing a ball, or testing his wits against an interactive toy. He's also capable of competing in agility and obedience trials. Be sure to always walk him on leash so he won't run after other animals or go off exploring on his own.
   Bull Terrier puppies are bouncy and into everything. High-impact exercise can damage growing bones, so until your puppy's full grown, at 12 to 18 months of age, beware of bone-jarring activities such as jumping on and off the furniture, playing Frisbee, or running on slick wood or tile floors. These can all stress or injure the still-developing joints and ligaments.
  Early and consistent training is essential. You must be able to provide leadership without resorting to physical force or harsh words. A Bull Terrier isn't the easiest breed to train, and you'll be most successful if you appeal to his love of play with positive reinforcement techniques while still remaining firm and consistent in what you expect.
  Bull Terriers can be difficult to housetrain. Follow the housetraining program closely; the crate method is best. A crate will also prevent your Bull Terrier from destroying your belongings or otherwise getting into trouble.

Living Conditions
  Bull Terriers will do okay in an apartment if they are sufficiently exercised. They are fairly active indoors and a small yard will do. They prefer warm climates.

Trainability
  Bullies are intelligent and have a mind of their own. Training should be started early and always done in calm-assertive manner, as they won't respond to discipline or harsh tones. Training is best done in short sessions due to Bull Terriers' short attention span and they will quickly become uninterested, even if treats are used as a reward. Lots of patience is necessary when working with a Bull Terrier, as training can be a long process.
  Even after a Bull Terrier is fully trained, they may decide to test their boundaries as they get older and project dominance. These situations should be handled with calm assertion; like a teenager, they just want to see what they can get away with.

Exercise 
  Bullies need a lot of vigorous exercise. Though short and stocky, they are a hardy breed and are happiest when they are active. Long walks, short runs, or playing long games of ball in the back yard will meet their daily activity requirements. If a Bull Terrier is not getting enough exercise, they are sure to let you know. They are notoriously destructive, making easy work of flower beds or expensive furniture, and some develop the neurotic behavior of obsessively chasing their own tail.

Grooming
  Grooming the Bull Terrier is a cinch. Though the breed is naturally clean with little doggie odor, a bath every three months (or when he’s dirty) in a mild shampoo is a good idea. Brush his sleek coat with a natural bristle brush or rubber hound mitt once a week. Use coat conditioner/polish to brighten the sheen.
  His ears need to be checked every week and cleaned if needed, and toenails trimmed once a month. Regular tooth brushing with a soft toothbrush and doggie toothpaste keep the teeth and gums healthy and the breath fresh. Introduce grooming to the Bull Terrier when he is very young so he learns to accept the handling and fuss patiently.   

Children And Other Pets
  Bull Terriers and Miniature Bull Terriers are active dogs who can play rough, so they're not recommended for homes with young children. They're great playmates with boundless energy for active older children who understand how to interact with dogs.
  Bull Terriers can, however, be aggressive toward kids they don't know, especially if there's a lot of shouting or wrestling going on. They may feel it's their duty to protect "their" children from their friends. Always supervise play; as with any dog, never leave a dog alone with a child, and teach children how to approach and touch dogs.
  With the children in their own family, they're highly tolerant, but they don't like being teased. Don't permit your children to play tug-of-war with the dog.
  Bull Terriers, especially unneutered males, can be aggressive toward dogs of the same sex, but opposite genders usually get along well. Bull Terriers shouldn't be trusted with cats or other small furry animals.

Is this breed right for you?
  Bull Terriers can get along in most living enviroments, and they thrive in families with older children to play with. This breed can get along in smaller dwellings as long as a rigorous exercise regimen is part of their daily routine. Bull Terriers can be prone to various skin allergies and other more-serious health issues. All potential owners should take into consideration the financial responsibility with regard to a variety of health concerns.
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep. No trimming or stripping needed.
Moderate Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Difficult Training: The Bull Terrier isn't deal for a first time dog owner. Patience and perseverance are required to adequately train it.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  Because of his fun-loving, mischievous personality, the Bull Terrier is sometimes referred to as “the kid in a dog suit.”

In popular culture
  • General George S. Patton owned a Bull Terrier named Willie, and a portrayal of him is featured in the 1970 movie Patton.
    Bull Terrier about 1960
  • In Charles Dickens' Oliver Twist (1838), Bill Sikes' dog "Bullseye" is a Bull Terrier.
  • From 1987 to 1989, Budweiser's beer commercials featured a female Bull Terrier named "Spuds MacKenzie".
  • The book The Incredible Journey by author Sheila Burnford features a Bull Terrier named "Bodger", as well as in the 1963 film.
  • The 1993 Nickelodeon cartoon Rocko's Modern Life features a bull terrier named "Spunky", who is Rocko's pet dog.
  • The 1995 film Toy Story features a mean Bull Terrier named "Scud".
  • Target's mascot, named "Bullseye", is a Bull Terrier.
  • Ken Greenhill's 1977 novel Hell Hound recounts the story of a sociopathic Bull Terrier named Baxter, whose desire for a dominant master drives him to murder. The novel was adapted to the cult French horror film Baxter in 1989.
  • The album cover for Working Class Dog by singer Rick Springfield is of his own pet Bull Terrier named Ronnie.
  • Chris Van Allsburg, writer of books such as Jumanji and The Polar Express, includes a Bull Terrier named "Fritz" in each book he writes.
  • "Grimm" from the syndicated comic strip Mother Goose and Grimm is a yellow, cartoon Bull Terrier.
  • A formerly abandoned deaf Bull Terrier named "Patsy Ann", from 1929-1942, would greet new ships coming into the harbor in Juneau, Alaska. She was dubbed the "Official Greeter of Juneau, Alaska" in 1934. A statue in Juneau was erected in her honor in 1992.
A dream day in the life
  Games, training, running and more games. The Bull Terrier was originally bred for fighting purposes, so though it is a playful breed, training is required not only to diminish its protective tendencies, but also for mental and physical stimulation. Loyal 'til the end, Bull Terriers live for constant companionship, and a day spent with its beloved human makes this breed happy as a clown.



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Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Everything about your Border Terrier

Everything about your Border Terrier
  Although he’s not as flashy in appearance as some of his terrier relatives, the Border Terrier is still pure terrier, living life with great gusto, whether out and about with people or digging a hole in a flowerbed. Frankly, it’s a bit surprising that he isn’t more popular, given that he’s one of the healthier purebred dogs, is less driven to hunt than most other terriers, and is fairly flexible about exercise. He’s robust, sturdy, and great with children, making him one of the top terrier contenders for a family pet.

Overview
  The Border Terrier is one of the oldest and smallest of the working terrier breeds that originated in Great Britain. Earlier names for this breed include the Reedwater Terrier, Ullswater Terrier and Coquetdale Terrier. They are well-known for their scruffy face and beard and their friendly, welcoming disposition. They are active, agile and sturdy little dogs, said to be “hard as nails” and “as game as they come.” This breed thrives on human companionship and does well around children. However, they should not be in homes with other small animals such as birds, hamsters or mice, and they always will be inclined to chase cats. Border Terriers are friendly to everyone, including strangers, but will sound an alarm when something new or unfamiliar appears in their home territory.

Highlights
  • The Border Terrier is characterized by his rough coat, “otter”-shaped head, and an “at the alert” attitude.
  • As a breed, the Border Terrier has changed little over the years, aside from becoming more consistent in appearance.
  • Border Terriers have thick, loose skin, which protects them from adversary bites.Border Terriers become overweight easily, so be sure to measure your Border's food and give him at least a half hour of vigorous exercise each day.
  • Border Terriers thrive when they're with their people and aren't meant to live outdoors with little human interaction. When left to their own devices, they can be noisy and destructive.
  • These escape artists will find the way out of a fenced yard if given the time and opportunity. They've been known to climb over and dig under fences, and once they get out they have little street sense to keep them from dashing out in front of cars.
  • Border Terriers have a high threshold for pain. If your dog's sick, the only sign may be a behavioral change, such as the dog becoming withdrawn or quiet.
  • Border Terriers have a natural instinct to dig. Rather than fighting it, give your Border Terrier a place of his own to dig or put his digging drive to work with fun games.
  • Border Terriers are active and bouncy. They love jumping up on people to greet them.
  • Border Terriers aren't yappy, but they'll bark to alert you of anything unusual, and they can become nuisance barkers if they get bored.
  • Border Terriers have a high prey drive and will chase, attack, and even kill neighborhood cats, squirrels or other small animals. They'll also go after small pets such as rabbits, mice, or gerbils. Because of their tendency to chase, make sure your yard is securely fenced, and don't let your Border off leash in an unfenced area.
  • Border Terriers do well with other dogs and with family cats if the cat is raised with the Border Terrier or lived in the home before the Border Terrier.
  • Border Terriers can make excellent companions for kids, but they can be rambunctious, especially when young, and can unintentionally hurt small children.
Breed standards
AKC group: Terriers

UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 12 - 14 years
Average size: 11.5 to 15.5 pounds
Coat appearance: Dense, Harsh and Rough, Thick, and Wire
Coloration: Red, wheaten, grizzle and tan, or blue and tan.
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Families with children, singles, seniors, apartments, houses with/without yards
Temperament: Calm, friendly, curious, independent
Comparable Breeds: Irish Terrier, Kerry Blue Terrier

History
  The Border Terrier was developed in Great Britain, where it originally was bred to hunt and kill the powerful hill foxes that threatened the stock of farmers along the borders of Scotland and England. They had to be active, stout and tireless to perform this task. Their legs had to be long enough to keep up with horses and the accompanying foxhounds, while at the same time they needed to be low enough to the ground so that they could follow and corner foxes, even flushing them from their dens. It is thought that the Border Terrier, Bedlington Terrier and Dandie Dinmont share common ancestors. 
  The breed’s popularity surged after it was officially recognized by the English Kennel Club as a distinct breed, and following formation of the British Border Terrier Club, in 1920. True terrier fanciers feared that recognition of Border Terriers as show dogs might “prettify” and soften the breed, but that has not proven true. The breed was well-established long before it became a show dog in the 1920s and retains is rough-and-tumbled looks and sound working character to this day. Border Terriers were first registered with the American Kennel Club in 1930 and are part of its Terrier Group. The Border Terrier Club of America was founded in 1949.



Temperament
  Though sometimes stubborn and strong willed, border terriers are, on the whole sound dogs, and are friendly and rarely aggressive. They are very good with children, but may chase cats and any other small pets.
  Borders do well in task-oriented activities and have a surprising ability to jump high and run fast given the size of their legs. The breed has excelled in agility training, but they are quicker to learn jumps and see-saws than weaving poles. They take training for tasks very well, and are extremely trainable, and capable of learning tricks quickly and competently.   The border in recent years has been bred to harbor a more subtle character so are more adaptable to apartment living if properly exercised.
  They are intelligent and eager to please, but they retain the capacity for independent thinking and initiative that were bred into them for working rats and fox underground. Their love of people and even temperament make them fine therapy dogs, especially for children and the elderly, and they are occasionally used to aid the blind or deaf. From a young age they should be trained on command.
  Borders can adapt to different environments and situations well, and are able to deal with temporary change well. They will get along well with cats that they have been raised with, but may chase other cats and small animals such as mice, birds, rabbits, squirrels, rats, and guinea pigs.
  Borders are very independent and loyal. Some borders are known to be territorial and will protect their homes. They have a strong sense of smell and can tell when danger is near.
  Borders love to sit and watch what is going on. Walks with Borders will often involve them sitting and lying in the grass to observe the environment around them.

Health
  The Border Terrier, which has an average lifespan of 12 to 14 years, is prone to canine hip dysplasia (CHD) and heart defects. The breed may also suffer from minor health issues such as patellar luxation. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may conduct hip and cardiac exams on this breed of dog.

Care
  Even though it can live outside in cool climates, this terrier is better when it has access to the yard and the house. The harsh coat demands weekly brushing and dead hair should be stripped four times a year so that it looks tidy.
  As the Border Terrier enjoys activity, it should be provided with an adequate exercise routine such as a vigorous game, an off-leash expedition in a secure place, or a daily on-leash walk.

Living Conditions
  The Border Terrier will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. They are moderately inactive indoors and a small yard is sufficient.

Training
  You’ll find that it is fairly easy to train the smart and able Border Terrier.  An important note to remember is not to inadvertently teach this dog an unacceptable behavior, as Border Terriers have long memories. Once it is taught something is okay to do, it’s challenging to try to reverse the behavior. But on the positive side, if a Border Terrier is given love and attention for performing a command correctly, it will do it again and again.
  One of these reasons you see a lot of Border Terriers on TV and in the movies is because of its willingness to learn. This breed seems to really take to obedience training. This also means that the Border Terrier can be trained to work with disabled people.
  The Border Terrier likes to chew, reducing even the toughest of toys to piles of fluff with no effort. When training, set boundaries as to what is acceptable for chewing and what is not. It is a good idea to invest in chew toys that are geared toward safe, heavy duty chewing.
  Thanks to the irresistible combination of lovable, affectionate, and easygoing, the Border Terrier fits into just about any family or living environment. With the right training, you’ll be able to mold a perfect, well-behaved dog.

Activity Requirements
  Border Terriers can live happily in just about any environment be it an apartment, a house with lots of children, or a farm. They don't need an excessive amount of exercise, but should be allowed to walk several times a day and be allowed to run in a yard or park a few times a week. Yards should be fenced because Border Terriers will chase birds, squirrels and cats. Farmers like Border Terriers because they are very reliable ratters and keep foxes at bay.
  They enjoy challenges and new tasks, so they need lots of mental activity as well. Challenging toys or hide-and-seek games are right up the Border Terrier's alley.

Grooming
  The Border Terrier has a double coat composed of a short and dense undercoat and a wiry topcoat. His coat fits closely to the body, like a jacket, and comes in a few colors, including red, grizzle and tan, blue and tan, and wheaten. To keep his coat healthy, simply brush or comb him weekly. Even in the show ring, he only needs a little tidying of his head, neck, and feet, although most breeders “strip” the coat — pluck out dead hair by hand — for a less scruffy look. The Border Terrier Club of America offers advice on grooming through its website. The rest is routine care: Trim his nails every few weeks, and brush his teeth for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Border Terriers love kids and can match their energy levels all day long, but they're a little rambunctious for households with children under the age of 6 years.
  As with any dog, always teach children how to approach and touch your Border Terrier, and supervise all interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear pulling from either party.
  Border Terriers usually get along well with other dogs and cats, especially if they're introduced to them in puppyhood. They do best with dogs of the opposite sex. They're likely to chase outdoor cats as well as squirrels and other wildlife, and they shouldn't be trusted alone with pet birds or small, furry pets such as rabbits, hamsters, and gerbils.

Is the Border Terrier the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape. Occasional trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Moderately Easy Training: The Border Terrier is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Chomp in 102 Dalmatians
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
 Border Terriers hold more American Kennel Club Earthdog titles than any other breed.

Famous Border Terriers
  • Baxter in Anchorman
  • Brillo in Misfits episode "Four" as a street puppy eaten by new zombie Curtis
  • Hubble in Good Boy!
  • Lady Eccles in Coronation Street as Blanche Hunt's inheritance gift from her friend; belongs to her son-in-law Ken Barlow after her death in 2010
  • Monty and Rommel in Monarch of the Glen
  • Nancy in Unfabulous as Addie's pet dog
  • Oscar as Scotty the Dog in Ruby Sparks 2012 
  • Pard in High Sierra 
  • Pepper as Pinkybones in Another Happy Day
  • Puffy in There's Something About Mary
  • Seymour in Futurama episode Jurassic Bark
  • Shep Proudfoot, Greg Laswell's pet dog
  • Sickan in My Life as a Dog
  • Sorry in Seeking a Friend for the End of the World; Dodge's dog
  • Tansy as Toto from Return To Oz 1985 
  • Toots in Lassie




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Thursday, June 29, 2017

Everything about your Wire Fox Terrier

Everything about your Wire Fox Terrier
  The Wire Fox Terrier is believed to be a descendant of the Black and Tan Terrier well-known in Wales and related areas. The breed was frequently crossed with the Smooth Fox Terrier to refine the head and reinforce the genetics for the white coat. At one time, both breeds were considered one breed with two varieties. However, the American Kennel Club (AKC) has recognized these breeds as separate since 1985 and interbreeding has ended.

Overview
  An elegant and well-built dog, the Wire Fox Terrier is surprising strong for a dog with small structure. This breed is a hunting and tracking dog by nature, so the Wire Fox Terrier has got agility and energy to spare.
  Wire Fox Terriers are courageous, alert, playful, affectionate and independent. Always up for an adventure, this dog loves to explore, run, hunt, play, and chase, so it will keep you busy. If it’s a family dog you’re looking for, you’ll be glad to learn that the Wire Fox Terrier is excellent with children. And even though it is a bold dog, it isn’t aggressive towards people. Read on to learn more about this breed.

Breed standards
AKC group: Terrier
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan:15-18 years
Average size: Male Wire Fox Terriers weigh 15 to 20 pounds and females weigh 13 to 18 pounds
Color: Black, Brown, and White
Coat: Dense, Harsh and Rough, and Wire
Shedding: Minimal
Grooming Needs: High Maintenance
Hypoallergenic Breed: Yes
Comparable Breeds: Lakeland Terrier, Welsh Terrier

Is the Wire Fox Terrier the Right Breed for you?
High Maintenance: Grooming should be performed often to keep the dog's coat in good shape. Occasional trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Moderately Easy Training: The Wire Fox Terrier is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, houses with yards
Temperament: Independent, adventurous, courageous, playful

History
Wire fox terrier circa 1915

  The wire fox terrier was developed in England by fox hunting enthusiasts and is believed to be descended from a now-extinct rough-coated, black-and-tan working terrier of Wales, Derbyshire, and Durham. The breed was also thought to have been bred to chase foxes into their underground burrows; the dogs' short, strong, usually docked tails were used as handles by the hunter to pull them back out.
  Although it is said Queen Victoria owned one, and her son and heir, King Edward VII, did own a wire fox terrier named Caesar, the breed was not popular as a family pet until the 1930s, when The Thin Man series of feature films was created. Asta, the canine member of the Charles family, was a wire fox terrier, and the popularity of the breed soared. Milou (Snowy) from The Adventures of Tintin comic strip is also a wire fox terrier.
  In the late 20th century, the popularity of the breed declined again, most likely due to changing living conditions in the Western world and the difficulty of keeping hunting terriers in cities due to their strong prey instincts.
  As of 2014, the wire fox terrier has the distinction of having received more Best in Show titles at Westminster Kennel Club dog shows (currently 14) than any other breed. Matford Vic, a wire fox terrier, is one of only five dogs to have won the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show on more than one occasion. She won the competition twice, in 1915 and 1916. The only dog to win it on more occasions was Warren Remedy, a smooth fox terrier, who won it on three occasions between 1907 and 1909.


Temperament
  A happy, eager to please, excitable dog, the Wire Fox Terrier is always eager to play and makes an excellent pet for the active person. You may notice a streak of dominance in your dog – be sure you establish your role as the alpha early on. The Wire Fox Terrier was originally bred for hunting and tracking, so this dog still loves to dig under fences, in the garden, and even through sofas. Keep your dog in a secure, fenced-in yard, because this breed likes to roam and chase.
  As hunting dogs, the Wire Fox Terrier will chase smaller animals such as squirrels, rabbits, or cats. For this reason, keep your Wire Fox Terrier on a leash at all times. This bold little dog has no issues starting problems with bigger dogs and will not back down to dogs that are several times their size.
  Even though this breed is wonderful with children, the Wire Fox Terrier will react if it is being bothered or pestered. As well, this dog is quick to bark at any new sight or sound, which makes it a good watch dog. But overall, the Wire Fox Terrier makes a loyal, affectionate family pet.

Health
  The average life span of the Wire Fox Terrier is 12 to 15 years. Breed health concerns may include cataracts, congenital deafness, distichiasis, pulmonic stenosis, insulinoma, glaucoma, Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, shoulder luxation, mast cell tumors, cerebellar malformation, epilepsy, corneal ulceration, lens luxation, progressive retinal atrophy, ectopic ureters, congenital idiopathic megaesophagus and skin allergies.

Care
  Daily exercise in the form of a vigorous game, a good on-leash walk, or an off-leash outing in a secure area is a must for the Fox Terrier. When given room, however, the Fox Terrier can exercise on its own. It does well indoors with access to a secure yard, but can live outside in temperate or warm climates.
  The dog’s coat requires combing every week, and shaping once every three months. Pets are shaped by clipping, but for show dogs stripping is effective. This is because clipping tends to make the color of the coat dull and also softens it. In addition, Wire Fox Terrier puppies may require ear shaping techniques to retain proper shape as adults.

Living Conditions
  The Wire Fox Terrier will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is very active indoors and will do okay without a yard.

Training
  Training the Wire Fox Terrier can prove to be a bit difficult, especially if this is your first time owning this breed. If you’re bringing this dog home as a puppy, watch out for its sharp teeth. As well, the Wire Fox Terrier can be difficult to house train. In the beginning, you should consider staying at home with your dog as much as possible. Socialization is important, so introduce your Wire Fox Terrier to different dogs, people and environments whenever you can.
  Since this dog is intelligent, you should include obedience tasks as part of your Wire Fox Terrier’s training.  It can have stubborn and independent nature, so be sure to be firm when giving commands. Reprimand your dog in a firm manner when it exhibits bad behavior. If this is your first time owning this breed or lack faith in your training skills, don’t be afraid to hire an experienced handler.

Activity Requirements
  Fox Terriers are small, but they have energy to spare and need a lot of exercise to maintain health and happiness. Even when indoors they are always “on the go,” constantly moving about the house. You should walk your Fox Terrier several times a day, but jogging is even better. Fox Terriers prefer running to walking, so joggers have a true blue companion in this breed. They chase balls to the point that some owners believe they are obsessed with the activity, and can use up all of their energy playing fetch, as long as your arm doesn't tire out in the process. Their size makes Fox Terriers fine apartment dogs, but a commitment must be made to keeping up with a regular exercise program.

Grooming 
  The Wire Fox Terrier's coat requires stripping in order to maintain the proper look and texture. Stripping can be done at home, or at the groomer, and should be done at least twice per year. If a dog is not competing, his coat can be clipped, however this changes the texture of the coat, making it soft and also alters the coloring of the dog.
  Check the ears on a weekly basis for signs of infection, irritation, or wax build up. Cleanse regularly with a veterinarian-approved cleanser and cotton ball. Brush the teeth at least once per week to prevent tartar buildup and fight gum disease. Additionally, nails should be trimmed once per month if the dog does not wear the toenails down naturally.

Noteworthy wire fox terriers
  • Archie, owned by Gill Raddings Stunt Dogs starred in ITV's Catwalk Dogs.
  • Bob, from the Hercule Poirot episode Dumb Witness
    Snowy (French: Milou),
    companion of Tintin
  • Caesar, the companion of King Edward VII of the United Kingdom
  • Charles, brought to Ceylon by Leonard Woolf in 1905
  • Chester, in the film Jack Frost
  • J.D. from Millionaire Dogs
  • Mickey, the companion of French composer Francis Poulenc.
  • Sky, winner of the 2012 Purina Thanksgiving Dog Show and the 2014 Westminster Dog Show.
  • Van Gogh, Paul Meltsner's dog featured in his famous painting Paul, Marcella and Van Gogh
  • Vicki, Rudyard Kipling's dog
  • Wessex, the dog of British novelist (Tess of the d'Urbervilles) Thomas Hardy
  • Willy, from Ask the Dust
  • Wuffles, the Patrician's dog in the Discworld Series

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Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Everything about your Field Spaniel

Everything about your Field Spaniel
  The sturdy, medium-sized Field Spaniel dog breed was originally developed to retrieve game from land or water. Today, while he retains his excellent hunting skills, he is mainly a family companion and show dog and is rarely seen in the field. He loves people and is a loyal family friend.

Overview
  The Field Spaniel, also known as the Field, is a breed of dog in the Sporting Group. Known for their grace and agility, this breed is just as famous for their calm and steady personality.   The Field Spaniel was recognized by the AKC in 1894 and AKC approved in 1998.
  The average Field Spaniel stands 17 to 18 inches high at the shoulders and weighs between 35 and 50 pounds. Unlike many Spaniels their short coat is easy to care for, but their long floppy ears need to be cleaned on a regular basis and frequently checked for any signs of bacterial or fungal infections.

Highlights
  • Field Spaniels need regular contact with people; they become neurotic if locked away in a kennel or out in a yard with no human companionship.
  • Socialize them well when young to avoid timidity and problems with other dogs.
  • They are active dogs and require regular exercise.
  • They will follow their nose so a securely fenced yard is a must.
  • Field Spaniels love water and will play in any water they find, including their water bowl in the house. They will share the fun by bringing the water to you also.
  • They love to eat and will steal food when possible.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Field Spaniel is a little bigger than the English Cocker and a little smaller than the English Springer.
  • The Field Spaniel’s slightly wavy, thick coat can be black, liver, golden liver, roan, or any of those colors with tan points.
  • Comparable Breeds: Cocker Spaniel, English Springer Spaniel
History
  The Field Spaniel was developed in England in the latter half of the 19th century to be a medium-sized, all-black dog, which was unusual at the time as most hunters preferred dogs with some white so they could be easily seen in the field. The Field Spaniel was created at the same time that dog shows were becoming popular and is considered the first spaniel developed for conformation showing while at the same time retaining his excellent skills in the field.
  Until 1901, spaniels were divided by weight, so if one puppy in a litter grew to be more than 25 pounds, he was called a Field Spaniel. If he weighed less than 25 pounds, he was classified as a Cocker Spaniel.
Ch. Clareholm Dora, Best Champion at Crufts in 1909.
  The breed started out as a popular dog, but through some not-so-successful cross-breeding, fanciers turned him into a dog that was longer than he was tall, with short legs, a large head, and too much coat. That didn't make for a very good or very attractive hunting dog, and the public expressed its displeasure. The Field Spaniel's popularity bottomed out. Fortunately, a man named Mortimer Smith made the effort to bring back the Field Spaniel's functional good looks.
  The AKC registered its first Field Spaniel, Colehill Rufus, in 1894, but when a fire destroyed a major kennel in 1909, the breed practically disappeared in the United States. The last registration of a Field Spaniel occurred in 1930. The next importation of Field Spaniels occurred in 1967, and those three dogs along with subsequent imports are the basis of the breed today. Despite his fine qualities, he remains a rare breed compared to other spaniels.




Personality
  Larger than a Cocker Spaniel and smaller than a Springer Spaniel, the Field Spaniel is a medium-sized bundle of energy. They have steadier temperaments than their spaniel counterparts and are generally friendly to everyone, even though they are usually not outgoing. They love the outdoors and are at their happiest when involved in family activities such as swimming, hiking, biking and hunting. They are incredibly agile dogs, allowing them to maneuver quickly in heavy brush and marsh to flush birds from their hiding places. Field Spaniels love people and consider all members of the family to be best friends. They also love water and have a reputation for creating quite a mess with their water dish, splashing around as if it is a tiny wading pool. Their temperament, trainability and patience with children makes Field Spaniels make an excellent choice for a first time dog owner, if that person is committed to an active lifestyle.

Health
  The Field Spaniel, which has an average lifespan of 12 to 14 years, may be prone to minor health issues such as hypothyroidism and otitis externa, as well as seizures, heart murmurs, canine hip dysplasia, and patellar luxation. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may recommend heart, hip, thyroid, elbow, eye, and patella exams for this breed of dog.

Care
  The Field Spaniel should be brushed and combed at least once or twice a week. Show dogs, meanwhile, must be trimmed and clipped on a regular basis to prevent outgrowth. A Field Spaniel's ear should be protected against the accumulation of dirt. Moreover, the inner ear hair and footpad hair should be clipped regularly.
  Regular exercise and training is recommended for the Field Spaniel. The breed should be allows to live inside the home, with access to the outdoors. But beware, some Field Spaniels are prone to snoring.

Living Conditions
  The Field Spaniel is not recommended for apartment life. They are moderately active indoors and do best with at least a large yard. Because these dogs do have deeply rooted hunting instincts, it is essential to have a good fence surrounding your property, as otherwise they are likely to take off after any interesting scent. Do not lock this breed away in a kennel or it will become extremely neurotic. This breed prefers cool climates.

Trainability
  Field Spaniels, like other accomplished sporting breeds, can have an independent streak which can sometimes present training challenges. They like to do things their own way, however with enough treats and praise on hand to reward good behavior, Field Spaniels can be trained with moderate ease. It is best to do the training in short spurts, so that the dog doesn't become bored, and should always be conducted with a gentle hand. Field Spaniels won't respond to discipline or harsh treatment.

Activity Requirements
  Field Spaniels were not meant to be lazy house pets. Their medium size might make them appealing to apartment and condo dwellers, but that living situation would be quite unfair to the Field Spaniel. They are active animals who love being outdoors and need time to run every day. Sending them out in the yard to run around isn't going to cut it, however. Instead, this breed should be involved in interesting activities that involve humans. Biking, jogging, hiking and swimming are high on a Field Spaniel's list of fun activities. Agility and obstacle courses are even better, and if possible, hunting is the Field Spaniel's favorite activity. Their agile bodies and webbed feet makes them exceptional bird hunting companions. They can flush birds out of their hiding places without being detected, and they can efficiently retrieve a hunter's prize from the water.
  If a Field Spaniel does not get enough activity they will become anxious, and that anxiety can often be severe. Destructive behavior in a Field Spaniel is almost always related to lack of adequate exercise.

Grooming
  The Field Spaniel has a single coat, meaning there’s no undercoat. The silky hair is moderately long and can be flat or slightly wavy. The front of the chest, the belly, the backs of the legs, and the rear end all have feathering like that seen on the Setter breeds.
The coat isn’t heavy and it’s easy to maintain. Brush it weekly and comb out the feathering a couple of times a week, or whenever the dog has been outside or has twigs or other debris clinging to his hair. Trim the hair between the footpads and inside the ears. Bathe the dog only as needed; regular brushing should keep him pretty clean. Field Spaniels shed moderately.
  If you plan to show your Field Spaniel, ask the breeder for advice on presenting the dog in the show ring. He should look natural, but he may need a little more neatening with clippers, thinning shears, and stripping knives than a pet dog would receive.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. If your Field Spaniel loves to swim — and even if he doesn’t — keep the hanging ears clean and dry to prevent bacterial or yeast infections. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Field Spaniels are fond of children, but noisy roughhousing isn't their style. As with any breed, always supervise the interaction between Field Spaniels and young children to prevent any ear-tugging and tail pulling on the part of either party.

Did You Know?
  In the United States, there were no Field Spaniels until the 1960s. The Field Spaniel Society of America was formed in in 1978.

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