LUV My dogs: cane corso

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Showing posts with label cane corso. Show all posts
Showing posts with label cane corso. Show all posts

Thursday, September 8, 2016

Top 10 Black Dogs Breeds

Top 10 Black Dogs Breeds
  Black colored dogs are usually rarer than the other color varieties. From all dog coat colors, the black color is also the most fascinating and one of the few ones that has been purposely bred for a specific function. In the Northern countries for example, the Black Norwegian Elkhound was bred as a separate breed since 1877 because its distinctive color helps the hunter see his dog in the snowy landscape.
  There's no doubt that black dogs have a bad reputation. According to the ASPCA, they are the last to be adopted and the first to be euthanized. What's worse is that many people perceive them as less lovable because they are harder to see, and have been negatively portrayed in the media. In celebration of black dogs, we've rounded up 10 of the most popular black dog breeds that are giving it their all to proudly represent their coat color.

1. Great Dane
  The Great Dane was originally bred to hunt wild boar, but he probably wouldn't be very good at it today. The ferociousness necessary to track down such a large, wily animal was eventually bred out of the Great Dane. He's now a gentle soul who generally gets along well with other dogs, animals, and humans.
AKC standard for Black Great Danes: The color shall be a glossy black. White markings at the chest and toes are not desirable.  Any variance in color or markings as described above shall be faulted to the extent of the deviation. Any Great Dane which does not fall within the above color classifications must be disqualified.

2. Rottweiler
  Rottweiler dogs are sturdy build rectangular proportioned energetic dog which is a little longer in length than in height. The body structure is heavy boned with powerful muscle and dense substantial physique. Great stamina to drive cattle throughout the day, Rottweiler is not ignorant in its duty of herding. The powerful and elegant gait of the dog is full of confidence, signifies good drive and approach. The coat of Rottweiler is dense and straight but moderately rough; collectively expression projects a keen, alert responsive and confident investigator.
  "Rottweiler breeders aim at a dog of abundant strength, black coated with clearly defined rich tan markings, whose powerful appearance does not lack nobility and which is exceptionally well suited to being a companion, service and working dog."This breed is all about balance, endurance, proportionality, intelligence and strength. The various standards in place for the Rottweiler's physical appearance specify these characteristics.

3.Cane Corso
  The black breed Cane Corso originates from Italy. They are a large Italian breed of dog that is also known as Italian mastiffs. This breed is reserved, calm, quiet and evenly tempered. They are also very well muscled and less bulky than other mastiff dogs. Cane Corsos are closely related to Neapolitan mastiffs and have many similarities with them. Most of the Cane Corso assist in guarding big properties and hunt big wild boars. For many people, they are the favourite black dog breed.
  Majestic look Cane Corso is a muscular dog with massive build. The look is furious rather dreadful to warn intruder without any action by dog. Cane Cosro can spring into action with astonishing speeds to pin culprits. This is a versatile breed domesticate able to a variety of applications starting from hunting, guardian, watchdog , general working dog besides trustworthy companion. Its short coat is coarser; some could be near to smooth while dense to offer resistance to water and other climatic severe effects. Favourite color is Black to achieve formidable expression.

4. Doberman Pinscher
  Doberman pinscher, popularly known as Doberman is a medium large sized domestic dog. They originate from Germany and in the early 19th century, they were used as guard dogs. They are a mix breed of Rottweiler, Black Terriers and German Pinscher. Dobermans are strong and sometimes they can also be stubborn. Height of a male Doberman is around 66-72 cm whereas females are around 61-68 cm. A Male Doberman weighs around 34-45 kg and female ones weigh 27-41 kgs. They are highly energetic and intelligent dogs, best used for police and military work.
  The Doberman is compactly built, muscular, powerful and square-proportioned. It combines elegance and strength with speed and endurance. Its carriage is proud and alert, and its gait is free and vigorous. Its coat is short, smooth and hard, showing off the exceptionally clean-cut lines of this athletic breed.
  The Doberman pinscher is an intelligent capable guardian, ever on the alert and ready to protect its family or home. It is also a loyal and adventurous companion. It likes to be mentally challenged and is a gifted obedience pupil. It is sensitive and very responsive to its owner's wishes, though some can be domineering. It is generally reserved with strangers. It can be aggressive with strange dogs.

5. Newfoundland
  Newfoundland is one of the strongest breeds of dog which is perfect for being a lifeguard. He was originally used as a working dog for pulling nets for fishermen and haul wood from the forest. The breed Newfoundland originates from Canada. It is well suited for working on both land as well as water. It is known for its giant size, calm dispositions, loyalty and also forbeing anexcellent swimmer.
  Brown, black, gray and black with white are the recognized Newfoundland colors. Solid colors and white with black may have white on the chest, chin, toes and on the tip of the tail. A tinge of bronze may appear on a gray or black coat and lighter furnishings may appear on a brown or gray coat. Facial and muzzle hair is short and fine. The back legs are feathered for the entire length. The hair on the tail is long and dense.

6. Portuguese Water Dog

  Classified as a working dog, the Portuguese Water Dog is a hard worker and a loyal companion. It has been appreciated for its strength, soundness and spirtit for centuries along the coast of Portugal. This robust breed has a waterproof coat, giving it the ability to swim for hours. Called a Cao de Aqua, or dog of water in Portugal, the dog was bred as a working dog for fisherman on boats. The breed has dove for fish, retrieved broken nets, carried messages back to shore and guarded his master's boats while in foreign ports.
  The Water Dog has a thick coat of strong hair. It covers the body evenly except where the forearm joins the groin area where it is thinner. Some coats are curly and lusterless. Other coats are more wavy than curly with a slight sheen. 
  Coat color is white, black or tones of brown. The coat may also be a combination of brown, black and white. Water Dogs with white, black or black and white coats have bluish skin.

7.Neapolitan Mastiff 

  With its massive size made even more imposing by its abundant loose skin and dewlap, the Neapolitan Mastiff may have the most alarming appearance of any dog, and some say this look was purposefully bred in order to scare away intruders without the dog having to act. However, when forced to act, the Neo can spring into action with surprising speed. Its massive muscular body can knock down almost any intruder. Its huge head with short, powerful jaws and large teeth can crush or hold an opponent. The skin is tough and hanging, adding to the imposing impression of size as well as formidable expression.
  The Neapolitan Mastiff was bred for centuries to guard its family. As such, it is incredibly loyal and devoted to its family, watchful and suspicious of strangers, and tolerant of acquaintances. It is a stay-at-home-type dog. Although it is loving toward children, its sheer size can make accidents possible. It may not get along well with other dogs, especially domineering-type dogs. Because of its size, it should be carefully socialized at an early age.
  The Neo is short-haired with straight hairs that are one inch long or shorter. The coat is dense with hair uniform in length, giving a smooth appearance all over the body. There are no tufts or fringed hair anywhere. 
  Solid colors for coats include light and dark shades of black, gray-blue, tawny and mahogany. The AKC allows some brindling in all colors if the brindling is tan. This is known as reverse brindling. Some may have white markings on the chest, throat, underside of the body or on the toes. White hairs behind the wrists are accepted by the AKC.

8. Havanese
  Known for being the “National Dog of Cuba” and the only dog breed native to the island country, the Havanese is a small dog breed known for its silky coat that protects it against the harsh heat of the tropics. As a trainable and intelligent dog that possesses a naturally friendly and affectionate disposition, the Havanese is currently ranked as the 28th most popular dog breed in the United States by the American Kennel Club. If you are wondering whether the Havanese is the perfect match for you, the following is a complete description on this energetic toy breed.
  The abundant coat of the Havanese is acceptable in all coat colors, with white, fawn, red, cream brown, beige, orange, black, blue, chocolate, and silver being quite common. While the coat may be one solid color, others will have markings that create sable, brindle, black and tan, Irish piebald, part-colored, piebald, beige black, and more color patterns.
  Sometimes referred to as “Havana Silk Dogs,” the Havanese is a double-coated breed with soft, wavy, and silky lightweight hair on both the outer coat and undercoat. Reaching six to eight inches in length if never clipped or altered, the profuse coat is extremely light and insulating with a sheen appearance.

9.Yorkshire Terrier
  Affectionately referred to as “Yorkies” by their loyal owners, Yorkshire Terriers are members of the Toy Group that offer big personalities in a small package. As a portable pooch prized for its compact size and luxurious long-haired coat, the Yorkshire Terrier is currently ranked as the 6th most popular breed in the United States by the American Kennel Club. Read on to find a full breed description on the Yorkshire Terrier to determine whether the active dog will be an ideal match for your family’s lifestyle.
  Since the breed is often defined by its color, the breed standard indicates that the only acceptable coloring for the Yorkshire Terrier is steel blue and tan. While the body and tail are typically blue, the remainder of the dog’s body is tan. Puppies are often tan, black, and brown with white markings, but the pups will usually reach its final coloring by their third birthday.

10. Affenpinscher
  The Affenpinscher is a terrier type breed that originated in Central Europe, specifically Munich, Germany and France. The name Affenpinscher translates from German into Monkey Terrier. It is one of the oldest breeds in the Toy Group. During the 17th century they were kept on farms and stores to serve as ratters and in the home to keep mice out of the mistresses' boudoirs. It is an energetic little dog with the face and impishness of a monkey. They strut around with all the confidence of a larger dog. Their small size makes them a good dog for city and apartment dwellers. They are active indoors and can most of their exercise inside.
  The Affenpinscher's coat hair is thick and rough and about one-inch in length on the shoulders and body. The hair may be shorter on the backside and the tail. The hair on the head, chest, neck, stomach and legs is a little longer and softer. An adult will have a cape of sturdy hair that blends into the back coat near the withers. Longer hair on the head, beard and eyebrows frames the face to form the monkey-like expression. 
  Coat colors include black, red, silver, gray, black and tan or belge (a mixture of black and reddish brown.) Dogs with a black coat may have a few silver or white areas mixed in or may have a rusty cast. Reds vary from orange-tan to brownish red. The belge color coats have black, brown and/or white mixed in the red. Some dogs may have a small white spot on the chest. This is not penalized by kennel clubs but large white patches are not desirable.


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Sunday, August 17, 2014

Everything about your Cane Corso

Everything about your Cane Corso
  This Italian mastiff was bred to hunt wild boar and today acts as a guard dog. Fiercely devoted to his family, he doesn't care for strangers or small animals. More athletic and agile than other mastiffs, he’ll sit at your feet with impressive weight.
  With its large, athletic build and massive head, the Cane Corso is an impressive looking dog that may conjure up fear in those who have never met the Italian breed.
  Alas, while the Cane Corso was originally bred to be a guard dog, the breed today is well known as a lovable family companion. In fact, due to its increasing popularity, the American Kennel Club recently welcomed the breed to join its registry.
  Born to Perform! The Cane Corso Italian Mastiff is the Ferrari of the Canine world, a fine Italian high-performance machine! Magnificent Style, Sleek Muscular Lines, Tremendous Drive and more. The Cane Corso strikes the perfect balance between Family Companion & Protection. All this, in a Compact Powerful body with the heart of a lion, and the gentleness to watch over a child.

Overview
  The Cane Corso is a mastiff breed from Italy. He is a complex, powerful dog with special needs. For starters, he is a giant breed, weighing up to 120 pounds. He was created to hunt big game and guard property. The Cane Corso has a massive head, heavy rectangular body, and a short coat in black, gray, fawn, or red.
  The Cane Corso is not an appropriate choice for an inexperienced dog owner. First-time dog owners and people who have had only “soft” breeds such as retrievers, spaniels, or toy breeds need not apply. This dog is large, powerful, intelligent, active, and headstrong.
  A Cane Corso needs a leader who can guide him with firmness and consistency without using force or cruelty. The Cane Corso loves his family, but he’s not demonstrative about it. He will want to be near you, but he’s not demanding in terms of attention or physical touch.
  Early, frequent socialization is essential. Purchase a Cane Corso puppy from a breeder who raises the pups in the home and ensures that they are exposed to many household sights and sounds. Continue socializing your Cane Corso throughout his life by taking him to puppy kindergarten class, introducing him to friends and neighbors, and planning outings to local shops and businesses. This is the only way he can learn to be discriminating between what is normal and what is truly a threat.
  That said, no amount of socialization will make him friendly toward people other than his family. The Cane Corso is first and foremost a guard dog, and he takes his responsibilities seriously.
  Begin training as soon as you bring your Cane Corso puppy home, while he is still at a manageable size. Institute a nothing-in-life-is-free program, requiring puppies to “work” for everything they get by performing a command before receiving meals, toys, treats, or play. It’s always a good idea to take a Cane Corso to puppy kindergarten followed by basic obedience class, especially if you are working with a trainer who understands the Cane Corso mindset.
  The Cane Corso has a moderate activity level and needs a job to do, which can be anything from being your on-leash walking companion to daily training activities. Expect to walk or jog him at least a mile daily, in addition to 20 minutes or so of training practice. He will not be satisfied to lie around and do nothing all the time.
  He must also be prevented from chasing and killing cats or small dogs belonging to the neighbors. The Cane Corso has a high prey drive and a territorial nature, so he needs a strong, solid fence at least six feet high to keep him on his own property. An underground electronic fence is never appropriate for this breed.
  Like any dog, Cane Corso puppies are inveterate chewers and because of their size can do a whole lot of damage. Don’t give them the run of the house until they’ve reached trustworthy maturity. And keep your Cane Corso puppy busy with training, play and socialization experiences. A bored Cane Corso is a destructive Cane Corso.
  The Cane Corso should spend plenty of time with his family. Chaining a Cane Corso out in the yard and giving him little or no attention is not only cruel, it can also lead to aggression and destructive behavior.
  The Cane Corso has a smooth coat that sheds. Brush him at least once a week to remove dead hair and keep the skin and coat healthy. Clean the ears and trim the nails as needed, and bathe the Cane Corso on the rare occasions that he’s dirty.

Other Quick Facts:

  • Despite a multicentury legacy, the Cane Corso nearly went extinct during World War II.
  • The Cane Corso is a fiercely intelligent animal and requires an equally savvy owner.
Breed standards
AKC group: Working group
UKC group: Guardian Dog group
Average lifespan: 10 - 12 years
Average size: 90 - 110 pounds
Coat appearance: Waterproof, shiny, short and dense, similar to a cow
Coloration: Black, various to all shades of gray, fawn, red and brindle
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Medium-sized but large-boned and strong muscular body; thick skin; broad muzzle; muscular jaw; black nose; cropped or chin-length ears; long legs; black paws and nails
Possible alterations: May have pink nose, fringed or longer coat.
Comparable Breeds: Bullmastiff, Rottweiler
History
  The Cane Corso is a descendant of the canis pugnax, dogs used by the Romans in warfare. Its name derives from cane da corso, an old term for those catch dogs used in rural activities (for cattle and swine; boar hunting, and bear fighting) as distinct from cane da camera which indicates the catch dog kept as a bodyguard. In the recent past, its distribution was limited to some districts of Southern Italy, especially in Basilicata, Campania and Puglia.
  The Cane Corso is a catch dog used with cattle and swine, and also in wild boar and cougar hunters. It is also used by night watchmen, keepers, and, in the past, by carters as a drover. In the more distant past this breed was common all over Italy as an ample iconography and historiography testify.
  The American Kennel Club first recognized the Cane Corso in 2010. The popularity of the breed continues to grow, ranking in 50th place in the United States in 2013, a jump from 60th place in 2012.


Temperament and Personality
  The Cane Corso is a naturally strong-willed dog with a dominating personality. Those characteristics are what make him an exceptional protector of his family and home. However, his natural tendency to take charge can be troublesome to an owner who is unable to establish his or her role as pack leader and control this behavior. While the Cane Corso is loving and affectionate with his family, including children, he will try to rule the roost. Anyone considering this breed must be prepared to set boundaries with confidence because this dog will surely test them.
  The Cane Corso is highly intelligent and athletic, and he needs plenty of activity to keep him fit physically and mentally. Take him jogging or on strenuous hikes to help him burn off his energy.
The Cane Corso may be best suited to a family with older children (age 9 and up) rather than a family with babies and toddlers due to his large size and the time and effort required to closely supervise interactions between the dog and young children.
  Start training your puppy the day you bring him home. Even at eight weeks old, he is capable of soaking up everything you can teach him. Don’t wait until he is 6 months old to begin training or you will have a more headstrong dog to deal with. If possible, get him into puppy kindergarten class by the time he is 10 to 12 weeks old, and socialize, socialize, socialize. However, be aware that many puppy training classes require certain vaccines (like kennel cough) to be up to date, and many veterinarians recommend limited exposure to other dogs and public places until puppy vaccines (including rabies, distemper and parvovirus) have been completed. In lieu of formal training, you can begin training your puppy at home and socializing him among family and friends until puppy vaccines are completed.
  Don’t let him get away with behaviors such as growling or snapping when he is touched or moved, or when he doesn’t want to go outside or go in a certain direction on leash. Nor should he be allowed to behave that way when someone gets too close to his toys or food. Mounting family members is also inappropriate. Quick, decisive action is needed to reassert your authority as pack leader in such cases. To prevent these types of behaviors in the first place, work closely with a trainer or behaviorist who understands the mindset of guardian breeds.
  Ask yourself why you are interested in this breed. Talk with a reputable, experienced Cane Corso breeder. Describe exactly what you’re looking for in a dog and ask for assistance in selecting a puppy. Breeders see the puppies daily and can make uncannily accurate recommendations once they know something about your lifestyle and personality. Choose a puppy whose parents have nice personalities and who has been well socialized by the breeder from birth.

Health 
  Life expectancy for a Cane Corso is 10 to 11 years. As a large and robust dog, it has the typical bone and joint problems of giant breeds. These can include hip dysplasia and degenerative joint disease. Providing proper nutrition and preventing obesity from occurring can help reduce the risk of degenerative joint disease. Hip dysplasia is more genetically based.
  Cane Corso’s are also prone to common eye defects, such as entropion, ectropion, and glandular hypertrophy, or "Cherry eye."

Living Conditions
  The Cane Corso will do okay in an apartment if it gets enough exercise. They will be content to live outdoors provided they have adequate shelter.

Exercise
  This very athletic breed needs a lot of regular exercise. They make excellent jogging companions, and if not jogged daily, should be taken on at least one long, brisk daily walk.

Care
  The Cane Corso is quite simple to care for. As a short haired breed, it does not require much grooming; just a bath and a brush now and then. Shedding is minimal. It is also flexible when it comes to living arrangements as the Cane Corso can settle just as happily into apartment dwelling as outdoor living. If left outdoors, adequate shelter needs to be provided. If dwelling in an apartment, owners need to make sure to provide enough daily exercise. The Cane Corso can make excellent jogging companions, but for daily exercise needs it need at least one long, brisk walk.

Grooming
  Grooming the Cane Corso is quite easy due to his short coat, though his large size means it’s a big job. Brush his sleek coat with a natural bristle brush or mitt once a week. Use coat conditioner/polish to brighten the sheen. Bathe him every three months (or when he’s dirty) using a mild shampoo.
  The rest is basic care. Check his ears every week and clean if needed. Trim his toenails regularly, usually once a month, and brush his teeth regularly using a soft toothbrush and doggie toothpaste to keep his teeth and gums healthy. It is essential to introduce grooming to the Cane Corso when he is very young so he learns to accept the handling and fuss peacefully.  
Is this breed right for you?
  Active, the strong Cane Corso requires a lot of exercise. An excellent family dog, it gets along well with children but has a serious instinct to chase other animals, including cats. While it does well living in an apartment if it receives adequate fitness, the Cane Corso would also be satisfied living outdoors. Loyal to its owner and extremely gentle, it is best that it has an owner that is well-versed in the breed and is stern in its training. Typically, it is best that the Cane Corso is taught to be submissive to its owner and family. In addition, this breed should be socialized young to avoid its protective instinct kicking in with invited guests. Requiring only an occasional brush, the Cane Corso is very easy to groom and only lightly sheds. However, it is known for drooling, especially when overheated.

Did You Know?
The Cane Corso is also known as Dogo di Puglia, which means "dog of Puglia."

A dream day-in-the-life
  A simple breed, it does not require much to make the Cane Corso happy. An affectionate dog, it will be happy to be surrounded by its family throughout the entire day. Going for a quick walk or run, it is likely to guard the home while keeping on the trail of its owner. Around the home, it will be docile and go nearly unnoticed, until it gets into bed with its owner at night

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