LUV My dogs: calm

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Showing posts with label calm. Show all posts
Showing posts with label calm. Show all posts

Tuesday, November 15, 2016

Top 10 Quietest Dog Breeds

Top 10 Quietest Dog Breeds
  We all love dogs, but constant barking is a sure-fire way to upset your neighborhood and get yourself in trouble. And let’s face, incessant barking drives us insane too! So if you’re looking for a dog but don’t think you’ll be able to curb a barker’s noise, or perhaps just don’t want to deal with the possibility at all, we’e compiled a list of some of the most silent dog breeds.
  Whether your desire for a dog who doesn't bark stems from the fact that you share a thin wall with your neighbor or you just like a fairly quiet place to call home, we've got you covered. 

10.Collie


 The Collie isn’t exactly a silent breed — if he were, Lassie would never have been able to tell us that Timmy had fallen down the well! Still, this gentle and affectionate dog generally only speaks when he really has something to say. Given the appropriate amount of exercise, he shouldn’t be a nuisance barker.
  In addition to being one of the most intelligent dog breeds out there, the Collie is also one of the quietest. This breed does not tend to bark except when he really needs to. Because this breed is so smart, training is easy so, if barking does become an issue, you can just teach your dog a “hush” command.

9. Shiba Inu
  The Shiba Inu looks almost like a fox in appearance and does equally well as a jogging partner as an indoor companion.  He is clean, easy to groom, and loves his people. 
While he is quiet, he has a very strong prey drive which means he should never be off leash. 
  They are intelligent and independent, making them very attractive to people who want a small dog, who is quiet, but not necessarily one that is “in their face.”

8.Irish Setter

  Unlike many of the other dogs on this list, the Irish Setter is a rowdy and rollicking dog with more energy than he knows what to do with. Happily, though, that energy is rarely channeled into nuisance barking, and as long as he’s given plenty of exercise, he can be a great choice for families.
  This medium-sized breed does have a good bit of energy but, with proper exercise and mental stimulation, barking is rarely a problem. Irish Setters don’t tend to expend their extra energy by barking – they would much rather play a game or run around the house with your kids. That makes him an excellent family pet and a good listener! 

7.Bullmastiff
  Large and loveable, most of the noises that come out of the Bullmastiff are snorts and snuffles. Sure, he may not get along with cats , but this large breed is loyal with his family, fairly low-maintenance and saves his barking for special occasions.
  Strong-willed and incredibly loyal, the Bullmastiff isn’t a big barker, but he is not always good with other dogs  or cats .

6.Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

  This small breed is playful and friendly – he tends to form strong bonds with family and does not like to be alone. As long as you give the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel enough attention, he will remain calm and placid at home, not prone to barking. One thing to be wary of with this breed is that he can be a little stubborn at times. 
  Sweet and docile, these dogs get along well with everyone.  They are one of the larger of the toy breeds, weighing in at between 13 and 18 pounds. But they are still considered a quiet small breed dog.
  Fiercely loyal, they will follow you everywhere. 
  Some think of them as lazy, lounging around in your most-comfortable chair, but they are also playful and enjoy walks and activities as long as it involves their owners. 

5.Saint Bernard

  St. Bernards are very social, affectionate dogs, although they may bark at strangers. However, as long as they are properly socialized as young puppies, Saints will typically grow to love everyone they meet and have little need to bark.
  The Saint Bernard is a member of the Mastiff family. He can be sweet, shy and stubborn, but with proper training and socialization, this quiet breed can be fantastic for families or for use as a therapy dog.
  This giant breed is the definition of “gentle giant” – despite his size, he is sweet and friendly. The Saint Bernard can be a little aloof around strangers and he may have a bit of a stubborn streak, but barking generally isn’t a problem. These dogs are particularly well suited to families with children and they make great therapy dogs. 

4.Italian Greyhound

  Tiny, intelligent and a bit fragile, the Italian Greyhound can be rather defiant, but barking is rarely an issue. Housetraining, however, may be another story.
  The Italian Greyhound (IG for short) may need a few reminders from time to time that he is a small dog and not the same as his bigger cousin the Greyhound. 
  Energetic and playful, he will keep you going and happily amused for years to come.  His grooming needs are minimal, but extra effort might be needed when training.  You will need to convince him that what you want him to do is what he wanted to do all along.

3. Great Pyrenees
  Another large breed, the Great Pyrenees is known for its long white coat. This breed was developed for livestock guarding so he is protective and independent by nature, but with proper training he isn’t much of a barker.
  Like the first two breeds on this list, the Great Pyrenees is a large dog with an equally big heart. When properly trained, he’s calm, gentle and protective, but you’ll have to do your homework in order to get this strong-willed dog to that point.

2. Great Dane

  The breed named quietest of them all is also one of the biggest: the Great Dane. He’s a gentle giant with a calm nature, and while he doesn’t bark often, when he does, his voice will be louder and deeper than just about any other breed.
  He’s a gentle giant with a calm nature, and while he doesn’t bark often, when he does, his voice will be louder and deeper than just about any other breed.

1.Basenji

  Basenjis are actually known for their inability to bark! But that doesn’t mean they don’t make noise. Bred as hunting dogs in Africa, they make a yodeling sound instead of barking. However, they typically only do this when they feel there is a reason, and are not known to make noise often.
  Patience and a sense of humor are essential to living with a Basenji. He will chew up or eat whatever's left in his reach, and he's quite capable of putting together a plan to achieve whatever it is he wants, whether that's to get up on the kitchen counter or break into the pantry where the dog biscuits are stored. 

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Friday, September 16, 2016

Everything about your Dogue de Bordeaux

Everything about your Dogue de Bordeaux
  A powerful and muscular French breed, the Dogue de Bordeaux is a molossoid , "dogue" meaning Mastiff in French. A massive head and stocky body are trademarks of the breed. Americans became aware of the Dogue de Bordeaux when he appeared as drooling, messy "Hooch" in the 1989 Tom Hanks' film,Turner and Hooch. The breed's short, fine coat is fawn-colored, ranging from a dark red to a light fawn.

Overview
  The Dogue de Bordeaux is one of the most ancient French breeds. He is a typical brachycephalic molossoid type. He is a very powerful dog, with a very muscular body yet retaining a harmonious general outline. Built rather close to the ground, the distance from the deepest point of the chest to the ground is slightly less than the depth of the chest. A massive head with proper proportions and features is an important characteristic of the breed. His serious expression, stocky and athletic build, and self assurance make him very imposing. Bitches have identical characteristics, but less prominent.

Other Quick Facts
  • The Dogue de Bordeaux is a member of the mastiff family and originated in France.
  • The Dogue de Bordeaux can get along with cats and other dogs if he is brought up with them, but he has a strong prey drive and is likely to chase animals who stray onto his property.
  • The Dogue has thick, loose-fitting skin covered in fine, short hair. His coat can be any shade of fawn from light to dark-red, with or without a black or brown mask.
Breed standards
AKC group: Working Group

UKC group: Guardian Dog Group
Average lifespan: 8 - 10 years
Average size: 120 - 145 pounds
Coat appearance: Short and fine
Coloration: Fawn or mahogany with black or red masking
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Powerful, muscular body with thick skin; wrinkled face; hazel to brown eyes; muscular legs; and thick tail
Possible alterations: May have white markings on the body.
Comparable Breeds: Bullmastiff, Mastiff

History
  The translation of Dogue de Bordeaux could perhaps be described as “Bordeaux Mastiff,” but it is also known as a French Mastiff in areas outside of the country, particularly in America. As for its historical origins, the translations are not so clear. Many think the Dogue de Bordeaux could have descended from the Tibetan Mastiff and the Bulldog – which would certainly make the nickname “Bordeaux Bulldog” more appropriate. Dogs in the Middle Ages in the Aquitaine region may have also been ancestors to the modern Dogue de Bordeaux, and by the end of the Middle Ages, its use as a companion and guard dog was more frequent.
  Although the Dogue de Bordeaux took a heavy hit during the French Revolution, it regained its numbers throughout the years and a man named Raymond Triquet helped it to survive by taking the breed under his wing.
  The dog’s very tough history includes use in war, guardianship, and even training in hunting large game like bears, bulls, and jaguars. It was only recognized by the American Kennel Club in 2008.

Temperament
  The Bordeaux has a good and calm temperament. It is extremely loyal, patient and devoted to his family. Fearless and confrontational with strangers, he is a first class watch and guard dog. Socialize very well with other animals, preferably starting from an early age to avoid him being aggressive with other dogs. 
  The Dogue de Bordeaux snores and drools. Despite his fearsome appearance, the Dogue de Bordeaux is gentle with children and family members.   However, this is a powerful animal, and is not suitable for an inexperienced dog owner. The objective in training this dog is to achieve pack leader status. It is a natural instinct for a dog to have an order in its pack. When we humans live with dogs, we become their pack. The entire pack cooperates under a single leader. Lines are clearly defined and rules are set. You and all other humans MUST be higher up in the order than the dog. That is the only way your relationship can be a success. This breed needs a calm, but firm owner who displays a natural authority over the dog. One who is confident and consistent.

Health
  Like all breeds there may be some health issues, like hip, elbow and cardiac disease. Some dogs may be faced with these health challenges in their lives, but the majority of Dogue de Bordeaux are healthy dogs.
  Working with a responsible breeder, those wishing to own a Dogue de Bordeaux can gain the education they need to know about specific health concerns within the breed. Good breeders utilize genetic testing of their breeding stock to reduce the likelihood of disease in their puppies.

Care
  The dog is quite well groomed however sheds seasonally. Brushing twice a week during shedding season and once a week in rest of the year is comfortable for its grooming. The apartment living is not suitable until you accept its drools and snores; generally you will have everything covered in drool. Additionally wide area is required for exercise requirements.

Living Conditions
  This breed will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. They are very inactive indoors and will do okay without a yard.

Training
  Like all large dogs, training with the Dogue de Bordeaux should be handled with care. You will undoubtedly notice the fierce guardian instincts in this dog, and you’ll feel quite safe in its presence, but care should be taken so that the dog does not become suspicious of all strangers and all other dogs. Calm leadership that places clear boundaries on the Dogue de Bordeaux will be important, as will ensuring a pecking order that includes the dog in the family, but makes sure the dog understands its place below every human.

Exercise
  The two major issues are concerned with these dogs during puppyhood which necessitate regular exercises. Firstly, it is a healthy eater and gains weight rapidly, secondly it possesses high energies, it may be boisterous if not satisfied by its physical activities. Adult dog are more prone to get clumsy and fat. Healthy amount of daily exercises including long walks and accompanying in running and jogging are mandatory. Remember an unsatisfied dog would become too rambunctious to romp all over your house. They need any partner to exercise their activities, if left alone they would avoid exertion and would result in destructive dog instead.

Grooming
  The Dogue’s short coat is easy to groom. Brush him once a week with a rubber curry brush to remove dead hairs.
  But there’s more to grooming than coat care. The Dogue has wrinkles and they need special care so they don’t become infected. Wipe them out using a damp cloth or a baby wipe, then dry the folds thoroughly to prevent skin infections.
  Carry a hand towel for wiping his wrinkled face after every meal or drink of water. When he shakes that big head, he slings gobs of drool everywhere. He also sheds heavily, so you’ll be spending plenty of time sweeping and vacuuming.
  The rest is basic care. Check the ears weekly and clean them if necessary, brush the teeth as often as possible, and trim the nails regularly, usually every few weeks.

Children and other pets
  The breed is protective to family and remains curious to strangers, this breed needs to be introduced with your friends to accept them. The dog is sensible to differentiate between friendly and threatening elements. The Dogue de Bordeaux are excellent with children of 8 years and above. They may knock over young kids unintentionally due to their massive physique. Young kids should be governed when around them. This breed is aggressive to other dogs, some of them are more aggressive to same sex while some do not like opposite sex in the pack. They are healthy chaser of small animals including cats and other creatures. A demanding socialization from their early age is extremely needed to adapt the dog in multi-pet house

Is this breed right for you?
  Extremely family-friendly, the Dogue de Bordeaux has a much tougher exterior than it does demeanor. Calm and content, the dog will only be aggressive if its home feels threatened or if it is not socialized with other animals as a puppy. Requiring training and a good leader, this breed will become rough out of instinct if not taught how to behave properly. Relatively calm indoors, it will do OK with apartment life but will need regular exercise. A loud snorer and big drooler, the Dogue de Bordeaux is prone to many health problems, including epilepsy, heart problems and hip dysplasia.

Did You Know?
  The Dogue de Bordeaux, related to the Mastiff, starred alongside Tom Hanks in the 1989 comedy “Turner and Hooch.” The canine star’s name was Beasley, and although he stole nearly every scene he was in, this was his first and only film.

A dream day in the life
  This affectionate breed will likely wake up in one of its family member's room, although it will probably spend most of the night ensuring the home is safe from any harm. Enjoying a long walk, it'll settle in close to the ones that it loves. A calm and easygoing dog, the Dogue de Bordeaux will enjoy occasional rubdowns and play sessions while it keeps alert for anything out of the ordinary outside of the home.

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Saturday, July 19, 2014

Everything about your Saluki

Everything about your Saluki
  This sighthound is a living antiquity. Known as one of the first domesticated breeds, the Saluki hails from Egypt. Highly respected, they were actually mummified like the Pharaohs! Later brought to the Middle East to hunt down gazelles, these graceful-looking dogs have a lot of power built into them. Referred to as a reserved and quiet breed, the Saluki is sensitive and gentle.
  One of the oldest of dog breeds, Salukis were once considered a gift from Allah. They're fast as the wind, skinny as a supermodel, and quietly devoted to their people. A Saluki is easy to groom, challenging to train, and not to be trusted off leash.
  The Saluki is an elegant hunter with strong instincts to chase anything moving. He is a medium-size sighthound and can live happily in any environment, as long as he gets daily walks, maybe an opportunity to run a few times a week, and access to the sofa. His coat requires weekly brushing and sheds little. The Saluki is the world's oldest dog breed.

Overview
  The Saluki's origins are shrouded in the sands of time, but his history is believed to go back to antiquity. He is the very definition of grace and speed, well deserving of the name bestowed on him by his Arab breeders — The Noble. The Saluki is bred for speed, strength, and endurance, qualities that are evident in his long, narrow head and sleek yet muscular body.
  Beautiful but reserved, the Saluki is affectionate without being overly demonstrative. He's happy to prove his loyalty through quiet companionship. Not everyone is offered the gift of a Saluki's devoted friendship, but those happy few who receive it are appreciative of the honor.
Salukis are widely admired for their exotic appearance, but not everyone is well suited to live with this spirited and independent hunter. Any movement, be it a squirrel, cat, or radio-controlled car, will activate the Saluki's instinct to chase, and his speed has been clocked at 30 to 35 miles per hour.
  Unless he's protected by a strong human on the other end of the leash or a securely fenced yard, he's likely to meet his end beneath the wheels of a car. You might think that Salukis living in the country would have fewer issues, but they've been known to chase down and tangle with or kill goats, otters, foxes, raccoons, snakes, squirrels, and deer.
  To keep a Saluki safe and well exercised, provide him with 300 to 400 lateral feet of fenced area where he can run full out. If your yard isn't that large, you should have easy access to a fenced park, an enclosed sports field at a school, or a beach with no nearby road. On leash, the Saluki makes an excellent jogging companion — if you can keep up with him. He's also a good competitor in agility and lure coursing. Some Salukis participate in obedience and tracking as well.
  Indoors, the Saluki will make himself at home on your soft sofa or bed. He likes his comforts and needs cushioning for his somewhat bony body. Using his long, skinny muzzle, he'll surf your kitchen counters in search of anything edible.
  The calm and gentle Saluki can become timid and shy without early socialization and regular reinforcement through new experiences and introductions to many different people throughout his life. Generally quiet but alert, he's a good watchdog, but not a guard dog. Salukis are fearless in the hunt but otherwise unaggressive.
  Training a Saluki is possible, but don't expect the perfect obedience you might have from a Golden Retriever. Salukis think for themselves, and if something else is more interesting than what you're asking them to do, they're perfectly happy to ignore you. Use positive reinforcement techniques such as food rewards and praise, never harsh verbal or physical corrections.
  Salukis can make excellent companions for older children, but they aren't recommended for homes with young children. They're tolerant, but young Salukis can be too active for children younger than 8 years of age, and their thin skin and knobby bones make them vulnerable to injury if children aren't careful.
  While Salukis aren't overly demonstrative, they do become strongly attached to their people and dislike being left alone for long periods. Consider a Saluki if you have time to give to a devoted, graceful friend who can run like the wind.

Breed standards
AKC group: Hound
UKC group: Sighthound
Average lifespan: 11-12 years
Average size: 35-65 pounds
Coat appearance: Smooth or feathered
Coloration: White, cream, red, golden, tan, black and tan, tricolor
Hypoallergenic: No
Comparable Breeds: Borzoi, Greyhound
Other Quick Facts
  A Saluki is built of lines and curves, the very picture of grace and strength. He has a long, narrow head; long hanging ears covered in long silky hair; bright eyes that range from dark to hazel, with a far-seeing gaze; a long, supple, well-muscled neck; a deep but moderately narrow chest; long, straight legs; a broad back; strong hindquarters to power his ability to gallop and jump; moderately long feet with long, well-arched toes adorned with feathering; and a long tail feathered with silky hair and carried curved.

  Salukis have a smooth coat with a soft, silky texture and a slight amount of feathering on the legs, the back of the thighs and sometimes on the shoulder. Some Salukis have a smooth coat with no feathering. They come in the colors of the desert: white, cream, fawn, golden, red, grizzle and tan, tricolor (white, black and tan), and black and tan.

Highlights
  • Salukis love to run and need regular daily exercise.
  • They must be kept on leash whenever they're not in a securely fenced area. They have a strong prey drive and will pursue anything furry and in motion, heedless of their owner's commands.
  • Salukis are a reserved breed although they're devoted to their people.
  • Early and ongoing socialization is important for this breed to prevent shyness and skittishness.
  • Salukis are not recommended for apartments. They require a large fenced yard where they can run safely. Underground electronic fencing is not recommended; their prey drive is so strong they'll push past it.
  • It is important to provide comfortable bedding for a Saluki since he doesn't have enough body fat to provide padding.
  • Salukis should not live outdoors. They thrive on human companionship and will become depressed if left alone for long periods.
  • Although these dogs can make gentle and calm companions for older children, they are not recommended for homes with small children.
  • Salukis are generally quiet dogs.
  • When training a Saluki, be consistent, and use only positive reinforcement techniques such as food rewards and praise, since the breed is so sensitive.
  • Salukis are fastidious and like to be clean. They shed little and require only weekly brushing.
  • Salukis should not reside in homes that have small pets. Even with the best training, a Saluki will view small pets as prey and will try to hunt them.
  • Salukis prefer the companionship of other Salukis, but they can get along with other dogs that do not have dominant natures.
  • Salukis can be picky eaters.
  • Never buy a Saluki from a puppy mill, a pet store, or a breeder who doesn't provide health clearances or guarantees. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies and who breeds for sound temperaments.
History
  Once known as the Persian Greyhound or the gazelle hound, the Saluki has long been considered one of the most ancient of breeds. Recent genetic evidence confirms this to be the case.
  Scientists speculate that Salukis and other ancient breeds descend from the first dogs and made their way through the world with their nomadic owners. Depictions of dogs resembling Salukis — with a Greyhoundlike body and feathering on the ears, tail, and legs — appear on Egyptian tombs dating to 2100 B.C.E., some 4,000 years ago. Even older are carvings from the Sumerian empire (7,000-6,000 B.C.E.) that show dogs with a striking resemblance to the Saluki.
  Pharaohs hunted gazelles and hares with Salukis, which often worked in partnership with falcons. The dogs were frequently honored with mummification after death. Nomadic Muslims, who generally despised dogs as unclean animals, considered Salukis a gift from Allah and referred to the dogs by the honorific El Hor, meaning The Noble.
Salukis were the only dogs permitted to sleep inside the tents. The breed may take its name from the ancient city of Saluk, in Yemen, or perhaps from the city of Seleukia in Syria. Another theory suggests that the name is a transliteration of the Arabic word for hound.
Salukis were widespread in the Middle East and could be found in Persia (modern-day Iran), Syria, Egypt, Palestine, Anatolia, Mesopotamia, and Arabia. The first documented case of Salukis arriving in Britain was in 1840, but it wasn't until after World War I, when many British officers returned with them from the Middle East, that the breed became established in Great Britain.
  Interest in the Saluki was slower to take hold in the United States. The Saluki Club of America was founded in 1927, the same year the breed was recognized by the American Kennel Club. The first Saluki registered by the AKC was Jinniyat of Grevel in 1929. Today the Saluki is a rare treasure, ranking 116th among the 155 breeds and varieties recognized by the AKC.

Personality


  The Saluki is an aloof dog, but one who's devoted to his family. He's gentle and thrives on quiet companionship. He has a tendency to bond with a single person, which can lead to separation anxiety.

  With strangers, Salukis are reserved, and they can be shy if they're not socialized at an early age. Socialization should continue throughout their life. They generally get along with other dogs, but prefer other Salukis, or at least other sighthounds. They're sensitive dogs and will pick up on and become stressed by tensions in the home.
  Salukis love comfort and enjoy being pampered with soft bedding and access to furniture. Like cats, they're fastidious about personal cleanliness.
  Like every dog, Salukis need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Saluki puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

Health
  Hip dysplasia is uncommon in Salukis, with the breed ranking joint lowest in a survey by the British Veterinary Association in 2003. The breed scored an average of 5 points, with a score of 0 being low, while 106 is high. In a 2006 breed specific survey conducted by The Kennel Club and the British Small Animal Veterinary Association Scientific Committee, responses highlighted several health issues. The primary cause of death identified was that of cancer, being responsible for 35.6% of deaths, with the most common forms being that of liver cancer or lymphoma. The secondary cause of death was cardiac related, with forms such as heart failure, or unspecified heart defects. Old age is listed as the third most frequent cause of death.
  Cardiomyopathy, heart murmur and other cardiac issues were present in 17.2% of responses while dermatolic conditions such as dermatitis or alopecia were reported by 10.8% of responses. Salukis have an average lifespan of 12 to 14 years.


Living Conditions
  The Saluki is not recommended for apartment life. These dogs are relatively inactive indoors and will do best with acreage. This breed should sleep indoors. They prefer warm temperatures over cold ones.

Exercise
  The Saluki is a natural athlete that needs a lot of exercise, including a daily, long, brisk walk or run. They are happiest when running, however many are lost or killed when they are allowed to get free and they spot a small animal to chase. This very independent dog can never be off its lead except in an isolated, scouted area. These dogs hunt on sight. They will pay no attention to their handler's calls if they are chasing something. In some countries they are not permitted to be left off of their lead at all. Salukis run at top speeds of 55km/h or more with their feet barely touching the ground. These top speeds are reached in short spurts, but they also have exceptional endurance. An excellent way to exercise your Salukis is to let it trot alongside your bike.

Care
  Salukis are not suited for apartment life. They need a home with a large, securely fenced yard where they can run flat out. The ideal running area for a Saluki is 300 to 400 feet in length or width. Fences should be at least five to six feet high or a Saluki will easily jump them. Underground electronic fencing will not contain a Saluki, nor will it protect him from other animals that might enter your yard.
  Keep your Saluki on leash whenever he's not in an enclosed area. A Saluki was bred for hunting and has a strong prey drive. If he sees anything fast and furry, he'll pursuit it for as long as he can, disregarding any commands to come or stop.
  Salukis are indoor dogs and require soft, cushioned bedding to prevent calluses from forming. Place food well out of reach of the Saluki's inquiring nose. That means behind closed doors or up about seven feet.
  Salukis are intelligent and learn quickly, but they're also independent and can be stubborn, which makes training a challenge. To hold your Saluki's attention, keep training sessions short, fun, and interesting. If a Saluki becomes bored, he will choose not to learn. Use positive reinforcement, never harsh verbal or physical corrections.

Grooming
  The Saluki comes in two coat types: smooth and feathered. Brush the smooth coat weekly, but if you have the feathered variety, comb the feathering on the ears, tail, legs and feet at least a couple of times a week to prevent or remove mats and tangles, and bathe him as needed. At mealtime, you’ll probably want to put his ears up in a snood to keep them from dragging in his food dish. A water bowl with sides that slope inward at the top will help prevent the ears from getting wet when he drinks.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Keep the ears clean and dry. Check them weekly for redness or a bad odor that might indicate infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball moistened with a mild pH-balanced cleanser recommended by your veterinarian. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath. Introduce your Saluki puppy to grooming from an early age so that he learns to accept it with little fuss.

Is this breed right for you?
  Loving and extremely loyal, the Saluki can be a family pet; however, he may only attach himself to one owner. Not prone to roughhousing, it's best that the Saluki is paired with families that have older children and someone that he can choose as his human. A great watchdog, the breed does not do well with animals that are not dogs. An athletic breed in need of large amounts of exercise, he's not suited for apartment life and will make a great companion to a runner and biker.

Children and other pets
  Salukis can make excellent companions for older children, but they aren't recommended for homes with young children. They're tolerant, but young Salukis can be too active for children younger than 8 years of age, and their thin skin and knobby bones make them vulnerable to injury if children aren't careful.
  They generally get along with other dogs, but prefer other Salukis, or at least other sighthounds. They won't chase small dogs or cats in their own household, but other animals, such as pet birds, mice, rabbits, or hamsters could prove too much of a temptation.


Did You Know?
According to the Guinness Book of World Records the Saluki is the world's oldest dog breed. They are believed to have originated in Egypt around 329 BC.

A dream day in the life of a Saluki
The Saluki will love to wake up to exercise. After a great run, he's fine with being left alone at home for the day. Guarding the home is his No. 1 priority as he strolls the house and catnaps in his dog bed. After dinner, he's ready to run alongside during a bike ride with his favorite human. He'll enjoy ending his night with a treat and a bit of cuddling with his loving family.

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Thursday, May 1, 2014

How to Calm Your Hyper Dog

How to Calm Your Hyper Dog
  Got a crazy, hyper dog? These dogs can be quite a challenge – they never calm down, they never listen. They pull on leash, they destroy things. They have a hard time focusing on what you tell them, because everything else is so much more exciting! If you’re living with a crazy hyper psycho dog like this and you haven’t lost your mind yet, you’ve got my respect and admiration.
  Unfortunately, many hyper crazy psycho dogs end up in the shelter when their owners lose patience with them. I’m sure you don’t want to give your dog up, so check out the training videos and articles on this page. You’ll learn why your dog is out of control, and you’ll learn some effective ways to calm your crazy dog down.
  True hyperactivity, or hyperkinesis, is a rare condition in dogs. In order for a clinical diagnosis to be made, most or all of the following symptoms should be present:
  • Increased resting heart and respiratory rates;
  • Failure to adjust to common stimuli like everyday household noises and activities;
  • Agitation;
  • Reactivity;
  • Sustained emotional arousal and an inability to settle down;
  • Paradoxical calming response to amphetamines.
Ignore the hyper dog behavior.
  Dogs seek attention from you. By paying attention to the hyper dog during outbursts, you’re reinforcing the very dog problem behavior that you're trying to eliminate. The next time your dog is jumping or nipping at you in an overexcited way, give it a try - no touch, no talk, no eye contact - and see how you fare. You might be surprised how quickly the dog settles down.

Give your dog a job.

  Having a task to focus on can help tremendously. Hyperactivity in dogs can come from psychological needs as easily as it can from physical needs. By giving your dog a job to do, you are removing his hyperactive dog behavior and are redirecting his energy elsewhere. For instance, having your dog wear a backpack with extra weight will keep your dog focused on carrying instead of getting distracted by squirrels and other things.

Exercise
  If you want a well behaved dog, you need to exercise him. A long walk in the morning, 30-60 minutes, and then a shorter walk in the evening after work is ideal. You don’t need to regiment it quite as strictly like Millan does; you can let Fido stop and smell the roses. In addition to stretching his legs, all the fascinating smells will stretch his brain, too. Helps keep him from going stir crazy at home.
  During the day, play a vigorous game of fetch or frisbee to really wear Fido out. If no one is home during the day to play with him, consider hiring a dog walker or even a doggy daycare so that Fido doesn’t lose his marbles while you’re gone.

Build a routine
  Hyperactivity is often a result of insecurity on the dog’s part. This is especially true of adopted dogs who may have moved around a lot in their past and have had little if any structure in their lives. Dogs thrive on routine. Developing a daily routine gives your dog an idea of what to expect life to be like and can calm his nerves. A routine might go something like this:
  Early morning: walk, breakfast, a game of fetch, then inside for a few hours while everyone is at work or school.
  Afternoon: Someone, either owner or dog walker, comes to let Fido out and play a quick game with him.
  Evening: Family eats dinner, dog eats dinner, then a walk.

Smart toys
  Put your dog’s brain power to good use. Get a few toys that require your dog to think. Toys like Kongs and Buster Cubes allow you to load them up with your dog’s kibble or favorite treats, keeping him occupied for a while while he manipulates the toy to make it dispense his food. You can feed your dog his entire meal this way.

Obedience or trick training
  Obedience training builds a common language between you and your dog. It’s another way to calm his nerves, as it teaches him how the world expects him to behave. Learning new skills is also a great way to exercise Fido’s brain.

Learn a new sport or game
  Getting involved in a dog sport like agility, flyball, freestyle or disc dog is a great way to build the bond between you and Fido. It provides physical and mental exercise all at once. However, formal training for some sports can be expensive and time-consuming.
  If you want the benefits without getting seriously involved in a sport, you can set up home built agility obstacle courses in the backyard, play Frisbee just for fun, or teach your dog to play games like hide and go seek (especially fun to play with kids).

Try out aromatherapy.
  Don’t forget that dogs experience the world primarily by scent! Just as the smell of lavender is said to relax human beings, a soothing smell can also have a very calming effect on your pet. Talk to your veterinarian or consult a holistic professional to find out what smells may work for your dog and which dispersal methods are the safest for him.

Be Careful Not to Reinforce Unwanted Behavior
  Many parents of highly active dogs unintentionally reward their pets for excessive behavior.
  Some dogs - especially hyper what-about-me types – regard any attention, positive or negative, as better than no attention at all.
  Attention-seeking behaviors can run the gamut from non-stop barking every time you take a phone call, to games of “keep away” involving your cell phone or watch. There have even been reported cases of dogs feigning lameness or illness in a bid for attention.
  The way to put a stop to unwanted behavior in your dog is to ignore it. Depending on the behavior this can be a challenge, but if you remain consistent and determined, your dog will ultimately lose interest because his bid for attention is having the opposite effect.
  The first few times you ignore him when he’s performing an attention-seeking activity, understand that your dog will most likely escalate the behavior temporarily.
  But if you continue to ignore him, and only pay attention to him when he’s not engaged in unwanted behavior, eventually his attention-seeking antics will grind to a halt. His goal is to get your attention, which is the opposite of being ignored, so he’ll soon learn which behaviors are getting him the opposite of what he wants.
  Meantime, be sure to lavish attention on him with petting, praise, food treats and shared activities when he’s behaving as you want him to. Remember - attention to good behavior begets good behavior, and ignoring unwanted behavior extinguishes it.

Don’t Be Afraid to Ask for Help
  If you’re at the end of your rope with your energetic pooch and your efforts to properly socialize, train and exercise him don’t seem to be helping, it’s time to visit your veterinarian for a consultation and workup.
  Certain drugs, especially bronchodilator medicines and thyroid hormone supplements, can contribute to symptoms of hyperactivity. Aging can also be a factor, as can diseases of the central nervous system.
  And of course it’s possible your dog really is clinically hyperactive, in which case all your best efforts to modify his behavior may not have much effect without simultaneous drug therapy or treatment with natural remedies.
  If your vet determines there’s no physiologic basis for your pup’s hyperactivity, the next step is to consult a dog trainer or other animal behaviorist.
  What you don’t want to do is become overwhelmed or completely exhausted trying to modify your dog’s behavior on your own.
  Commit to finding answers for your dog’s behavior, and seek the help you need from knowledgeable sources. This will strengthen the bond and long-term relationship between you and your best furry friend.


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Wednesday, March 26, 2014

6 Tips To Minimize Dog Aggression

6 Tips To Minimize Dog Aggression
  Dog aggression is a major dog problem for owners. Dog aggression stems from the dog's frustration and dominance. The dog's frustration comes from a lack of dog exercise, and the dog's dominance comes from a lack of calm-assertive leadership.
  While extreme cases should be handled by a professional, dog owners can try these six tips to begin to address their dog's aggression towards other dogs.


1. Trainin is a must

Having a trained dog is very important. In fact usually when a dog has been trained well we don't see dog aggression, because the dog has been taught that showing aggression is not allowed.

2. Re-socialize your dog to other dogs
Teaching your pooch how to play and socialize with other dogs without aggression or fear is essential training for new puppies. After an attack by another canine, socialization becomes even more important in order for your buddy to return to his bouncy, friendly self.


3. Keep your dog distracted with a command
With a trained dog this is easy to do simply by giving a "heel" command. A nicely trained dog will ignore the distraction and do what it was commanded.

4. Neuter or spay to prevent sexually-based aggression

5. Put your dog in a down-stay when he needs a moment to calm down
The down and down stay commands or the most important and powerful exercises you have for gaining control of your dog. When you need control simply put it in the down position. With dogs that show aggression this exercise is a must.

6. Make sure you do not give the wrong body language

  Think of the difference between your body language during your lecture and during an average daily greeting or interaction. You are using a different tone of voice, moving erratically, giving very stern looks, and not touching your dog as you normally do. Your dog looks at you and sees and very different individual than he sees on an average day.

As you can see, dog aggression can be handled many different ways. By learning to work through aggression problems, you can begin to help your pet learn new ways of handling himself around other dogs.
  If your pet is going to show dog aggression it will usually happen sometime around 12-24 month of age. Keep in mind that this type of aggression usually doesn't get better by itself so be sure to look for help from a canine behavior specialist or a trainer with experience with dog aggression.
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