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Showing posts with label bulldog. Show all posts
Showing posts with label bulldog. Show all posts

Wednesday, July 12, 2017

10 Most Popular Dog Breeds in UK

10 Most Popular Dog Breeds in UK
  There are an estimated 9 million dog owners in the UK. This figure is rising year on year as new generations become dog parents and our canine companions become our surrogate children.
  Over the years, the list of most popular dog breeds has fluctuated, with new breeds emerging and taking pole position. However there are some breeds that have maintained their ranking and remain amongst the most popular breeds owned in the UK.
Here’s a list of the top 10 most popular dog breeds based on The Kennel Club registration in 2016.

10. Border Terrier
  In 10th place is the Border Terrier , part of the KC’s Terrier Group. Boasting a rustic, working appearance, the breed is easily identifiable and held in high esteem. First developed in the early 18th century in the Cheviot Hills, the Border Terrier was primarily bred for the purpose of flushing out and killing foxes that were attacking the farmer's livestock. Highly valued for its willingness and stamina, the Border Terrier rose to tremendous popularity in the century, also hunting otters, badgers and vermin.
  The Border’s wiry double coat is commonly coloured wheaten, blue, tan, grizzle, red and white, which may have aided the breed's camouflage in the outland terrains of the border.   The Border Terrier is an affectionate, loyal and mannered breed, displaying a relaxed temperament that makes for an ideal companion. Compatible with children and other house pets as well as being a practical size, it is unsurprising that this breed appears on the popularity list.

9. Miniature Schnauzer
In ninth place is the Miniature Schnauzer. The miniature schnauzer is a robust, sturdily built terrier of nearly square proportion. It was developed as a ratter and is quick and tough. Its gait displays good reach and drive. Its coat is double, with a close undercoat, and hard, wiry, outer coat which is longer on the legs, muzzle and eyebrows. Its facial furnishings add to its keen expression. 
  The miniature schnauzer deserves its place as one of the most popular terrier pets. It is playful, inquisitive, alert, spunky and companionable. It is a well-mannered house dog that also enjoys being in the middle of activities. It is less domineering than the larger schnauzers and less dog-aggressive than most terriers. It is also better with other animals than most terriers, although it will gladly give chase. It is clever and can be stubborn, but it is generally biddable. It enjoys children. Some may bark a lot. 

8. Golden Retriever 
  In eighth place is the Golden Retriever.Lower in the list than some might have assumed, the Golden Retriever is widely considered one of the most popular breeds, not only as a companionable house dog but in obedience, service and therapy. Believed to have been developed by Lord Tweedmouth in the late 1800s, the Golden Retriever has its roots in the Scottish Highlands where it was selectively bred for the purposes of hunting, tracking and retrieving upland game, as its name would suggest.
  Easily identifiable for its wavy golden coat, the Retriever is medium-sized with a straight muzzle, large brown eyes, feathering on ears, back of legs, underside of tail and front of neck. Highly trainable, the breed is the ideal choice for the modern family, being devoted to children and demonstrating love, loyalty and affection. Like the Labrador Retriever, the breed’s natural love of people is showcased at every opportunity.

7. German Shepherd Dog
   In seventh place is the German Shepherd Dog, a member of the Herding Group.
Despite falling fourth on the list, the German Shepherd – otherwise known as the Alsatian – is arguably the most popular breed worldwide. Founded in 1899, the Shepherd was primarily bred as a versatile working dog, developed to be fearless and agile for the purposes of military and police work. The German Shepherd retained its concrete reputation across Europe and the United States following its wide usage during World War I.
  Athletically built to change direction at full speed, the appearance of the German Shepherd reflects its versatile working capabilities. Contrary to popular belief, a socialised and consistently trained German Shepherd will not display undue aggression. Instead, a Shepherd will demonstrate a calm and gentle manner - having an enormous capacity for love, loyalty and affection. Inherently able-minded and intelligent, the Shepherd can be trained to a very good degree and is known for being incredibly devoted to children.

6. Bulldog
  In sixth place is the Bulldog, which is included in the Utility Group. Less of a lap dog, more of a fully-fledged canine side-kick, the Bulldog is just behind its smaller counterpart on the list of popular breeds. Commonly entitled the National Dog of Great Britain, the breed features in various patriotic pictorials – for this reason alone, the Bulldog simply had to appear on the list! Once the so-called sport of bull and badger baiting was finally dispensed with in 1850, the Bulldog grew in popularity as a fearless yet increasingly placid companion dog, hence its positioning on the list.
  Bearing in mind its early sporting heritage, the appearance of the Bulldog is somewhat intimidating, however such is not a fair reflection of its nature. The breed possesses an easy and affectionate temperament, is protective of children and its home, and is a great lover of people. The appearance of the Bulldog is distinctive and clearly desirable. Anyone wanting a dog with an outwardly fierce appearance but a mellow interior should seriously consider buying a Bulldog.

5. English Springer Spaniel 
  In fifth place is the English Springer Spaniel, part of the KC ’s Gundog Group.Larger than its cousin the Cocker Spaniel, the English Springer is a strong competitor in the popularity contest. Deriving its name from its early usage as a game flusher, 'springing' furred and feathered game from the bush in order for the hunter to shoot it, the breed is revered for its ability to work tirelessly in a variety of working fulfillments. Having retained its popularity as a companion dog since its early prevalence in the Renaissance, the English Springer Spaniel is often described as the ideal family dog.
  The coat of the English Springer Spaniel is typically wavy and feathered, common in colours of white and liver, usually with black, liver or tan markings. The breed possesses an amiable and relaxed temperament, displaying affection and loyalty towards its family and engaging well with children. Owners have described the Springer Spaniel as being ‘full of life and character,’ and making a great addition to active family life.

4. Pug
  In fourth place is the Pug, a member of the Toy Group. This entry might come as a surprise to some. Much conjecture surrounds the ancestry and origin of the Pug, although it was made popular during the Victorian period when it was commonly observed atop private carriages. As a breed, it has boasted many notable admirers throughout history, including Napoleon's wife – Josephine, Queen Victoria, and the Duke and Duchess of Windsor.
  The breed boasts several distinctive features, including a broad, flat and pronounced muzzle, prominent eyes, low-set, triangular ears and a short tail, arching over the back. The Pug is a suitable and delightful breed choice for families or a dedicated sole owner wanting a lap dog, due to its calm and amiable temperament and its compact proportions. Animated and spirited, a Pug is guaranteed to liven up any home setting – perhaps accounting for its popularity!

3. French Bulldog
  In third place is the French bulldog, which is included in the Utility Group. Another close contender, the French Bulldog is the eighth most popular breed choice in the UK – up four places from last year. Contrary to popular belief, the French Bulldog hails from Nottingham, England, where it was the breed choice of lace makers and craftsmen in the city. Popular amongst the artistic and eccentric of Parisian city dwellers also, the French Bulldog grew in favour, retaining its name on its return to England, as well as its concrete reputation.
  A compact dog of reduced proportions, the French Bulldog possesses a steady and easy temperament, despite its bullish appearance. A popular lap dog and ladies’ companion, the Bulldog is well suited to the home setting, being compatible with both children and other house pets. Time has proven the popularity of this breed, which is unlikely to ever go out of favour.

2.  Cocker Spaniel
  In second place is the Cocker Spaniel, a member of the Gun Dog Group. Taking second position is this versatile hunting gun-dog. The Cocker Spaniel was prominent during the Tudor reign of Henry VIII and proved a favourite in the royal courts of the 16th and 17th centuries. Until 1990, the breed was considered the most popular as registered by the American Kennel Club, however it now ranks 25th.
  Characterised by an arched head, low-set ears, ovular eyes and a soft, wavy coat in colour deviations of solid black, red or liver, the Cocker Spaniel is a highly attractive breed and is considered the original family companion, proceeding the Labrador and Golden Retriever as the dog most compatible with children, other pets and domestic living. The breed experienced a resurgence in popularity following the acquisition of a black Cocker Spaniel, named Lupo, by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge before Christmas of last year.

1.  Labrador Retriever
  In first place is the Labrador retriever, a friendly and active member of the Gundog Group. The KC (UK) recognized the breed in 1903. The Labrador retriever, the most popular dog breed in the United Kingdom, comes in three colors: yellow, black, and chocolate.   Labrador Retrievers are among the most popular dog breeds out there today. 
  The fact the Labrador Retriever takes pole position is probably not surprising. Described as 'the best all-round dog' by the Kennel Club, the Labrador Retriever has enjoyed great popularity throughout its existence, both as a domestic pet and service dog. This traditional working animal was originally utilised off the coast of Labrador and neighbouring Newfoundland in Canada, helping Portuguese fishermen to trawl, retrieve fish and retract the nets. The modern Labrador was developed in 19th century England and was officially recognised by the Kennel Club in 1903.
  Typically a proportioned and sprightly-looking breed, the Labrador Retriever boasts strong legs, a broad head, medium-sized pendant ears, and wide-set eyes. Today, the Labrador is observed in hunting, tracking, retrieving, military and police work, search and rescue, competitive obedience, agility and as a guide dog to the blind. Highly valued for being inherently gentle, affectionate and obedient, the Labrador is well suited to the home setting and is neither unduly shy nor aggressive. The Labrador is a great lover of people, perhaps why people are a great lover of it!
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Saturday, July 8, 2017

10 Most Popular Dog Breeds in America

10 Most Popular Dog Breeds in America
  Americans really, really love their dogs. And that’s in spite of dogs not being the easiest pet you could bring into your home. Training a dog is difficult, especially if you end up with a headstrong canine. Choosing the right dog breed for your lifestyle or your family can be a challenge. And owning a dog can be surprisingly expensive thanks to an assortment of hidden costs.
  So which dog breeds do Americans love the most? Take a look at the American Kennel Club’s ranking of the most popular dog breeds in America for 2016. Some of them might surprise you.

10. Boxers
  In 10th place is the boxer, part of the AKC’s Working Group. The boxer is a fun-loving dog that, interestingly enough, was one of the first breeds selected in Germany for police training. The AKC recognized the boxer in 1904. This breed is a medium-sized, square-built dog with an alert, curious face and a distinctive muzzle. Boxers move smoothly and gracefully. They’re related to practically all recognized breeds of the bulldog type. Boxers are patient and protective, which makes them great family dogs.
  Boxers were originally bred to be medium-size guard dogs. Today, although they are a part of the AKC’s Working Group, they mostly find homes as loving family companions.


  In ninth place is the Yorkshire terrier. The AKC first recognized this member of the Toy Group in 1885. Yorkies first became popular pets in the late Victorian era, and they have a distinctive coat and confident manner of carrying themselves. The AKC notes that Yorkshire Terriers “offer big personalities in a small package.” They’re brave and energetic, and most owners would say these dogs don’t know how small they are.
  Small in size but big in personality, the Yorkshire Terrier makes a feisty but loving companion. The most popular toy dog breed in the U.S., the “Yorkie” has won many fans with his devotion to his owners, his elegant looks, and his suitability to apartment living.

  In eighth place is the Rottweiler. This breed, a member of the Working Group, is one of the descendants of Roman drover dogs. The AKC recognized it in 1931. Rottweilers are powerful dogs, and the AKC notes that “the Rottweiler is happiest when given a job to perform.” The breed’s intelligence and endurance makes Rottweilers great service dogs and companions. And according to the AKC, “No one told him that he’s not a toy breed, so at some point he’s going to plop onto your lap for a cuddle.”
  If you want a Rottweiler, learn how to raise it first! If you don't get these dogs off to the right start, you may never be able to control them, and they will be a constant danger to you, your family, and others. With a bite strength roughly 25% greater than a German Shepherd, they must be trained - it isn't optional. If you do learn to do it right, you will own one of the best and safest pets it is possible to own.

  In seventh place is the poodle, a member of the Non Sporting Group. Poodles, officially recognized by the AKC in 1887, are a single breed commonly divided into standard, miniature, and toy sizes. Poodles are known for being very intelligent and active dogs. They excel in obedience training and are eager to please their humans. All sizes of poodles can be trained successfully. The standard poodle tends to be more outgoing.
  These fluffy dogs weren't always the delicate beauties they are today. Poodles were once natural-born hunters and were originally bred as water retrievers. These prim and proper pups are still excellent swimmers with a knack for anything that involves using their brains as well as their brawn. Named after the German word for puddle, this breed's webbed feet and water-resistant coat make them great lake and pool companions who love the challenge of obedience training at the highest levels.

  In sixth place is the French bulldog, which is included in the Non Sporting Group. The AKC notes that two distinctive features of this breed, which it recognized in 1898, are its bat ears and the unique silhouette of its skull. French bulldogs are affectionate and playful. And the AKC reports that this breed “is a great companion for single pet owners, as well as families with young children.” They’re a little bit stubborn in nature, so you’ll need to exercise some patience when training a French bulldog. But in general, Frenchies are intelligent and eager to please their family.
  The Frenchie will make you laugh. He's a charming, clever dog with a sense of humor and a stubborn streak. Bred for centuries as a companion, he's very fond of people, and becomes particularly attached to his family. In fact, sometimes he becomes a little too attached, which means he's not the best choice for someone who'll be away long hours every day. It also means he absolutely, positively cannot live in the backyard or garage, but only indoors as a member of the family. That's doubly true given that he, like all brachycephalic, or "flat-faced" breeds, has difficulty regulating his body temperature and needs to live in a climate-controlled environment.

  In fifth place is the beagle, part of the AKC’s Hound Group. The AKC first recognized the breed in 1885. The beagle was bred primarily for hunting rabbits and hares, and beagles are still excellent hunting dogs and companions. They enjoy the company of people and other dogs; however, they’re a challenge to train because they want to follow their noses. As the AKC puts it, “Beagles are at best temporarily obedient due to their independent nature, which is common among most hounds.”
   Small, compact, and hardy, Beagles are active companions for kids and adults alike. Canines in this dog breed are merry and fun loving, but being hounds, they can also be stubborn and require patient, creative training techniques. Their noses guide them through life, and they're never happier than when following an interesting scent. The Beagle originally was bred as a scenthound to track small game, mostly rabbits and hare. He is still used for this purpose in many countries, including the United States.

  In fourth place is the bulldog, a member of the Non Sporting Group. The bulldog originated in the British Isles, and the AKC recognized it in 1886. Bulldogs are thick-set dogs with short faces and sturdy limbs. The AKC describes these medium-sized dogs as “equable, resolute and dignified.” Despite a “well-earned” reputation for stubbornness, bulldogs are very intelligent and can be very successfully trained.
  Bulldogs originally were used to drive cattle to market and to compete in a bloody sport called bullbaiting. Today, they’re gentle companions who love kids. A brief walk and a nap on the sofa is just this dog breed’s speed.

  In third place is the golden retriever, a highly identifiable breed, which the AKC recognized in 1925. Golden retrievers are a member of the Sporting Group and are active, alert, and confident. As the AKC explains, “It’s not surprising that golden retrievers are one of the most popular dog breeds in the United States. Along with being exuberant and friendly, they are strong dogs and hard workers.”
  The Golden Retriever is one of the most popular dog breeds in the U.S. The breed's friendly, tolerant attitude makes him a fabulous family pet, and his intelligence makes him a highly capable working dog. Golden Retrievers excel at retrieving game for hunters, tracking, sniffing out drugs, and as therapy and assistance dogs. They're also natural athletes, and do well in dog sports such as agility and competitive obedience.
 This sporting breed has a sweet, gentle, people-pleasing personality. A well-bred Golden Retriever does not have strong guarding instincts, so don’t expect him to protect your home from burglars. He will, however, make friends with them and show them where the treats are.

  In second place is the German shepherd, a member of the Herding Group. The AKC recognized this breed in 1908. These dogs are smart and courageous, and they come from a long lineage of old herding and farm dogs. German shepherds are loyal family dogs and good guard dogs. According to the AKC, German shepherds are “considered dogdom’s finest all-purpose workers.”
 The German Shepherd Dog is a natural protector and so adaptable and intelligent that he has performed just about every job known to dog. If he had opposable thumbs, he would be unstoppable.
  The German Shepherd Dog is one of America's most popular dog breeds — for good reason. He's an intelligent and capable working dog. His devotion and courage are unmatched. And he's amazingly versatile, excelling at most anything he's trained to do: guide and assistance work for the handicapped, police and military service, herding, search and rescue, drug detection, competitive obedience and, last but not least, faithful companion.

  In first place is the Labrador retriever, a friendly and active member of the Sporting Group. The AKC recognized the breed in 1917. The Labrador retriever, the most popular dog breed in the United States, comes in three colors: yellow, black, and chocolate. These dogs are eager to please, which means they excel not only as family dogs, but also “as guide dogs for the blind, as part of search-and-rescue teams, or in narcotics detection with law enforcement.”
  Labrador Retrievers are among the most popular dog breeds out there today. Loyal, easy to get along with, and easy to train, these retrievers could be considered a neighborhood classic all around the United States and even in other parts of the world. But what exactly makes them such popular, well-respected dogs… and does a strong breed always mean that a Labrador Retriever will be the right dog for you?
  The Labrador Retriever was bred to be both a friendly companion and a useful working dog breed. Historically, he earned his keep as a fisherman’s helper: hauling nets, fetching ropes, and retrieving fish from the chilly North Atlantic. Today’s Labrador Retriever is as good-natured and hard working as his ancestors, and he’s America’s most popular breed. These days the Lab works as a retriever for hunters, assistance dog to the handicapped, show competitor, and search and rescue dog, among other canine jobs.



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Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Everything about your American Bulldog

Everything about your American Bulldog
  It may have its roots in fighting and working, but the American Bulldog is a big old softie at heart. Now, you’ll find him as a much-loved companion in many households in North American and around the world. He’ll keep a watchful eye over the family and work his tail off all day, but he’s just as content to curl up at your feet on the couch.

Overview
  The American Bulldog, also known as the Old Country Bulldog, the Old Country White, the Old Time Bulldog, the Old English White, the English White, the White English, the Alabama and the Southern Bulldog, is known for its superb strength and fine character. It does not closely resemble the more familiar English Bulldog and is not yet recognized by the American Kennel Club. This breed is similar to the old, seventeenth-century bull-baiting dogs used to fight bulls for entertainment and supposedly to tenderize the meat for human consumption in Great Britain. The predecessors of this breed came to America in early colonial times, before the English Bulldog went through its transformations to become what that breed is today. This is a friendly, versatile dog that can do almost anything well. It is cherished as a hunting dog of large and small game, a guard dog, a guide dog and a beloved family companion. American Bulldogs form strong bonds with their people but if not properly socialized can be aggressive towards strangers and other animals.
  The American Bulldog is on average between 20 and 28 inches at the withers, with the females being on the smaller side of the range. They weigh between 60 and 125 pounds, again with females being lighter. Their short, shiny coat is low-maintenance. As these are working dogs, there is a wide variation in height and weight more so than in other breeds.

Other Quick Facts
  • American Bulldogs can vary in size, appearance and energy level, according to the line or strain from which they were bred. For instance, Scott-type American Bulldogs tend to be smaller than those from the Johnson line and larger than those from the Painter line.
  • The American Bulldog is usually white or white with patches of brindle, black or red/fawn. For showing purposes, it can be any color, pattern or combination of colors except for solid black, solid blue, merle or white with patches of black and tan (tricolor), according to the United Kennel Club.
  • An American Bulldog can have a docked tail, but a natural tail is preferred. The natural tail is thick at the base and tapers to a point. It’s sometimes described as resembling a pump handle. 
  • Comparable Breeds: Bulldog, Pitbull
History
  The Old English Bulldog was preserved by working class immigrants who brought their working dogs with them to the American South. Small farmers and ranchers used this all-around working dog for many tasks including farm guardians, stock dogs and catch dog. These dogs were not an actual breed as considered by today's standards but were a generic bulldog type. There were no recorded pedigrees or records and breeding decisions were dependent on the best working farm dogs despite breed or background. Several separate strains of the "bulldog" type dogs were kept by ranchers as utilitarian working dogs.
  Perhaps the most important role of the bulldog and the reason for its survival, and in fact why it thrived throughout the South, was because of the presence of feral pigs, introduced to the New World and without predators. The bulldogs were the settlers' only means of sufficiently dealing with the vermin. By World War II, the breed was near extinction until John D. Johnson and his father scoured the back roads of the South looking for the best specimens to revive the breed. During this time a young Alan Scott grew an interest in Johnson's dogs and began to work with him on the revitalization process. At some point, Alan Scott began infusing non-Johnson catch bulldogs from working Southern farms with John D. Johnson's line, creating the now Standard American Bulldog. At another point, Johnson began crossing his line with an atavistic English bulldog from the North that had maintained its genetic athletic vigor.
  American bulldogs are now safe from extinction and are enjoying a healthy increase in popularity, either as a working/protector dog or as a family pet. All over the world, they are used variously as "hog dogs" , as cattle drovers and as working or sport K-9s. American Bulldogs also successfully compete in several dog sports and in conformation dogs shows .

Personality
  With roots in the violent sport of bullbaiting, the American Bulldog was later developed as a farm dog and hunter's assistant, herding and protecting livestock and hunting everything from squirrels to bear. Today, the breed is a sturdy companion for families or farmers, keeping a watchful eye over his people and property. Active and playful, the American Bulldog loves people and craves constant attention, (though he may not be fond of other dogs and should be kept away from cats). He can work or play all day long, and will happily curl up at your feet for a nice belly rub at the end of the day.

Health
  The American Bulldog generally lives about 10 to 16 years and is considered a healthy breed. Some genetic issues common to the breed include neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (a nervous system disorders with swelling and/or changes in some retinal cells), disorders of the kidney and thyroid, ACL tears, hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia (another common form of dysplasia in larger breed dogs), cherry eye (or a mass that protrudes from the eyelid of a dog), entropion (a condition in which a portion of the eyelid is inverted or folded inward) and bone cancer.

Care
  The short, fine coat of the American Bulldog requires minimal grooming and care, however, similarly to the English Bulldog, the American Bulldog has been known to drool and slobber. With a history as an all-purpose working dog and fearless guard dog, the American Bulldog is a good indoor/outdoor dog but does require sufficient outdoor exercise and activity, especially if it lives in an apartment setting. 

Living Conditions
  The American Bulldog will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. They are relatively inactive indoors and will do best with at least an average-sized yard.

Trainability
  American Bulldogs are strong willed and can be a challenge to train until leadership is established. Not the best choice for a first-time dog owner, this breed will make his trainer prove who is in charge. Training requires absolute consistency – give an American Bulldog an inch and you'll find he's taken about six miles. A calm-assertive approach is best, with lots of positive reinforcement and treats for extra incentive.
  Once the initial hurdles are crossed, however, American Bulldogs can excel in advanced obedience and agility training.

Exercise Requirements
  If you have an active family, the American Bulldog will fit right in. Expect to give you dog about an hour or two of outside exercise per day. If you don’t deliver these exercise requirements, the American Bulldog will take it out on your home.    Activities can include walking, jogging, chasing balls, agility, farm work, and advanced obedience training.
  Unless you can fulfill the outdoor activity requirements, apartments and condo dwellers should stay away from this breed. Houses with fenced-in yards or farms/rural areas are best suited for the American Bulldog.

Grooming
  The American Bulldog has a short coat that may feel either soft or stiff. The breed sheds moderately year-round. Brush or comb the coat weekly to remove dead hair and distribute skin oils.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails every three to four weeks or as needed. Brush the teeth often — with a vet-approved pet toothpaste — for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  His amiable temperament and bulk make the American Bulldog an excellent companion for children, even young ones. A American Bulldog will put up with a lot from a child, although he shouldn't have to, and he'll walk away if he gets tired of being tormented.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  With their pacific nature, American Bulldogs also get along well with other pets, dogs and cats. They may be less sociable toward strange dogs, however.

Did You Know?
  The American Bulldog was bred to be what’s known as a “catch dog.” His job is to chase, catch and bring down free-ranging livestock.

American Bulldogs in popular culture
  • Spike and Tyke from the Tom and Jerry franchise.
  • The Deftones' video Bloody Cape featured a model walking an American Bulldog down the street. The American Bulldog was actually played by two separate dogs from the Norcal's American Bulldog Kennel. The names of the dogs were Big Trouble and Tory Hesta.
  • In Return to Me (2000), David Duchovny’s character’s dog, Mel, is played by an American Bulldog named Peetey.
  • In the 2001 film Kevin of the North, one of Kevin Manley's sled dogs is an American Bulldog named Snowflake.
  • Nedd ("Nasty Evil Dead Dog") in The Number 23 (2007)
  • In Tucker and Dale vs Evil (2010), Jangers, Tyler Labine's character’s dog, is played by an American Bulldog named Weezer.
  • An American Bulldog features prominently as the titular character's companion in the 2013 film Joe.
  • Since the 1990s, American Bulldogs have become more frequently used in films as family pets, replacing the previously popular Pit Bulls and Bull Terriers




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Friday, February 26, 2016

Everything about your French Bulldog

Everything about your French Bulldog
  French Bulldogs may look tough on the outside, but inside they are lovably soft, caring and easygoing. These dogs spread the good vibes wherever they go. Outgoing and open, they love nothing more than to cuddle on the couch, romp on the carpet or play in the yard. Boasting unlimited energy, they sometimes have no idea when (or how) to stop their motors.
But, with a Frenchie, things never get out of hand. They rarely lose their cool, snap or bark. They simply want to roll around and play.

Overview
  With a tough-on-the-outside, sweet-on-the-inside demeanor, unmistakable bat-shaped ears and distinctive bow-legged gait, the French Bulldog has gained so much popularity that he’s fast becoming the city-dwellers' dog of choice. He's small – under 28 pounds – and has a short, easy-care coat that comes in a variety of colors. He doesn't need a great deal of exercise, fits comfortably into a condo, co-op or apartment, and is far less likely to bark than many small dogs. In fact, other than being a little pugnacious with other dogs, it would be hard to imagine a better dog for city living.
  The French Bulldog should be on the short list of breeds for anyone who lives without a vast tract of suburban backyard. He's also a good choice for those who might have trouble giving a more active breed ample exercise.
  The Frenchie will make you laugh. He's a charming, clever dog with a sense of humor and a stubborn streak. Bred for centuries as a companion, he's very fond of people, and becomes particularly attached to his family. In fact, sometimes he becomes a little too attached, which means he's not the best choice for someone who'll be away long hours every day. It also means he absolutely, positively cannot live in the backyard or garage, but only indoors as a member of the family. That's doubly true given that he, like all brachycephalic, or "flat-faced" breeds, has difficulty regulating his body temperature and needs to live in a climate-controlled environment.
  The Frenchie can also be a little hard to housetrain and may not be safe with a slow-footed family cat. He also snores, which might seem like a minor problem until you've actually heard the dramatic sounds that can emanate from his small body.
  For exercise, Frenchies jump on and off the furniture and do the “Frenchie 500” circuit through the house. A short daily walk of 15 to 20 minutes will help to keep them in shape. Schedule walks and outdoor playtime for cool mornings and evenings. Frenchies are sensitive to heat and can quickly succumb to heatstroke. This is not the breed for you if you enjoy hiking or jogging with a dog.
  Breeders like to send French Bulldog puppies to their new homes when they are nine or 10 weeks old. Frenchie puppies can become unpleasant little tyrants if they don’t get to spend the optimal amount of time with their mother and littermates, learning the rules of behavior toward people and other dogs.
  The French Bulldog does best in a family where someone is home most of the day. He’s not always good with small children or cats, and he can be aggressive toward dogs he doesn’t know. When a Frenchie is the right match for you, though, you’ll find it’s impossible to have just one.

Highlights
  • French Bulldogs do not need a lot of exercise, but they do need daily walks to keep them at a healthy weight.
  • French Bulldogs do not handle heat very well and need to be monitored on hot days to ensure that they don't overexert themselves.
  • French Bulldogs can be easy to train, but they can also be stubborn. Be firm and patient when training this breed.
  • If you value cleanliness the French Bulldog may not be the dog for you, since he is prone to drooling, flatulence and some shedding. He can also be difficult to housetrain.
  • French Bulldogs can be a quiet breed and are not known as a breed that barks frequently although there are exceptions to every rule.
  • Because they don't tend to be excessive barkers, French Bulldogs make exceptional apartment dogs.
  • Although it is important to always supervise young children and dogs when they are together, the French Bulldog does very well with children.
  • French Bulldogs make wonderful watchdogs, but they can become territorial. They also like being the center of attention, which can lead to behavioral problems if they are overindulged.
  • French Bulldogs are companion dogs and thrive when they have human contact. They are not a breed that can be left alone for long periods or left outside to live.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store.
Other Quick Facts
  • French Bulldogs are restful and have minimal exercise needs, so they are a good choice for couch potatoes.
  • The French Bulldog should not weigh more than 28 pounds, making him easily portable.
  • French Bulldogs can be stubborn when it comes to housetraining. Be patient, be consistent, and consider the use of paper training or puppy pee pads to get around the problem (although it's always best to get the pup outdoors).
  • Frenchies snort, snore and grunt, and they are known for making other odd noises.
  • Frenchies are not good swimmers and should not have access to pools, spas or other bodies of water.
Breed standards
AKC group: Non-sporting
UKC group: Companion
Average lifespan: 10 - 12 years
Average size: 19 - 28 pounds
Coat appearance: Short, smooth and glossy
Coloration: Brindle, white, fawn, brindle and white
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Sturdy, compact and muscular body; black nose with a short muzzle; top lip hangs below the corners of the bottom lip; dark, rounded eyes; slight wrinkling around the neck and back; straight or corkscrew tail
Possible alterations: May have darker coloration
Comparable Breeds: Boston Terrier, Pug

History
The “bouldogge Francais,” as he is known in his adopted home country of France, actually originated in England, in the city of Nottingham. Small bulldogs were popular pets with the local laceworkers, keeping them company and ridding their workrooms of rats. After the industrial revolution, lacemaking became mechanized and many of the laceworkers lost their jobs. Some of them moved to France, where their skills were in demand, and of course they took their beloved dogs with them. The dogs were equally popular with French shopkeepers and eventually took on the name of their new country.
  In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the dogs became popular with members of the Paris bohemian class: ladies of the night, artists, writers such as the novelist Colette, and wealthy Americans doing the Grand Tour. Impressionist artist Toulouse Lautrec even put a Frenchie in one of his paintings, “Le Marchand des Marrons.”
  The Frenchie has gained rapidly in popularity in the past decade. Today, the breed ranks 21st among the breeds registered by the American Kennel Club, up from 71st in 2000, a testament to his qualities as a companion.

Temperament
  The French Bulldog, like many other companion dog breeds, requires close contact with humans. They have fairly minimal exercise needs, but do require at least daily short walks.   The French Bulldog is sometimes called 'Frog dog' or a 'Clown dog.' Frog dog is in reference to the unique way they sit with hind legs spread out. Clown dog is because they are known to be fun loving vivacious 'clowns of the dog world.' Their calm nature makes them an excellent choice for apartment dwellers, as does their sensible attitude towards barking.
  Their bulk and their compromised breathing system makes it impossible for them to regulate their temperature efficiently. The French bulldog has only a single short coat. What this all means for the dog is that it becomes cold very easily. Also, they will very likely need to have some extra covering inside during the winter if you live in a particularly cold area.   These dogs need warm clothing when out in cold weather. Precautions must be taken when exercising during hot or humid weather, as they are prone to heat stroke. It is also recommended that French Bulldogs who live indoors have access to air conditioning to regulate their temperature, provided the air conditioning is not set too low.
  French Bulldogs make excellent companions. The French Bulldog rarely barks, and if he does it is to draw attention, to point out that she needs something (like attention), or just because he is not happy he may give the "Frenchie death yodel." This breed is patient and affectionate with its owners, especially with children, who are especially protected by the females. French Bulldogs can easily live with other breeds when the proper introductions are done.
  They are ranked 58th in Stanley Coren's The Intelligence of Dogs. There are certain exceptions to this average level of canine intelligence; a French Bulldog named Princess Jacqueline which died in 1934 was claimed to understand 20 words, reacting correctly.

Health Problems
  French Bulldogs are prone to joint diseases, spinal disorders, heart defects and eye problems. Dams often have to deliver pups by cesarean section, because pups have relatively large heads. They often have respiratory problems. They tend to wheeze and snore and have trouble in hot weather. Prone to heatstroke. An overweight Frenchie may have trouble breathing, because of a swollen abdomen. Do not overfeed this breed. Putting them under anesthesia is risky because of their breathing issues.   French Bulldogs are high maintenance and potential owners need to be aware that their vet bills may be high. Take this into consideration before choosing a Frenchie puppy.

Activity Requirements
  French Bulldogs need a couple of 15 minutes walks every day to maintain their physique, and a few sessions of playing ball to keep them entertained. Their size and activity requirements make them good apartment dogs, but they are just as happy in a big home or on a farm with lots of wide open space. Frenchies don't care so much about the size of their home, as they do the size of their owners heart.
  French Bulldogs should not be exercised too hard in the summer months, as they are prone to heatstroke. Swimming pool owners should be alert – this breed can not swim and falling into a pool could be life-threatening to a Frenchie.

Care
  Although the Frenchie is a fun-loving dog, it has minimal exercise needs. It loves an outdoor romp but does not enjoy hot and humid weather. In fact, the French Bulldog is not suited for outdoor living and cannot swim.
  A short on-leash walk is adequate to fulfill most of the dog’s physical needs. Coat care is minimal but the facial wrinkles of the dog need regular cleaning. In addition, Frenchies tend to snore, drool, and wheeze.

Living Conditions
  Frenchies are good for apartment life. They can be fairly active indoors and will do okay without a yard. They do not do well in temperature extremes.

Trainability
  French Bulldogs can be a training challenge. They are stubborn and quickly lose interest in repetitive activities. Training should be conducted in short sessions, and the routine should be mixed up to keep the Frenchie's interest. Showering a Frenchie with affection and treats when training is the best way to get results from him. Discipline, punishment and yelling will cause this dog to stop listening all together.
   House training is a long, drawn out process with a French Bulldog. It can take six months to fully train them, and many breeders recommend crating a Frenchies for that period of time.

Grooming
  The French Bulldog has a short, fine, smooth coat that is easy to groom. Brush him weekly with a rubber hound glove or a soft bristle brush. Bathe monthly or as needed to keep the coat clean.
  Frenchies don’t shed much, but twice a year they lose their undercoat. During the spring and fall shedding seasons, use a stripping comb and grooming mitt to remove the excess hair.
  The only other grooming required is routine nail trimming, ear cleaning, tooth brushing and wrinkle care. The deep skin folds may need to be cleaned only a couple of times a week or every day. Wipe out the crud from the wrinkles with a soft, damp cloth or a baby wipe, then dry them thoroughly. If moisture is left behind, wrinkles become the perfect petri dish for bacterial growth. Do the same for the indentation at the tail set and the outer vulval area.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the toenails as needed, usually every few weeks. They should never get long enough that you hear them clacking on the floor. Brush the teeth frequently for good dental health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Frenchies get along well with children, and they're not so tiny that they can't live in a household with a toddler. That said, no dog should ever be left alone with a young child. It's just common sense to supervise and make sure that neither is poking or otherwise harassing the other.
  When they are socialized to them during puppyhood, Frenchies can get along well with other dogs and cats. Overly spoiled Frenchies, however, may be jealous toward other dogs, especially if those other dogs are getting attention from the Frenchie's very own person.

Is this breed right for you?
  A breed that gets along well with children and animals, the French Bulldog not only makes an excellent companion but a great family dog too. Well-suited for apartment life, this breed will need regular exercise. Playful, he can romp in the yard for hours on end. In need of guidance with a strong leader, the French Bulldog requires a lot of human interaction, socialization and affection to avoid any aggressive behavior. A clean dog, he has an average shedding rate and requires low-maintenance grooming. Easily overheated, it's best that the Frenchie lives in a cooler climate.

Did You Know?
  The wee French Bulldog is popular with celebrities - actor Leonardo di Caprio shares custody of his Frenchie with ex-girlfriend Gisele Bündchen.

A dream day in the life of a French Bulldog
  Waking up in the arms of his owner, the French Bulldog will snooze until his master rises. Once up and at 'em, he'll want to be let out first in the morning to work off some of his high energy. Trotting back inside, he'll be ready for lunch and a bit of cuddle time on the couch. After receiving some affection, he'll greet the other members of the family while romping around the house and backyard. Once the day has ended, the French Bulldog will crawl into bed with his loving master.


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Saturday, February 28, 2015

Everything about your English Bulldog

Everything about your English Bulldog
  The English bulldog is a brawny little powerhouse whose characteristic crablike waddle exudes great strength, stability and vigor.The English Bulldog is a wide, medium-sized, compact dog with short legs. The body and head are massive with extra skin on both the skull and forehead falling in folds. The cheeks extend to the sides of the eyes. The muzzle is wide, short and pug with a broad, deep stop. The black nose is broad with large nostrils. The dark eyes are deep set. The rose ears are small, thin and set high on the head. 
  The jaws are massive, very broad, and square with hanging upper lips. The teeth should have an under bite. The tail is either straight or screwed and carried low. The short, flat coat is straight, smooth and glossy. Coat colors include red brindle and other shades of brindle, solid white, solid red, fawn, fallow, piebald, pale yellow or washed-out red or white or a combination of these colors.
  The Bulldog is a medium-sized breed of dog commonly referred to as the English Bulldog or British Bulldog. Other Bulldog breeds include the American Bulldog, Old English Bulldog , Olde English Bulldogge, and the French Bulldog. The Bulldog is a muscular, heavy dog with a wrinkled face and a distinctive pushed-in nose.The American Kennel Club , The Kennel Club , and the United Kennel Club  oversee breeding standards. Bulldogs are the 5th most popular purebreed in the United States in 2013 according to the American Kennel Club.

Overview
  Laughter, love and a face everyone adores ensure the enduring popularity of the Bulldog. He's a gentle family companion today, but he was originally bred to fight bulls for sport – a past that, combined with his stalwart devotion, has made the breed the mascot of a number of colleges as well as the United States Marine Corps. No breed is more admired for the qualities of loyalty and determination that the Bulldog represents.
  Few breeds are as easily recognized as the Bulldog, with his wrinkled mug, distinctive underbite and Churchillian jowls. Sometimes referred to as the English or British Bulldog, he's a short, sturdy dog with a bow-legged gait, weighing between 40 and 60 pounds.
If all you're talking about is personality and temperament, the Bulldog is just about perfect. He loves children and is very easy to train as a family pet. He's an endless source of amusement, clever and very affectionate. He’s also an attention magnet everywhere he goes.
  The Bulldog may be perfect in spirit, but in the flesh, he’s a different story. These dogs are intolerant of warm weather, and may die if overheated. Too much exercise or stress can make it difficult for them to breathe. Without exception, Bulldogs must live indoors, and need air conditioning in all but the mildest summer weather.
  Most Bulldogs are born by C-section. Because breeding them is expensive, the puppies are, too. Love is an expensive proposition when you own a Bulldog.
  In general, the Bulldog is an easy-care breed. His exercise needs are manageable for even the most dedicated couch potato, and he doesn’t tend to be a picky eater. He has a short coat that doesn’t require any fancy grooming, but he does have some special needs when it comes to skin care. Last but not least, it’s important for him to live in air-conditioned comfort, not only to prevent heatstroke but also because he loves his family and wants to be with them. He’s not a dog who can or should live outdoors.

Highlights
  • Bulldogs can be stubborn and lazy. Your mature Bulldog may not be very enthusiastic about going to a walk, but it's important that he is exercised every day to keep him fit.
  • Bulldogs can't tolerate heat and humidity. When your Bulldog is outdoors, watch him carefully for signs of overheating and take him inside immediately if he starts to show distress. Some people put kiddy play pools filled with water in a shaded spot for their Bulldogs to lie in when the weather is warm and everyone is outside. They definitely are housedogs and should not live outdoors all of the time.
  • Bulldogs are sensitive to cold weather.
  • Bulldogs wheeze, snort, and snore. They also are prone to sleep apnea.
  • Bulldogs are well-known for having flatulence. If this problem seems excessive with yours, talk to your vet.
  • Bulldogs' short noses make them prone to a number of respiratory ailments.
  • Bulldogs can have pinched nostrils that make it difficult for them to breathe and may require surgery to correct.
  • Bulldogs are greedy eaters and will overeat if given the chance. Since they gain weight easily, they can quickly become obese if you don't monitor their food intake.
  • Because of the size of their heads and fronts, Bulldogs have difficulty giving birth. Most require caesareans to deliver their puppies. It isn't advised for inexperienced breeders to try to breed them.
  • As a short-nosed breed, Bulldogs are sensitive to anesthesia. Be sure to talk with your vet about this before any surgeries are done.
  • To get a healthy pet, never buy a puppy from a backyard breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Find a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs for genetic health conditions and good temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Bulldog has a distinctive walk: a loose-jointed, shuffling, sidewise roll.
  • Many Bulldogs breathe in a labored fashion and it’s often difficult for their bodies to dissipate heat.
  • Bulldogs can’t swim. Their massive head, solid torso and short legs limit their ability to stay above water. If you have a pool, spa or pond on your property, limit your Bulldog’s access to it.
  • The Bulldog’s smooth coat can be brindle, solid white, solid red, fawn or fallow, or piebald.
  • Comparable Breeds: Bull Terrier, French Bulldog
History
  The term "Bulldog" was first mentioned in literature around 1500, the oldest spelling of the word being Bondogge and Bolddogge. The first reference to the word with the modern spelling is dated 1631 or 1632 in a letter by a man named Preswick Eaton where he writes: "procuer mee two good Bulldogs, and let them be sent by ye first shipp". In 1666 Christopher Merret applied: "Canis pugnax, a Butchers Bull or Bear Dog" as an entry in his Pinax Rerum Naturalium Britannicarum.

  The designation "bull" was applied because of the dog's use in the sport of bull baiting. This entailed the setting of dogs onto a tethered bull. The dog that grabbed the bull by the nose and pinned it to the ground would be the victor. It was common for a bull to maim or kill several dogs at such an event, either by goring, tossing, or trampling. Over the centuries, dogs used for bull-baiting developed the stocky bodies and massive heads and jaws that typify the breed as well as a ferocious and savage temperament. Bull-baiting, along with bear-baiting, reached the peak of its popularity in England in the early 1800s until they were both made illegal by the Cruelty to Animals Act 1835. This amended the existing legislation to protect animals from mistreatment and included bulls, dogs, bears, and sheep, so that bull and bear-baiting as well as cockfighting became prohibited. Therefore, the Old English Bulldog had outlived its usefulness in England as a sporting animal and its active or "working" days were numbered. However, emigrants did have a use for such dogs in the New World. In mid-17th century New York, Bulldogs were used as a part of a citywide roundup effort led by Governor Richard Nicolls. Because cornering and leading wild bulls were dangerous, Bulldogs were trained to seize a bull by its nose long enough for a rope to be secured around its neck. Bulldogs as pets were continually promoted by dog dealer Bill George.
  Despite slow maturation so that growing up is rarely achieved by two and a half years, Bulldogs' lives are relatively short. At five to six years of age they are starting to show signs of aging.
  In time, the original old English Bulldog was crossed with the pug. The outcome was a shorter, wider dog with a brachycephalic skull. Though today's Bulldog looks tough, he cannot perform the job he was originally created for as he cannot withstand the rigors of running and being thrown by a bull, and also cannot grip with such a short muzzle.
  The oldest single breed specialty club is The Bulldog Club, which was formed in 1878. Members of this club met frequently at the Blue Post pub on Oxford Street in London. There they wrote the first standard of perfection for the breed. In 1894 the two top Bulldogs, King Orry and Dockleaf, competed in a contest to see which dog could walk 20 miles. King Orry was reminiscent of the original Bulldogs, lighter boned and very athletic. Dockleaf was smaller and heavier set, more like modern Bulldogs. King Orry was declared the winner that year, finishing the 20-mile walk while Dockleaf collapsed. The Bulldog was officially recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1886.
  At the turn of the 20th century, Ch. Rodney Stone became the first Bulldog to command a price of $5,000 when he was bought by controversial Irish American political figure Richard Croker.


Personality
  Sociable and sweet, but with a reputation for courage that makes him an excellent watchdog, the Bulldog is a lover, not a fighter. He's dignified rather than lively and has a kind although occasionally stubborn nature. The Bulldog is friendly and easygoing; he gets along with everyone. He can be a slow learner, but once he knows something, he's got it for good. Bulldogs don't tend to be barkers. Usually their appearance alone is enough to frighten off intruders.
  Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner. Always meet at least one of the parents-usually the mother is the one who's available-to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.
  Like every dog, Bulldogs need early socialization-exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences-when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Bulldog puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog. Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.

Health Problems
  Prone to breathing problems; some have small windpipes as well. Also poor eyesight, cherry eye, very susceptible to heatstroke in warm weather or hot rooms and cars. Very cold sensitive. Prone to mast cell tumors. Birth defects are common in some lines. Susceptible to skin infections, hip and knee problems. Prone to flatulence, especially when fed any other type of food other than their regular dog food. Puppies are often delivered by caesarian section. Some say it is because of the dogs’ large head size, however others claim you can hardly tell the difference between the head size of a Bulldog with the head size of other breeds when the pups are first born; claiming not enough dams are given the opportunity to try and deliver naturally because of the large head myth. A lot of Bulldogs do run the risk of having weak labors and this could increase the risk of a caesarian.

Care
  Many Bulldogs tend to wheeze and snore, while some drool because of their short snouts and outward protruding lower jaw. These are normal physical side-effects of the breed. Because of the compressed nature of the jaw, extra care needs to be taken in keeping the teeth clean. Early dental care, with daily brushing, will get your Bulldog in the habit so that it is grooming time that is looked forward to. Minimal coat care is needed for this dog, but the folds around the tail and facial wrinkles should be cleaned every day to prevent build up of dirt or rubbish. Failure to perform this regularly can lead to infection of the skin.
  Bulldogs love their daily outings, however, do not expect them to walk or jog long distances, or dart from great heights. The short-hair and snout of the Bulldog make it sensitive to extremely hot and humid climates, and most do not enjoy swimming. Using sun screen lotion on the dog's skin if you are going to be spending time in the sun, and making sure your Bulldog has plenty of water is essential for healthy days out.

Living Conditions
  The English Bulldog is good for apartment life. They are very inactive indoors and will do okay without a yard. This breed is an indoor dog. Bulldogs do best in temperate climates as the breed can chill easily in cold weather and have trouble cooling off in very hot weather.

Exercise
  The English Bulldog needs to be taken on a daily walk to fulfill its primal canine instinct to migrate. Those individuals that do not get this need met are more likely to have behavior issues. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as in a dog's mind the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human. Teach them to enter and exit all door and gateways after the human. English Bulldogs that are in good shape are capable of moving very quickly for short periods of time.

Grooming
  The Bulldog’s coat is easy to groom, but his wrinkles need some special care. Here’s what you need to know.
  Brush the Bulldog’s short coat three times a week with a rubber curry or a soft bristle brush to keep it shiny and healthy. If you keep him well brushed, he shouldn’t need frequent baths. Bulldogs don’t normally shed heavily, but during spring and fall you may see a little more hair coming off when you brush. Step up the brushing until the shedding period ends.
Caring for the facial and nose wrinkles requires a bit more effort. Depending on the individual dog, wrinkles may need to be cleaned a couple of times a week or every day. Wipe out the crud from the wrinkles with a soft, damp cloth or a baby wipe, then dry them thoroughly. If moisture is left behind, wrinkles become the perfect petri dish for bacterial growth. Do the same for the indentation at the tail set and the outer vulval area. If you have any questions about dealing with skin problems or wrinkle issues, talk with your veterinarian who may prescribe a specific care regime.

Children and other pets
  His amiable temperament and bulk make the Bulldog an excellent companion for children, even young ones. A Bulldog will put up with a lot from a child, although he shouldn't have to, and he'll walk away if he gets tired of being tormented.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  With their pacific nature, Bulldogs also get along well with other pets, dogs and cats. They may be less sociable toward strange dogs, however.

Did You Know?
  The same line of English Bulldogs has served as the mascots for the University of Georgia since 1956, under the name of Uga. Each Uga is issued his own student ID and watches games in an air-conditioned doghouse.

Popular mascot
  The Bulldog is popularly used to represent England or the United Kingdom. It has been associated with Winston Churchill's defiance of Nazi Germany. The Bulldog breed is the official mascot of the United States Marine Corps, and many bases have their own mascot on base. Thirty-nine American universities use a Bulldog as their mascot including Bryant University, Drake University, Georgetown University, Mississippi State University, Louisiana Tech University, Yale University, The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina South Carolina State University, and University of Georgia.

10 Interesting Facts About Bulldogs
  • Bulldogs are the 6th most popular breed in America and French bulldogs are ranked 18th. In Los Angeles though, bulldogs are #1, and French bulldogs are #5, according to the American Kennel Club.
  • Warren G. Harding was the only U.S. President to own a bulldog while in office. His pet bulldog, Oh Boy, passed away early during his term as president, and was replaced by an Airedale terrier, Laddie Boy as First Dog.
  • Brigitte, the bulldog who plays Stella on Modern Family, has the distinction of being the first bulldog to win a Golden Collar award. She beat out dog performers from Chelsea Lately, Hot in Cleveland, Entourage, and Suburgatory. She also beat out the only human competitor, Jason Gann, the star of Wilfred.
  • Bulldogs are one of the most popular mascots for universities and sports teams. Uga, the mascot of the University of Georgia team, is one of the most famous. Sonny Seiler, famed as the attorney of Jim Williams in the book Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, is responsible for selecting who will fulfill Uga’s responsibilities. There have been 8 Ugas since 1956, and the search for Uga IX is currently ongoing.
  • Bulldogs were originally bred in England dating back to the 16th century, believed to be a mix of mastiffs and pugs. The English bulldog is what’s most commonly referred to as a “bulldog” but there are popular French and American varieties as well.
  • Bulldogs have suffered the most airline deaths of any breed due to their respiratory issues. They often suffer from hip dysplasia and other medical concerns.
  • Over 80 percent of bulldogs are delivered by Caesarean section. Having been bred with such large heads precludes most bulldog pups from being delivered naturally.
  • Bulldogs, like many brachycephalic (large-skulled) dogs are not well-suited for water and are in danger of drowning when swimming.
  • Many celebrities own bulldogs including Leonardo DiCaprio, Reese Witherspoon, David Beckham, Ashley Olsen, Hugh Jackman, Zac Efron, and Martha Stewart.
  • The famous haute cuisine restaurant elBulli in Catalonia, Spain run by chef Ferran Adrià is named for the French bulldogs belonging to the original owners of the land where the restaurant is located.





  Have fun with your Bulldog  in this week! ;)









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