LUV My dogs: breeds

LUV My dogs

Everything about your dog!

Showing posts with label breeds. Show all posts
Showing posts with label breeds. Show all posts

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Reasons Why Shih Tzu Become Violent

Reasons Why Shih Tzu  Become Violent
  Dog aggression is a major dog problem for owners. I want to help you understand the causes of dog aggression, so you can overcome this dog problem. Dog aggression stems from the dog's frustration and dominance. The dog's frustration comes from a lack of dog exercise, and the dog's dominance comes from a lack of calm-assertive leadership.

  Shih Tzu are small cute dogs that don't look like they could harm a fly. This then means that many of us make the mistake of thinking that they can get away with being aggressive and that we don't need to train it out of them.
  However this is a big mistake and while your Shih Tzu might not be a threat to your health, it is nevertheless still important to make sure that they aren't aggressive and that they recognise you as in charge. For one this is important because while you may not be afraid of a little bad pup, your visitors and other people might and this can be very upsetting for them if they have to deal with a dog that is constantly growling at them. At the same time if they are aggressive to other dogs they might well get themselves into a fight that they can't win – so it's important for their safety too. And anyway it is simply not pleasant to have a little dog who you love growling at you every time you move – you're supposed to be friends.
  Aggressive Shih Tzu behavior specially when it is a family dog should be resolved quickly or it may lead to danger and scare not just people in your family but also visitors and others who are around you. This aggressive behavior is a condition that might have developed since it was a puppy, like being attacked by another dog or it might not like the feeling of being dominated by a master.


Reasons behind Aggressive Behavior in Dogs- The delicate age for a Shih Tzu behavior development is at the 6th week. Whatever the environment gives makes it significant like socializing with other dogs and training to ensure they are people-friendly. You can easily apply this to a dog until it is 14 weeks old or can extend longer as you deem necessary.


How Does a Dog Become Aggressive?
  So the question is, how did your Shih Tzu get to be aggressive in the first place? Well there are a couple of ways. Firstly aggression can sometimes gradually occur as your dog grows up through play. If you dog bites and mouths you and you don't ever teach it to stop, then this biting can increase to the point where it is drawing blood and leaving teeth marks and it is then somewhat too late to stop it. 
  At the same time you might find that your dog is aggressive because it believes itself to be the leader of the pack or the 'alpha male'. Dogs are descended from wolves and they are pack animals as a result. Thus your dog will conclude that it's in charge if you pander to its every need and will use aggression to keep you in line. Lastly, sometimes aggression can be learned, and if you are very aggressive towards your dog, and to each other, your dog might simply learn the behaviour and might act out because it's unhappy.

What you should do to bring up a non-aggressive Shih Tzu are:

1. Let the Shih Tzu puppy on it's own with its litters until 2 months old. Do not use violent practice to a puppy aged between 8 and 10 weeks but alternatively address it tenderly. Talk to it softly and avoid hurting it physically if you would like grow a dog without aggressive Shih Tzu habits.
2. The Shih Tzu have to understand how to get along with other dogs (many dogs that are highly sociable can get along well together with other pets like cats, birds, horses, etc.) and more importantly with people. At the age of 14 weeks, if your puppy had been taught how to socialize you've great probability of an aggressive Shih Tzu.
3. Provide a conducive and wholesome setting whenbreeding up a puppy, totally free of mean masters, appropriate and enough living conditions with socialization, and protect it from attack by not just other dogs but in addition other animals.
4. Aggression is also seen as a hereditary and genetics affect.meaning that naturally some breed of dogs are aggressive but some are friendly. But it does not follow that a naturally aggressive breed can't be nurtured to lose its aggressive behavior.
5. A dog that would like to establish dominance over a territory displays aggression. Your shih tzu should learn that you're the master of the house at a very early age.


Reward Your Dog
  But the rest of your time should be spent petting your dog and rewarding it for all its good behaviour. Make sure you pay it attention and stroke it as often as possible. This will make your dog feel happy and loved and as a general rule a happy dog is a well behaved dog.

What to Do If a Shih Tzu Shows Aggressive Behavior

  A dog actually reaches sexual maturity at age of 14 months. If it shows signs of aggression during this period, take best suited actions straight away. At the moment the Shih Tzu puppy must have understood it that you are the master. It should not get any reward after expressing aggression out of being fearful. That will teach the dog a lesson.
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Saturday, July 19, 2014

Everything about your Great Dane

Everything about your Great Dane
  Very large but very gentle, this is truly a great dog. Sometimes referred to as the "Apollo of Dogs," the Great Dane was developed in Germany for its graceful appearance, large size, and hunting ability — all important attributes to the landed gentry. These same characteristics have made the breed popular today in America, even appearing in popular culture, such as the Hanna-Barbera cartoon character Scooby-Doo, the newspaper comic character Marmaduke, and Astro in the TV show The Jetsons.
  Great Danes combine robust strength with a refined dignity. In the home and around the yard, you’ll find them uniquely gifted with mental and physical strengths. Truly gentle giants, Great Danes are loving, affectionate and pleasant companions that like nothing better than to hang around the house with the family.

Overview
  The Great Dane was originally bred to hunt wild boar, but he probably wouldn't be very good at it today. The ferociousness necessary to track down such a large, wily animal was eventually bred out of the Great Dane. He's now a gentle soul who generally gets along well with other dogs, animals, and humans.
   However, his size and his power bark will scare the wits out of a burglar. Anyone who owns one of these dogs eventually understands that while you may be used to his awesome size, others usually need a little time to get there.
  The Great Dane was developed from Mastiff-type dogs, but he's more refined than other descendents of this ancient breed. A Great Dane is sleek and elegant. He has an athletic, muscular body. His massive head — and massive is the right word — is long and narrow. He's got a long, graceful neck. His ears can be cropped or left natural. 
  His size can present problems. Eyeballing a dog who weighs what you do makes some folks nervous. His tail can knock over a lot of things, particularly in a small space. And given the opportunity, he's an impressive counter surfer. Luckily, he isn't rambunctious or highly energetic.
  Size notwithstanding, a Great Dane is a sweet, affectionate companion. He loves to play and is gentle with children. He has a peaceful disposition, although he hasn't lost any of the courageousness that helped him hunt wild boar. Although he isn't particularly vocal , he wouldn't hesitate to defend his family.
  Even given his inherent gentleness, it's advisable to teach him good manners and attend obedience training classes when he's young. His sheer size alone could make him impossible to control when he's an adult, and — as with any dog — you never know when he might see something he just has to chase.
  He's eager to please and highly people-oriented, demanding a great deal of attention from those around him. He tends to nudge people with that big old head of his when he wants to be petted. Sometimes you'll meet one with lapdog tendencies who see no reason not to hop onto the sofa and drape themselves on you.
  Surprisingly, the Great Dane typically doesn't eat as much food as you'd think. And while he needs daily exercise, he doesn't need a huge yard to play in. 
Because of his beauty and gentle nature, more and more people are discovering the Great Dane. He currently ranks as the 24th most popular dog breed, according to registrations with the American Kennel Club.
  Just be aware that because of his size, he's got a relatively short life span of around eight years old. That means he takes up a huge space in your heart for a short amount of time.

Highlights
  • The Great Dane is sweet, eager to please, people-oriented, easy to housetrain, and he responds well to training using positive reinforcement.
  • Like many giant dogs, Great Danes are short-lived.
  • Great Danes require a lot of space. Even though they make great housedogs, they need a lot of room just to move around. There's little that they can't reach , and their tails can easily sweep your coffee table clean.
  • Everything costs more when you have a big dog — collars, veterinary care, heartworm preventive, food. In addition, you'll need both a crate and a vehicle that are large enough to hold your Great Dane without crumpling him into a pretzel. And let's face it, you'll scoop up a lot of poop.
  • It takes a while for the bones and joints of large dogs such as Great Danes to stop growing and become stable. Don't allow your Great Dane puppy to jump, and don't take him jogging until he's at least 18 months old; this will reduce stress on the growing bones and joints.
  • The Dane's special giant-breed dietary requirements have to be followed, or else orthopedic issues can develop.
  • Great Danes aren't particularly suited to apartments or small houses, simply because they're so big. They're not jumpers, fortunately, so a six-foot fence will contain them.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
  • Comparable Breeds: Boxer, Mastiff
History
   Drawings of dogs who look like Great Danes have been found on Egyptian artifacts dating back to 3000 B.C. and in Babylonian temples that were built around 2000 B.C. There's evidence that similar dogs originated in Tibet, with written reports of such dogs appearing in Chinese literature in 1121 B.C.
   The breed is thought to have been taken into various parts of the world by the Assyrians, who traded their dogs to the Greeks and Romans. The Greeks and Romans then bred these dogs with other breeds. Ancestors of the English Mastiff were probably involved in the breed development, and some folks believe that the Irish Wolfhound or Irish Greyhound also may have played a role.
  Great Danes originally were called Boar Hounds, because boars were what they were bred to hunt. Their ears were cropped to prevent boar tusks from tearing them. In the 16th century, the name of the breed was changed to "English Dogges."
  Late in the 1600s, however, many German nobles began keeping the largest and most handsome of their dogs in their homes, calling them Kammerhunde . These dogs were pampered and wore gilded collars lined with velvet. Talk about a sweet life.
  The name Great Dane arose in the 1700s, when a French naturalist traveled to Denmark and saw a version of the Boar Hound who was slimmer and more like a Greyhound in appearance.   He called this dog Grand Danois, which eventually became Great Danish Dog, with the more massive examples of the breed called Danish Mastiffs. The name stuck, even though Denmark did not develop the breed.
  Most breed historians give credit to German breeders for refining the breed to be the well-balanced, elegant dog we love today. In 1880, breeders and judges held a meeting in Berlin and agreed that since the dogs they were breeding were distinctly different from the English Mastiff, they would give it its own name — German Dog.
  They founded the Deutscher Doggen-Klub of Germany, and many other European countries took up the name as well. The Italians and English-speaking countries didn't accept this name, however.
  Throughout the late 1800s, wealthy German breeders continued to refine the breed. They turned their attention to the dog's temperament, because Great Danes had aggressive, ferocious temperaments due to the fact that they were originally bred to hunt wild boar, a particularly ferocious beast. These breeders tried to produce more gentle animals, and — luckily for us today — they succeeded.
  We don't know when the first Great Danes were brought to the U.S., or even where they came from, but the Great Dane Club of America was formed in 1889. It was the fourth breed club allowed to join the American Kennel Club.


Personality
  A well-bred Dane is one of the best-natured dogs around. He's a gentle, sweet, affectionate pet who loves to play and is relaxed with children. He has a great desire to please, which makes him easy to train.
  The Great Dane wants to be where the family is. He likes people a lot, including strangers and children, and will welcome visitors happily, unless he thinks you need defending. Then he can be fiercely protective.
  Some Danes wish they were lapdogs, and they'll keep trying to get there even if you and your lap mysteriously keep moving.
  Good-natured as they are, Great Danes definitely need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Great Dane puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.
  Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.


Is this breed right for you?
  As one of the tallest and largest breeds in the world, it's plain to see the Great Dane needs ample space to stretch its legs; however, due to its calm and lazy disposition, this breed can adapt to smaller dwellings. By nature, this is an athletic breed and daily exercise is required to keep the Great Dane in tip-top health. Great Danes love to be around people and do very well with families of all ages and sizes. Owners with very young children will want to make sure training and socialization is implemented early on as this extra-large breed could be a hazard to small children if not properly trained. This breed is prone to a short lifespan and may suffer from bloat. Owners should be prepared for potential health hazards and vet visits.


Health
  Great Danes, like most giant dogs, have a fairly slow metabolism. This results in less energy and less food consumption per pound of dog than in small breeds. Great Danes have some health problems that are common to large breeds, including bloat (gastric dilatation volvulus(GDV)). The average life span of Great Danes is 6 to 8 years. Like many larger breeds, Great Danes are at particular risk for hip dysplasia.
  Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and many congenital heart diseases are also commonly found in the Great Dane, leading to its nickname: the Heartbreak breed, in conjunction with its shorter lifespan. Great Danes also may carry the merle gene, which is part of the genetic makeup that creates the harlequin coloring.
   The merle gene is an incomplete dominant, meaning only one copy of the gene is needed to show the merle coloring; two merle genes produce excessive white markings and many health issues such as deafness, blindness, or other debilitating ocular issues. Great Danes can also develop something called "wobblers disease" that can affect their vertebral column. Since these dogs do grow at a rapid rate, the bones in their vertebrae can push up against the spinal cord and cause a little bit of weakness in the legs. This can be treated with surgery or it may straighten itself out.

Care
  Coat care for this breed is minimal. It does, however, need regular exercise, which can be accomplished with a lengthy walk or a fast-paced game. And although the Great Dane looks sturdy, the dog cannot live outdoors. Instead, it is more suited to an equal schedule of indoor and outdoor activities. While indoors, it should be given plenty of space and a soft bed for sleeping.

Living Conditions
  The Great Dane will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is relatively inactive indoors and does best with at least a large yard.


Exercise
  Like most dogs, Great Danes require daily walks to maintain their health. However, it is important not to over exercise this breed, particularly when young. Great Dane puppies grow very large, very fast, which puts them at risk of joint and bone problems. Because of a puppy's natural energy, Dane owners often take steps to minimize activity while the dog is still growing.
Given their large size, Great Danes continue to grow (mostly gaining weight) longer than most dogs. Even at one year of age a Great Dane will continue to grow for several more months.

Grooming
 The smooth, shorthaired coat is easy to groom. Comb and brush with a firm bristle brush and dry shampoo when necessary. Bathing this giant is a major chore, so it pays to avoid the need by daily grooming. The nails must be kept trimmed. This breed is an average shedder.


Children and other pets
  A Great Dane loves children and is gentle with them, especially when raised with them from puppyhood. Keep in mind he doesn't have any idea how big he is compared to a small child, and so can accidentally knock them over quite easily.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child not to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away.
  Generally speaking, a Great Dane will get along with other pets in the household, but occasionally some can be aggressive with livestock, or they just may not care for the other pets. It's an individual taste: some won't tolerate another animal in the house, while others will snooze with the cats and other dogs.

Popular culture
  • Fang, Hagrid's dog from the Harry Potter series, is a boarhound, another name for Great Danes. Though in the movie, the role was played by a Neapolitan Mastiff.
  • Manchester United goalkeeper Peter Schmeichel was nicknamed the "Great Dane".
  • The Great Dane was named the state dog of Pennsylvania in 1965.
  • Scooby-Doo, the famous Hanna-Barbera character, was based on a Great Dane by animation designer Iwao Takamoto. Takamoto based his illustrations on sketches given to him by a Hanna-Barbera employee who bred this dog. Scooby closely resembles a Great Dane, although his tail is longer than the breed's, bearing closer resemblance to a cat's tail.
  • The athletic teams of the University at Albany have been known as the Great Danes since 1965. Damien The Great Dane has been the mascot since that time. In 2003, the school added Lil' D, a smaller Great Dane, to help Damien entertain the crowds.
  • The University of Iowa had Great Danes, Rex I and Rex II, as mascots before the Hawkeye was chosen.
  • Astro, the dog in The Jetsons.
  • Brutus in The Ugly Dachshund, a Great Dane raised by a Dachshund mother.
  • Marmaduke is a newspaper comic strip drawn by Brad Anderson from 1954 to the present day. The strip revolves around the Winslow family and their Great Dane, Marmaduke.
  • Singer, the main but tragic hero of The Guardian, a novel by Nicholas Sparks.
  • Elmer, a Great Dane in Oswald the Lucky Rabbit by Walter Lantz
  • In each film version of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles, a Great Dane was cast as the cursed hellhound that kills the Baskerville family.
  • Ace the Bat-Hound, from the Batman TV series, was depicted as a Great Dane mix. In the animated series Batman Beyond, Bruce Wayne owns a black Great Dane mix he picked up on the street, also named Ace.
  • Ben, Hōgen, and Genba from Japanese anime and manga, Ginga Nagareboshi Gin and Ginga Densetsu Weed.
  • Just Nuisance who was the only dog to be officially enlisted in the Royal Navy. Done mainly as a morale booster for World War II enlisted troops, Nuisance proved to be a lasting legacy of the small Cape Town suburb of Simons Town.
  • Chestnut: Hero of Central Park revolves around the inventive ways the Great Dane is kept hidden from his new owners.
A dream day in the life of a Great Dane
  Watching a television show marathon on a cloudy Sunday afternoon would make this giant a happy camper. To make the day even better, a nap on your lap would complete a perfect day. This breed does have an athletic built and needs daily exercise. Although he would prefer the couch or bed, he'll be a healthier pooch with daily walks, meaning more time and more years to spend lounging around with you.



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Thursday, June 5, 2014

Dogs that love summer

Dogs that love summer
  It's essential to keep pets safe as temperatures leap up, whether via a cool kiddie pool or chilly spray bottle!
  Dogs with thick, double coats are more vulnerable to overheating. So are breeds with short noses, like Bulldogs or Pugs, since they can't pant as well to cool themselves off. If you want a heat-sensitive breed, the dog will need to stay indoors with you on warm or humid days, and you'll need to be extra cautious about exercising your dog in the heat.
  Although most breeds can live in hot climates with the proper care, some breeds do much better in hot weather. Dogs living in areas known for hot temperates need special care because they cannot handle the temperature extremes the way people can. When you adopt a dog, consider his outdoor environment and how much time he will be spending outdoors. When selecting a breed for hot climates, consider the following:
  • Size
  • Hair coat 
  • Facial conformation
  Panting is one method that dogs use to cool off. Breeds with pushed in noses and short faces such as English Bulldogs, pugs, Pekingese and boxers, tend to have a more difficult time in a hot climate.
  Giant dog breeds such as Newfoundlands and St. Bernard’s cannot handle exercise in hot weather as well as smaller dogs can. They are prone to sluggishness and obesity.


  If you’re looking for a dog that enjoys hot weather, consider dogs that come from high-temp locales. Dogs originating from warmer, drier climates, like the Basenji, are best suited for summer weather. This hard-working dog originated in central Africa and has hot-weather hunting in its blood, and even today it is used by Pygmy tribes to take down lions. As a bonus, the Basenji naturally does not bark and sheds little.



  That small, short-haired dogs, such as the Mini Pin, can handle the heat better than their large, heavily furred counterparts. Miniature Pinschers have a short, smooth coat and no undercoat, which helps them dissipate heat.



  Long, lean and known for speed, the Greyhound is another ancient breed with history in Egypt. The dog’s smooth, low-maintenance coat helps in keeping it from overheating. Greyhounds are slim and capable of exercise when the weather is hot.

  Smaller dogs can tolerate heat well. If you’re into small dogs, Chihuahuas have a short coat and are typically pretty resilient. Of note, small dogs with flat faces, such as Pugs or Bulldogs, do not do well in the heat.

  The Pharaoh Hound happily soaks up the sun rays. This slender, athletic canine has a fuss-free short coat and loves to play outdoors. One of the oldest dog breeds, the Pharaoh Hound originated in Egypt but is now the national dog for Malta, bred for hunting rabbits.

  The terriers can do well in the heat. The Cairn Terrier is a rugged pup with a weather-resistant coat that protects it in hot- and cold-weather conditions. This spunky canine lives for outdoor activity and craves physical and mental stimulation, particularly hunting-type games.

Also other dogs that  do well in hot weather are:
Hot-weather tips for dogs
  Though some dog breeds tolerate or even thrive in higher temperatures, it's important to providing ample opportunity for your pawed pal to cool off. During hot summer months, dogs should have multiple clean-water sources and plenty of shade. This is particularly true if you have a pet that doesn’t do well in the heat, especially flat-nosed dog breeds, such as the Pug and Bulldog. These breeds can easily overheat due to their facial structure, which impedes efficient panting and cooling off. Regardless of breed, keep a close eye out for signs of heat exhaustion.
 Always make sure that his dog water bowl is filled at all times, especially during hot weather.

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Wednesday, May 28, 2014

What Dog Breeds Have Blue Eyes?

What Dog Breeds Have Blue Eyes?
  Genetically, there are four ways in which a dog can have blue eyes. Three of these are linked with pigment loss in the coat.
  The most common way is as a side effect of the merle gene. Merle dilutes random parts of the pigment, including the eyes and nose. This sort of dilution causes blue colour in the iris. Because of the random pigment loss, often merle dogs have "butterfly" noses and blue, wall or split eyes. Wall eyes are when a dog has one blue eye and one brown or amber eye, and a split eye has some blue in it and the rest is brown or amber. Split eyes vary from mostly blue to mostly brown or amber. 
  The more dilution there is in the coat of a merle , the more likely they are to have blue eyes or a butterfly nose. A heavily merled dog  is unlikely to have either of these traits. Double  merles are highly likely to have blue eyes and a completely or almost completely pink nose because of the combination of merle dilution and large amounts of white around the face .
  The second way in which blue eyes can occur is when a dog has large amounts of white around its eyes. White areas on the coat are where the cells are unable to produce any pigment, so if these areas spread to the face then there may be pigment loss in the eyes and on the nose, making the nose pink and the eyes blue. This only tends to occur on very high-white dogs with the extreme spotting pattern, such as white Boxers, and even then is fairly unusual.
  The third way is when a dog is affected by the C series. The C series is albino. There are no confirmed cases of true albinism in dogs, however "white" Dobermanns have a very light coat, blue eyes and a fully pink nose, and this is thought to be a form of albinism.
  Lastly, blue eyes can be inherited as a completely separate gene, unaffected by coat colour. This gene is, however, rare. It is rumoured to occur occasionally in the Border Collie, but mainly it's seen in the Siberian Husky. Huskies can have one or both blue eyes, regardless of their main coat colour, ranging in shade from almost white to sky blue. This is particularly striking when seen on black dogs.
  
Therefore, any breed of dog can be born with blue eyes in spite of its breed and coat color. Even if the puppy's parents do not have blue eyes, a puppy can have it. Of course, this is a very rare case.
  Let's talk more about those dogs that mostly may have blue eyes regardless of the color of their coat.


Siberian Husky. Sledge dog breed is considered one of the oldest dog breeds. These dogs can be several colors, from black to white. Usually white are muzzle and belly. Eyes are blue, brown, amber color. The dogs may have different eyes - for example one blue and one brown. At present, very popular with dogs Sky-blue eyes. This is a very strong dogs that can survive in extreme cold. In terms of the character of these dogs can distinguish three features - a energetic, playful and friendly dog. These dogs love human company and do not like to be alone. They are not suitable for protection. Huskies rarely bark, but sometimes screaming just for fun. For these dogs require strenuous physical exercise, about 80-100 minutes. However, these dogs are prone to escape, so better to let go of their fenced area.



Australian Shepherd. This breed name may be misleading, because these dogs are descended not from Australia as it may seem, but they are from United States. In ancient times, these dogs are cared for very large flocks of sheep. It is a medium-sized dogs. Their fur can be black, blue marble, red marble, brown tri-color, black and white. Their coat is with spots and star on the head. Australian Shepherd eyes are amber and brown, blue and azure. One of the finest Australian Shepherd properties are big desire to please their owners, so these dogs are fast learners and great friends. These dogs are good guard dogs. They are wary of strangers, but not fearful. They are noisy - lots of bark and howl. This breed is affectionate and playful, but without sacrificing the basic working instinct. They need a big physical exercise, about 80-100 minutes. They are not enough for walking, but be free and jogging.


Dalmatians
  Blue-eyed Dalmatians are thought to have a greater incidence of deafness than brown-eyed Dalmatians, although a mechanism of association between the two characteristics has yet to be conclusively established. Some kennel clubs discourage the use of blue-eyed dogs in breeding programs.





  Some people think that the blue eyes come from a Husky ancestor, but that is not true. The blue eye color always appears in the Border collie. Border Collies with 2 eye colors was once considered useful, or desirable for working Border Collies. Blue eyes are often called glass eyes, or watch eyes.If a Border collie has a white head and blue eyes, it would very likely become deaf.




Shetland Sheepdogs
  Note that many of these dogs are blue eyed because of the dominant merle coat colour gene, which may be connected to deafness. The blue-eyed factor in Siberians is NOT connected with deafness, unlike some of the other breeds in which blue eyes may occur. Deaf Siberians are very, very rare. The Merle gene is actually a semi-lethal dominant: dogs with one dose of Merle show the effects of the gene - scattered patches of missing pigment - including on the iris of the eye. They will also show a structural defect of the iris called 'iris coloboma'. Dogs with two doses of the merle gene are frequently deaf and seem to have otherwise reduced vigor. 
  It is important to add that the blue eye colouring is a recessive gene existing in almost all breeds. In other words, any dog can have blue eyes regardless of its breed and coat colour. A puppy can be born with blue eyes even though its parents do not have it. This is a rare instance though. Moreover, in some breeds blue eyes are considered a disqualifying fault .
  Some dog breeds such as Weimaraners have blue eyes as puppies. As they grow up, the eye colour change.
 
However, blue eye coloring is a recessive gene in most breeds. Even if the breed is not known for it, and the parents do not have it, a puppy can still be produces with one or both eyes blue. This means that ANY breed can throw a blue eyed pup in a very rare instance. Health concerns associated with blue eyed dogs are cateracts and deafness, so be sure you get your puppy from a reputable breeder.

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Sunday, May 4, 2014

Top dog breeds for kids

Top dog breeds for kids

There are many great dogs to consider when looking for your next pet. In order to determine the best fit for your family, you must first be realistic about how a dog will affect your children.
  It is important to know that many of the dogs considered worst for getting along with kids are often miss-trained or not properly cared for.
  A common factor that places dogs in shelters is families who don’t choose the right pet for their lifestyle and don’t know how to manage the pet.

1. Bull Dog
   The Bull Dog has a sturdy build that is perfect for kids who like to roughhouse. However, it won’t win any awards for "most energetic dog." A docile, friendly, and loyal dog, it gets along well with other pets and dogs, too. The Bull Dog is comfortable living in large houses as well as small apartments.


2. Beagle
  Originally kept as hunting dogs, Beagles fit well in homes with active kids, as they are sturdily built and never too tired to play a game. Friendly, clever and cheerful, the Beagle usually gets along with other pets, too (except for a bit of chasing here and there). They do shed, and require frequent brushing and bathing, however.
  While your beagle most likely won't have a bird named Woodstock as his best friend, you can, by all means, name him (or her) Snoopy.

3.Bull Terrier
  Unfairly branded as an aggressive animal, the Bull Terrier was actually bred to be a companion dog -- friendly and loving towards grown-ups and kids alike. This well-framed dog also has a high threshold for pain, making it perfect for rambunctious children who are learning how to properly treat dogs.
  The Bull Terrier can get quite rambunctious and requires plenty of playtime. Therefore, it is a perfect dog for a large family. The Bull Terrier will return your affection by being very protective of your children.

4.Collie
  This is the dog Lassie made famous. Collies are a very gentle and predictable breed, rarely biting its human family and easily trainable, perfect for families that are unfamiliar with dogs.
  While this breed is typically mild mannered (like Clark Kent!), it was originally bred as a herding dog, so it may try and herd your children. This might be amusing at first, but it's probably best to discourage the child-herding (no matter how handy you may think it could be). The Collie's long hair means it requires regular grooming to keep its coat in tip-top shape. Collies get along great with children and love to please their owners and protect their family.


5. Newfoundland
  Nicknamed "Nature’s Babysitter," the Newfoundland dog loves children and is very protective of them. Gentle, kind, and patient, this breed is almost like the Mother Teresa of dogs. Both young and old will quickly fall in love with this wonderfully sweet, large dog.
  The Newfoundland best suits a family with large open spaces. And although it is known to drool and shed excessively, it is not considered a proper dog for the yard. This breed wants to be inside with its family. Wouldn’t you? The Newfoundland is also a great swimmer and has been known to save lives in emergency situations.

6. Vizsla
  This may be a breed you haven't heard of before, but it's actually one of the best dog breeds for kids. The Vizsla has a gentle disposition and manner, and is loyal, affectionate, and quiet, perfect for your little ones to play with.
  Additionally, it is obedient, confident and smart, forming close bonds with its family and able to learn new tricks quickly. Best of all, the Vizsla has very little "doggy" smell about it.

7. Irish Setter
  Known for its red coat, the Irish Setter is playful, energetic, loves being around people, and plays well with children. This doggy needs lots of exercise, and is a good match for energetic kids. A smart and trainable companion, the Irish setter is perfect for people with a yard.

8. Poodle
  Often given rather curious haircuts by their owners, the poodle is a very smart and gentle dog. It's also great for kids with allergies, as it sheds very little; it does, however, require scheduled grooming.
  This is a proud and elegant dog that is both caring and loyal. Seldom annoyed or bored, the Poodle's friendly demeanor, good nature, and patience make it an excellent playing partner for any child.

9. Labrador Retriever
  This is one of the most popular dog breeds, and for good reason -- the Labrador Retriever is playful, patient, loving, protective, and reliable. In fact, its sweet personality and intelligence is only matched by its beauty. What does this mean for you? A perfect family pet.

10. Golden Retriever
  Not as big as the Lab, the Golden Retriever is a kind, smart, confident, and loyal dog. Neither aggressive nor timid, the Golden Retriever is extremely patient, which is perfect for kids. While it does need a lot of exercise, its love of play makes this an easy thing to achieve.

11. Pug
  This pint-sized pup has an irresistible face and prominently curved tail that any child will find intriguing. The Pug does especially well in a moderate climate but is just as comfortable hanging out indoors to keep your kiddos entertained.

12. Yorkshire Terrier
Though a tiny canine, the Yorkie has a big adventurous personality that makes it an engaging dog. This affectionate pint-sized pup is an ideal pet if your family loves travel — it will keep your kids affectionately entertained in the back seat while you're en route.


13. Miniature Schnauzer
  The most popular of the three Schnauzer breeds (which include the giant and standard sizes), the Mini Schnauzer is an intelligent and cheerful canine that is as happy hanging out in the house with the family as it is romping outdoors with the kids in the yard or at the park.

14. Havanese
  This toy-sized silky-coated canine is in high demand as a family pet because of its affectionate temperament, easy trainability and hypoallergenic non-shedding coat. The Havanese is as eager to be a loved-on lap dog as it is to playfully chase the kids around.

15. Shetland Sheepdog
If you've got a big yard or live on a farm, the Sheltie will keep your kids well-exercised. One of the best obedience breeds, this long-haired, energetic beauty thrives on physical and mental activity.

  The Boston Terrier is a diminutive dapper-looking dog that has a gentle disposition and enjoys being close by its family's side.



  If the French bulldog is the clown-philosopher, the Cavalier King Charles spaniel may be the joker of the canine community. Named for King Charles II of Britain, these dogs' whimsical and high-spirited personalities can instantly charm even the hardest heart. They are very friendly and vivacious animals with virtually no tendency toward nervousness or aggression, Jones says.

  Cavalier King Charles spaniels are highly adaptable in their need for exercise, which is great for families who like to get out and play but also appreciate a little rest and relaxation. Jones adds that these pups are smart, obedient and generally quite eager to learn. According to the AKC, they're also relatively low-maintenance, requiring little more than weekly brushing to keep them looking great.



18. Pembroke Welsh Corgi
  Bold and friendly, the Corgi thrives on having work to do. Considered a herding dog, this strong, sturdy pup is ideal if your family lives on a farm but, if given adequate mental and physical stimulation, can adapt easily to any living situation.



The pint-sized Miniature Poodle is a top pet choice for kids with allergies. Highly intelligent, this cuddly fluff ball easily entertains its family with smile-evoking antics and heartwarming cuddles.


  If you're into royalty, you'll love the Maltese. According to the American Kennel Club (AKC), these playful and affectionate creatures have lounged alongside aristocrats for the past 28 centuries. And this is no surprise when you consider their beautiful silken locks, gentle dispositions and constant cheerfulness.
  Despite being bred for lounging on the bed -- or chaise, as the case may be -- the Maltese is actually quite enthusiastic about learning and highly trainable. The only possible downside to having a Maltese in a family with kids is that this animal needs to be brushed daily, which may be too big a responsibility for younger kids or those with only a passing interest in their pet.

21. Brussels Griffon Terrier
  The Brussels Griffon terriers are extremely lovable and sensitive animals. They will follow you around for as long as it takes to win your attention. They're also very loyal and protective. These great qualities, Weiss says, combined with the fact that they're remarkably obedient, make these pups excellent watchdogs and fun playmates for children.
  Bred in Belgium as rat catchers, Brussels Griffons are extremely smart dogs that love to learn and excel in training. But despite generally cheerful, energetic dispositions, they are also perfectly content to be snoozing in the sun room.


22. French Bulldog
  The French bulldog has been called a "clown in the cloak of a philosopher," which, according to the AKC, essentially means that dogs of this breed are smart with a powerful penchant for play. They're very lively and social, but not overly boisterous or barky. In fact, Weiss says their stellar doggie demeanors stand out among other dogs, large and small.
  Bred to be loungers, French bulldogs require very little in the way of exercise or grooming. They're also heavy-boned and fearless, which makes this breed a good choice for families who want a pet that's playful, but not too skittish or delicate. However, one important consideration is that French bulldogs do best in a mild climate, which means they need air conditioning when the temperature rises.

23. Shih Tzu
  The fact that Shih Tzu means "lion dog" in Chinese is misleading, considering that most members of this breed probably couldn't hurt a fly, let alone bring down a gazelle. Shih Tzus are ideal small dogs: lively and alert, yet rarely nervous or snappy. And despite their diminutive stature, they're strong and unafraid, which means they have no trouble holding their own when playing with children and keeping up with an active family.
  The Shih Tzu's long, luxurious coat of hair is certainly beautiful, but it can also be a lot of work to maintain. If you're considering a Shih Tzu, keep in mind that they do require regular grooming. Most pet parents don't mind this aspect of caring for their Shih Tzus, though, considering these dogs' infinitely loving and loyal nature.

24. Pomeranian
  The Pomeranian is an adorable dog with a mellow and gentle personality, but they can sometimes get noisy (just like children). As a matter of fact, if you want a Pomeranian, they are great with kids, just as long as they are introduced as puppies. However, because Pomeranians shed profusely, it may not be the best choice for a house with very small children.

25. Chihuahua
  Meek though they may look, this small dog can really pack a punch in attitude. They are known for nipping at children (probably not the best choice for a house with kids) or barking incessantly at strange dogs. They can also be loud and demanding. But before you cross this breed off the list, you should know that the Chihuahua is loyal and affectionate, even seen canoodling with cats every one in awhile (after an adjustment period, of course).


Good luck finding the best dog for your family!

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