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Showing posts with label breed. Show all posts
Showing posts with label breed. Show all posts

Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Everything about your Komondor

Everything about your Komondor
  The dreadlocked Komondor tends to be gentle and affectionate with family but wary of strangers. Intelligent and loyal to no end, he will give his life to protect his family - his flock - and property. An independent thinker with physical strength, he needs a firm, consistent leader. His corded coat requires daily grooming but sheds little.

Overview
  The Komondor is a sneaky flock-guarding dog. With his long, heavily-matted white coat, this dog blends right in with the sheep, so predators have no idea what’s in store for them! But even if he’s not guarding sheep, the Komondor is a wonderful companion for the right family. Also known as the Hungarian Komondor, the Hungarian Sheepdog and the Kom, this breed likes to be put to work. Whether it is guarding sheep or guarding your family, the Komondor is happy to be watching your back.
  He may look like a mop, but the Kom is known for his dignity, strength and courage. Even though this dog is generally reserved and serious with strangers, he’ll be open to showing his love to his family. His coat takes some time and energy to care for, so this is not a breed for anyone looking for low-maintenance grooming. Read on to learn more about the Komondor.

Highlights
  • Komondor are rare, but unethical backyard breeders and puppy mills do breed them. It's important to find a good breeder to make sure you don't get a puppy who will develop health or behavior problems.
  • Although an apartment or condo is not the ideal living space for a Komondor, he can adjust to that lifestyle if he receives daily exercise and is trained not to bark excessively.
  • This strong-willed dog needs a confident owner who can provide leadership the Komondor will respect. This isn't a good choice for the first-time dog owner.
  • Although Komondor shouldn't be brushed, their coat needs extensive care to keep its white color and to stay free of dirt, debris, and parasites. If you want your Komondor's coat to stay clean, he should sleep indoors.
  • Komondor are barkers and suspicious of most things they see or hear. The breed is an excellent watch dog for both home and livestock and was originally developed for this role.
  • Komondor can be aggressive to other dogs.
  • Komondor aren't high-energy, and are happy just watching and following you around the house. But they still need daily exercise of at least a few walks per day to keep them healthy and at their proper weight.
  • A high fence is required to prevent the Komondor from attempting to expand his territory, a common habit of guard dogs.
  • The Komondor is happiest when he's working. He's ideal for guarding livestock, but any job will give him the mental exercise he needs.
  • Although Komondor historically spent their time outside protecting the flock, they do need time inside with their family. Like any dog, a Komondor can become aggressive, fearful, or aloof when deprived of human company.
Other Quick Facts
  • When you look at a Komondor, you see a dog with a large head; dark brown eyes; hanging ears that are shaped like an elongated triangle, slightly rounded at the tip; and a long tail.
  • The Komondor has a dense, protective coat that starts to fall into cordlike curls when the dog is a puppy. The adult Komondor has a dense, soft, woolly undercoat and a coarse outer coat that is wavy or curly. Together, the outer coat and undercoat form tassel-like cords that lengthen as the dog grows older. The coat is always white, but not necessarily a pure white.
  • Comparable Breeds: Kuvasz, Puli
History
  The Komondor is the largest of the native Hungarian breeds and has guarded  sheep and cattle for ten centuries or more. It is considered to be an almost direct descendant of the Aftscharka (or Ovtcharka), a dog found by nomadic Huns on the southern steppes when passing through Russia. However, the earliest known written record of the breed appeared in 1544. In 1673, there was a report that “the Komondor guards the herd.” The first know illustration of the Komondor dates back to 1815 and is virtually identical to the dog today.
  His corded white coat is unique in the dog world, although the related but much smaller Puli has a similar coat, but in black. This coat provided an armor of sorts against the vicious predators the Komondor met and fought in the course of his daily work , many of which were his superior in size and weight. The Komondorok coat also kept it warm in the winter and prevented sunburn in the hotter seasons. Finally, it served as camouflage when the dog mingled with its wards, adding an element of surprise during a predator’s attack.
  The Magyars bred the Komondor for more than a thousand years, focusing on his performance, vigilance and courage rather than his pedigree. The Komondor was a prized worker and guardian, and was never thought of for commercial purposes. However, these dogs were not cross-bred with other dogs, so their pedigree remains essentially pure. The Hungarian Kennel Club and the Hungarian Komondor Club, while they have records of this breed only going back maybe a century or so, are committed to controlling and maintaining the purity, soundness and historical characteristics of this ancient breed and worked together to create the existing Hungarian standard for the Komondor.
  The Kom has been in North America since the 1930’s. They are routinely seen in flock-guarding programs and in the conformation ring. The American Kennel Club has adopted a translation of the Hungarian standard as its own. Today’s Komondor retains its strong protective nature, intelligence and self-reliance. It still is used in the United States and elsewhere to protect sheep flocks from coyotes. It is distinctive in the show ring and can make a loyal companion, although it is not a particularly affectionate breed.



Temperament
  The Komondor is built for livestock guarding. The Komondor's temperament is like that of most livestock guarding dogs; it is calm and steady when things are normal, but in case of trouble, the dog will fearlessly defend its charges. It was bred to think and act independently and make decisions on its own.
  It is affectionate with its family, and gentle with the children and friends of the family. Although wary of strangers, they can accept them when it is clear that no harm is meant,but is instinctively very protective of its family, home and possessions.The Komondor is very good with other family pets, often very protective over them, but is intolerant to trespassing animals and is not a good dog for an apartment. The dog is vigilant and will rest in the daytime, keeping an eye on the surroundings, but at night is constantly moving, patrolling the place, moving up and down around the whole area. The dogs usually knock down intruders and keep them down until the owner arrives Hungarian Komondor breeders used to say that an intruder may be allowed to enter the property guarded by a Komondor, but he will not be allowed to come out again.

Health
  The Komondor, which has an average lifespan of 10 to 12 years, is susceptible to minor health issues like canine hip dysplasia (CHD) and gastric torsion, as well as otitis externa, hot spots, and entropion. To identify some of these issues early, your veterinarian may recommend hip tests for dogs of this breed of dog.

Care
  This breed is not fond of warm weather but can live outdoors in cool and temperate climates. Though the dog does not shed, its cords (which begin to develop at 2 years of age) must be separated regularly to prevent matting and excess dirt from becoming trapped in the coat. This also makes bathing and drying quite the difficult task, often taking up an entire day. Its exercise requirements, meanwhile, may be met with a few short romps in the yard or a long walk around the neighborhood.

Living Conditions
  This dog does best in a clean country environment where he can receive extensive daily exercise, but it will do okay in an apartment if sufficiently exercised. It does well in most climates, for the Komondor lives for many months outdoors in all kinds of weather.

Training
  Since this is a large dog, you must ensure that your Komondor receives obedience training. Start as early as possible for the best results. This breed becomes obstinate when bored, so it’s in your best interest to keep training sessions interesting and upbeat. Use positive reinforcements for a job well done.
  Because the Komondor can be wary of strangers, socialization skills must be introduced when your dog is a puppy. Take your dog to new places and introduce him to new people as often as you can. As a natural guard dog, the Kom will be aggressive if he is not socialized properly as a puppy.

Exercise Requirements
  Komondors do well with moderate exercise needs. These can consist of two or three short walks daily or adequate playtime in the yard. If you have a yard, it needs to be securely fenced so they can define their territory. As well, it will keep other animals from entering that territory.

Grooming
  The coat of the Komondor begins to cord when he is eight months to a year old. The coat doesn’t shed much, but the cords must be separated regularly to maintain their look, and the coat does attract dirt. Once a Komondor is past young puppyhood his coat will probably never have its earlier pristine whiteness. The coat should never be dirty, matted, or bad smelling.
  To prevent problems, ask the breeder to show you how to care for the coat. Trimming the hair around the mouth and cleaning the dog’s face after meals is one way to help reduce odor.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Keep the ears clean and dry. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Komondor can be good companions to children in their own family, but may have difficulty accepting visiting children. They're best suited to homes with older children who understand how to interact with dogs. Always supervise Komondor when they're with children, and never leave them alone with young children. They're livestock guardians, not babysitters.
  Even when exposed to them often, Komondor are generally not fond of other dogs. They do best in a single-dog home but can learn to get along with cats. They're always pleased to have livestock to guard. That is, after all, their purpose in life.

Did You Know?
  The Komondor’s coat helps him blend in with his flock and protects him from weather extremes and the attacks of predators. The cords should develop by the time the dog is 2 years old.



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Monday, January 16, 2017

Everything about your Pembroke Welsh Corgi

Everything about your Pembroke Welsh Corgi
  This type of Corgi was first used by farmers in South Wales to skillfully herd cattle, sheep, and ponies. A friendly and beautiful dog, it is still used today as a farm herder - nipping at heels and bending under hooves - but is more often kept as a house pet. 
   Outgoing, playful, loving, and companionable dogs, the Pembroke Welsh Corgi makes a great family pet, as it plays wonderfully with children, although it may be a bit reserved around strangers. As long as you provide your Pembroke Welsh Corgi with daily exercise, both mental and physical, you’ll get a lot out of your big-eared little companions.

Overview
  A popular competitor in dog sports, the Pembroke Welsh Corgi is an active and obedient herding breed. The Pembroke Welsh Corgi was bred in the 10th century in Pembrokeshire, Wales, as a working dog to herd cattle, horses and sheep. Having such a historical pedigree, there is a myth that the Pembroke Welsh Corgi sprang from the lairs of fairies and elves to help children around the farm. Regardless of which story you believe, the breed is a lover of children, family and wide-open spaces.

Highlights
  • Pembrokes are vocal dogs that have a tendency to bark at anything and everything.
  • While they are intelligent dogs, they also can be stubborn. If housebreaking is a problem, crate training is advised.
  • Their strong herding instinct may cause them to nip at the heels of children when they are playing.
  • Pembrokes are prone to overeating. Their food intake should be monitored closely.
  • Even though they are small dogs, Pembrokes have a lot of energy and need a healthy amount of exercise each day.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • The Pembroke originated in Wales some 1,000 years ago and was employed as an all-around farm dog. He herded livestock, killed rats and other vermin, and barked an alarm if strangers came by.
  • The Pembroke’s personality has been described as a cross between a cruise-line social director and a high school hall monitor. He likes being involved and being in charge.
  • Pembrokes can adapt to any home environment as long as they get plenty of daily exercise.
  • The Pembroke has a medium-length double coat that comes in red, sable, fawn, or black and tan, with or without white markings. He sheds.
  • The words “cor gi” are thought to mean “dwarf dog.”
  • The Pembroke is the smallest member of the Herding Group.
Breed standards
AKC group: Herding Group
UKC group: Herding
Average lifespan: 13 - 15 years
Average size: 24 - 30 pounds
Coat appearance: Short and thick
Coloration: Red, black and tan, fawn, sable
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Long body with short legs, black nose, eye colors in various shades of brown, oval-shaped feet, docked or short tail
Possible alterations: Often born without a tail; coat can sometimes be long or fluffy
Comparable Breeds: Australian Cattle Dog, Cardigan Welsh Corgi

History
  The Pembroke Welsh Corgi lineage has been traced back as far as 1107 AD. It is said that the Vikings and Flemish weavers brought the dogs with them as they traveled to reside in Wales. As far back as the 10th century, corgis were herding sheep, geese, ducks, horses, and cattle as one of the oldest herding breed of dogs.
  Pembroke Welsh Corgis are closely related to Schipperkes, Keeshonds, Pomeranians, Samoyeds, Chow Chows, Norwegian Elkhounds, and Finnish Spitz. Pembrokes and Cardigans first appeared together in 1925 when they were shown under the rules of The Kennel Club in Britain. The Corgi Club was founded in December 1925 in Carmarthen, Carmarthenshire. It is reported that the local members favored the Pembroke breed, so a club for Cardigan enthusiasts was founded a year or so later. Both groups have worked hard to ensure the appearance and type of breed are standardized through careful selective breeding. Pembrokes and Cardigans were officially recognized by the Kennel Club in 1928 and were initially categorized together under the single heading of Welsh Corgis, before the two breeds were recognized as separate and distinct in 1934.
  Pembroke Welsh Corgis are becoming more popular in the United States and rank 20th  in American Kennel Club registrations, as of 2015 . However, corgis are now listed as a "vulnerable" breed in the United Kingdom; the decline has been said to be due to a 2007 ban on tail-docking  in the U.K., as well as the lack of breeders in the U.K.

Personality
  The Pembroke Welsh Corgis my be small, but they pack a lot of dog into a little body. Originally used to herd cattle and hunt rodents in Pembrokeshire, Wales; Corgis were sturdy herding dogs who took their jobs seriously. They would nip the heels of the cattle to keep them in line, and their small bodies enabled them to avoid being kicked. Today, the Corgi is still used on farms and ranches, but is also an energetic family companion.
  They are good with other pets, make reliable watchdogs, and are trustworthy around children. Corgis have a mind of their own but still have a desire to please people. They pack a large personality, which varies from clownish and attention seeking, to thoughtful and introspective.

Health
  Pembrokes have an average life expectancy of 12–15 years. Pembroke Welsh Corgis are achondroplastic, meaning they are a "true dwarf" breed. As such, their stature and build can lead to certain non-inherited health conditions, but genetic issues should also be considered. Commonly, Pembrokes can suffer from monorchidism, Von Willebrand's disease, hip dysplasia, degenerative myelopathy, and inherited eye problems such as progressive retinal atrophy. Genetic testing is available for Pembroke Welsh Corgis to avoid these issues and enhance the genetic health pool. Pembrokes are also prone to obesity given a robust appetite, characteristic of herding group breeds.

Care
  As the Pembroke Welsh Corgi loves to herd, a regular herding session is an ideal form of exercise. If it is unable to herd, take it out for a moderate leash-led walk or play session.
  The Pembroke is suited to live outdoors in temperate weather, but temperamentally it prefers to share its owner's home, while having access to the yard. Coat care comprises of a weekly brushing routine to ride the dog's coat of any dead hair.

Training
  Smart and quick-witted, Pembroke Welsh Corgis learn quickly. But even though the breed is intelligent, you’ll still need to implement firm training methods and consistent training sessions to maintain good behavior and skills. As with most dog breeds, you shouldn’t use harsh or negative training methods on your Pembroke Welsh Corgi – it just won’t work and you’ll end up frustrated. Another thing to keep in mind is that Corgis don’t respond to repetitive training because it gets bored easily. Part of the training should include not to bark at strangers – socialization and obedience training can help this problem. And although the Pembroke Welsh Corgi probably will not respond to commands from strangers, it will respond commands from all family members. Once properly trained, the Pembroke Welsh Corgi makes good obedience and show dogs once they have been properly trained. This breed is natural herders, so herding trails are a good competition to get involved in.

Living Conditions
  Corgis will do fine in an apartment if they are sufficiently exercised. With enough exercise they can be calm indoors, but will be very active if they are lacking. Will do okay without a yard so long as they are taken for daily walks.

Exercise Requirements
  Exercise is important for the Pembroke Welsh Corgi, as it can develop back problems and needs to be kept at a healthy weight. If your dog is obese, its back problems will only get worse. As well, try to make sure your Corgi doesn’t jump. An active dog, the Pembroke Welsh Corgi loves to play and run. Regular exercise is mandatory, so a backyard is a great asset.  To wear your dog out, kids make excellent playmates – get them to play tug of war, hide and seek, and chase games. For outdoor activities to do with your Pembroke Welsh Corgi, go for a walk, jog or hike, or take your pooch to the dog park to play with other dogs.

Grooming
  The Pembroke Welsh Corgi is a wash-and-go dog. He has a medium-length double coat that should be brushed or combed at least weekly to control shedding. The coat sheds heavily twice a year, in spring and fall and will require extra brushing during that time.
  The Pembroke’s coat should never be extremely long with lots of feathering on the ears, chest, legs, feet, belly, and rear end. Dogs with that type of coat are known as “fluffies.” Some breeders may try to market fluffies as being rare or suggest that the coat can be trimmed, but don’t get sucked in by those tactics. There’s never any need to trim a Pembroke’s coat except to occasionally neaten the feet.
  Bathe the Pembroke only when he gets dirty or as often as you like. With the gentle dog shampoos available today, you can bathe a Pembroke weekly if you want without harming his coat.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Don’t let them get so long that you can hear them clicking on the floor. Brush the teeth with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for overall good health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Pembrokes have a remarkable affinity for children, but thanks to their herding instincts, they sometimes nip at children's feet or ankles. Pems are eager learners, though, and can be trained out of this behavior at a young age.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  They usually are good with other pets in the household, so long as they have been socialized with them.

Is this breed right for you?
  A very active breed, the Pembroke Welsh Corgi loves children and wide-open spaces. Doing OK in an apartment if sufficiently exercised, this breed would do best with a large yard to roam in. A loud barker, it needs to be trained early to avoid problems and instinctively herding its own people and other animals. Although intelligent, the Corgi can sometimes be hard to train. It is best that you give the breed a lot of attention and socialization, as when left alone too long, it may become destructive. Easy to groom, the dog does shed heavily twice a year.

Did You Know?
  Queen Elizabeth II is perhaps the world’s most famous Corgi owner; she typically has four or five at a time and is frequently photographed with them. Her first Corgi, Susan, was a gift on her 18th birthday; most of her current dogs are Susan’s descendants.

In popular culture
  • Cowboy Bebop features an extraordinarily intelligent Pembroke Welsh Corgi named Ein.
  • Lil' Lightning from 101 Dalmatians II: Patch's London Adventure is a Pembroke Welsh Corgi.
  • In RWBY, Ruby and Yang have a Pembroke Welsh Corgi named Zwei, who is sent to them by their father Taiyang and may be a reference to Ein.
  • Well-known for their association with Queen Elizabeth II, who has owned more then 30 during her reign.
A dream day in the life
  The Pembroke Welsh Corgi loves its family and loves to work. It will wake up ensuring that the home is safe and immediately run outside to herd whatever possible. Enjoying playtime, it'll be happy with a training session and a few brain-stimulating games. A few barks at the mailman and any passerby, you will always know where the dog is in the house. Once it has its daily run, the Corgi will be more than pleased to be with the family for the remainder of the day before heading off to bed.
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Friday, December 9, 2016

Everything about your Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever

Everything about your Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever
  An active and fun loving dog, the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever is not only favored by hunters but by energetic families as well. This well-rounded breed is always ready for retrieving ducks, hiking, swimming, playing fetch and snuggling on the couch with his loved ones. His affectionate, loving and patient nature makes the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever a wonderful companion for adults and children alike.

Overview
  Originally known as the Little River Duck Dog for its ability to lure ducks, the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever was bred in Canada, as its name suggests. Nicknamed the Toller, it was bred from retrievers and spaniels for supreme agility and gait when hunting. Still used as a hunter and retriever, the breed is an excellent swimmer, hunting partner and family dog.   The Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever prefers colder climates and the great outdoors.
The Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever is a rare breed that originated in the Little River district of Nova Scotia, a province on Canada's Atlantic coast. Originally known as Little River Duck Dogs, they were renamed the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever — a mouthful, even for a retriever, so most fans call them Tollers.
  This sporting breed has a lot going for it: personality, versatility, and an easy-care coat. They're the smallest of all the retriever breeds and share many of the same traits, such as a strong working drive, intelligence, and a happy nature. But the breed has some drawbacks as well. They can be strong willed and are not as eager to please as a Labrador or Golden Retriever. If allowed to, they will take control of a household.

Highlights
  • Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers are generally healthy, but because of the limited gene pool, some diseases have begun to occur. His red coat and flesh-colored nose mean the Toller may have a higher incidence of immune-mediated disease.
  • Although he has a medium length coat, the Toller's coat is fairly low maintenance and easy to care for.
  • Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers are moderately active sporting dogs and need roughly an hour a day of exercise. If not properly exercised, they will expend their energy in less positive ways, such as chewing and digging.
  • Tollers have a strong prey drive that will prompt them to chase cats or other small animals they see outdoors. Keep your Toller in a fenced yard to prevent him from running after prey.
  • If you live in an apartment, or noise controlled neighborhood, the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever may not be the dog for you. When he's excited, he's likely to emit a scream that's loud, high-pitched, and nerve wracking.
  • If you prefer a clean and tidy dog, the Toller may not be the breed for you. He sheds seasonally and enjoys rolling and frolicking in mud and dirt.
  • The Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever is not a miniature Golden Retriever; their temperaments are quite different.
  • The Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever is a rare breed and it may take time to locate a reputable breeder who has puppies available. Expect a wait of six months to a year or more for a puppy. To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • At 17 to 21 inches tall at the shoulder, the NSDTR is the smallest of the Retrievers.
  • True to his heritage, the NSDTR loves playing in water.
  • Fewer than 500 Tollers are registered with the American Kennel Club annually.
Breed standards
AKC group: Sporting Group
UKC group: Gun Dog
Average lifespan: 11 - 14 years
Average size: 37 - 52 pounds
Coat appearance: Soft, medium-length; straight, water-resistant double coat
Coloration: Gold, red, reddish-orange and copper; possible white markings on body
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Muscular body similar to a Golden Retriever; light-colored eyes and nose; triangular high-set ears; and long tail
Possible alterations: Coat may have small wave to it.
Comparable Breeds: Golden Retriever, Newfoundland

History
  The breed was developed in the community of Little River Harbour in Yarmouth County, Nova Scotia, around the beginning of the 19th century to toll waterfowl and as an all purpose hunting dog. The breed was originally known as the Little River Duck Dog or the Yarmouth Toller. Its exact origins are not known but it appears that some possibly spaniel and setter Pointer-type dogs, retriever-type dogs, and rabbit hounds. Farm collies also went into the mix as many became herding dogs as well as hunting dogs and family pets.
  The Toller was officially admitted to the Canadian Kennel Club in 1945. Declared the provincial dog of Nova Scotia in 1995, the breed gained national recognition in 1980, when two Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers were awarded Best in Show at championship events that included many breeds. On June 11, 2001, it was approved for admission into the Miscellaneous Class of the American Kennel Club and was granted full recognition into the Sporting Group on July 1, 2003.

Use in hunting
  Tollers are named for their ability to entice or lure waterfowl within gunshot range, called "tolling". The hunter stays hidden in a blind and sends the dog out to romp and play near the water, usually by tossing a ball or stick to be retrieved. The dog's appearance is similar to that of a fox. Its unusual activity and white markings pique the curiosity of ducks and geese, who swim over to investigate.
  When the birds are close, the hunter calls the dog back to the blind, then rises, putting the birds to flight, allowing him a shot. The Toller then retrieves any downed birds. They are particularly suited for retrieving in cold water climates because of their water-repellent double coat.



Personality
  The Nova Scotia Duck Trolling Retriever has a most interesting way of luring ducks within a hunter's range. They will frolic along the water's edge, hopping in and out of the water, chasing sticks and balls that the hunters throw from their blinds. Eventually, the water fowl will become curious, and move toward the happy dog, right into the hunter's trap.   These retrievers have a never-ending reserve of energy, making them a great companion for hunters and active families. They are easy going, happy dogs who love to play and are excellent around kids.

Health
  The Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever, which has an average lifespan of 11 to 13 years, is not prone to any major health concerns; however it may suffer from minor issues such as progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) and canine hip dysplasia (CHD). To identify these issues, a veterinarian may recommend hip and eye exams for the dog.

Genetic diversity
  A worldwide study of the Tollers' registration history in 17 countries shows that about 90% of the genetic diversity present in the founding population has been lost. Tollers born between 1999–2008 have an effective founder size of 9.8, realized effective population size of 18 and an average inbreeding coefficient of 0.26. Breeders are working to prevent losing heterozygosity and to maintain sufficient genetic variations, but high kinship value means the breed is not able to maintain a steady level of inbreeding in the long term.

Care
  The grooming requirements for the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever is fairly easy: a weekly combing. It is important that the dog receives plenty of exercise and access to water, if possible, as it loves to swim. It also enjoys retrieving objects.
  The Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever prefers to live indoors with its human companions, but it is adaptable to various climatic conditions and can survive outdoors.

Living Conditions
  The Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retriever will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. This breed does well in cold climates.

Training
  Always wanting to please their owners, Tollers are relatively easy to train. Positive training methods that include loads of praise and lots of treats work best for this breed. They are highly sensitive to harsh words and discipline so a calm and patient trainer is needed. Consistency in training is essential for the Toller to succeed in obedience.
  Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers do well in many forms of canine competition. Of course, they excel in obedience trials but they also do well on agility courses. Agility is a great way to bond with the Toller as well as let him get the exercise he needs to stay healthy.

Activity Requirements
  Trollers need a lot of vigorous activity to maintain health and happiness, and the biggest mistake people make with this breed is not exercising them enough. Simple walks around the block are not going to cut it for Trollers. They need time to run several hours a day, as they were bred for endurance. They had to be able to spend long hours working in the field, so their stamina is high. Those with active lifestyles will find their Troller makes an excellent jogging companion, can keep up with bike riders, and will never tire of hiking, especially if there is water nearby.
  Fetching is the Troller's favorite activity and they will fetch sticks and balls for as long as you are willing to toss them. They prefer you toss the sticks and balls into a lake or pond, as they are water dogs who love to swim. If you do not properly exercise your Troller, be prepared for destruction. These dogs will chew, chew, and chew some more when they are bored and have pent up energy to burn off, and you aren't likely to approve of the items they decide to chew in your absence.

Grooming
  The Toller is a wash-and-go dog. His medium-length water-repellent double coat requires only weekly brushing to remove loose hair and prevent mats or tangles. Brush him daily during spring and fall, when he sheds heavily. As with most dogs, there is a certain amount of shedding year-round. Bathe him only as needed, which shouldn’t be more than a few times a year unless he rolls in something stinky.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails regularly, usually every week or two. Keep the ears clean and dry, and brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Tollers love kids and make good playmates for active older children who'll play ball with them, teach them tricks, and otherwise keep them occupied. They may be too rambunctious for very young children.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Tollers enjoy the company of other dogs and get along just fine with cats, especially if they're raised with them.

Is this breed right for you?
  An intelligent and affectionate breed, the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever requires a lot of activity, and not just playing. The breed enjoys retrieving and obedience training, which is advised to avoid behavioral problems. Loving, it gets along well with children and other animals, but it will need a lot of socialization to maintain its happiness. Energetic, the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever does OK with apartment life if it is given daily walks, but it does best with a large yard with a body of water to roam, swim and play fetch in. Since it is an average shedder, it is easy to groom but should be given a regular dry shampoo bath to maintain the natural oils in its coat.

Did You Know?
  The Toller’s red or orange coat gives him a foxlike appearance and has even given rise to the idea that he’s the result of a fox-Retriever cross, but that’s a genetic impossibility.

A dream day in the life
  The Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever would adore to wake up with a nice pat down and session with its owner. Running outside to romp around in the yard, it'll run inside for an affectionate hour of playtime with the kid. After its long daily walk, this breed will go for a swim in the backyard pool or be happy with a game of fetch. In the evening, it'll settle in with its family, running outside to burn off energy whenever it feels the need.


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Wednesday, December 7, 2016

Everything about your Ibizan Hound

Everything about your Ibizan Hound
  A rare breed due to their striking looks, this dog has roots as far back as the Egyptian Pharaoh Hound. Moving from Egypt to Spain, this breed is able to handle heat due to its ancestor's island life. In Spain, the dog learned to be a great hunter of rabbits. Trained to retrieve the animal and bring it back to its owner, he enjoys working and pleasing his master.

Overview
  The Ibizan Hound, also at times in its development known as the Ibizan Warren Hound, the Ibizan Podenco, the Podenco Ibiceno, the Podenco Mallorquin, the Ivicene, the Balearic Hound, the Balearic Dog, the Balearen-Laufhund and the Galgo Hound, is an ancient breed with an exotic and highly distinctive appearance. When it spread to the Catalonia region of the Spanish mainland, it was called Ca Eivissenc or Ca Eibisenc. 
  When it reached the south of France, it was called the Charnique, Charnihue, Charnegue, Charneque and Chien de Baleares, although the breed eventually was banned from France due to its association with poachers. It also has been called the Anubis - the “Watchdog of the Dead” - in part because a full-sized statue identical to the Ibizan Hound of today was found inside the tomb of King Tutankhamen when it was discovered in 1922. The affectionate nick-name for the breed is “Beezer.” An interesting historical footnote is that according to legend, Hannibal was born on Ibiza and carried Ibizan Hounds with him on his elephants when he invaded Italy.

Highlights
  • Ibizan Hounds do well in apartments if they are properly exercised.
  • They must be kept on leash whenever they are not in a securely fenced area. Beezers have a strong prey drive and will pursue moving objects heedless of your commands.
  • Ibizan Hounds are excellent jumpers. It takes at least a 6-foot fence to confine them to a yard. Underground electronic fences are not recommended for this breed.
  • Beezers need daily exercise. If their exercise requirements are not met, they can become bored and destructive.
  • Male Ibizan Hounds may develop poor appetites when they are adolescents. Encourage them to eat, but don't go overboard with food bribes, elaborate meals, or hand feeding; you'll simply end up with a picky eater.
  • Beezers become cold easily. If you live in a cold or wet climate, purchase a coat for your dog.
  • Ibizan Hounds are excellent with children, but all dogs should be supervised when they are with young children.
  • These dogs are generally quiet indoors and can become couch potatoes but they need a daily walk or run.
  • Ibizan Hounds are expert counter surfers so don't leave food out, even if you think it's out of your dog's reach.
  • Ibizan Hounds are generally not aggressive but they do have a high prey drive and are not best suited for homes with small animals. They can learn to get along with cats if they're raised with them, but outdoor cats and other animals are fair game.
  • Ibizan Hounds are a rare breed. Expect to spend time on a waiting list if you're interested in one of these dogs.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Ibizan Hound has a long, narrow head; large pointed ears that are highly mobile; clear amber eyes; and a long tail.
  • The Ibizan comes in two coat types - shorthaired and wirehaired - but the shorthaired variety is most common. The wirehaired Ibizan has a bushy mustache.
  • The coat can be white or red, with the red ranging from a light yellowish-tint known as lion to a deep tone. The dog can be a solid color or a mixture of white and red.

Breed standards
AKC group: Hound
UKC group: Sighthound
Average lifespan: 10 - 12 years
Average size: 45 - 65 pounds
Coat appearance: Smooth
Coloration: Red, red and white, white, fawn
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Lean, slender body; slender neck; rose-colored nose; caramel- to amber-colored eyes; long, pointed ears; deep-chested with narrow head; long legs and tail
Possible alterations: Coat appearance and feel may be wiry
Comparable Breeds: Greyhound, Italian Greyhound

History
  For a long time it was thought that the Ibizan Hound was an ancient breed, but the advent of DNA studies has shown that he’s a much more recent creation. He comes from the Spanish island of Ibiza where he’s popular as a rabbit hunter. In Spain, Ibizans often hunt in tandem with ferrets, nabbing the rabbit after the ferret flushes him from his den.
  The Ibizan Hound was first introduced to the United States in 1956 by Colonel and Mrs. Consuelo Seoane. The American Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1979. Today the Ibizan is a well-kept secret, ranking 151st among the dogs registered by the AKC. Television viewers got an eyeful of the breed in 2003 and 2004 when Ch. Luxor’s Playmate of the Year (nicknamed Bunny) won the Hound Group at the Westminster Kennel Club show.

Personality
  The lively Ibizan is attracted by anything that moves and will run after cats, rabbits, or anything else that looks like it might be fun to chase. His large, mobile ears are indicative of his super sense of hearing, which makes him an excellent watchdog. He might not bark an alarm, but if you see those ears twitching, you'll know something or someone is around.   With his family, the Ibizan is even-tempered, affectionate, and loyal. He may be reserved at first with strangers, but he should never be shy or aggressive.
  Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner. Always meet at least one of the parents — usually the mother is the one who's available — to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.
  Like every dog, Ibizan Hounds need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Ibizan puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog. Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.

Health 
  The Ibizan Hound is hardy and strong, but can have allergic reactions to drugs, including insecticides and flea powders. Some lines seem to be prone to seizures. The Ibizan Hound has a genetic propensity for Axonal Dystrophy, nerve and muscle disease.

Care
  Given soft bedding and warm shelter, the Ibizan can stay outdoors in cold climates, but it is not usually kept as an outdoor dog. As the hound is a skillful jumper, care should be taken when constructing an enclosure. The dog’s smooth coat needs just occasional brushing but the wire coat has to be brushed every week.
  The athletic and independent Ibizan Hound should be given regular exercise in a safe and enclosed area. Good exercise enables the hound to stretch its body, but its requirements are also satiated through jogs on a leash, long walks and full running.

Living Conditions
  The Ibizan Hound will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is moderately active indoors and will do best with at least a large yard. The Ibizan Hound can jump very high from a complete standstill, enabling him to easily jump most fences. An incredibly fast dog, the Ibizan Hound can be extremely difficult to recapture. This breed is a sighthound, meaning it hunts by sight rather than scent. Ibizans have selective hearing and an independent nature. They will take off running and WILL NOT return until they feel like it.   The strong chase instinct and lack of caution in traffic can lead to disaster. The breed is quite sensitive to cold, as his coat is not very protective.

Trainability
  Ibizan Hounds are docile animals who should be treated gently at all times. Gentle consistency, lots of praise and treats, and and extra helping of patience are required for training. Beezers are independent animals and don't particularly have a need to please people. Their attitude toward training is, “What's in it for me?” You need to give them a reason to listen to you.
  Beezers can be wary of strangers which can lead to excessive shyness or fearfulness, if left unchecked. Early and frequent socialization is required to teach the dog to accept new people and new situations are welcome.

Activity Requirements
  Though Beezers need time to gallop every week, you don't need to be a runner yourself to raise this breed, in fact even the fastest sprinters can't keep up with an Ibizan Hound. They should be taken to a dog park or better yet, enrolled in a dog club with a lure-training track where your Beezer can chase a mechanical lure at top speed. Other than their weekly runs, Ibizan Hounds are content with several walks per day to stay fit. They are fine city dwellers, as long as they are allowed to get to a park for regular sprints. Their size makes them unsuitable for small apartments, but they are graceful dogs who don't need excessive room to move around indoors, so large apartments or condos are ok spaces.

Grooming 
  Both shorthaired and wirehaired Ibizan Hounds are easy to groom. They require weekly brushing to remove loose and dead hair and maintain coat sheen. Bathe only as needed. Ibizans are naturally clean dogs, which makes baths only necessary once every few weeks.
  Check the ears on a regular basis for signs of wax buildup, irritation or infection. Clean the ears with a cotton ball and a veterinarian-approved cleanser; never use a cotton swab in a dog's ear canal. Teeth should be brushed on a weekly basis to prevent tartar buildup, promote gum health and keep bad breath at bay. Trim nails monthly if the dog does not wear the toenails down naturally outdoors.

Children And Other Pets
  Because they're so playful and silly, Ibizans are good with children. They can be gentle but may chase young children who are running around. They're probably best suited to homes with older children who understand how to interact with dogs.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Ibizans enjoy the company of other dogs and can learn to get along with cats, if they're introduced at an early age. Your housecat will fare best with an Ibizan if he's the type to stand his ground rather than run. Cats or other animals that wander into their yard are fair game, however.

Is this breed right for you?
  A breed that believes itself the equal of humans, the Ibizan Hound is in need of a strong and active lifestyle. With a knack for jumping, he's best in a yard without a gate or fence and not to be kenneled. A good dog with children and in a family, he's affectionate, caring, clean and protective. With an intrinsic ability to hunt, this pup will only do well with cats if raised with one — if not, he'll most likely chase and kill it, as with other small animals and rodents. He'll need to be introduced to strangers with ease, including the human and dog kind.

Did You Know?
  The Ibizan’s resemblance to depictions of the Egyptian dog god Anubis is one of the reasons he is often thought to be an ancient breed.

In folk culture
  According to journalist Norman Lewis, when an owner no longer wants to own one of these dogs (having too much of an appetite, for instance), it is considered very bad luck to kill the dog. Instead, they release the dog on the other side of the island, so that someone else might 'adopt' the animal.

A dream day in the life of an Ibizan Hound
  Starting off the day with a walk, this pup will come home to play and cuddle with the kiddos. Watching the house all day will be his No. 1 priority, a close second being to trail the home for rodents. He'll happily run next to you on your bike ride as you peddle away. After lunch and a catnap, he's ready to play again. After dinner and a swim with his favorite person, he'll be happy to sleep next to you while ensuring the home is safe.
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Tuesday, December 6, 2016

Everything about your Black and Tan Coonhound

Everything about your Black and Tan Coonhound
  A descendent of the Bloodhound and Black and Tan Foxhound, this pup was bred to hunt raccoon and other small game. With a strong ability to deal with excessive heat and cold, he has since moved on to bigger game, including the mountain lion. An adaptable pet perfect for working and hunting, he is a loyal and passionate worker.

Overview
  The Black and Tan Coonhound is a true hound breed in every sense of its name. Not only does it look the part, but it’s got a nose on it that will track down whatever it is hunting – but the Black and Tan Coonhound really loves going after raccoons and opossums. Known to bay and howl until the hunter arrives, this dog is mellow, calm, determined and hardworking.
  A great pet for families and lovers of the outdoors, the Black and Tan Coonhound may be the perfect fit for your household.

Highlights
  • Bays and howls as only a hound can; city living is not recommended
  • Easily distracted by various scents. Once he has decided to follow one you'll have a very hard time calling him off — this dog needs to be leashed!
  • Coonhounds are not homebodies and will roam if given the chance. They can go for miles before looking up and realizing that home is nowhere to be found.
  • Makes a good jogging or running companion but is also more than satisfied with 30 to 60 minutes of daily exercise, and walks that allow for plenty of sniffing time.
  • This breed does well with children, but is active and bouncy when young.
  • Easily gains weight if given the chance.
  • Can be stubborn and independent, making training a challenge.
  • A bored Coonhound is a noisy, destructive Coonhound. He needs lots human companionship and training.
  • Obedience training is highly recommended and likely to lead to a closer relationship with your dog.
  • Never buy a Black and Tan Coonhound from a puppy broker or pet store. Reputable breeders do not sell to middlemen or retailers, and there are no guarantees as to whether the puppy had healthy parents. Interview breeders thoroughly, and make sure the puppy's parents have been screened for genetic diseases pertinent to that breed. Ask breeders about the health issues they've encountered in their dogs, and don't believe anyone who claims that her dogs never have any health problems. Ask for references so you can contact other puppy buyers to see if they're happy with their Coonhound. Doing your homework may save you a lot of heartbreak later.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Black and Tan was the first Coonhound breed admitted to AKC registration.
  • The Black and Tan is known as a “trail and tree hound,” meaning he can not only find his quarry but also tree it.
  • This breed has a black coat with tan points above the eyes, on the sides of the muzzle, and on the chest, legs and breeching (the upper thigh area), plus black pencil markings on the toes.
  • Comparable Breeds: Bloodhound, Chesapeake Bay Retriever

History
  Scenthounds descend from the Talbot Hound, the hunting dog used by nobles and kings a thousand years ago. The direct ancestor of the Black and Tan Coonhound is the English Foxhound, but the coonhound breeds themselves are a uniquely American creation.

  The Black and Tan Coonhound, developed in the mountains of the southern United States in the 1700s, takes his size, coloring, long ears, and scenting ability from the foxhounds and bloodhounds perched in the branches of his family tree.
  He was bred to tree raccoons and possums, but he's more than capable of running bigger game. That versatility made him an ideal companion for colonial settlers who created him to be a "trail and tree" dog, meaning he could find his quarry and tree it until the hunter arrived.
  The American Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1945. The first Black and Tan Coonhound registered by the AKC was Grand Mere Big Rock Molly.
  Despite his fine qualities, the Coonhound has never made the leap to popular companion dog, something for which his fans are probably grateful. He ranks 131st among the 155 breeds and varieties recognized by the AKC.

Personality
  Black and Tan Coonhounds are a pleasant, laid-back addition to families of all sizes and ages. Playful as puppies, this breed mellows out considerably in adulthood and is happy with moderate exercise and lots of time to relax around the house. Black and Tans are good with children, they are patient and not dominant, but they aren't particularly playful when the get older. Many Black and Tan Coonhounds think they are lapdogs, despite their size, and can ball up into the tiniest of spaces to sleep next to the people they love.

Health
  The Black and Tan Coonhound, which has an average lifespan of 10 to 12 years, is prone to minor health concerns such as ectropion and hypothyroidism, and major issues like canine hip dysplasia (CHD). The Coonhound also occasionally suffers from Hemophilia B. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may recommend hip and thyroid tests for the dog.

Care
  Grooming a Black and Tan Coonhound consists of the occasional brushing of the coat and regular ear checkups. Exercise, meanwhile, may be satisfied with a long walk, short jog, or an excursion on a field. The Coonhound also loves to run a few miles and wanders on catching a scent. As the Black and Tan drools, it is a good idea to wipe its face regularly.

Living Conditions
  The Black and Tan Coonhound is not recommended for apartment life. They are relatively inactive indoors and will do best with at least a large yard.

Trainability
  Black and Tans assume they are the leader and require their trainer to prove otherwise. They can be stubborn and even manipulative with their expressive brown eyes and droopy faces. Training a Black and Tan is not for the soft-hearted.
  As with most hound breeds, the Black and Tan is sensitive and needs to be trained with a confident, consistent, but gentle hand. Harsh treatment can lead to avoidance behaviors, and extremely sensitive individuals can shut down completely. Positive reinforcement, treats, and a lot of patience will yield the best results when training a Black and Tan.

Activity Requirements
  Black and Tans don't need an excessive amount of vigorous activity, and as adults they quite enjoy relaxing on the living room rug or attempting to curl up next to you on the couch, despite their large size. They can adapt to just about any living situation and will do just fine in an apartment.
  While outside, the Black and Tan Coonhound should be kept on a leash or in a fenced in yard. If they catch a scent, their instincts will take off and employ true hound dog “selective deafness,” and will not obey your commands to return home. They make excellent companions for hunters and farmers. They will track an animal across any terrain, in any weather, and won't stop working until they have that animal penned up a tree.

Grooming
  The Black and Tan Coonhound has a short, dense coat. It’s easy to groom, but it sheds a lot. Brush the coat with a hound mitt or rubber curry brush one to three times a week to remove dead hair and distribute skin oils.
  Regular brushing should keep your Coonhound pretty clean, but if he has a houndy odor you can bathe him to help reduce the smell. Be sure to rinse thoroughly. Shampoo left on the coat can cause dry, flaky skin.
  Keep those droopy ears clean and dry to prevent bacterial or yeast infections from taking hold. Plenty of Coonhounds like to swim, so dry the ears thoroughly any time they’ve been in the water.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Black and Tan Coonhounds are patient and tolerant with children. That said, it's never appropriate to leave dogs and young children alone together. They should always be supervised to prevent any ear biting or tail pulling on the part of either party.
  Being pack dogs, Black and Tan Coonhounds are always happy to have the company of other dogs. A bored hound will find ways to entertain himself — destructive ways that you won't like — so if no one's home during the day, it's best if he has at least one canine buddy.
  They can also get along well with cats, rabbits and similar pets if they're raised with them in the home. Be sensible and don't leave them unsupervised with other pets until you're sure they all get along.

Is this breed right for you?
  Due to great exercise needs, this pet will do best with an active family. Playful, loyal and passionate, this gentle giant is dedicated to his owner and his family. A friendly pooch, he'll greet others with ease. Needing good training, this breed will learn appropriate behaviors — without it, he may act out. Best for older children, he may be too aggressive and playful with younger children. In need of a yard and walks, in addition to being a big drooler, apartment life may not be suited for him.

Did You Know?
  Although they’re called Coonhounds, Black and Tans can also hunt other game, including deer, mountain lions and bear.

A dream day in the life of a Black and Tan Coonhound
  Waking up with a job to do, this pup will be happy to be taken on a walk first thing in the morning. After being fed and engaging in a bit of play, he'll head right back outside to ensure that the home is protected. Satisfied that no stray animals or new humans have come into his territory, he'll go back inside for a pat-down to reward him for a job well done. After an evening run and a swim in the pond, he'll catnap to prepare for tonight's guard watch. If you leave him, he may howl to let everyone know that he's there.



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