LUV My dogs: boxer

LUV My dogs

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Showing posts with label boxer. Show all posts
Showing posts with label boxer. Show all posts

Saturday, July 8, 2017

10 Most Popular Dog Breeds in America

10 Most Popular Dog Breeds in America
  Americans really, really love their dogs. And that’s in spite of dogs not being the easiest pet you could bring into your home. Training a dog is difficult, especially if you end up with a headstrong canine. Choosing the right dog breed for your lifestyle or your family can be a challenge. And owning a dog can be surprisingly expensive thanks to an assortment of hidden costs.
  So which dog breeds do Americans love the most? Take a look at the American Kennel Club’s ranking of the most popular dog breeds in America for 2016. Some of them might surprise you.

10. Boxers
  In 10th place is the boxer, part of the AKC’s Working Group. The boxer is a fun-loving dog that, interestingly enough, was one of the first breeds selected in Germany for police training. The AKC recognized the boxer in 1904. This breed is a medium-sized, square-built dog with an alert, curious face and a distinctive muzzle. Boxers move smoothly and gracefully. They’re related to practically all recognized breeds of the bulldog type. Boxers are patient and protective, which makes them great family dogs.
  Boxers were originally bred to be medium-size guard dogs. Today, although they are a part of the AKC’s Working Group, they mostly find homes as loving family companions.


  In ninth place is the Yorkshire terrier. The AKC first recognized this member of the Toy Group in 1885. Yorkies first became popular pets in the late Victorian era, and they have a distinctive coat and confident manner of carrying themselves. The AKC notes that Yorkshire Terriers “offer big personalities in a small package.” They’re brave and energetic, and most owners would say these dogs don’t know how small they are.
  Small in size but big in personality, the Yorkshire Terrier makes a feisty but loving companion. The most popular toy dog breed in the U.S., the “Yorkie” has won many fans with his devotion to his owners, his elegant looks, and his suitability to apartment living.

  In eighth place is the Rottweiler. This breed, a member of the Working Group, is one of the descendants of Roman drover dogs. The AKC recognized it in 1931. Rottweilers are powerful dogs, and the AKC notes that “the Rottweiler is happiest when given a job to perform.” The breed’s intelligence and endurance makes Rottweilers great service dogs and companions. And according to the AKC, “No one told him that he’s not a toy breed, so at some point he’s going to plop onto your lap for a cuddle.”
  If you want a Rottweiler, learn how to raise it first! If you don't get these dogs off to the right start, you may never be able to control them, and they will be a constant danger to you, your family, and others. With a bite strength roughly 25% greater than a German Shepherd, they must be trained - it isn't optional. If you do learn to do it right, you will own one of the best and safest pets it is possible to own.

  In seventh place is the poodle, a member of the Non Sporting Group. Poodles, officially recognized by the AKC in 1887, are a single breed commonly divided into standard, miniature, and toy sizes. Poodles are known for being very intelligent and active dogs. They excel in obedience training and are eager to please their humans. All sizes of poodles can be trained successfully. The standard poodle tends to be more outgoing.
  These fluffy dogs weren't always the delicate beauties they are today. Poodles were once natural-born hunters and were originally bred as water retrievers. These prim and proper pups are still excellent swimmers with a knack for anything that involves using their brains as well as their brawn. Named after the German word for puddle, this breed's webbed feet and water-resistant coat make them great lake and pool companions who love the challenge of obedience training at the highest levels.

  In sixth place is the French bulldog, which is included in the Non Sporting Group. The AKC notes that two distinctive features of this breed, which it recognized in 1898, are its bat ears and the unique silhouette of its skull. French bulldogs are affectionate and playful. And the AKC reports that this breed “is a great companion for single pet owners, as well as families with young children.” They’re a little bit stubborn in nature, so you’ll need to exercise some patience when training a French bulldog. But in general, Frenchies are intelligent and eager to please their family.
  The Frenchie will make you laugh. He's a charming, clever dog with a sense of humor and a stubborn streak. Bred for centuries as a companion, he's very fond of people, and becomes particularly attached to his family. In fact, sometimes he becomes a little too attached, which means he's not the best choice for someone who'll be away long hours every day. It also means he absolutely, positively cannot live in the backyard or garage, but only indoors as a member of the family. That's doubly true given that he, like all brachycephalic, or "flat-faced" breeds, has difficulty regulating his body temperature and needs to live in a climate-controlled environment.

  In fifth place is the beagle, part of the AKC’s Hound Group. The AKC first recognized the breed in 1885. The beagle was bred primarily for hunting rabbits and hares, and beagles are still excellent hunting dogs and companions. They enjoy the company of people and other dogs; however, they’re a challenge to train because they want to follow their noses. As the AKC puts it, “Beagles are at best temporarily obedient due to their independent nature, which is common among most hounds.”
   Small, compact, and hardy, Beagles are active companions for kids and adults alike. Canines in this dog breed are merry and fun loving, but being hounds, they can also be stubborn and require patient, creative training techniques. Their noses guide them through life, and they're never happier than when following an interesting scent. The Beagle originally was bred as a scenthound to track small game, mostly rabbits and hare. He is still used for this purpose in many countries, including the United States.

  In fourth place is the bulldog, a member of the Non Sporting Group. The bulldog originated in the British Isles, and the AKC recognized it in 1886. Bulldogs are thick-set dogs with short faces and sturdy limbs. The AKC describes these medium-sized dogs as “equable, resolute and dignified.” Despite a “well-earned” reputation for stubbornness, bulldogs are very intelligent and can be very successfully trained.
  Bulldogs originally were used to drive cattle to market and to compete in a bloody sport called bullbaiting. Today, they’re gentle companions who love kids. A brief walk and a nap on the sofa is just this dog breed’s speed.

  In third place is the golden retriever, a highly identifiable breed, which the AKC recognized in 1925. Golden retrievers are a member of the Sporting Group and are active, alert, and confident. As the AKC explains, “It’s not surprising that golden retrievers are one of the most popular dog breeds in the United States. Along with being exuberant and friendly, they are strong dogs and hard workers.”
  The Golden Retriever is one of the most popular dog breeds in the U.S. The breed's friendly, tolerant attitude makes him a fabulous family pet, and his intelligence makes him a highly capable working dog. Golden Retrievers excel at retrieving game for hunters, tracking, sniffing out drugs, and as therapy and assistance dogs. They're also natural athletes, and do well in dog sports such as agility and competitive obedience.
 This sporting breed has a sweet, gentle, people-pleasing personality. A well-bred Golden Retriever does not have strong guarding instincts, so don’t expect him to protect your home from burglars. He will, however, make friends with them and show them where the treats are.

  In second place is the German shepherd, a member of the Herding Group. The AKC recognized this breed in 1908. These dogs are smart and courageous, and they come from a long lineage of old herding and farm dogs. German shepherds are loyal family dogs and good guard dogs. According to the AKC, German shepherds are “considered dogdom’s finest all-purpose workers.”
 The German Shepherd Dog is a natural protector and so adaptable and intelligent that he has performed just about every job known to dog. If he had opposable thumbs, he would be unstoppable.
  The German Shepherd Dog is one of America's most popular dog breeds — for good reason. He's an intelligent and capable working dog. His devotion and courage are unmatched. And he's amazingly versatile, excelling at most anything he's trained to do: guide and assistance work for the handicapped, police and military service, herding, search and rescue, drug detection, competitive obedience and, last but not least, faithful companion.

  In first place is the Labrador retriever, a friendly and active member of the Sporting Group. The AKC recognized the breed in 1917. The Labrador retriever, the most popular dog breed in the United States, comes in three colors: yellow, black, and chocolate. These dogs are eager to please, which means they excel not only as family dogs, but also “as guide dogs for the blind, as part of search-and-rescue teams, or in narcotics detection with law enforcement.”
  Labrador Retrievers are among the most popular dog breeds out there today. Loyal, easy to get along with, and easy to train, these retrievers could be considered a neighborhood classic all around the United States and even in other parts of the world. But what exactly makes them such popular, well-respected dogs… and does a strong breed always mean that a Labrador Retriever will be the right dog for you?
  The Labrador Retriever was bred to be both a friendly companion and a useful working dog breed. Historically, he earned his keep as a fisherman’s helper: hauling nets, fetching ropes, and retrieving fish from the chilly North Atlantic. Today’s Labrador Retriever is as good-natured and hard working as his ancestors, and he’s America’s most popular breed. These days the Lab works as a retriever for hunters, assistance dog to the handicapped, show competitor, and search and rescue dog, among other canine jobs.



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Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Everything about your Boxer

Everything about your Boxer
  Boxers are silly, sweet and mischievous. They clown around with family and friends, are patient and playful with children, but show a deliberate and wary face to strangers, responding with unmatched courage to anything that threatens their loved ones. Those characteristics are why people love them.

Overview
  The Boxer is a breed of stocky, medium-sized, short-haired dogs developed in Germany. Their coat is smooth and tight-fitting; colors are fawn or brindled, with or without white markings, which may cover the entire body, and white. Boxers are brachycephalic (they have broad, short skulls), have a square muzzle, mandibular prognathism (an underbite), very strong jaws, and a powerful bite ideal for hanging on to large prey. The Boxer was bred from the Old English Bulldog and the now extinct Bullenbeisser, and is part of the Molosser group. The Boxer is a member of the Working Group.
  Boxers were first exhibited in a dog show for St. Bernards in Munich in 1895, the first Boxer club being founded the next year. Based on 2013 American Kennel Club statistics, Boxers held steady as the seventh most popular breed of dog in the United States for the fourth consecutive year.

Highlights
  • Boxers are high-energy dogs and need a lot of exercise. Make sure you have the time, desire, and energy to give them the play and activity they need.
  • Boxers are exuberant and will greet you ecstatically.
  • Early, consistent training is critical — before your Boxer gets too big to handle!
  • Although they are large, Boxers are not "outdoor dogs." Their short noses and short hair make them uncomfortable in hot and cold weather, and they need to be kept as housedogs.
  • Boxers mature slowly and act like rambunctious puppies for several years.
  • Boxers don't just like to be around their family — they need to be around them! If left alone for too long or kept in the backyard away from people, they can become ill-tempered and destructive.
  • Boxers drool, a lot. Boxers also snore, loudly.
  • Although they have short hair, Boxers shed, especially in the spring.
  • Boxers are intelligent and respond well to firm but fun training. They also have an independent streak and don't like to be bossed around or treated harshly. You'll have the biggest success in training your Boxer if you can make it fun for him.
  • Some Boxers take their guarding duties a little too seriously, while others may not exhibit any guarding instincts at all.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • Boxers are big dogs with a big streak of mischief in their makeup. You’ll need a sense of humor to live with one.
  • Boxers are great watchdogs but not aggressive toward people unless the situation calls for it.
  • Boxers are athletic and excel in many dog sports, including agility and herding.
  • Boxers are lovers, not fighters, but they won’t back away from a showdown if another dog starts something.
  • Comparable Breeds: Bull Terrier, Bulldog
History 
  The Boxer was developed as a working breed in Germany in the late nineteenth century. He belongs to the family of bull breeds, which include the Bulldog, Bull Terrier and Dogue de Bordeaux, to name just a few.
  In his modern incarnation, the Boxer has existed for only about a century, but you can see hints of him in the dogs portrayed on old tapestries from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Those big Mastiff-type dogs may have been ancestors of the Boxer. They were known as bullenbeissers, a German word meaning “bull biter.” Bullenbeissers were used on great estates to bring down large game, and later they were employed by butchers and cattle drovers to keep livestock in line.
  The modern Boxer was born in the 1880s, when a man named George Alt, who lived in Munich, imported a brindle bullenbeisser named Flora from France. Her offspring became the foundation of the Boxer breed. It’s unclear whether the breed name comes from a corruption of the word “beisser” or is a reference to the breed’s habit of using his front paws in a fight. Boxers were trained for police work, were some of the earliest guide dogs and served in the German military during World War I as messengers and scouts.
  The American Kennel Club first registered a Boxer in 1904. The breed didn’t catch on right away, and the dislike for German breeds that occurred during World War I didn’t help matters any. It wasn’t until the 1940s and 1950s that the Boxer became a popular breed. In 1951, a Boxer named Bang Away won Best in Show at Westminster, the third Boxer to do so, and for the time, he was a rock star. You could see Bang Away’s photo in Lifeand Esquire, and when he flew to dog shows, he rode in the cabin of the plane, never in cargo. Only one other Boxer has won Westminster since the days of Bang Away, Ch. Arriba’s Prima Donna, who won in 1971.
  Boxers today are more refined and elegant than their ancestors, but they are still strong, smart, and fearless. The breed ranks seventh among those registered by the AKC.

Personality
  Boxers may look like imposing figures from afar, but up close and personal they are playful and loving family companions. Often dubbed the Peter Pan of dogs, Boxers are highly energetic, and as they grow into adulthood, they never lose the desire to romp and play like a puppy. Perpetual cuddle bugs, Boxers will try to wriggle into even the smallest spaces possible to get close to the ones they love. They love to be the center of attention and make a sound unique to their breed that some owners call a “Woo Woo.” When they want something they will make this “woo woo” sound to attract an audience.
  Protective of their family, Boxers are alert and reliable watchdogs, sounding the alarm that strangers are approaching. Their menacing, muscular appearance will deter anyone whose intent is not above board. Boxers get along well with other pets, including cats and make a loving and loyal addition to any active family.

Health 
  Some major concerns are cardiomyopathy and other heart problems, sub-aortic stenosis and thyroid. Can be prone to skin and other allergies. Sometimes prone to epilepsy. From age eight on they are more likely to get tumors than other breeds. Prone to cancer. Boxers are highly prone to mast cell tumors. Prone to arthritis, hip dysplasia, back and knee issues. These dogs may drool and snore. May have excessive flatulence, especially when fed something other than their own dog food. Some white Boxers are prone to deafness.

Care
  The Boxer’s coat needs just occasional brushing to get rid of dead hair. Daily physical and mental exercise is essential for the dog, which also loves to run. A long walk on leash or a good jog is enough to meet the dog’s exercise needs. It is not suited to live outdoors nor does it like hot weather. The dog is at its best when given a chance to spend equal time in the yard and home. Some Boxers may snore.

Living Conditions
  Boxers will do okay in an apartment if sufficiently exercised. They are fairly active indoors and do best with at least an average-sized yard. Boxers are temperature sensitive, getting easily overheated and chilling very quickly.

Exercise
  An active, athletic breed, Boxers need daily work or exercise, as well as a long brisk, daily walk. They also enjoy fetching a ball or other sessions of play.

Grooming
  The Boxer is an easy-care dog. His short, smooth coat benefits from weekly brushing with a firm bristle brush or rubber curry brush to keep it shiny and healthy and to remove dead hairs that would otherwise find their way to your clothes and furniture.
  Frequent baths are not necessary unless he gets dirty, but with the gentle dog shampoos available now, you can bathe a Boxer weekly if you want without harming his coat.
  Clean the ears as needed with a solution recommended by your veterinarian. Don’t use cotton swabs inside the ear; they can push gunk further down into it. Wipe out the ear with a cotton ball, never going deeper than the first knuckle of your finger.
   Trim the nails every couple of weeks or as needed. Don’t let them get so long that you can hear them clicking on the floor.

Children and other pets
  Boxers love kids and are great playmates for active older children. They can be too rambunctious for toddlers, however, and can accidentally knock them down in play.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Boxers can get along well with other dogs and cats, especially if they're raised with them.

Did You Know?
  White Boxers are not albinos and their coloration is not the result of a genetic mutation. In Boxers, white is just a color. But white dogs tend to burn in the sun and may be at increased risk of skin cancer.

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