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Showing posts with label blue eyes dogs. Show all posts
Showing posts with label blue eyes dogs. Show all posts

Wednesday, December 27, 2017

Everything about your Alaskan Klee Kai

Everything about your Alaskan Klee Kai
  The Alaskan Klee Kai was developed fairly recently by a woman in Alaska who took a strong interest in a small dog resembling a Husky. Over time other breeders became interested in furthering the development of the Alaskan Klee Kai; however, it is still considered a rare breed.

Overview
  Small, smart, and energetic, the Alaskan Klee Kai is a relatively new breed that looks like a smaller version of the Siberian Husky, and even the name “Klee Kai” comes from an Inuit term meaning “small dog.” While Alaskan Klee Kais may resemble larger Husky breeds, they have some key differences, especially when it comes to temperament, that distinguish it from its ancestor working class dogs of the north. 
  This breed is more suited to the life of a companion, though the Alaskan Klee Kai shares the high energy of the Huskies and demands plenty of exercise. They also tend to be shy around strangers and are prone to expressing their emotions with whines and barks. An inexperienced owner would find it difficult to take on the challenge of caring for an Alaskan Klee Kai, but for an owner that keeps up with training and physical activity, this breed is sweet, loyal, and happy to shower loved ones with affection.

Highlights
  • The words "Klee Kai" come from an Inuit term meaning "small dog," which is appropriate for this breed that is a smaller version of its Husky ancestors.
  • The breed hails from Alaska where it was developed in the 1970s and 1980s to be a companion dog, rather than a working sled dog.
  • Although it is not recognized by the American Kennel Club, Alaskan Klee Kais are a recognized breed in the United Kennel Club and the American Rare Breed Association among others.
  • Solid white Alaskan Klee Kais do exist, but breed standards do not include this coat color.
  • Although they can shed a lot, Alaskan Klee Kais do not require much grooming and mostly take care of themselves.
  • Because they are skittish around strangers, these dogs require early socialization training that should last for the rest of their lives if they are to be friendly to unfamiliar faces.
  • The high prey drive of the Alaskan Klee Kai may make them ill suited for homes with other small pets such as cats, rabbits, hamsters, etc. Though they love their human families, small children that are not taught how to interact with dogs may inadvertently hurt Alaskan Klee Kais during play or provoke them to nip or snap.
Breed standards

Dog Breed Group: Companion Dogs
UKC group: Northern Breed
Average lifespan: 12-15 years
Average size: 10 to 15 pounds
Coat appearance: Double coat
Coloration: red and white, black and white, or gray and white, though solid white 
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: families with older children, apartment, houses with/without yards, active singles and seniors
Temperament: Intelligent, energetic, loyal, curious
Comparable Breeds: Siberian Husky, American Eskimo Dog

History
  The breed was developed in Wasilla, Alaska, from the early 1970s to 1988 by Linda S. Spurlin and her family. The breed was developed with Siberian and Alaskan Huskies, using Schipperke and American Eskimo Dog to bring down the size without dwarfism. She bred these dogs in private until she released them to the general public in 1988. Originally called the Klee Kai, the breed split into Alaskan Klee Kai and Klee Kai for political reasons in 1995. 
  The breed consolidated as its current name in 2002. Though a relatively new breed the Alaskan Klee Kai has a rich history. They are extremely energetic and intelligent, and their northern heritage is evident in their appearance. In contrast to Siberian Huskies, which were originally bred as sled dogs, the Alaskan Klee Kai were bred as companion dogs. The Alaskan Klee Kai was officially recognized by the American Rare Breed Association  in 1995 and by the United Kennel Club  on January 1, 1997.



Personality
  Alaskan Klee Kais are intelligent, energetic, and loving to their families. They don't much care for strangers and require lifelong socialization training if they are to be friendly to new people. Their wariness of new faces does, however, make them excellent watchdogs. When it comes to training, Alaskan Klee Kais are quick to pick up on basic commands and may even find themselves at the top of the class. 
  They are eager to please and highly food motivated, and they are more than capable of taking on agility training, which can help burn off some of their high energy throughout the day. Once they have at least a good, long walk and a healthy play session, they're usually happy to spend the rest of the day being couch potatoes, but neglect their exercise needs, and they may become bored, anxious, and destructive. Be careful on walks, as these dogs have a high prey drive that may cause them to bolt if they see wildlife. Alaskan Klee Kais love to be the centers of attention in their families, but they will also be vocal when their needs are not being met. Though they do not tend to be overly mouthy and are generally quieter than their Husky forbears, they will bark and whine to express their displeasure, and they can be sensitive.

Health
  The Alaskan Klee Kai is considered to be quite a healthy breed with few genetic problems. However, owners should be aware that the breed is predisposed to certain conditions that they should keep an eye out for, including luxating patella, thyroid disease, heart conditions, liver shunts, factor VII deficiency, and cataracts. They may also keep their baby teeth, which can cause problems when adult teeth grow in. They may need to have these teeth removed.

Care
  When it comes to Alaskan Klee Kai care, it is very important to make sure their exercise needs are met, as they may become high strung and anxious if they do not have an outlet to burn off energy. Like any dog breed, they require regular teeth brushings, nail clippings, and ear cleanings. You should ask your veterinarian about your dog's specific needs.

Living Conditions
  Because of their size, these dogs can live in an apartment, but a house with at least a small yard is recommended.

Training
  Due to its high intelligence, the Alaskan Klee Klai typically responds well to training. These dogs are quick learners and they enjoy being given a task to complete. For this reason, Alaskan Klee Klais excel in obedience training as well as agility – agility training also gives the dog a way to exercise its brain as well as its body. Because this breed is prone to developing Small Dog Syndrome, it is essential that you start training early and that you maintain a firm and consistent hand.

Exercise Requirements
  The Alaskan Klee Klai is a very active and energetic breed that requires a significant amount of daily exercise. This breed can be adaptable to apartment life but you will need to take the dog for a long walk on a daily basis. Regular playtime is also encouraged to help this breed work off its energy.

Grooming
  Unlike many other breeds, Alaskan Klee Kais do not usually develop a dog odor, and they generally like to groom themselves, so they may not need to bathe as frequently as some other dogs. They will likely need regular brushing during the seasons in which their coats blow out, which happens before summer and winter. During this time, they tend to shed profusely, while they only shed moderately the rest of the year.

Children And Other Pets
  The Alaskan Klee Kai is a dedicated family dog that loves its humans, even children. However, they are small dogs, and children that are very young are not always taught how to interact with animals. They may injure or provoke Alaskan Klee Kais to nip. Children should always be supervised when playing with dogs, and the Alaskan Klee Kai is no exception to that rule. 
  Alaskan Klee Kais are usually good with other dogs, especially if they have been socialized early on, though they have a high prey drive. This makes them ill suited for homes that have smaller pets unless they are specifically trained to live with them.

Is the Alaskan Klee Kai the Right Breed for you?
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Moderately Easy Training: The Alaskan Klee Kai is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.
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Friday, January 13, 2017

15 Dog Breeds That Love The Snow

15 Dog Breeds That Love The Snow
  Winter is on its way here. It’s time to bring out the doggy boots, coats, and cold-weather gear to keep your pup from being miserable on those chilly walks. But some breeds aren’t miserable in the snowy weather at all. To them, it’s the most wonderful time of the year. They’re happy to eat snowflakes, chase snowballs, and make snow angel-dogs while you stand there freezing. Here are ten dog breeds who love the snow.

1. Alaskan Malamute
  The Alaskan Malamute is a descendent of the Arctic wolf, and with its thick double coat and large, tough paws, it can handle the snowiest of days. Known for pulling sleds through the snow and having a love for being outdoors, the Alaskan Malamute is a terrific companion for your polar adventures.

2. Akita
  An Akita is truly a royal pup—hailing from Japan, this breed was once only owned by the Imperial family. Statues of the Akita were also given as gifts to new parents to bring health, happiness, and a long life. This dog, originally bred as a cold-weather hunting companion with a dense undercoat and harsh outer coat, can often be independent and stubborn, but will remain protective and loyal to its family.

3. Pembroke Welsh Corgi
  Pembroke Welsh Corgis are believed to be descended from Vallhunds–Swedish cattle dogs brought by the Vikings to Wales–so you know they’re tough. They have a double coat, the undercoat being thick and covered by the longer topcoat. And they shed pretty consistently throughout the year, especially when the weather changes. This makes them well-prepared for romps in the snow, which they’ll most likely love.

4. Bernese Mountain Dog
  Originally from Switzerland, the Bernese Mountain Dog is a loyal, sweet breed that would love nothing more than to go on a nice long walk through a winter wonderland. Its cheerful attitude will definitely put on a smile on anyone's face.

5. Siberian Husky
  Famous for his sledding prowess, the Siberian Husky wears a thick double coat that makes him well-suited for snow and harsh weather. If the Siberian could have his way, his owner would love snow just as much as he does. The breed tends to thrive at winter dog sports, but he’ll usually be happy to try other sports, too. Either way, he needs plenty of exercise all year round.

6. Old English Sheepdog
  The Old English Sheepdog is known for its shaggy coat. In fact, you’ll probably have to spend lots of time grooming an Old English Sheepdog if you want to keep their fur from matting. In the warm months, they can get overheated pretty quickly, so they’ll be much happier in the winter months when their fur coats don’t make them so hot. Be careful to wipe them down before bringing them in from the snow or you’ll have lots of puddles around the house later on.

7. Newfoundland
  The Newfoundland, often referred to as a Gentle Giant, would be crushed if you headed out for a snowy hike without it. Its double, thick coat and super-sweet disposition makes it the perfect candidate to go on a winter hike. And if you happen to get a bit chilly, it would love nothing more than to snuggle up tight and warm you right up! Keep in mind that this breed sheds and drools a lot, even in the winter, so if you're a neat freak, this breed may not be for you.

8. Tibetan Mastiff
  As their name suggests, the Tibetan Mastiff is from Tibet where it is, of course, very cold. They have a thick coat suited for surviving freezing temperatures, which makes them more than able to stand up to most winter walks you’ll be taking them on. They aren’t able to handle the hot months very well, though. They are able to handle a certain level of dry heat provided they have shade and water, but these pups will be happiest when the temperature drops.

9. Pomeranian
  Pomeranians are descended from ancient breeds of the far north, which makes them a bit like a small version of the American Eskimo Dog or the Samoyed. Their undercoat is soft and fluffy, and it’s quite thick. Some owners groom the fur completely to the undercoat, which gives the Pomeranian a stuffed animal-like appearance. They do have an overcoat, too. It’s straight and shiny, and it’s a little harsh to the touch, but it protects them well from cold weather. Pomeranians can overheat easily, which means they’re right at home in the snow.

10. Labrador Retriever
  This popular family pet’s thick, water-repellant coat is ideal for keeping him dry when retrieving water fowl from frigid lakes during fall hunting season. His stocky build and short, dense double coat provides him with an effective barrier to cold weather and icy conditions however if your pooch is typically an indoor dog wintery weather should be experienced in moderation.

11. Samoyed
  The Samoyed, like the Siberian Husky, is from Siberia where it was a valuable companion for the Samoyede people. It was bred to hunt, haul sledges, herd reindeer, and cuddle up for warmth on cold nights. Their double coat is very thick and sheds constantly. With all that thick fur, they won’t want to be out in the heat for too long, but you might have trouble bringing them back inside in the winter. Especially because their white fur blends in with the snow so well, it may be hard to spot them.

12. American Eskimo Dog
  Originating from Germany, the American Eskimo was originally called the White German Spitz but was renamed after World War II, most likely for its white coat--not for any connection with Eskimos. Though this playful and compact and used to perform indoors with the Barnum and Bailey Circus, outdoor activity suits it much better; its coat resists soaking and thick ears stay warm in low temperatures.

13. Chow Chow
  Considered one of the oldest dog breeds, the Chow Chow’s thick, furry coat will keep it warm for hours during a winter excursion, and its strong, loyal personality will keep you on your toes for many years. This breed is considered a heavy shedder in certain months, so be sure to have your brushes handy.

14. German Shepherd
  The breed's popularity grew with Rin Tin Tin, the abandoned German Shepherd pup found during WWI who went on to star in TV shows and movies. Known for their herding, guarding, and police work, German Shepherds are strong, agile, hard workers that have a lot of energy and learn quickly. This breed commonly suffers from hip dysplasia, which can likely be avoided by buying from a credible breeder.

15. Kuvasz
  To be considered a true Kuvasz, this dog must always sport white fur, according to the American Kennel Club. Originating in Tibet, the Kuvasz—which means "armed guard of nobility" in Turkish—was later owned by the royal family in Hungary before finding a more "common" lifestyle as a light-footed hunter and herder. The Kuvasz's double coat makes it a perfect mountain dog, and its trainability and fearless protective instincts provide a perfect four-legged companion. A fenced-in, open yard works best for this energetic, yet possibly destructive, breed.
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Tuesday, August 2, 2016

I want a white dog with blue eyes

I want a white dog with blue eyes
  There are dog breeds that for white coat color can have blue eyes. If white coat dominate on the head, around the eyes or mouth, there is a chance that the dog will have blue eyes. Here are some dog breeds that on the white color of the coat can have blue eyes.
   Unfortunately, but there are some cases where these dogs are born deaf or hearing impairments. The researchers found that white dogs who lack pigment in the head area, causing the lack of pigment cells in the ear. It must be remembered that blue eye color is a recessive gene, which has almost all dog breeds. Therefore, any breed of dog can be born with blue eyes in spite of its breed and coat color. Even if the puppy's parents do not have  blue eyes, a puppy can have it. 

1. Wolf Hybrid
  A Wolf Hybrid can be quite skittish and does not respond well to inanimate objects, fast motion, loud noises or new people. It requires much patience. Training is not for the weak and serious consideration should be given prior to obtaining a Wolf Hybrid, as it requires firm, consistent training and ample space to roam.  If there's something you find foul and offensive you can bet a wolfdog will roll happily in it and coat itself in the funk! It is not until a Wolf Hybrid is about 18 months of age that it will start showing signs of the wolf. Wolves younger than 18 months of age are adolescents; they are playful and adaptable. They take directions readily and can bond with other species. Young wolves act more like the common dog as they have not developed into maturity. As a wolf grows out of its adolescence, its hormonal system reaches maturity and it will begin to exhibit all of the typical behaviors of the wolf.

2. Alaskan Malamute
  This great dog is similar to a timber wolf in both size and coloring. Most Alaskan malamutes weigh about 35 to 40 kilos (around 75 to 85 pounds), but some can get as large as 45 kilos (around 100 pounds).
  Alaskan malamutes have a double coat, often part white and part sable or gray. Their eyes are brown and their tails are fluffy and usually carried up.
  Like the other sled dogs, these dogs have some eye problems like retinal atrophy (PRA) and cataracts. Like a lot of other big dogs, they are prone to hip dysplasia.
Alaskan malamutes usually live about 11 years. They are well known for their ability to resist training, so make sure to take it to obedience classes and socialize it from a young age. Like Siberians, Alaskan malamutes have a lot of energy—too much for most people. While most people cannot run them on a sled, there are several alternative exercises available for them.   They are strong, so they do well in bikejoring, skijoring, and weight-pulling.

3.Siberian Husky

  Sledge dog breed is considered one of the oldest dog breeds. These dogs can be several colors, from black to white. Usually white are muzzle and belly. Eyes are blue, brown, amber color. The dogs may have different eyes - for example one blue and one brown. At present, very popular with dogs Sky-blue eyes. This is a very strong dogs that can survive in extreme cold. In terms of the character of these dogs can distinguish three features - a energetic, playful and friendly dog. These dogs love human company and do not like to be alone. They are not suitable for protection. Huskies rarely bark, but sometimes screaming just for fun. For these dogs require strenuous physical exercise, about 80-100 minutes. However, these dogs are prone to escape, so better to let go of their fenced area.


The Difference Between an Albino Dog and a White Dog
   All-white dogs have genetic markers by virtue of which the white pigment masks, or suppresses, all other colors. Albinism, on the other hand, is caused by the absence of both melanin and the enzymes that produce it. That said, some dogs exhibit characteristics of albinism without being true albinos. Let’s explore the distinctions, as plainly and legibly as possible, and see what makes an albino dog an albino.

  Albinism is rare in all animals, including dogs, and many people easily confuse white-coated dogs, or dogs that exhibit forms of albinism, for albinos. True albinism is a genetic condition in which pigmentation of eyes, coat, and skin is completely absent.
  An important distinction to draw between dogs with white coats and albino dogs is that white-coated dogs produce the color white, while albinos only appear white due to lack of pigmentation.

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