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Showing posts with label blue eyes. Show all posts
Showing posts with label blue eyes. Show all posts

Tuesday, June 26, 2018

Everything about your Pomsky

Everything about your Pomsky
  Cute, silly, and suited for apartment life, the Pomsky is a dog that likes to be the center of attention, and with their adorable looks and playful antics, they often get the adoration they crave. Their unfortunate start as a designer breed mixed between Siberian Husky and Pomeranian parents hasn’t stopped them from earning popularity with dog lovers. Unfortunately, those who rush to buy Pomsky puppies from breeders are often overwhelmed and unprepared for their needs, and dogs of this breed sometimes find themselves left at shelters or with rescue groups. 

Overview
  The Pomsky is a mixed breed the result of crossing the Siberian Husky with a Pomeranian. She is a medium sized dog with a life span of 13 to 15 years. She is bred using artificial insemination as natural breeding would be dangerous due to the size difference between the parents. She is a fun and watchful dog who is great for families with older kids, couples or singles or seniors as long as she can be given the exercise she needs.
  The Pomsky is a dog best suited for a household that does not have children or other pets unless she is going to be raised with them. Early socialization and training are important for her. If you love the look of the Husky but do not have the room or the energy for a purebred the Pomsky is a great though expensive substitute.

Highlights
  • Pomsky are very trainable, but may inherit some stubbornness from the Siberian Husky, so they are best suited for experienced dog owners.
  • The Pomsky's thick coat makes it more tolerant of cold weather than most other kinds of lap dogs.
  • Pomskies are vocal dogs that tend to be yappy if they aren't properly trained.
  • The coat of the breed comes in a variety of colors, just like its parent breeds.
  • Socialization with other dogs and people is important, especially at an early age.
  • Pomsky are highly adaptable, don't have large space requirements, and only have moderate exercise needs, making them good apartment dogs.
Other Quick Facts

  • A Pomsky typically has a soft, fluffy, silky coat, prick ears and a furry tail that swishes over the back.
  • The Pomsky is usually bred from a Siberian Husky female and a Pomeranian male. Breedings are usually done through artificial insemination because of the size difference in the two breeds.
  • The size of a Pomsky can vary dramatically, from toy size to medium size. Like their parent breeds, the dogs can come in many different patterns and colors, such as grey/white, brown red, blue merle, blonde and more.
Breed standards
Dog Breed Group: Mixed Breed Dogs
Average lifespan: 12 to 15 years
Average size: 20-30 lb
Coat appearance: Fluffy, soft, wavy, double
Coloration: black-and-white coloration,this breed can exhibit a wide range of colors including black, grey, brown, red, blue, blonde, and more
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with older children, singles and seniors, apartments and houses with/without yards
Temperament: Loving, friendly, energetic, playful
Comparable Breeds: Pomeranian, Siberian Husky

History
  Pomsky breeders have formed the Pomsky Club of America, with the goal of achieving a recognized purebred dog. This can take years, however, and will not be accomplished any time soon.
  But crossing two breeds over and over does not a breed make. To achieve consistency in appearance, size and temperament, breeders must select the puppies with the traits they want and breed them over several generations for the traits to become set.
Crossbreeds such as Pomskies have become popular over the past 10 or 20 years as people seek out dogs that are different from the everyday Yorkie or Poodle. It’s also often claimed that crossbreeds are hypoallergenic or have fewer health problems or will carry the best traits of each breed, but this just isn’t true.
  Whatever his breed, cross or mix, love your dog for what he is: a unique and loving companion.

Personality
  The Pomsky is a bit of a comedian and tends to know that its cute antics will be met with plenty of adoration from human onlookers. They are highly adaptable to change, and their moderate exercise needs make them fairly suited to apartment living, so long as they get at least one long walk per day. That said, they tend to inherit their Husky parents' chatty howling and whining tendencies along with their Pomeranian parents' penchant for yapping.   This makes them very vocal dogs that may get on the neighbors' nerves. Also, they shed a ton, so be prepared to find hair everywhere and have some lint rollers and a vacuum cleaner at the ready. Pomskies tend to latch on to one favorite family member, though they may get along with all humans in the household. Socialization is very important and should begin at an early age. Pomskies can be nervous around strangers if they haven't been properly socialized.

Health
Since the breed is so new, not much is known about any common Pomsky health conditions. Keep in mind, though, that as is common with most mixed breeds, any hereditary health conditions that show up in either the Pomerian  or the Husky  may show up in your Pomsky, as well.

Care
As with any other breed, Pomskies need to be groomed on a regular basis to make sure their coats and skin are kept in top condition. They also need to be given regular daily exercise to ensure they remain fit and healthy. On top of this, dogs need to be fed good quality food that meets all their nutritional needs throughout their lives.

Living Conditions
The Pomsky’s generally small size makes this breed the perfect companion for someone living in an apartment all the way up to a larger home.

Training
Pomskies are highly intelligent and respond well to reward based training methods. However, they can sometimes inherit the Pomeranian’s stubbornness and the willfulness of the Siberian Husky and should therefore be handled with calm and assertive leadership. Failure to do so can result in “small dog syndrome” and other behavioral problems. For instance, Pomskies can be prone to resource guarding like the Pomeranians, and catching early signs of this behavioral problem will help you eliminate before it becomes a serious issue.
  For most new dog owners, it’s important to start with the basics such as potty training and learning to walk on a leash. Depending on the breeder you’ve got your Pomsky from and the puppy’s age, they might already know a trick or two, but it’s also highly likely you’ll need to be the one that that housetrains them. Training a puppy is not an easy feat, but it’s important to teach your Pomsky fur baby manners while they’re still young. If they sniff out you’re not an alpha, they’ll shamelessly exploit your weak side to their advantage- as any smart pupper would do!

Exercise
  Pomskies are high energy, intelligent dogs, much like both parent breeds. As such they must be given the right amount of daily exercise and as much mental stimulation as possible for them to be truly happy, well-rounded dogs. They need to be given a minimum of 30 to 40 minutes exercise a day, but more would be better so that boredom does not set in which could lead to a Pomsky developing some unwanted behavioural issues around the home.
  A shorter walk in the morning would be fine, but a longer more interesting one in the afternoon is a must. These dogs also like to be able to roam around a back garden as often as possible so they can really let off steam. However, the fencing must be extremely secure to keep these energetic dogs in because if they find a weakness in the fence, they will soon escape out and get into all sorts of trouble.

Grooming
  A Pomsky has a double coat that is usually soft, fluffy and silky. Brush or comb the Pomsky coat with a bristle brush at least weekly to distribute skin oils and prevent or remove mats and tangles.
  Bathe a Pomsky as needed. That might be weekly , monthly or somewhere in between.
Twice a year he “blows coat” as it’s called, losing a great deal of hair so new hair can grow in. This period can last up to three months during each shedding season — typically spring and fall. Brushing him daily at this time will help to ensure that loose fur comes out when you want it to and helps to keep it off your clothing and furniture.
  Other grooming needs include trimming his nails every few weeks, keeping his ears clean and dry and brushing his teeth regularly — daily if you can — with a vet-approved pet toothpaste. Small dogs can be especially prone to periodontal disease.

Children And Other Pets
  Pomskies are often wary of small children who may not be properly trained on how to handle animals, and they can nip if they feel uncomfortable or threatened. They can get along with other dogs if they are socialized, especially if they have been raised with them, though the high prey drive they inherit from the Husky means they might like to give chase to smaller animals like cats. It is best to socialize them early, especially if you plan to have them in a household with children or other pets.

Fun Facts About the Pomsky
  • The Pomsky is usually made by crossing a female Siberian Husky with a male Pomeranian to avoid complications caused by the smaller Pomeranian bearing a litter of larger puppies.
  • There is no way to predict which characteristics the Pomsky will inherit from each parent breed, but many Pomskies become protective of their owners and are skittish around children – they may not be the best family pet.
  • Though the black-and-white Husky-like coloration is the most popular for Pomskies, these dogs can range in coat type and length as well as color, including shades of brown, red, and even blonde.
  • Is the Pomsky a vulnerable breed? No, they have become one of the more popular cross breeds thanks to their kind natures and charming looks
  • A Pomsky’s sire is a Pomeranian and their dam is a Siberian Husky to avoid birthing complications
  • They come in lots of sizes, but prospective owners should be careful when considering buying an extra small Pomsky because of the health issues associated with their size
Did You Know?
Pomskies can be smart and learn quickly, especially when motivated by praise and food rewards.
  
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Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Everything about your Weimaraner

Everything about your Weimaraner
  A descendant from the Bloodhound, the Weimaraner is most known for its role on Sesame Street where it was often dressed in people's clothes during short skits. Bred in Germany to hunt large game, this breed is now an excellent bird pointer and retriever. Imported to the states in the 1920s, Weimaraners are wonderful with children and make excellent family pets.
  Originally bred as a gundog to handle big game like deer and bear, the "Silver Ghost" was a highly sought-after dog breed in its native Germany. Today, these elegant but demanding dogs can still be found out on the hunting grounds, but can also make a fine family friend if well exercised.


Overview
  You may not know his name, but you probably recognize his silvery gray snout and long ears, a face made famous by Weimaraner photographer William Wegman. His distinctive look aside, the Weimaraner isn’t an ornament — he’s an active dog, with a deep need to hunt and connect with his human family.
  In fact, there are two things a prospective owner needs to know about the Weimaraner: He has no “off” switch, and he’s not happy when left alone. Bred in Germany as a hunting dog and a family companion, the Weimaraner would love nothing more than to spend the day hunting with you — all day long, every single day. Failing that, he’ll settle for obedience training, agility, hiking, or participating in canine sports, just as long as it means that he can be active with you.
  If you’re getting the idea that Weimaraners tend to attach to their owners like Velcro, you’re right. Separation anxiety is a serious problem in this breed; some Weimaraners become so distraught when left to their own devices that they bark, dig, escape, and even injure themselves. They can also be stubborn, demanding, and tough to house-train. They’re frequently a hazard to cats and other small pets, and if they don’t get a lot of daily exercise, they go stir crazy.
  So why even have one? The answer is simple: They’re incredibly intelligent, loyal dogs who bond deeply with their owners. For some people, the depth of that relationship, coupled with the unique appearance of the breed, makes them the only dog to consider. To see if the Weimaraner is the right breed for you, take the Weimaraner Club of America’s interactive quiz.

Highlights
  • Weimaraners were bred to have a lot of energy and stamina. Be prepared to provide them with lots of exercise and mental stimulation.
  • Weims aren't a soft-mouthed dog like a Golden Retriever and some have a low tolerance for small, furry animals, such as rabbits, and even cats and dogs. Until you know your dog well, watch him carefully when small animals are in his presence.
  • Weims are high-strung dogs and can suffer from severe separation anxiety. If left alone for too long, they may bark, become destructive, or even injure themselves.
  • Although Weimaraners are hunting dogs, they don't like living outdoors. They require a lot of attention and want to be close to you.
  • Weims often are suspicious of strangers and can be unacceptably aggressive. Socializing them to many different people and situations when they are puppies and throughout their lives is critical.
  • Weimaraners are intelligent and they think for themselves. Firm, consistent, gentle training must continue throughout their lives.
  • Weimaraners can be difficult to housetrain. Crate training is recommended.
  • Unethical breeders may advertise blue or black Weims as "rare" to attract buyers and will charge more for pups of these colors, but the truth is that blue and black Weimaraners are disqualified in the breed standard.
  • Weims are intelligent and can learn quickly, but if their intelligence and energy aren't channeled constructively, they may learn some things you don't want them to know, such as how to open doors and escape.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • Weimaraners aren’t suited to apartment life — they need a home with a yard and an owner who won’t scold them for digging up moles and mice.
  • The Weimaraner’s beautiful coat is a snap to maintain, but it sheds.
  • Weimaraners love to play in the water, and they drip copious amounts it when they drink.
  • They are talented escape artists who excel at breaking out of enclosures, jumping fences, and figuring out how to unlatch doors and gates.
  • The Weimaraner has a mind of his own, so he needs consistent training throughout his life to reinforce that you’re the one in charge.
  • Females weigh between 55 to 70 pounds, while males can weigh in at 85 pounds.
Breed standards
AKC group: Sporting group
UKC group: Gun Dog group
Average lifespan: 10 - 12 years
Average size: 50 - 70 pounds
Coat appearance: Short and smooth
Coloration: Various shades of gray, silver
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Athletic build; blue, gray or amber eyes; folded straight ears; gray-colored nose; long legs with small, webbed paws
Possible alterations: May have a pink-colored nose.
Comparable Breeds: Greyhound, Vizsla
History 
  Members of Germany’s Weimar court created the breed in the early 19th century. They wanted a dog who possessed courage, intelligence, and good scenting abilities in order to hunt big game. It remains a mystery just how they achieved their dream dog, but it’s believed that several breeds played a role, including the Bloodhound, English Pointer, German Shorthaired Pointer, blue Great Dane, the silver-gray chicken dog, and the red Schweisshunde, a stellar scent hound. The result was a dog with speed, stamina, and the versatility to switch gears from hunting to pointing and retrieving upland game birds and waterfowl when big game was scarce.
  The American Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1943. In Germany, the Weimaraner is still used to hunt furry and feathered prey, as well as retrieve on land and in the water. In the United States, he doesn’t compete in retrieving trials, although he is used as a personal hunting dog. His popularity is evidenced by his AKC registration ranking, which has held steady at 32nd for the past decade, with a slight rise to 29th in 2005.


Personality
  Early tales about the Weimaraner made it seem as if the dog came fully trained and was perfect in all respects. Even today, many people still hold this belief about the breed. Unfortunately for them, there's no such thing as a dog that comes programmed with good behavior.
  The typical Weimaraner is friendly, fearless, alert, and obedient, all traits that make him an excellent companion and watchdog. On the flip side, he's assertive, smart, restless, and willful. This is a dog who will take over the household if you give him half a chance. He'll chew, bark, chase cats, and steal the roast off the counter — if you don't give him the socialization, training, and structure he needs throughout his life.
  Aggression and shyness are temperament flaws that are seen in this breed. They must be dealt with early and may require the assistance of a behaviorist or experienced trainer to avoid serious behavior problems such as biting.
  Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner. Always meet at least one of the parents — usually the mother is the one who's available — to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.
  Like every dog, Weimaraners need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. For the Weim, however, socialization should continue throughout his life. Socialization helps ensure that your Weimaraner puppy grows up to be a well-rounded, outgoing, friendly dog and stays that way.   Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.


Health
  According to the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals, Weimaraners enjoy low rates of dysplasia. The breed is ranked 102nd of 153 total breeds and has a very high test rate and a very high percentage of excellent rating among those dogs tested. It is generally recommended to acquire Weimaraners only from breeders who have their dogs' hips tested using OFA or PennHIP methods.
  As a deep-chested dog, the Weimaraner is prone to bloat or gastric torsion, a very serious condition that can cause painful and rapid death when left untreated. It occurs when the stomach twists itself, thereby pinching off blood vessels and the routes of food traveling in or out. Symptoms include signs of general distress, discomfort, no bowel movement or sounds, and a swollen stomach. Immediate medical attention is imperative when bloat occurs and surgery is the only option if it is caught early enough.
  One way to help prevent bloat is to spread out the Weimaraner's feedings to at least twice daily and to avoid any vigorous exercise an hour before or after meals. It is also recommended that the dog's feeding dish not be placed on a raised platform to discourage it from gobbling its food too quickly and keep air from entering the stomach. Raised food bowls have been found to more than double the risk of bloat in large dogs.
  Skin allergies can affect some dogs. Take your dog to the vet if he starts to lose hair, itch constantly or develop rashes. You should also check for dog for parasites, as they can cause an allergic reaction in addition to the normal irritation from bites.



Living Conditions
  Weimaraners will do okay in an apartment if they are sufficiently exercised. They are relatively inactive indoors and will do best with at least a large yard. They are not suited to outdoor kennel life.

Exercise
  These are powerful working dogs with great stamina. They need to be taken for a daily, long walk or jog. In addition, they need plenty of opportunities to run free. Do not exercise them after meals. It is best to feed a dog after a long walk, as soon as it cools down.

Grooming
  The Weimaraner’s short coat is easy to maintain: Brush it with a rubber curry brush at least once a week. The brush removes dead hairs that would otherwise end up on your floor, furniture, and clothing. Weimaraners shed, so the more you brush, the less hair you’ll have flying around. And bathe your Weimaraner only when he’s dirty, which shouldn’t be very often.
  The Weimaraner is a hunting dog, so good foot condition is important. Keep his toenails trimmed short. Last but not least, brush his teeth with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Is this breed right for you?
  Characteristically happy and affectionate, the Weimaraner will do best in a home in which it has a large yard to play and is given a sufficient amount of exercise. If not given enough activity, it will become disorderly and misbehave. Due to inactivity while in the home, it does OK with apartment life but is a loud barker. In need of training, this breed needs a happy and calm owner who is never harsh or abrasive. Known for becoming overexcited, it is best that it learns commandments for when this type of behavior is appropriate. The Weimaraner is awesome with children but does not do well with other small animals.

Children and other pets
  For an active older child who's familiar with dogs, a Weimaraner can be a great companion. They're far too rambunctious for toddlers, however, and may chase small children who are running.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Weimaraners are not the best choice for families with cats, small dogs, rabbits, hamsters, gerbils, or birds. Weimaraners have a strong prey drive and it's difficult, if not impossible, to redirect that instinct. They will go after and kill, if possible, any small or large furry animals they see.

 Did You Know?
  “Blue” Weimaraners can’t compete in the American show ring, but the color is considered normal and is not associated with any health problems. “Brown” Weimaraners, on the other hand, are not purebred Weimaraners, but rather German Shorthaired Pointer/Weimaraner mixes.

A dream day-in-the-life
  This happy-go-lucky breed will love to wake up surrounded by its loved ones. Going outside for a romp in the yard, the Weimaraner will happily hang out indoors with the family for the remainder of the day. Keeping its guard up as the good watchdog that it is, it'll be excited as ever when you two go for your daily run at sunset.


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Friday, May 2, 2014

Everything about your Siberian Husky

Everything about your Siberian Husky
  The Siberian Husky is a beautiful dog breed with a thick coat that comes in a multitude of colors and markings. Their blue or multi-colored eyes and striking facial masks only add to the appeal of this breed, which originated in Siberia. It is easy to see why many are drawn to the Siberian's wolf-like looks, but be aware that this athletic, intelligent dog can be independent and challenging for first-time dog owners. Huskies also put the "H" in Houdini and need a fenced yard that is sunk in the ground to prevent escapes.

Overview
  The Siberian husky combines power, speed and endurance, enabling it to carry a light load at moderate speed over a great distance. It is moderately compact, slightly longer than it is tall, and of definite Northern heritage. It is quick and light on its feet, with a smooth and effortless stride exhibiting both good reach and drive. It has a double coat of medium length, with a soft, dense undercoat and a straight, somewhat flat-lying outer coat. Its expression is keen but friendly, interested and even mischievous. 
  Fun-loving, adventurous, alert, independent, clever, stubborn, mischievous and obstinate — all describe the Siberian husky. This breed loves to run and will roam if given the chance. It may be aggressive toward strange dogs, but it is generally good with other household dogs. In fact, it is a very social dog that must have human or canine companionship. It may chase strange cats or livestock. Some howl, dig and chew.


Breed standards
AKC group: Working
UKC group: Standard
Average lifespan: 12 - 14 years
Average size: 35 - 60 pounds
Coat appearance: Thick and dense, can withstand -58 to -76 degrees F
Coloration: Black to pure white, variety of markings
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Strong, compact body; head proportionate to body; erect, triangular ears; oval-shaped eyes vary between blue, hazel and brown depending on coat color; nose is black or pinkish depending on coat color; curved tail; snowshoe paws have hair in between pads for protection from cold
Possible alterations: May have a long-haired, wooly coat; some dogs have one blue eye and one brown
Comparable Breeds: Akita, Alaskan Malamute
Highlights
  • Depending on your climate, Siberian Huskies are generally low shedders except during the times of year when they blow their coat, meaning they drop large amounts of hair all at once. This happens roughly twice a year, more if you live in warmer climates, and when it does, the breed becomes a heavy shedder for about a three-week stretch.
  • Siberian Huskies are not recommended for apartment living, but some do quite well in apartments if they are properly trained and exercised.
  • Siberian Huskies are known escape artists and have been known to wander away and disappear. They can jump fences, break tie-out chains, slip collars and find any other way to escape. They need a high fenced yard and the fence should also be buried several inches below ground to prevent the Husky from digging his way out.
  • Siberian Huskies can be very destructive both inside and out. If they are left uncrated inside, the breed can destroy a house and cause a wide variety of damage. Outside, they enjoy digging and will dig up yards and flower gardens alike. A dog that is given a place to dig in the yard is much happier and so are you.
  • While they enjoy howling, Siberian Huskies rarely bark and they will not alert bark if someone comes onto your property. This makes them an unsuitable watchdog. The rap on Huskies is that they would aid a burglar before posing any threat.
  • Siberian Huskies are not a breed for the new or timid owner. They need a strong owner who will maintain an alpha position in the home. They need obedience training from a young age and can be a difficult and stubborn breed to train.
  • Siberian Huskies are very curious and can become injured or lost while they are exploring something new.
  • Affectionate and good natured describes the Siberian Husky. Generally, they do well with children although young children should never be left alone with any breed. They also get along with people and do well in homes with multiple dogs.
  • Siberian Huskies were bred to need very little food to survive. This still applies today and the Siberian Husky does not need a high level of calories per day. It is important to ask your Siberian Husky's breeder what they recommended for a serving helping and to follow their advice.
  • Huskies cannot be allowed to run off leash during walks. They will run away and will also chase other small animals.
  • Due to their beauty, Siberian Huskies are one of the most wrongly purchased breeds around. Many do not take into consideration their temperaments and particular quirks and are often left with an unruly, albeit beautiful, dog. Many Siberian Huskies are either lost, killed, or given to shelters due to uninformed owners. If you are thinking of purchasing a Siberian Husky, take a lot of time learning about the breed. Visit some Siberian Husky breeders or shelter dogs, read books, talk to other owners and possibly foster if you feel you can. If after all your experiences, you feel you still want a Siberian Husky, take the time to decide on whether you should adopt a rescue or a puppy. Follow your breeder's advice and remember that this beautiful dog will make your life an adventure and not always a good one.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Did You Know?
  The Disney adventure movie “Eight Below” is based on the true story of the 1957 Japanese expedition to the South Pole and stars six Siberian Huskies.



Is this breed right for you?
  Sweet by nature and friendly to all people, the Siberian Husky isn't much of a watchdog, but he is a gentle soul. Requiring cool weather due to his winter coat, it's best that he does not live in warm climates. Shedding only twice a year, the Siberian Husky makes for a good inside dog. He requires a good amount of physical activity and does best with a larger fenced-in yard. Doing best with specialized training, he requires a master that is firm with him. Needing a lot of attention and socialization, a lonely Siberian Husky is known to howl and become destructive. Avoid any such issues by partaking in physical activity prior to leaving him alone. Excelling with other Siberian Huskies around, he can learn to enjoy other breeds if he is raised with them.


History  
  The Siberian Husky is not a dog-wolf hybrid. The original dog was developed about half a million years ago by the Chukchi people in Siberia. He was a working dog who pulled heavy sleds over long distances. The Chukchi tribe lived inland and had to travel to the sea to hunt. They needed a way to get a full sled of walrus meat back home. A sledding dog was just the answer. The Chukchi women took care of the dogs, so the dogs were always around children.
  In the early 1900s, the dogs were brought to Alaska to compete in long-distance races, notably the All-Alaska Sweepstakes. Known as Siberians after their homeland, they gained fame for their sledding capabilities and began to be used to deliver mail as well as race.
  The Siberian Husky’s greatest feat came in 1925 when people in Nome, Alaska, suffered a diphtheria epidemic in the middle of winter. Antitoxin was needed desperately. A long-range relay of about 20 mushers brought the antitoxin from Anchorage to Nome in six days, nearly 700 miles in temperatures that hovered around 40 degrees below zero. The run brought fame to the breed.
  Siberian Huskies were used on the Byrd Antarctic Expeditions, as well as in the U.S. Army’s arctic search-and-rescue efforts during World War II. Many Siberian Huskies were assembled and trained at Chinook Kennels in New Hampshire for use on the Byrd Antarctic Expedition beginning in 1928. Siberians also performed gallantly in the Army during World War II as part of the Air Transport Command’s Arctic Search and Rescue Unit.
  Today the Siberian is still famous as a great sled dog who can win races, but he’s also a terrific family pet and companion. He ranks 18th among the breeds registered by the American Kennel Club.

Personality
  Siberian Huskies are pack dogs, and they need an owner who is the clear leader of the pack. This makes training easier because you will find that your dog respects you, but don't be surprised if he tests the limits of your position in the pack and tries to take control from time to time.
  When this happens, it's important not to give into their pushiness. Assert yourself as leader — not by bullying or hitting — but by confirming the ground rules with clarity and consistency.
  Making your dog wait to eat is one of the best ways to establish your leadership role. The Husky will view you as the keeper of all valuable resources — food, treats, toys and other canine assets.
  This high-energy breed can be destructive both indoors and out — especially when bored or not given adequate exercise. They will demolish a house if they are left alone and there has even been a case of a Siberian Husky chewing through a cement wall.
  They will dig up flower gardens and yards alike, but they can be trained to dig in a specific spot in the yard. It is better for everyone if you merely teach your dog to dig in one spot instead of trying to break him of that habit.
  Nonetheless, they can be quite charming with their mischievous and playful nature. They are also quite social and love to show off their talents.
  Siberian Huskies do not bark — that's the good news. Here's the bad: they do enjoy howling, which can be very frustrating for your neighbors. Unless you have a properly trained and well-exercised Siberian Husky, they do not make ideal pets for apartments.
  Another caution: although Huskies are adored for being friendly and gentle, they make lousy watchdogs. Unfortunately, they are not overly suspicious of strangers, including burglars. The fact is that they tend to love everybody.
  Temperament doesn't occur in a vacuum. It's affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner.
  Always meet at least one of the parents — usually the mother is the one who's available — to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.
  Like every dog, Siberian Huskies need early exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Siberian puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.
  Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.

Children and other pets
  Huskies make great pets for households with children. They can be very tolerant of children, but like all other dogs, should be supervised when around young children.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Siberian Huskies do get along with other dogs but it is still important to take your puppy to socialization classes. This gets them used to other dogs and also to people, although they are also very affectionate to strangers. Socialization teaches puppies how to behave and greet other dogs and their owners.
  Keep in mind the history of this breed. The harsh conditions in Siberia created a strong prey drive in this breed because food was often hard to find. As a result, many Huskies today maintain that prey drive toward small animals such as squirrels, rabbits, and cats. Some Huskies, however, thrive in multi-pet households, especially when they are raised with other pets from puppyhood.

Health
  A 1999 ASPCA publication gives the life span of the Siberian Husky as 12 to 14 years. Health issues in the breed are mainly genetic, such as seizures and defects of the eye (juvenile cataracts, corneal dystrophy, canine glaucoma and progressive retinal atrophy) and congenital laryngeal paralysis. Hip dysplasia is not often found in this breed; however, as with many medium or larger-sized canines, it can occur. The Orthopedic Foundation for Animals currently has the Siberian Husky ranked 155th out of a possible 160 breeds at risk for hip dysplasia, with only two percent of tested Siberian Huskies showing dysplasia.
  Siberian Huskies used for sled racing may also be prone to other ailments, such as gastric disease, bronchitis or bronchopulmonary ailments ("ski asthma"), and gastric erosions or ulcerations.
  Modern Siberian Huskies registered in the US are largely the descendants of the 1930 Siberia imports and of Leonhard Seppala’s dogs, particularly Balto. The limited number of registered foundational dogs has led to some discussion about their vulnerability to the founder effect.

Care
  Siberian Huskies need to be exercised 30 to 60 minutes daily to keep them from becoming bored. They make excellent jogging companions, but should not be exercised in hot weather. Surprisingly, they need only a small (but secure) backyard to expend their energy.
  Bottom line: Siberian Huskies need to be working to stay happy. Usually just maintaining your own active life through hiking and other outdoor sports will keep you Siberian Husky healthy, happy and out of trouble.
  As mentioned earlier, training is a must with this breed and you may want to invest in more advanced obedience classes. This can be difficult for many owners and trainers as the breed is very intelligent and will determine the difference between classes and home.
  They will behave wonderfully at class, following all instructions and commands, but at home they may revert back to the stubborn dog that stole your heart. This can be frustrating, but you will find that patience, time, and a little of your own stubbornness will pay off.
  Crate training is an important tool that is often recommended by breeders. It keeps you dog and puppy safe and also gives them their own safe haven to retreat to when they are feeling overwhelmed or tired. A crate should never be used as a punishment.
  Leash training is also a must as Siberian Huskies should never be left off leash when they are not in a fenced area. They love to run and will do so without any thought of how far away you are. You can easily lose your Siberian Husky if he decides to chase something or simply enjoy a heartfelt run. Siberian Huskies do have a high prey drive and that is another reason why they should be leashed during walks.

Grooming
  The Siberian should look “well furred” according to the breed standard, and indeed he does. He has a medium-length double coat. The soft, dense undercoat is topped with straight guard hairs that lie smooth. That double coat means that the Siberian sheds. Oh, yes, he sheds. He sheds throughout the year; once or twice a year he undergoes a process called “blowing coat,” which is just what it sounds like. During this period you may feel that it is snowing gray and white hair. A shedding blade or coat rake will become your best ally.
  That said, the Siberian is actually pretty easy to groom. Outside of shedding season, brush him occasionally with a slicker brush to remove dead hair. Trim the hair between the foot pads. That’s all. A bath is almost never necessary. The Siberian is a very clean dog with little to no odor.
  The rest is basic care. Trim his nails as needed, usually every week or two if he doesn’t wear them down naturally with all his running around. Brush his teeth regularly with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Famous Siberians
  Siberians gained in popularity with the story of the "Great Race of Mercy," the 1925 serum run to Nome, which made dogs Balto and Togo famous. Though Balto is the more famous of the two, and was the dog to deliver the serum to Nome after running the final 53-mile leg, it was Togo who made the longest run of the relay, guiding his musher Leonhard Seppala on a 91-mile journey that included crossing the deadly Norton Sound to Golovin.
  Several purebred Siberian Huskies portrayed Diefenbaker, the "half-wolf" companion to RCMP Constable Benton Fraser, in the CBS/Alliance Atlantis TV series Due South.
  In 1960, the US Army undertook a project to construct an under the ice facility for defense and space research, Camp Century, part of Project Iceworm involved a 150+ crew who also brought with them an unofficial mascot, a Siberian Husky named Mukluk.
  Siberian Huskies are the mascots of the athletic teams of several schools and colleges, including Northern Illinois University (Northern Illinois Huskies), the University of Connecticut (Connecticut Huskies, Jonathan) and University of Washington (Washington Huskies, Harry).

A dream day in the life of a Siberian Husky
  The Siberian Husky loves to wake up at the crack of dawn ready for action. Bred to work, he's ready to pull sleighs and tromp in the snow for hours on end. Needing only a moderate amount of food, he'll continue engaging in play or running with his master until the day has ended. Visiting with neighbors and anyone who comes to the house, the Siberian Husky enjoys socialization. Ending his day cuddled at the foot of the bed, he'll be happy to have spent his day with his master.

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