LUV My dogs: bichon frise

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Showing posts with label bichon frise. Show all posts
Showing posts with label bichon frise. Show all posts

Friday, December 22, 2017

Everything about your Coton de Tulear

Everything about your Coton de Tulear
  This cute member of the Bichon family hails from the African island nation of Madagascar, where he is variously said to have arrived via shipwreck, pirates, traders or sailors, and then to have mated with local dogs. He is usually gentle and friendly, but be prepared for lots of grooming.

Overview
  “Coton” is the French word for cotton. Like the name suggests, the most conspicuous feature of the Coton de Tulear is its coat, which is cottony or fluffy rather than silky. It has a long topcoat. The fluffy hair covers the thin, lightly-muscled forelegs. Colors come in white and black, and white and tri-colored. Some have slightly yellowish markings on the ears.
  Cotons are happy dogs that thrive on human companionship. Puppy kindergarten and obedience training are recommended. They should not be left unattended for long periods of time. They are extremely sturdy and versatile, excelling in all types of dog activities, from agility to therapy. The breed gets along well with other dogs, cats and children provided that proper socialization is given.

Highlights
  • The Coton de Tulear originated on the island of Madagascar and is related to the Bichon Frise and the Maltese.
  • The Coton loves being with people and dislikes being separated from them.
  • The Coton is smart and takes well to training. He's an enthusiastic participant in agility and obedience competitions.
  • The Coton is a hardy dog, but he's a companion breed who should live indoors. He's particularly well-suited to apartment living.
  • Cotons enjoy playing and going for walks, but they adjust their activity to their people's level.
  • Cotons require brushing several times a week to prevent mats and tangles from forming. Bathe them as needed, weekly or monthly.
  • Coton puppies need extra grooming while their adult coats are coming in, usually between seven and 15 months of age.
Quick Facts

  • Cotons have dark eyes with an engaging expression, black lips and a black nose. The face is adorned with a prominent beard and mustache, and hair falls over the eyes. Floppy ears are covered in long, flowing hair.
  • A Coton’s coat may be white (sometimes with champagne-colored patches), black and white, or tricolor (mostly white with champagne patches and a dusting of black hairs).
  • The Coton is the official dog of Madagascar and has appeared on that country’s stamps.
Breed standards
AKC group: Non-Sporting
UKC group: Companion
Average lifespan: 14-16 years
Average size:  8-13 lb
Coat appearance: medium-to-long, fluffy, cotton-like coat that is considered hair rather than fur
Coloration: white (sometimes with tan markings; all white is preferred by show breeders); black and white; and tricolor. 
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Families with children, singles, seniors, apartments, houses with/without yards
Temperament: Lively, playful, intelligent, affectionate
Comparable Breeds: Bichon Frise, Maltese

History
  Small, fluffy, white-coated dogs have been favored companions for more than 2,000 years. Being portable, they quickly spread throughout the known world, becoming a little different in each place they settled. These Bichon dogs, as they became known, often took their names from the places they were found. One is the Coton de Tulear, from Tulear, Madagascar.
  How they actually came to be is unclear. One tale suggests that the dogs swam ashore after a shipwreck and then mated with local dogs. Others claim that the little white dogs were brought to the island by visitors, whether those were sailors, pirates, traders or diplomats. Whatever the case, they are said to have a 300-year history there and eventually became known as the Royal Dog of Madagascar.
  The Federation Cynologique Internationale recognized the Coton as a distinct breed in 1970. The Coton de Tulear Club of America (now the Madagascar Coton de Tulear Club of America) was formed in 1976. The American Kennel Club recognized the breed in 2014 through another club, the United States of America Coton de Tulear Club.  



Personality
  The happy and boisterous Coton is a people-pleaser, who wants nothing more than to spend time with his humans. He forms strong bonds with family members and doesn't like to be separated from them.
  He's smart and easy to train, responding well to praise, play, and food rewards. He'll play the clown for attention, which he loves. Cotons may bark once or twice if the doorbell rings or they see something interesting, but they don't generally bark just for the fun of it. Guests and intruders alike run the risk of being licked to death.
  Females are more independent than males and often rule over them.
Like every dog, Cotons need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences. Socialization helps ensure your Coton puppy grows up to be a well-adjusted, happy dog.

Health Problems
  The Coton de Tulear is a relatively health breed. There are a few issues seen in this breed, but they are not widespread. These include Neo-Natal Ataxia, Luxating patellas, Hip Dysplasia and Progressive Retinal Atrophy.

Care
  The Coton is a hardy dog who enjoys playing in all types of weather, including snow and rain. But he should always live indoors with his people (as should all dogs).
He's well-suited to living in any environment, from apartments to ranch houses, but if he has a yard it should be fenced so he doesn't wander off — or get stolen away by someone who admires him as much as you do.
  Some people find the Coton difficult to housetrain, but given a regular schedule, frequent outings to do his business, and praise when he potties in the right place, a Coton can pick it up very quickly.
  Crate-training can help him learn to wait until he's taken outside to potty, as well prevent him from getting into trouble when you're not around to supervise.
Cotons take well to training, especially when it's presented in a positive manner. Reward him with praise, play, and treats, and let him know what a great job he's done. Remember that his goal is to please you.

Living Conditions
  The Coton is good for apartment life. They are fairly active indoors and will do okay without a yard.

Training
  The Coton de Tulear is a real people-pleaser and he’ll want to please you when it comes to training. Because this breed is intelligent, you’ll find that your Coton picks up on basic training quickly. Use positive training techniques and be sure to reward him with praise, play, and treats. After the basics have been mastered, move on to other challenges, such as agility training, doggy dancing and tracking exercises.
  Although they are easily trained, the Coton can have issues picking up the finer points of house-breaking. Crate training will help your dog learn where it’s okay to do his business.

Exercise and Activity
  The Coton is often content with being lazy and curling up next to you, but he does enjoy and can use exercise and activity. The Coton used to run alongside his master on horseback and has often been well-regarded for his stamina and durability. Cotons may look like frou frou dogs, but they can walk over various terrain, love an expedition on a wooded trail, will welcome a long walk, or a hearty, fast paced activity like Agility or just a rousing game of fetch or chase. Cotons have good speed, especially for their size, and can jump well for their size also.
  As with many dogs, a good exercise routine can help keep excess energy away, help give them a more fulfilling day, and satisfy an instinctive need to wander, explore, and leave "pee-mail". In addition, regular outings can give them more opportunities for socialization, both with dogs and people, which can be very important if you have a Coton that's on the shier side of the personality scale.
  Don't forget the mental exercise as well. Remember that the Coton loves a mental challenge and that will also help to burn off energy, often times even faster than a physical activity of the same duration!

Grooming
  The Coton has cottonlike hair that is dry and wind tossed. It shouldn’t look shiny, and it shouldn’t be so long in the chest or abdominal area that it touches the ground. Although the Coton’s coat is not especially difficult to maintain, considering its length of 4 to 6 inches, it does require a regular investment of time.
  On the plus side, the Coton’s hair dries quickly, requires relatively little brushing and doesn’t shed much.
  It’s also a good idea to trim the hair on the feet between the pads and toes. It may be necessary to trim the hair over the eyes if it seems to impair the dog’s vision. Of course, it’s important to keep the eyes and ears clean.
  A Coton puppy’s coat is easy to groom, but when he reaches 7 to 8 months of age, the coat starts to change and begins to mat more easily. It’s essential to begin grooming the Coton at an early age so that when this coat change occurs, he is already used to being brushed and combed and is less likely to put up a fuss.
  Grooming tools you should have on hand for the Coton include a small or medium-size slicker brush to remove mats and dead hair, a comb to remove food or other debris from the facial furnishings , a nail trimmer and styptic powder in case you accidentally cut into the quick and cause the toenail to bleed, and a good coat detangler recommended by your dog’s breeder or groomer.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails every three to four weeks or as needed. Brush the teeth often — with a vet-approved pet toothpaste — for good overall health and fresh breath.    

Children And Other Pets
  Cotons are good with kids if kids are good with them. They're fun-loving and energetic enough to be playmates for older children who treat them respectfully, but they'll learn to hide from clumsy younger children who may pat them too hard or accidentally kick them or step on them.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party.
  Teach your child to never approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how good-natured, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Cotons prefer the company of people, but they get along well with other Cotons, dogs of other breeds, and cats. If his people aren't around all the time, a Coton will appreciate having the company of another animal.

Is the Coton de Tul̩ar the Right Breed for you?
High Maintenance: Grooming should be performed often to keep the dog's coat in good shape. Professional trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Easy Training: The Coton de Tul̩ar is known to listen to commands and obey its owner. Expect fewer repetitions when training this breed.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  The Coton de Tulear is a member of the Bichon family of dogs, which also includes the Bichon Frise, the Maltese, the Bolognese and the Havanese.
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Thursday, November 9, 2017

Everything about your Zuchon

Everything about your Zuchon
  No, that’s not a teddy bear – it’s a Zuchon! A non-shedding, designer dog breed, the Zuchon is a mix of Shih Tzu and Bichon Frise. This breed is also known by the names of Shichon and Teddy Bear Zuchon . No matter what you call it, this dog will melt your heart and make a wonderful addition to your family.
  Because he gets along with everyone, there isn’t a lifestyle this dog won’t fit into. They rarely bark, are hypo-allergenic, love kids and other animals and can be active or laid back. Boasting a happy disposition and a passion for playtime, the Zuchon will be a loving companion for many years to come. Please read on to learn more about this hybrid breed.

Overview
  The Zuchon is also known as a Shichon, teddy bear dog, or fuzzy wuzzy puppy. They reach an average height of 9-12 inches from the shoulder, and a weight of 8-25 pounds fully grown. 'Dog Breed Info' says the Zuchon is a dog "known for his endearing face, large expressive eyes, and his soft teddy-bear coat." The Zuchon usually has a longer coat that does not shed very much, if at all. This longer coat may lead to more time for maintenance and grooming. As hypoallergenic dogs, Zuchons are generally more suitable for homes with allergy problems amongst the inhabitants, although allergic reactions may still occur.
  This toy dog is said to have a "great" personality, and it is playful, lively and well-mannered. They can be a bit stubborn, but when they are trained well, they are a good family pet. They are easily trained. The Zuchon is a well-mannered dog known to be social, happy, and gentle. They become devoted to their families but need much attention and do not do well when left alone for long periods of time. They are good therapy dogs.   Sometimes the Zuchon may be stubborn and in need of training. The Zuchon will remain active. They make fairly good watch dogs. When necessary, this dog will bark to alert its family that someone is nearby. This breed is typically good with other pets, especially when socialized at an early age. This dog gets along well with children, but it may be a good idea to socialize this breed at an early age as well as to supervise play time with children to make sure that the dog does not get hurt as a result of its small size.

Breed standards
Group: Not Applicable
Average lifespan: 15-18 years
Average size: 40-55 pounds
Coat appearance: Silky, Smooth, and Soft
Coloration: Apricot, Black, Cream, Gray,Red,Silver,White
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Families with children, singles and seniors, apartments, houses with/without yards
Temperament: Friendly, well mannered, affectionate, loving
Comparable Breeds: Shih Tzu, Bichon Frise

History
  Americans began breeding designer dogs in the 1990s. The Zuchon is a cross between an oriental Shih Tzu and a Mediterranean Bichon Frisé. Although this breed of dog is relatively new, its popularity and fame is growing quickly. The Zuchon is still not thought of as an official breed of dog, only a cross-breed. This may change as the dog is becoming a popular toy dog being classified with all other toy dog purebreds. Organizations that recognise this breed include the American Canine Hybrid Club and the Designer Dogs Kennel Club.

Temperament
  Sporting an excellent temperament, you’ll find that your pup is eager to please you. With a lively and spunky personality, Zuchons are known to be well-mannered, making them great with children of all ages and all kinds of animals. Intelligent and affectionate, your pooch is sociable, so be sure to take your pooch to the dog park and around town so he can socialize. Playing and hogging attention is high on their list of priorities, so make sure your dog gets plenty of both. But this breed isn’t all about just fun and games – he will also serve as a watchdog, letting you know when someone is at the door. And this is generally the only time when he will bark. Even though the Zuchon is small, it’s not a yappy dog.

Health
  An important feature with the Zuchon hybrid breed is its longevity. The average life-expectancy of a Zuchon is around 12–15 years. The Zuchon, like many hybrid breeds, is usually healthy without showing the congenital defects that purebreds can have from inbreeding. However, this is only true if the Zuchon is a first generation dog. When a multi-generation Zuchon is born, the possibility of health issues increases. Some possible defects known to designer dogs include canine hip dysplasia, deafness, epilepsy, and liver disease.

Training
 High trainability, they are known for their high intelligence and train-ability and are always eager to please their loved ones. They are very responsive to facial expressions and body language, and love nothing more than to spend time close to the people they love. 

Exercise Requirements
  The Zuchon loves to play, so most of his exercise requirements can be met with a game of catch or tug of war. That means he is the ideal roommate for people who live in apartments and condos. But he’ll still need fresh air and visits to the bathroom, so make sure he gets his daily walk and makes a few trips outdoors. A trip to the dog park will also help tire him out.
   This is an intuitive breed, so the Zuchon will match your energy level. Whether you want to get outside for a walk or want to relax on the couch, the Zuchon will be by your side, content to do whatever it is you want to do.

Grooming
  Very little grooming is needed if their hair is kept in a low maintenance "teddy bear cut” or "puppy cut" every 3 months. It best represents the Teddy Bear Zuchons look.  Regular combing is recommended it is great for bonding and mat prevention. Regular nail trims and eye trims are all that’s required between trims. As with all dogs regular teeth cleaning and removal of tarter is important for overall health.

Children And Other Pets
  Being so patient, cuddly and gentle in temperament they are excellent with children. They pay attention to children of all ages and love to interact, make eye contact and play with them creating uniquely special bonds with them to remember for a lifetime. Teddy Bear Zuchons are calm, gentle, lovable and cuddly, and because of this, they were originally bred as companions for handicapped children who needed a cuddly and squeezable dog that would gladly handle hours of snuggling without becoming irritated or nippy.
  They are excellent with other pets of various types. 

Is the Zuchon the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep.
Moderately Easy Training: The Zuchon is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.


Hypoallergenic
  Their fur is hypoallergenic, meaning most individuals will not be allergic to them as they may be to other breeds, making them great companions for allergy sufferers. Their hair is easy to groom, and they love baths, gladly jumping in when they are asked to.
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Friday, September 15, 2017

Top 10 Dog Breeds For Seniors

Top 10 Dog Breeds For Seniors
  One of the best things a person can do at any age is to adopt a dog.  Dogs can provide a tremendous amount of love and joy, and are a great way to overcome loneliness or boredom, which sometimes can affect seniors in their retirement. There are so many different breeds that sometimes it can be difficult to decide which dog is best for you. Seniors need to think about how much exercise certain types of dogs need, and whether they can provide it. 
  Owning a pet has it's pros and cons, and you have to really think what type of pet, whether a cat or dog, and what type of breed is right for you.  For example, you have to factor in if you will have the time and energy for a larger dog, or whether a small lap dog is more your speed. There are an almost infinite amount of sizes and temperaments when it comes to dogs.  If you do choose to adopt a furry friend, they quickly become a loving and wonderful addition to any family.

1. Pug
  The short-faced pug is both gentle and quiet. But don’t let their laid-back nature fool you. These compact dogs have a lot of personality! They don’t need tons of exercise, but they love being social and definitely need to be a part of the group.
  Pugs are known as adaptable, charming, and eager to please — affectionate and playful without requiring a lot of exercise to maintain their health. They are small, so they generally meet the size requirements of assisted living communities. They can be a bit mischievous, and they tend to shed quite a bit, especially in warmer climates.

2. Bichon Frise

  Independent spirit, intelligent, affectionate, bold and lively. They are bright little dogs that are easy to train and love everyone. They need people to be happy and always love to tag along. They are competitive and obedient.

  The fluffy little Bichon Frise is a joyful and affectionate dog that makes an excellent companion. With an average weight of about 7-12 pounds, this small breed is extremely easy to handle for most people. Bichons are also relatively simple to train. The Bichon will need to be groomed periodically but is otherwise fairly low-maintenance. Many Bichon owners choose to take their dogs to a professional groomer every month or two. Moderate daily exercise is usually enough to keep the Bichon healthy and happy as long as he has your companionship.

3. Miniature Schnauzer

  Schnauzers come in various sizes, including miniature, so they offer a lot of choice to a senior trying to meet a community’s pet size requirements. They are energetic, playful, trainable, and good with children, although they can have strong guarding instincts. They can be quite active; the AKC notes that they have a medium energy level, so playtime with your schnauzer can help keep you active as well.

  Miniature Schnauzers are the smallest of the Schnauzers and they are intelligent, fun-loving dogs that are a great choice for a more active lifestyle. They are the perfect choice for an older individual looking to maintain a relatively active lifestyle, as they enjoy exercise but not so much as a larger breed. 


4. Beagle

  Beagles are moderately active dogs that can do well with a daily walk. They are social dogs that enjoy spending time with their people and make an excellent choice for someone older looking for a companion. 

  Beagles are cute (think Snoopy), funny, loyal, and friendly, enjoying the company of other dogs and humans. They love to play and are excellent family dogs. They can also be independent, which may make training a challenge, and they do need plenty of exercise – which is great for fitness-minded seniors. They shed a lot, but their coat is relatively easy to care for with regular brushing.

5. Chihuahua
  If you live in a small assisted living apartment, why not consider one of the smallest dogs there is?Chihuahuas make a great choice for seniors because they are relatively low maintenance and small enough to be easily handled. They require minimal exercise and are perfectly happy being lapdogs. 
 Chihuahuas have a ton of personality for their size, and love being showered with affection; on the flip side, they are so loyal and protective that they might need a bit of training before dealing with children, and some Chihuahuas bark a lot. They can be active, but being small, they can often get sufficient exercise by playing indoors.

6. Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

  Another dog bred for companionship, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is a great option if you want a dog that is as happy to snuggle in your lap as they are to be out exploring with you. They’re also great family dogs, and love nothing more than to be the center of attention.

  The Cavalier is a beloved puppy-like dog that is affectionate and adaptable. This is a small dog that is often happiest when snuggled up beside her owner. This breed typically weighs about 11 to 18 pounds and is easy to handle and train. The Cavalier has some grooming needs, such as regular hair brushing, ear cleaning, and possibly the occasional trip to a groomer. Overall, Cavaliers are favored among those who love small, snuggle companions.

7. Pembroke Welsh Corgi

  If you want a small to medium dog that makes a great companion, the Corgi might be for you. Weight 24 to 30 pounds, this breed is still small enough for most people to handle. Corgis are smart and fairly easy to train. They are also quite adorable with those short little legs! A herding dog by nature, your Corgi will need routine exercise, but daily walks will often be enough. The Corgi has minimal grooming needs, which can be very convenient. 

  The spunky corgi is the perfect companion for an active senior. Compact in size, this herding breed has the energy of larger dogs, but in a more manageable package. They’re the favored companions of Queen Elizabeth and are a loving—albeit stubborn!—breed.

8. Boston Terrier

  The Boston Terrier is a loving, gentle and clownish breed with an endearing personality. They make a great choice for seniors because of their outstanding temperaments and easy keeping. 
  Boston Terriers often make the list of top dogs for seniors because of their manageable size, friendliness, ease of grooming, and love of spending time with their owners. 

  Known as the American Gentleman, the Boston Terrier is lively, smart, and affectionate with a gentle, even temperament. They can, however, be stubborn, so persistence and consistency are definite musts when training.

9. Poodle

  Poodles are great companions. They’re easy to train, devoted to their families, and a low-shedding breed (though they still need to be groomed). 

  Coming in different sizes from large to tiny, there’s a poodle out there for everyone, even if you live in a small apartment. Smart, proud, and active according to the AKC, it’s no surprise that poodles are the 7th most popular breed overall. They’re easily trained and enjoy a variety of activities, which makes them very adaptable to different-sized living situations. Their coats require regular grooming, but they are also hypo-allergenic.

10. Greyhound

  The biggest dog on our list best dog breeds for seniors is also the laziest. Retired racing greyhounds are a great option for seniors because they are huge couch potatoes. If you adopt a greyhound from the track, you’re also getting a furry friend who has seen a lot and is well socialized.

  How can a racing dog be good for older adults? You may be surprised to learn that Greyhounds are not the high-energy dogs many think they are. Although Greyhounds will enjoy daily walks and the occasional chance to run, most tend to be "couch potatoes" that enjoy loafing around with their owners. They are usually very responsive to training and therefore easy to handle, even though most weight about 60 to 80 pounds. If you like larger dogs but worry about being able to handle one, the Greyhound is a breed to consider.
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