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Showing posts with label best friends. Show all posts
Showing posts with label best friends. Show all posts

Friday, June 30, 2017

Everything about your Curly-Coated Retriever

Everything about your Curly-Coated Retriever
   Created to retrieve game from land or water, the Curly-Coated Retriever dog breed was popular with English gamekeepers, hunters, and poachers alike. Today he competes in such dog sports as field trials, agility, obedience, and flyball and has been successful as a therapy dog, drug detection dog, and search and rescue dog. When he’s not out working or competing, he’s happy to lie beside his favorite person, enjoying a nice back scratch.

Overview
  The Curly-Coated Retriever has been around since the late 18th century, probably created by crossing now-extinct Old English Water Dogs, Irish Water Spaniels and small Newfoundlands, with, yes, some Poodle added later. The result was a black or liver-colored retriever with tight curls on his body and a zest for water retrieving. The Curly-Coat is a fun and interesting dog, no doubt about it.
   The Curly may be uncommon, but he has a dedicated band of followers who prize him for his intelligence, trainability, multiple abilities, sense of humor and, of course, that unusual appearance. He’s not the breed for everyone, but if you can appreciate his constantly thinking brain, you will find him to be a loving, talented and entertaining companion.
  A typical retriever, he enjoys activity, although he requires somewhat less exercise than, say, a Lab or a Flat Coat. Channel his energy into dog sports such as agility, flyball and flying disc games, or teach him to pull you or your kid on skates or a skateboard. He’ll also do well in competitive obedience. The Curly is slow to mature, however, so it can take time for training to stick. Be patient, and use positive reinforcement techniques such as play, praise and food rewards. When the motivation is there, the Curly learns quickly and easily.
  Like most dogs, Curly-Coats become bored when left to their own devices. They can easily become noisy or destructive if they don’t have other dogs to keep them company and don’t receive much attention from their people. But when the Curly lives with a family who is willing to spend plenty of time training and exercising him, he thrives.

Highlights
  • The Curly-Coated Retriever has the most unusual coat of all of the retriever breeds. The coat requires only moderate grooming, and the breed sheds only twice a year.
  • Curly-Coated Retrievers generally have an oily coat, which is more likely to cause reactions in people with allergies.
  • Curly-Coated Retrievers are more reserved around strangers than other retriever breeds and needs to be properly socialized to avoid any timidity.
  • Curly-Coated Retrievers are sporting dogs and have the energy that other sporting and working dogs have. If they are not given adequate exercise, at least 30 to 60 minutes per day, they can become quite destructive in their boredom.
  • Curly-Coated Retrievers tend to be mouthy and will nip and chew everything in reach, including toys, clothes, and hands.
  • The Curly-Coated Retriever is intelligent and enjoys working, but he needs a strong, confident owner who will keep him from taking charge. He also needs variety in training and activities because he tends to get bored doing the same old thing again and again.
  • Curly-Coated Retrievers are more difficult to find than other breeds, but it is still important to look for the best possible breeder, even if long waiting lists await you.
  • Curly-Coated Retrievers take longer to mature than other breeds, so be prepared for your dog to act puppylike for at least three years.
  • In general, Curly-Coated Retrievers do well with children but small children should never be left unsupervised with any dog regardless of breed.
  • Curly-Coated Retrievers are not meant for apartments and do better in homes with a large yard where they can expend their energy. They are quieter in homes when their energy levels are met.
  • Although they enjoy the great outdoors, Curly-Coated Retrievers are not dogs who can be kenneled outside. They enjoy being with their family and can become very destructive when left away from them.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Curly dates to the 18th century and is acknowledged as the oldest of the retrieving breeds.
  • The Curly’s coat is unusual but easy to care for and sheds little. It can be black or liver-colored.
  • Like most retrievers, the Curly loves playing in water.
  • A home with a yard is the best environment for a Curly, but a person who is committed to walking him or taking him to a dog park daily can keep one happy in a home without a yard.
  • Curlies excel at many activities, including hunt tests, agility, herding instinct tests, lure coursing, dock diving, flyball, scent hurdle racing, tracking and rally. At least one has run as part of a sled-dog team.
  • A daily walk of up to a mile will satisfy a Curly, but he’ll take all the exercise you can give him.
Breed standards
AKC Group: Sporting
UKC Group: Gun Dogs
Lifespan:  8 to 12 years
Average size:  between 60 to 70 pounds
Color: Black and Brown
Coat: Dense, Short, and Water-Repellent
Hypoallergenic Breed: No
Shedding: Moderate
Grooming Needs: Low Maintenance
Comparable Breeds: English Springer Spaniel, Labrador Retriever



History
  The exact history of the Curly-Coated Retriever is not known. Popular conjecture suggests that the Curly-Coated Retriever descends from the now-extinct Old English Water Spaniel and from the Retrieving Setter. Other contributors to the breed are thought to include the small St. John’s Newfoundland, the Poodle, the Labrador Retriever, the Pointer and/or the Irish Water Spaniel. 
  This popular gun dog was first exhibited in 1860 at Birmingham. In 1889, some Curly’s were exported to New Zealand, where they have since been used for retrieving duck and quail. In Australia, Curly-Coated Retrievers are also highly prized for use on water fowl in the swamps and lagoons of the Murray River. They are excellent all-around hunting dogs, with an especially tender mouth and unparalleled water skills.
  The first breed club was established in England in 1896. The breed was introduced to America as early as 1907, with the first American Kennel Club registration of a Curly-Coated Retriever being made in 1924. They are members of the AKC’s Sporting Group. The Curly-Coated Retriever Club of America was formed in 1979 and is the breed parent club in this country. In the early part of the twentieth century, the Curly’s popularity waned while the Flat-Coated Retriever’s popularity rose. Today, the Curly-Coated Retriever retains its world-wide presence as a determined, durable hunter and a gentle family companion, although the breed is still uncommon.


Personality
  The Curly-Coat is full of retriever drive and determination. He'll work 'til the job is done. In the field or at home, he's alert and self-confident. He has an even temper but is more reserved with strangers than other retrievers. Early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds and experiences — helps prevent timidity. That said, don't confuse his independence and poise with shyness or a lack of willingness to please. Curly-Coated Retrievers take longer to mature than other breeds, so be prepared to live with a full-grown puppy for several years.
  Curlies have a mind of their own and need a confident owner who won't allow them to run the show. The Curly-Coated Retriever responds well to training, although not always as quickly as other dogs. That doesn't mean he's dumb. He simply gets bored easily. Keep him interested with a variety of training exercises. It's not unusual for a Curly to ignore his trainer when an exercise or activity becomes repetitive.


Health
  The average life expectancy of the Curly-Coated Retriever is between 10 and 12 years. Breed health concerns may include gastric dilatation and volvulus (bloat), canine follicular dysplasia, entropion, ectropion, distichiasis, cataracts, epilepsy, generalized progressive retinal atrophy, glycogen storage disease and hip dysplasia.

Care
  The Curly-Coated Retriever does not require too much maintenance. However, certain things have to be taken care of. The curls require a bit of trimming, and occasional brushing. However, this is not required at the time of shedding. A daily exercise regimen, including retrieving and swimming, is important for Curly-Coated Retrievers. And if you are in search of an outside pet, the Curly-Coated Retriever is adaptable to living outdoors in temperate climates.

Living Conditions
  The Curly-Coated Retriever is not recommended for apartment life. It does best with at least a large yard. An eager and tireless land and (especially) water retriever outdoors, but a calm companion indoors. Curlies need to be part of the family and not left alone outside in the yard all day.

Training
  Curly-Coated Retrievers grow to become large dogs so it is essential that you start training when they are puppies. It is also important that you keep in mind that because they are such great Retrievers, they tend to mouthy and chew things up as pups. This unwanted behavior must be nipped in the bud at an early age.  The Curly is highly trainable and responds well to repetitive training sessions along with positive reinforcement. His willingness to please makes the Curly-Coated Retriever the perfect candidate for AKC Sanctioned Obedience Trials.
  Owners who plan to use their Curly-Coated Retrievers for hunting purposes should acclimate the pup to water as soon as possible. This doesn’t mean that a ten week old puppy should go into icy water in the freezing cold. It’s best to buy a plastic wading pool and fill it with water on a mild day. More than likely, the pup will find his way in and have a grand, old time. A retrieving dummy will make his first experience in the water a good one.

Activity Requirements
  Like other retriever breeds, the Curly Coated version needs lots of vigorous exercise every single day. They are an active person's dog – couch potatoes should steer clear of this breed. They love running, swimming, hiking, playing ball and catching frisbees. They can be competitive in agility courses, but they are not as obedient as their Golden Retriever counterparts, so they often do not excel in this arena, but they enjoy the activity and eat up the attention.
  Curlies need as much mental stimulation as they do physical stimulation and should always be provided with plenty of interesting activities throughout the day, especially when left alone. Inactivity and boredom leads to destructiveness and hyperactivity that is hard to curb.

Grooming
  The Curly coat of small, tight, crisp curls has little odor and is easy to care for. Comb or brush it out before bathing with an undercoat rake or a slicker brush and comb. Don’t worry that brushing will take the curl out of the coat.
  Depending on how dirty a Curly gets, a bath is necessary only every month or two. Most Curly coats dry quickly, sometimes in as little as ten minutes. Don’t blow dry a Curly unless you want him to look like a chia pet. 
  The only other grooming is a little trimming to neaten any straggly hairs, a bushy tail, or excessive feathering on the backs of the legs and behind the ears. Some Curlies have tufts of fur between their toes, giving the feet the appearance of fluffy houseslippers. These tufts are usually trimmed for the show ring, but can be left alone if you like the look.
  Curlies don’t shed much, but they do shed. If your Curly spends time in the house, you will find hair on the furniture or floor. The coat usually sheds a small amount year-round, with a heavier shed twice a year.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Keep the ears clean and dry to prevent ear infections. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  The Curly-Coated Retriever is a great companion for older children who can stand up to his size and energy level, but he may be overwhelming for younger children who are easily knocked down in play. Any time your Curly interacts with children, lay down some ground rules for dog and child. No ear pulling, tail pulling or biting allowed! For the safety of both, never leave small children unsupervised with any dog.
  Curly-Coated Retrievers generally do very well with other dogs and animals but socialization is still important in regard to animal interactions.

Is the Curly-Coated Retriever the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep. No trimming or stripping needed.
Moderate Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Moderately Easy Training: The Curly-Coated Retriever is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  You might mistake the Curly-Coated Retriever for a Labradoodle, but he’s a distinct breed, created in the 18th century by crossing now-extinct Old English Water Dogs, Irish Water Spaniels and small Newfoundlands. And yes, there’s some Poodle in the mix, too.





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Thursday, June 29, 2017

Everything about your Wire Fox Terrier

Everything about your Wire Fox Terrier
  The Wire Fox Terrier is believed to be a descendant of the Black and Tan Terrier well-known in Wales and related areas. The breed was frequently crossed with the Smooth Fox Terrier to refine the head and reinforce the genetics for the white coat. At one time, both breeds were considered one breed with two varieties. However, the American Kennel Club (AKC) has recognized these breeds as separate since 1985 and interbreeding has ended.

Overview
  An elegant and well-built dog, the Wire Fox Terrier is surprising strong for a dog with small structure. This breed is a hunting and tracking dog by nature, so the Wire Fox Terrier has got agility and energy to spare.
  Wire Fox Terriers are courageous, alert, playful, affectionate and independent. Always up for an adventure, this dog loves to explore, run, hunt, play, and chase, so it will keep you busy. If it’s a family dog you’re looking for, you’ll be glad to learn that the Wire Fox Terrier is excellent with children. And even though it is a bold dog, it isn’t aggressive towards people. Read on to learn more about this breed.

Breed standards
AKC group: Terrier
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan:15-18 years
Average size: Male Wire Fox Terriers weigh 15 to 20 pounds and females weigh 13 to 18 pounds
Color: Black, Brown, and White
Coat: Dense, Harsh and Rough, and Wire
Shedding: Minimal
Grooming Needs: High Maintenance
Hypoallergenic Breed: Yes
Comparable Breeds: Lakeland Terrier, Welsh Terrier

Is the Wire Fox Terrier the Right Breed for you?
High Maintenance: Grooming should be performed often to keep the dog's coat in good shape. Occasional trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Moderately Easy Training: The Wire Fox Terrier is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, houses with yards
Temperament: Independent, adventurous, courageous, playful

History
Wire fox terrier circa 1915

  The wire fox terrier was developed in England by fox hunting enthusiasts and is believed to be descended from a now-extinct rough-coated, black-and-tan working terrier of Wales, Derbyshire, and Durham. The breed was also thought to have been bred to chase foxes into their underground burrows; the dogs' short, strong, usually docked tails were used as handles by the hunter to pull them back out.
  Although it is said Queen Victoria owned one, and her son and heir, King Edward VII, did own a wire fox terrier named Caesar, the breed was not popular as a family pet until the 1930s, when The Thin Man series of feature films was created. Asta, the canine member of the Charles family, was a wire fox terrier, and the popularity of the breed soared. Milou (Snowy) from The Adventures of Tintin comic strip is also a wire fox terrier.
  In the late 20th century, the popularity of the breed declined again, most likely due to changing living conditions in the Western world and the difficulty of keeping hunting terriers in cities due to their strong prey instincts.
  As of 2014, the wire fox terrier has the distinction of having received more Best in Show titles at Westminster Kennel Club dog shows (currently 14) than any other breed. Matford Vic, a wire fox terrier, is one of only five dogs to have won the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show on more than one occasion. She won the competition twice, in 1915 and 1916. The only dog to win it on more occasions was Warren Remedy, a smooth fox terrier, who won it on three occasions between 1907 and 1909.


Temperament
  A happy, eager to please, excitable dog, the Wire Fox Terrier is always eager to play and makes an excellent pet for the active person. You may notice a streak of dominance in your dog – be sure you establish your role as the alpha early on. The Wire Fox Terrier was originally bred for hunting and tracking, so this dog still loves to dig under fences, in the garden, and even through sofas. Keep your dog in a secure, fenced-in yard, because this breed likes to roam and chase.
  As hunting dogs, the Wire Fox Terrier will chase smaller animals such as squirrels, rabbits, or cats. For this reason, keep your Wire Fox Terrier on a leash at all times. This bold little dog has no issues starting problems with bigger dogs and will not back down to dogs that are several times their size.
  Even though this breed is wonderful with children, the Wire Fox Terrier will react if it is being bothered or pestered. As well, this dog is quick to bark at any new sight or sound, which makes it a good watch dog. But overall, the Wire Fox Terrier makes a loyal, affectionate family pet.

Health
  The average life span of the Wire Fox Terrier is 12 to 15 years. Breed health concerns may include cataracts, congenital deafness, distichiasis, pulmonic stenosis, insulinoma, glaucoma, Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, shoulder luxation, mast cell tumors, cerebellar malformation, epilepsy, corneal ulceration, lens luxation, progressive retinal atrophy, ectopic ureters, congenital idiopathic megaesophagus and skin allergies.

Care
  Daily exercise in the form of a vigorous game, a good on-leash walk, or an off-leash outing in a secure area is a must for the Fox Terrier. When given room, however, the Fox Terrier can exercise on its own. It does well indoors with access to a secure yard, but can live outside in temperate or warm climates.
  The dog’s coat requires combing every week, and shaping once every three months. Pets are shaped by clipping, but for show dogs stripping is effective. This is because clipping tends to make the color of the coat dull and also softens it. In addition, Wire Fox Terrier puppies may require ear shaping techniques to retain proper shape as adults.

Living Conditions
  The Wire Fox Terrier will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is very active indoors and will do okay without a yard.

Training
  Training the Wire Fox Terrier can prove to be a bit difficult, especially if this is your first time owning this breed. If you’re bringing this dog home as a puppy, watch out for its sharp teeth. As well, the Wire Fox Terrier can be difficult to house train. In the beginning, you should consider staying at home with your dog as much as possible. Socialization is important, so introduce your Wire Fox Terrier to different dogs, people and environments whenever you can.
  Since this dog is intelligent, you should include obedience tasks as part of your Wire Fox Terrier’s training.  It can have stubborn and independent nature, so be sure to be firm when giving commands. Reprimand your dog in a firm manner when it exhibits bad behavior. If this is your first time owning this breed or lack faith in your training skills, don’t be afraid to hire an experienced handler.

Activity Requirements
  Fox Terriers are small, but they have energy to spare and need a lot of exercise to maintain health and happiness. Even when indoors they are always “on the go,” constantly moving about the house. You should walk your Fox Terrier several times a day, but jogging is even better. Fox Terriers prefer running to walking, so joggers have a true blue companion in this breed. They chase balls to the point that some owners believe they are obsessed with the activity, and can use up all of their energy playing fetch, as long as your arm doesn't tire out in the process. Their size makes Fox Terriers fine apartment dogs, but a commitment must be made to keeping up with a regular exercise program.

Grooming 
  The Wire Fox Terrier's coat requires stripping in order to maintain the proper look and texture. Stripping can be done at home, or at the groomer, and should be done at least twice per year. If a dog is not competing, his coat can be clipped, however this changes the texture of the coat, making it soft and also alters the coloring of the dog.
  Check the ears on a weekly basis for signs of infection, irritation, or wax build up. Cleanse regularly with a veterinarian-approved cleanser and cotton ball. Brush the teeth at least once per week to prevent tartar buildup and fight gum disease. Additionally, nails should be trimmed once per month if the dog does not wear the toenails down naturally.

Noteworthy wire fox terriers
  • Archie, owned by Gill Raddings Stunt Dogs starred in ITV's Catwalk Dogs.
  • Bob, from the Hercule Poirot episode Dumb Witness
    Snowy (French: Milou),
    companion of Tintin
  • Caesar, the companion of King Edward VII of the United Kingdom
  • Charles, brought to Ceylon by Leonard Woolf in 1905
  • Chester, in the film Jack Frost
  • J.D. from Millionaire Dogs
  • Mickey, the companion of French composer Francis Poulenc.
  • Sky, winner of the 2012 Purina Thanksgiving Dog Show and the 2014 Westminster Dog Show.
  • Van Gogh, Paul Meltsner's dog featured in his famous painting Paul, Marcella and Van Gogh
  • Vicki, Rudyard Kipling's dog
  • Wessex, the dog of British novelist (Tess of the d'Urbervilles) Thomas Hardy
  • Willy, from Ask the Dust
  • Wuffles, the Patrician's dog in the Discworld Series

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Thursday, September 8, 2016

Everything about your Schipperke

Everything about your Schipperke
  Choosing to add a furry friend to your growing household is a long-term commitment, and picking a breed that fits your lifestyle presents the key to a happy home. With over 160 American Kennel Club-recognized breeds, that decision can seem overwhelming. We're here to help you meet the breed that's right for you. If you're looking for a loyal and devoted companion to bring into your family, learn everything you need to know about the Shipperke.

Overview
  Bred to guard canal bridges in Belgium, the Schipperke is lovingly nicknamed "little captain" or "little skipper." Known for being the captain's dog, the breed played a very important role on the ships. Popular in Belgium homes, it became a worldwide-known breed after being seen with Queen Marie Henriette. Coming to the U.S. in the 1900s, the breed has become increasingly popular in American households. Still a great companion on ships and boats, the active breed is a very kind and loving family dog.

Highlights
  • Schipperkes are a long-lived breed. It is important that you understand the length of time a Schipperke can live and make sure you are committed enough to provide a good life for the dog for the next 15 or more years.
  • The Schipperke is so independent-minded he's not recommended for first-time dog owners.
  • These are adaptable dogs who can do well in any setting, including life on a boat or in an apartment, as long as they get plenty of daily exercise and the neighbors are tolerant of barking! They do best, however, if they have a small fenced yard to run in.
  • Schipperkes have a high energy level and will demand at least a half hour of activity every day, and preferably more.
  • Schipperkes are considered light shedders except for twice a year, when they shed heavily. Weekly brushing keeps their coat clean, and they don't need frequent baths.
  • Training can be challenging if it is not done with patience, consistency, and positive reinforcement, all aided by a good sense of humor.
  • Schipperkes are naturally suspicious of strangers and can be territorial toward people and other dogs. They make excellent watchdogs.
  • Loving and devoted, the Schipperke is an ideal family dog who adores children. They can get along with other dogs, especially if they are properly socialized, and they get along with cats extremely well.
  • Schipperkes can be noisy and they will bark for entertainment and as an alert.
  • Never buy a Schipperke from a puppy mill, a pet store, or a breeder who doesn't provide health clearances or guarantees. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies and who breeds for sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Schipperke is a small black tailless dog with a foxy face. He has a square body and a distinctive coat, characterized by a ruff that stands out from the neck, a cape, jabot and culottes, all creating a dog with a unique silhouette. The ruff begins behind the ears and goes all the way around the neck. The cape is an additional layer beyond the ruff. The jabot .
  • The Schipperke has a wedge-shaped head with prick ears and small oval dark-brown eyes. His expression is questioning, mischievous, impudent, and alert.
  • The Schipperke is what’s called a natural breed, meaning his coat should not be sculpted in any way. Only the whiskers and the hair between the pads of the feet may be trimmed for the show ring.
  • This breed’s name is often pronounced “skipper-kee” but in Flemish it is pronounced “sheep-er-ker.”
  • One of the earliest, maybe the first, dog shows was one for Schipperkes held in Brussels in 1690.
  • Legend has it that the Schipperke’s taillessness arose in the 17th century when a shoemaker became angry that his neighbor’s dog kept stealing from him and cut off the tail.
Breed standards
AKC group: Non-sporting
UKC group: Companion
Average lifespan: 13 - 15 years
Average size: 10 - 16 pounds
Coat appearance: Thick and soft
Coloration: Black
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Fox-like look to medium-sized body; wide chest and large, erect ears; small black nose and oval eyes; typically born tailless
Possible alterations: Can be tan or fawn in color, although not accepted by the UKC
Comparable Breeds: Keeshond, Samoyed

History
  The Schipperke is an old breed that was developed in Belgium. He has often been erroneously called a "Dutch Dog," but the breed is not associated with Holland in any way.
The Schipperke is believed to be descended from a black sheepdog called a Leauvenaar, the same breed credited with being the foundation dog for the Groenendael. While the Groenendael was developed to be a herding breed, the Schipperke was developed to be a small watchdog. They were often seen guarding the boats that plied the canals between Brussels and Antwerp.
  The Schipperke has the distinction of having one of the first "specialty shows." This show took place in 1690, when members of the shoemakers guild were invited to display their Schipperkes and their hammered brass collars, which were a custom at the time, in the Grand Place of Brussels.
  Originally known as the Spitske or Spits, the Schipperke was given its current name when the breed club was formed in 1888. The word Schipperke may mean "little shepherd" or "little captain," either of which would be appropriate given this breed's heritage.
  The Schipperke became a fashionable pet after Queen Marie Henriette saw one at a Brussels dog show in 1885. The popularity of the breed grew and the Schipperke was eventually imported to the United States in 1888.
  The first United States specialty club for the Schipperke was formed in 1905, but the official breed club, the Schipperke Club of America, was not founded until 1929.
  Today, the Schipperke is loved for his cleverness, devotion, and versatility, as well as his sly sense of humor. He ranks 82nd among the 155 breeds and varieties recognized by the American Kennel Club.



Personality
  The Schipperke is the proverbial "big dog in a little dog's body." He's active, confident, and curious. A closed door is simply a challenge to be overcome.
  The Schipperke retains his puppylike qualities — including the troublesome ones — until he's 4 or 5 years old.
  He loves his people and wants to please them, but he also likes to have his own way. If he's allowed to, the Schipperke will soon be running the household. Protective, fearless, and naturally suspicious of strangers, he makes an excellent watchdog and will take on anyone who seems to have evil intent.
  Schipperkes are selective in offering their friendship, generally limiting it to family members, with whom they create strong bonds. When it comes to training, they're mischievous and can be stubborn, but with positive reinforcement they learn quickly.
  Like every dog, Schipperkes need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Schipperke puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

Health
  The average life expectancy of the Schipperke is 12 to 15 years. Increased health risks associated with this breed include epilepsy, hip dysplasia, hypothyroidism, progressive retinal atrophy, Legg-Calves-Perthes disease, and cataracts.

Care
  The Schipperke is an easy to care for and adaptable breed who should live indoors with his family. During hot weather, which he doesn't tolerate well, he enjoys lying in front of a fan or beneath a ceiling fan.
  He generally does well in all types of settings and families, as long as he gets plenty of daily exercise and firm and consistent guidance from someone with a sense of humor.
With his high activity level, however, he may be best suited to a home with a small but securely fenced yard where he can run off some of his energy. Be aware that Schipperkes like to dig, especially if there may be a mole at the end of the tunnel.
  Schipperkes need at least half an hour of exercise daily, and more is better. Their people are usually tired before they are. They are always running and playing and will use your house as a racetrack when the mood strikes. Walk them on leash to prevent a sudden dash toward an interesting animal or object.
  Count on two daily walks to keep your Schipperke's desire for action satisfied. He'll also enjoy riding in a basket on a bicycle or cruising the aisles of the pet supply store in a grocery cart.
  Begin training when your Schipperke is young, and continue to reinforce lessons throughout his life. He requires a trainer who's patient and consistent and responds best to positive reinforcement techniques such as food rewards, praise, and play.
  The Schipperke is known for being stubborn. Although he's intelligent and wants you to be happy, his idea of how things should be may outweigh any desire to please. Some Schipperkes can be difficult to housetrain, and crate-training is recommended.

Living Conditions
  Schipperkes are good dogs for apartment life. They are very active indoors. These dogs are incredibly quick and it is a good idea to have a fenced yard.

Trainability
  Schipperkes can be a handful to train, but with a little patience, it can be done. They bore easily, so it is important to keep sessions short and to vary the routine in order to hold their interest. Positive reinforcement is all you need to get your Schipperke to learn new behavior, as they soak up praise and treats. These little dogs are smart, however, and they can often manipulate you into bending the rules, whether it be flaunting their sheer cuteness or blatantly breaking a rule so many times that you give up enforcing it. 100% consistency is key in raising an obedient Schipperke.
  Housebreaking a Schipperke can also be a challenge as they will flaunt their independence by relieving themselves where and when they please. Crate training is the best recipe for success, and expect anywhere from six to eight months of training before your Schipperke finally follows the program.

Exercise
  The Schipperke is an active and tireless breed. To be happy and mentally stable, they need to be taken on a daily, long walk or jog. They also enjoy play and getting a chance to run. This breed is very active indoors and will get a lot of its exercise running around your house. It will greatly enjoy running free off its lead in a safely fenced-in yard or a park.

Grooming
  The Schipperke’s abundant double coat is straight and slightly harsh to the touch, with a soft, dense undercoat. The coat should never be silky or excessively long or short.
  Although the Schipperke’s coat looks like a lot of work, it can be maintained with brushing once a week — more often when he’s shedding, which occurs once or twice a year. Bathe him only when he’s dirty or every three or four months.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, but Schipperkes are not fond of having their nails trimmed, so consider using a nail grinder instead.
  Keep the ears clean and dry. Check them weekly for redness or a bad odor that might indicate infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball moistened with a mild pH-balanced cleanser recommended by your veterinarian. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.
  It is important to begin grooming the Schipperke when he is very young. An early introduction teaches the independent Schipperke that grooming is a normal part of his life and to patiently accept the handling and fuss of the grooming process.

Children And Other Pets
  Sturdy and energetic, Schipperkes can be loyal and affectionate companions to children. They generally get along well with children of all ages, playing gently and kindly with younger ones.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how good-natured, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  The Schipperke generally does very well with cats who share his home. This acceptance is stronger if the Schipperke has been raised with cats. He can also get along with other dogs if he's raised with them, but it's important to realize that the breed is territorial and will defend its property from unknown dogs as well as people.

Is this breed right for you?
  Extremely devoted to his master, the Schipperke is an intelligent and active breed. Very loving with children and getting along well with other animals if exposed to them early on, it's likely that the Schipperke will attach himself to his master. Easy to train and a good guard dog, the breed will need proper leadership to avoid behavioral issues. If he believes he's the pack leader, he will act unlike himself with an erratic personality. Likely to bark, he will need to be socialized well. Doing OK with apartment life if properly exercised, the Schipperke does best with a small yard that he can play in. Requiring little grooming, he is an average shedder.

Did You Know?
  Legend has it that the Schipperke’s taillessness arose in the 17th century when a shoemaker became angry that his neighbor’s dog kept stealing from him and cut off the tail.

Populars Schipperke
  • In World War II, the Belgian Resistance used the dogs to run messages between various resistance hideouts and cells, to which occupying Nazi Forces were none the wiser.
  • A Schipperke is intermittently featured in the tiger-centric movie Two Brothers (2004).
A dream day in the life of a Schipperke
  Waking up in the bed of his master, the Schipperke will go downstairs to greet the other members of the family with a few licks. Going outside for a quick run around the yard, he'll come back inside for playtime with the kiddos. A great guard dog, he'll bark at any strangers that approach the home. Enjoying a walk in the afternoon, he'll come in and out of the house, taking a small nap and hanging out with the family. After practicing a few tricks, the Schipperke will tuck himself in next to his master for a good snooze.

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Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Unique names for your new dog

Unique names for your new dog
  Did you know that there are approximately 68,000,000 dogs currently owned as pets in the U.S? That’s 68 million dog names! Let’s see if we can help you get started on your search for the perfect name for your new best friend with our new collection of dog names.
  Obscure Harry Potter references, world travel, sci-fi sidekicks—they all serve as inspiration in our compilation of the most unique dog names. After all, our dogs are special, and they deserve personalized names just as much as personalized care.

Female Dog Unique Names inspired by fashion
  • Collette
  • Maripol
  • Vuitton
  • Natacha
  • Dior
Male Dog Unique Names inspired by fashion:
  • Birkenstock
  • Carnegie
  • Helmut Lang
  • Gaultier
  • Rad
Female Dog Unique Names inspired by historical figures
  • Thatcher
  • Keller
  • Oakley
  • Stowe
  • Sojourner
Male Dog Unique Names inspired by historical figures:

  • Bonaparte
  • Crockett
  • Goethe
  • Houdini
  • Schwarzkopf
Female Dog Unique Names inspired by fictional characters:

  • Marlowe
  • Lisbeth
  • Corky
  • Scout
  • Uhura

Male Dog Unique Unique Names inspired by fictional characters:

  • Heisenberg
  • Pip
  • Humbert
  • Ebenezer
  • Draper
Female Dog Unique Names inspired by tech:
  • Java
  • Widget
  • Beta
  • Icon
  • Qwerty
Male Dog Unique Names inspired by tech:
  • J-Peg 
  • Dongle
  • Vector
  • Scuzzi 
  • Codec
Female Dog Unique Names inspired by celebrities:
  • Paget
  • Demi
  • Fergie
  • Famke
  • Charlize
Male Dog Unique Names inspired by celebrities:
  • Cumberbatch
  • Barrymore
  • Kutcher
  • Meat Loaf
  • Barkevious Mingo
Female Dog Unique Names inspired by drinks:
  • Sambuca
  • Chianti
  • Shandy
  • Grenadine
  • Tanqueray
Male Dog Unique Names inspired by drinks:
  • Champers
  • Johnny Walker
  • Rémy
  • Bootlegger
  • Cider
  Fortunately, whatever you end up choosing matters not one iota to the dog. But if you’re hoping for the respect of other owners, it’s best to steer clear of Sir Humps-A-Lot, Lady McDroolie, and Mr. Puddles.
Other classic dog Names here : Best dog names!
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Monday, November 30, 2015

10 reasons a dog is the best investment you will ever make

10 reasons a dog is the best investment you will ever make
Are you tired of being let down by life? We feel your pain. 

There is one thing in life, though, that will never disappoint you.


A dog.


1. Imagine being greeted by this when you come home. EVERY DAY. 

2. Imagine never feeling unloved again. 
3. Making people happy makes dogs happy. It's like having your own personal happiness machine.
4. Let's put it this way. You'll never find a cat doing something like this, will you?
5. A dog, on the other hand, will be there for you when you need him most.
6. They care about your health, so they'll go out of their way to get you up and outside.
7. They never judge. They just love.
8. And when they say they'll love you forever, they mean it.
9. A dog can teach you everything you need to know about how to enjoy life.
10. You'll never eat alone again.

Of course. There can be more than 100 reasons to investment in a dog, but we said here 10 funny reasons, but all of them are one hundred percent real! 


Don't be sad if you don't have a dog. Buy one!


You have no money? Adopt one! 


You will see your life with other eyes. I promise!



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Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Your Dog is Your Best Friend

Your Dog is Your Best Friend
  Dogs have been our constant companions for thousands of years. The history of dogs is closely tied to our own history, and no other animal on Earth shares as close a relationship with humans as dogs do. Dogs and humans understand each other, and it’s because of the undying love they show us that we keep them by our sides.
  It’s not that having a human BFF is a bad thing. It’s just that your dog makes it clear, every second, that you matter more than anyone else in the world.
  And we’re not saying you’re needy, either. But your dog is in awe of you. You feed his soul with food, walks, sleep, and play. If he could build you a shrine, he would.
  In case you’re still on the fence about whether your dog, or that friend you’ve had since you were five, is your true bestie.



He Never, Ever, Leaves Me Alone

  Buddy’s friendship means I never have to feel alone again. He makes it clear I will never have to take even one step without him. Whether I walk to the computer or across the living room, he is closer than a shadow. So close I have to be careful not to step on his paws.

 You don’t mind doing even the most mundane of activities together.



He Is My Bathroom Hero

  He watches over my safety in the bathroom. He has taught me not to close the door tightly or he’ll throw his body against it and begin frantically scratching. He knows he can’t save me if I’m not in his line of vision. My hero has made it clear to leave the door open a crack. That way he can use his nose to push the door all the way open, smile at me, and wag his tail like a metronome on speed.

You don’t even need anyone but each other to have fun.


Just having each other around brings a smile to your face.

He Loves Sharing Meals

  He shares food. My food. When I’m seated at the table the Budster comes over and rests his chin on my lap. If that doesn’t work in one millisecond, his head burrows through and pops up in the space under my arm when I’m about to bite into a sandwich. And, no matter how many people look at me disapprovingly he scoffs at them and lets me feed him bites. I’ve learned to make the food bits small because he never chews, only gulps. When the meal is over he lazily lets his head flop back in my lap with a snorty sigh of approval.


You do everything together.

Time Means Nothing to Him

  I can’t wait to run home for one of his dopamine filled hugs even if it’s only been 20 minutes since I saw him last. He can’t wait either. When he hears my keys he runs up to wait at the door. When I open it he stands up on his hind legs, and reaches his front paws towards me for a hug. He does that even if it’s only been five minutes.

You’re there for each other, even when no one else is.


He Isn’t Afraid of Feet

  He takes excellent care of my feet. After a long walk in the morning I get in the bathtub and he trots in after me (You know, in case I slip or something). I dangle my foot over the side of the tub and he rushes to lick it. And lick it. And lick it.

I Can Read Him With a Look

  He has taught me a secret language. If he gnashes his teeth together like a snapping turtle it means he’d like me to look up so he can gaze into my eyes. If he sits perched at my feet and lets out a long, slow whimper he is merely looking out for me. He’s saying I’ve been working too many hours and will feel much better if I take a break and scratch behind his ears.

You always go everywhere together (as long as it’s not the vet).

He Is Never too Shy to Make a Fuss

  He whips his tail in circles like a propeller when he sees me. If Buddy is walking my husband Steve, and then spots me approaching on the street he stands at alert, and thrashes his tail as he bursts into song. People look at us because they think he is in pain. They don’t understand that caterwauling is the Bud’s happy voice.

You can only get to sleep when you’re together.


He Respects My Sleep

  Buddy doesn’t wake me up. He waits until I stir from sleep before he pounces on my chest, leans into my face, and smothers me with slobbery kisses because he knows it’s good for me.

You help make each other’s dreams come true.

He Keeps Me Warm

  He keeps Steve and me warm in the winter. By plastering his body against us he saves us from having to buy a heating pad. When Steve gets up to make coffee Buddy moves over to Steve’s spot on the bed and curls up like a pill worm. When Steve comes back with our mugs of java Buddy slides closer to me thus presenting Steve with his gift – a warm spot on the bed.

You’ll always make time to listen to each other’s feelings.

He Wears a Cape

Buddy sacrifices to make my Halloweens joyful. He consents to wearing a Superman cape because he knows it makes me happy. Of course, I understand that he cannot tolerate booties, coats, hats, or sweaters, and because I respect his boundaries, he indulges me.

You can’t hide anything from each other.




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