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LUV My dogs

Everything about your dog!

Showing posts with label best. Show all posts
Showing posts with label best. Show all posts

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Grooming Your Dog

Grooming Your Dog
  Ever watched your dog roll on the ground, lick her coat or chew at a mat on her fur? These are her ways of keeping clean. Sometimes, though, she’ll need a little extra help from her friend to look her best.  
  Regular grooming is very important. It keeps your dog clean, healthy, and manageable, as well as preventing yeast infections caused by matted hair, periodontal disease caused by uncared for teeth, ear infections from excessive buildup of wax, dirt and bacteria, etc. This article covers basic at-home grooming and ways to make the process more pleasant for everyone involve.
Grooming sessions should always be fun, so be sure to schedule them when your dog’s relaxed, especially if she’s the excitable type. Until your pet is used to being groomed, keep the sessions short-just 5 to 10 minutes. Gradually lengthen the time until it becomes routine for your dog. You can help her get comfortable with being touched and handled by making a habit of petting every single part of your dog, including such potentially sensitive areas as the ears, tail, belly, back and feet.
  Brushing your dog's teeth prevents all kinds of unpleasant health problems that have nothing to do with dog breath. Keeping nails trimmed allows your dog to move around comfortably. Cutting any hair that falls into the eye can prevent eye irritatation; keeping ear hair trimmed can help prevent ear infections.
  There's also the cleanliness factor. Bathing keeps dirt from being tracked all over your home. Grooming alleviates fleas, which can cause health problems for both you and your dog. Trimmed nails won't mark your flooring.

Basic tools
Any pet supply store will stock the basic grooming supplies you'll need:
  • Brush
  • Nail clipper
  • Shampoo
  • Flea control
  • Dog toothpaste and toothbrush
  Depending on your dog's coat, you'll need a specific type of brush or a flea comb, most of which are available at good pet supply stores. Certain flea prevention products and toothpastes are only available at your veterinarian's office. If you're not sure which tools are best for your dog, a talk with your vet will help you get started.

Brushing
  Regular grooming with a brush or comb will help keep your pet’s hair in good condition by removing dirt, spreading natural oils throughout her coat, preventing tangles and keeping her skin clean and irritant-free. And grooming time’s a great time to check for fleas and flea dirt--those little black specks that indicate your pet is playing host to a flea family.

  If your dog has a smooth, short coat (like that of a chihuahua, boxer or basset hound), you only need to brush once a week:

  • First, use a rubber brush to loosen dead skin and dirt.
  • Next, use a bristle brush to remove dead hair.
  • Now, polish your low-maintenance pooch with a chamois cloth and she’s ready to shine!
  If your dog has short, dense fur that’s prone to matting, like that of a retriever, here’s your weekly routine:
  • Use a slicker brush to remove tangles.
  • Next, catch dead hair with a bristle brush.
  • Don’t forget to comb her tail.
If your dog has a long, luxurious coat, such as that of a Yorkshire terrier, she’ll need daily attention:
  • Every day you’ll need to remove tangles with a slicker brush.
  • Gently tease mats out with a slicker brush.
  • Next, brush her coat with a bristle brush.
  • If you have a long-haired dog with a coat like a collie’s or an Afghan hound’s, follow the steps above, and also be sure to comb through the fur and trim the hair around the hocks and feet.
Bathing
The ASPCA recommends bathing your dog every 3 months or so; your pet may require more frequent baths in the summertime if she spends lots of time with your outdoors. Always use a mild shampoo that’s safe to use on dogs, and follow these easy steps:
  • First, give your pet a good brushing to remove all dead hair and mats.
  • Place a rubber bath mat in the bathtub to provide secure footing, and fill the tub with about 3 to 4 inches of lukewarm water.
  • Use a spray hose to thoroughly wet your pet, taking care not to spray directly in her ears, eyes or nose. If you don’t have a spray hose, a large plastic pitcher or unbreakable cup will do.
  • Gently massage in shampoo, working from head to tail.
  • Thoroughly rinse with a spray hose or pitcher; again, avoid the ears, eyes and nose.
  • Check the ears for any foul odors or excessive debris; if you choose to use a cleansing solution on a cotton ball, take care not to insert it into the ear canal.
  • Dry your pet with a large towel or blow dryer, but carefully monitor the level of heat.
Please note: Some animals seem to think that bathtime is a perfect time to act goofy. Young puppies especially will wiggle and bounce all over the place while you try to brush them, and tend to nip at bathtime. If this sounds like your pet, put a toy that floats in the tub with her so she can focus on the toy rather than on mouthing you.

Steps
1.Gather all necessary supplies before beginning to groom the dog. Make sure you have all you need to clean eyes and ears, trim nails and/or hair, brush teeth, bathe, and dry.

2. Always brush your dog first, and do it thoroughly. Mats enlarge and become unmanageable when wet. If a mat goes undetected or coat care is neglected, you may have to shave or cut out the mat so that bacteria doesn't grow between it and the skin and cause a yeast infection. Severe matting can also pull the skin from the muscle! Short-haired dogs will probably only need to be brushed over with a curry brush or glove, while medium- to long-coated dogs may require special tools like a slicker, a pin brush, or an undercoat rake. Whatever you use, it must effectively remove loose hair and distribute oils from the skin throughout the coat.
  • Start by brushing the dog's coat. Begin on his neck and move down his body, under his belly, and on his tail.
  • If you want, you may use a human comb or hair brush. Stroke his coat gently with it to make the hairs lie flat.
  • When you are finished, praise your dog and give him a treat or two for standing still.
3. Follow with any necessary clipping or other grooming that needs to be done before the bath. For example, trim out any mats or large amounts of hair that will only waste your time shampooing and drying. Dogs look best when groomed after they are bathed and blow-dried.
  • Eyes - Some breeds require more maintenance in this area than others. While it may be a simple matter of pulling eye debris away from a potentially irritating spot in the corner of the eye, long-haired or white-haired dogs may require special attention to make sure that all gunk is truly out of the coat. There are products made specially for removing "tear stains" from a white coat available in many pet supply stores or catalogs. A healthy eye should be clear and should not show any signs of irritation or unusual discharge. Your vet can cut or trim the hair around the eyes for you, which can cause tear stains (do not attempt to try this yourself).
  • Ears - A clean ear may contain some wax and shouldn't have any particular smell to it. Warm any cleaner or medication in a container of body temperature water (as you would a baby bottle) before you put it in the ear. Cold is painful in the ear canal. A few drops of warmed rubbing alcohol will dry water from the ear canal and kill bacteria, yeast and mites. To clean your dog's ears, apply some ear cleaning solution to a cotton ball and simply wipe dirt and wax away from the inner ear. Don't rub vigorously as to cause sores, and don't travel too far into the ear; both could cause damage. And don't expect your dog to like the process; you may be met with some resistance. When you're done wiping out the ear with a damp cotton ball or cloth, gently dry it out with a dry one. If your dog's ear looks swollen, red, irritated, dark or blackened, shows signs of discharge or sores, or smells really bad, call your veterinarian. This is not normal and could be signaling an infection or disease.
  • Teeth - According to veterinarians, about 80% of dogs have periodontal disease. Ouch! If plaque is continually digested on a larger than normal scale, it can cause kidney or liver troubles. And how unbelievably painful can you imagine suffering through teeth rotting out of your head to be? Double ouch! Try to brush your dog's teeth at least 2 to 3 times a week, or use "PetzLife" antimicrobial spray if you don't have time or your dog is particularly resistant to the idea. Use only those products made specifically for dogs so that you don't unintentionally poison your dog. You can use gauze over your finger or a toothbrush, or there are more advanced and effective products available. For example pets tooth brush is a surgical glove with bristles attached to the thumb and forefinger. But either way, ease your dog into the process so that it can be a pleasant experience rather than a stressful one and you don't get yourself bitten. Pets will usually prefer human touch rather than a hard plastic brush. If your dog already has a considerable buildup of tartar and plaque, veterinary cleaning may be needed. Some dogs will let you scrape the tartar if you are brave enough to try it. Just purchase a dental scraper and be gentle. Otherwise, brushing or spraying about 3 times weekly supplemented with the occasional frozen raw bone (acquired at any butcher or deli) should be enough for maintenance. Remember that you should not use human toothpaste on your pets. Pets will swallow the toothpaste and may get sick. There are several pet toothpaste products available, just be sure that whatever you use is specifically approved for pets.
  • Nails - If left uncared for, nails can grow to enormous lengths, twisting the toe and causing a pained, irregular gait that can lead to skeletal damage, sometimes even curling into the pads of the foot. To keep your dog's nails short, clip them regularly. Depending on the dog, you may need to do it as often as once a week or as infrequently as once a month. To clip the nails, trim a very small amount of nail (like 1/16 of an inch) away with a pair of dog nail clippers (unless it is a very young puppy or very small dog, in which case human clippers may suffice). Should you accidentally clip too much nail away and hit a blood vessel, styptic powder or corn starch applied with a bit of pressure should stop any bleeding.
4. Get your dog into the tub and, if necessary, secure to something such as a suction cup-type bath lead to keep him or her in place. Some dogs are frightened by the sound of running water - if this is the case, you need to desensitize the dog to the sound. Filling a tub with water and using it for bathing just leaves your dog sitting in dirty bath water. The regular collar should be off and replaced with one that will not stain the coat or be damaged by water to restrain the dog in the tub. Do not put on the dog's regular collar until late in the day (if you bathe in the morning or early afternoon) or the next day (if you bathe in the evening). A collar can cause sores around the neck of a dog who is not fully dry.

5. Thoroughly wet down your dog. If you have a medium or large dog, or one with a double coat, a water pressurizer attached to the hose or a hose attachment for the sink, bath spout, or shower head can help you clean all parts of your dog's body with ease. Just don't force the dog if the noise hurts its ears. Desensitize it to the sound of running water so it won't be frightened.

6. Begin shampooing at the neck and move downward. Shampoos will always be easier to apply and rinse off if diluted. It's better to give 2 diluted shampoos that rinse thoroughly than one strong shampoo that leaves residue. When you are shampooing a certain area, give it a few squirts and use your hand to spread the shampoo. For double coated dogs, a curry brush such as the Kong Zoom Groom will help you work the shampoo into the coat, especially long-haired dogs cannot simply be scrubbed with a curry. They will need to have the shampoo worked into the hair by smoothing it into a length of coat and continuing like that over the dog, or you will pay in gigantic mats. Save the head for last, and don't actually use soap around the ears and eyes. Be careful around the nose and mouth too.

7. Thoroughly rinse your dog. As long as you see dirt or soap bubbles in the water coming off of an area, keep spraying, then move on. Shampoo left in the coat will cause hot spots, an irritating spot of bald, itchy, red skin.

8. Towel dry your dog as best as you can. If your dog has a very short coat or you prefer to let your dog's coat dry naturally, you're done. If you have a double coated or long-haired dog, keep reading.

  • Blow dry the dog as best as you can without completely drying him or her. You don't want to dry out the skin. If you have a dog with especially long hair, you may need to dry the coat while brushing it.
  • Dogs with curly coats like poodles and Bichons need to be dried thoroughly or the hair will revert to curl. Feet always need to be dried thoroughly as well or fungus may take hold.
  • When blow drying your dogs hair make sure that the blow dryer is on the cool setting! It may take longer than usual, but it's worth the time because there will be less of a chance your dog's hair and skin will dry out.

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Wednesday, April 2, 2014

Training Your Dog.Tips for best results

Training Your Dog.Tips for best results

Many people can’t imagine life without dogs. We admire and adore them for their loyalty, unconditional affection, playful exuberance and zest for life. Nevertheless, dogs and people are very different animals. Although officially “man’s best friend,” dogs have some innocent but irksome tendencies—like jumping up to greet, barking, digging and chewing—that can make it downright difficult to live with them! To make the most of your relationship with your dog, you need to teach her some important skills that will help her live harmoniously in a human household.
  Learning how to train your dog will improve your life and hers, enhance the bond between you, and ensure her safety—and it can be a lot of fun. Dogs are usually eager to learn, and the key to success is good communication. Your dog needs to understand how you’d like her to behave and why it’s in her best interest to comply with your wishes.
  If you ask around, you’ll get all kinds of advice about training your dog. Some people will tell you that the key is to use a “firm hand”—to make sure your dog doesn’t think she can get away with naughty behavior. Some people argue that you should only use rewards in dog training and avoid punishing your dog in any way. Some people insist that all you have to do is “be the alpha dog,” assert your status as the dominant leader of your “pack.” It’s easy to get overwhelmed by the glut of differing opinions out there.
 Regardless of which method and techniques you use, effective dog training boils down to one thing—controlling the consequences of your dog’s behavior. If you want to influence the way your dog behaves, you need to:
  • Reward behaviors you like.
  • Make sure behaviors you don’t like aren’t rewarded.
Top Tips

Just like kids, dogs need a schedule
  Like a temper tantrum-throwing toddler without structure in its life, a dog without a set schedule is bound to become irritable and act out. Dogs need set times for interaction, exercise, feeding and training.


Listen to your dog

  Learn to listen to your dog. If your dog appears to be uncomfortable meeting another dog, animal or person, don’t insist that he say hello. He’s telling you that he isn’t comfortable for a reason, and you should respect that. Forcing the issue can often result in bigger problems down the line.

Leadership is the foundation of training
  Dog training relies on the presence of one pack leader. A dog lover who assumes the role of pack leader will have successful training sessions.

Half the battle takes place in your mind
  You must have unwavering mental strength and confidence to gain the trust and respect of your dog during training sessions. Your dog can sense if you are uncertain or fear it, so you must control situations by maintaining the role of an authoritative pack leader.

Be generous with your affection
  Most people don’t have a problem being very clear about when they are unhappy with their dogs, but, they often ignore the good stuff. Big mistake! Make sure you give your dog lots of attention when he’s doing the right thing. Let him know when he’s been a good boy. That’s the time to be extra generous with your attention and praise. It’s even okay to be a little over the top.

Does he really like it?
  Just because the bag says “a treat all dogs love” doesn’t mean your dog will automatically love it. Some dogs are very selective about what they like to eat. Soft and chewy treats are usually more exciting for your dog than hard and crunchy treats. Keep your eyes open for what he enjoys.

Discipline and punishment are not synonymous
  Invest heavily in dog training, and there will be no need for punishment. It takes time and effort to see real improvement in your dog's behavior. Don't let your frustrations distract you from your goal to properly and successfully train your pet.

A dog is a dog
  Treating a dog in a humanized manner is perhaps the cardinal sin dog lovers commit. Love your dog, but do not treat him as a baby. Only dogs that understand their role within a family unit are actually trainable. Upset the role identification, and problems are sure to ensue.

Tell him what you want him to do
   There is nothing inherently wrong with telling your dog “no,” except that it doesn’t give him enough information. Instead of telling your dog “no,” tell him what you want him to do. Dogs don’t generalize well, so if your dog jumps up on someone to say hello and you say no, he may jump higher or he may jump to the left side instead of the right. A better alternative would be to ask him to “sit.” Tell him what you want him to do in order to avoid confusion.

Be consistent
  Whenever you’re training your dog, it’s important to get as many family members involved as possible so everyone’s on the same page. If you are telling your dog “off” when he jumps on the couch and someone else is saying “down,” while someone else is letting him hang out up there, how on earth is he ever going to learn what you want? Consistency will be the key to your success.

Freedom
  Let your new dog gradually earn freedom throughout your home. A common error that many pet parents make is giving their new dog too much freedom too soon. This can easily lead to accidents relating to housetraining and destructive chewing. So, close off doors to unoccupied rooms and use baby gates to section off parts of the house, if necessary. One of the best ways to minimize incidents is to keep your dog tethered to you in the house and by using a crate or doggie safe area when you can’t actively supervise him.

Start today
  It never is too early or too late to start working with a dog. Whether your canine companion is a puppy or a more mature dog, commit to start today and achieve with your dog what Millan refers to as "balance between people and dogs."

Get all family members on board
  It takes a household to properly train a dog. You, your partner and all household members need to be on the same page when it comes to acceptable and unacceptable behavior. While there only is one pack leader, the other family members still are dominant to the dog, and they must treat their relationship with it as such.

Bribery- Reward
  The idea of using treats to train is often equated with bribery. Truthfully, dogs do what works. If using treats gets them to do what you want, then why not? You can also use the world around you as a reinforcement. Every interaction you have with your dog is a learning opportunity, so when you think about it, you probably don’t use food very often except during active training sessions. So why does your dog continue to hang out? Because you reinforce him with praise, touch, games and walks. Just remember, the behavior should produce the treat; the treat should not produce the behavior.

Have realistic expectations
  Changing behavior takes time. You need to have realistic expectations about changing your dog’s behavior as well as how long it will take to change behaviors that you don’t like. Often behaviors which are “normal” doggie behaviors will take the most time such as barking, digging and jumping. You also need to consider how long your dog has rehearsed the behavior. For example, if you didn’t mind that your dog jumped up on people to say hi for the last seven years and now you decide that you don’t want him to do that anymore, that behavior will take a much longer time to undo than if you had addressed it when he was a pup. Remember it’s never too late to change the behavior some will just take longer than others.

Dogs need boundaries
  Set boundaries in your home. If your dog's barking at company bothers you, make this a focal point of your training. If a dog's presence in an off-limits room annoys you, focus on this aspect of the dog's behavior instead.

Don't  underestimate the benefits of feeding a high quality food
  Feed your dog a high-quality diet with appropriate amounts of protein. If your dog spends most of his days lounging in your condo, don’t feed him food with a protein level that is ideal for dogs who herd sheep all day. The money that you will spend on feeding an appropriate quality food will often be money that you save in vet bills later on. I recommend you always check with your veterinarian for the right diet for your dog.

You get what you reinforce- not necessarily what you want
  If your dog exhibits a behavior you don’t like, there is a strong likelihood that it’s something that has been reinforced before. A great example is when your dog brings you a toy and barks to entice you to throw it. You throw the toy. Your dog has just learned that barking gets you to do what he wants. You say “no,” and he barks even more. Heaven forbid you give in and throw the toy now! Why? Because you will have taught him persistence pays off. Before you know it you’ll have a dog that barks and barks every time he wants something. The solution? Ignore his barking or ask him to do something for you (like “sit”) before you throw his toy.


  If you’d like to learn how to train your dog or if your dog has a behavior problem you’d like to resolve, don’t hesitate get help from a qualified professional trainer or behaviorist. To learn more about locating the right expert for you and your dog, please see our article, Finding Professional Help. Many Certified Professional Dog Trainers (CPDTs) and Certified Applied Animal Behaviorists (CAABs or ACAABs) offer telephone consultations, in-home private consultations and training sessions, and group classes.

  There are also a number of excellent books and DVDs to explore. Here are some of our favorites:
  • The Power of Positive Dog Training by Pat Miller (and other books by her)
  • Maran Illustrated Dog Training
  • Dog-Friendly Dog Training by Andrea Arden
  • The Culture Clash by Jean Donaldson
  • How to Teach a New Dog Old Tricks by Ian Dunbar, PhD
  • Take a Bow-Wow! video series by Virginia Broitman and Sherri Lippman
  • New Puppy! Now What? DVD by Victoria Schade
  • Clicker Magic DVD by Karen Pryor

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What Are The Best Dog Toys?

What Are The Best Dog Toys?
  Dogs are just like us; they need to be kept busy, mentality stimulated and in tip-top health. There are a huge range of toys that can help. We’ve taken expert advice to find the best out there for canines of all breeds, ages and sizes. From the innovative alternative to potentially harmful wood, Safestix, to fun novelty-shaped squeakers like the Ruff and Tuff Mallard, there’s something to take all dogs’ – and their owners’ – fancy.

Importance of Dog Toys
  Exercise is the primary reason why many dog owners invest in toys. Having a ball to throw for a dog helps not only to keep exercise rigorous, but also makes it fun for both the dog and the owner. Exercise is a crucial part of having a healthy dog because without adequate exercise a dog will become obese and will fall prey to a number of illnesses. Obesity in dogs is a serious concern not only due to an increased risk for illnesses like diabetes, but also because it puts additional strain on their joints and their internal organs.

Intellectual Stimulation - All dogs require exercise not only to help to keep them at a healthy weight, but also to ensure that they stay stimulated. Despite being “domesticated,” dogs can easily become bored. There is a saying that a “tired dog is a good dog” and this is particularly true for working breeds such as border collies. Without adequate intellectual stimulation dogs can become destructive, disobedient and downright impossible to handle. With a combination of exercise and intellectual stimulation, however, it is possible for even the most high energy dog to relax.

Bonding - Dogs are pack animals by nature and they have a need to bond with other members of their pack and feel accepted. A great way to bond with your dog is to engage in play time that involves their favorite toys. Not only does your dog benefit from the time you spend together bonding, but researchers have found a proven link between better health and dog owners!
Toys are also a great way to encourage bonding in multiple-dog households. If you have more than one dog, toys can encourage interactive playing and help dogs to bond with each other as well as understand their place in the hierarchy of the home.

Dental Health - Dental health is a difficult concern for many dog owners. It is crucial to a dog’s overall health to have clean teeth. Poor dental hygiene can lead to malnutrition as well as infections, absences and bad breath. Brushing a dog’s teeth can be particularly difficult, especially with dogs that don’t like to have their teeth cleaned. Surgical cleanings can be particularly difficult as well since they involve a significant financial burden and putting your dog under anesthesia. A great way to improve dental health and reduce the need for surgical cleanings, however, is to invest in toys that are designed to clean teeth as your dog plays. These toys encourage chewing which stimulates saliva and helps to diminish plaque and reduce its occurrence.

Top Dog Toys

KONG Chew Toy
  The granddaddy of all work-to-eat toys, the Kong is a chew toy made of nearly indestructible rubber. It was originally based on a part of a Volkswagen bus' suspension device that the creator's German Shepherd found particularly irresistible. Kongs can be stuffed with a wide variety of yummies. Kong sells especially shaped treats and different things you can squeeze inside, but you can stuff it with whatever your dogs' weakness might be: cream cheese, Cheez Whiz, wet dog food, peanut butter, liverwurst, frozen blueberries, hamburger meat. Yummers.
  There used to be a great product that operated on a timer and dispensed Kongs at intervals, so you could stuff four of them and then leave for the day and your dog would get them doled out at neat intervals. The product was discontinued a few years ago, but you can occasionally find a used one on Ebay, and they're well worth the $100 or so that they usually sell for. Search the ‘Bay for Dogopolis KongTime Automatic Dog Toy Dispenser.

"It's a super-durable chew toy, but its true value is its ability to occupy your dog for hours on end."- Kathy Santo

Wainwright’s Ruff and Tuff Mallard
  This fun squeaker toy from the pet specialists is designed to be tougher than your average canine plaything. With its added rope, this one’s good for a dog’s dental health – when they chew, it acts almost like dental floss.

The Bob-a-Lot
 This genius little Bob-a-Lot is weighted on the bottom, so it wobbles all around like those inflatable "bop bags" we had as kids. It comes in a few different sizes. The yellow part at the top screws off, allowing you to put kibble inside, or any kind of small and fairly hard treats. If you feed your dog kibble, you can put his entire meal in this thing. It makes mealtime last ten times as long, which is a good thing for reasons both behavioral and healthful.
Kong makes a similar to, the Wobbler, which is just as good except that there are no doors or flaps, so the levels can't be changed.

 Sergeant’s Powzer Glow Ball Toy For Dogs
  The Sergeant’s Powzer Glow Ball Toy is a glowing ball that makes fetch fun and easy even in the dark! So if you prefer to get out and about early or after you get home from work, fetch no longer has to wait because this ball can be seen anywhere. The Powzer ball comes in four different colors including pink, green, yellow and orange as well as two different sizes: large which is 3.25” and small or junior which is 2.25”. Benefits include high visibility, dental health and two sizes of balls for play.
The Sergeant’s Powzer Glow Ball Toy is made from rubber by the Sergeant’s Pet Care Products, Inc. Company. This is an American made product.
The Sergeant’s Powzer Glow Ball Toy makes a great fetch toy no matter the time of day but it is important to remove the ball after playing since it can be damaged by rough play.

The Tricky Treat Ball
 The Tricky Treat Ball is similar to the Bob-A-Lot. There's a single hole in which you put in kibble or treats and they fall out as the dog pushes it. Much enjoyment will ensue. Your dog will continue to play with the ball after all the treats are gone–he'll be holding out hope that maybe there's still one lodged in there somewhere. He'll also keep playing with it because, like so many humans, dogs like balls.

Orbee Tuff Woof Ball
  
Dogs can gnaw on this ball to their heart’s content, it’s mint-scented, bouncy and will float. It’ll keep even the most persistent chewers busy.



Nylabone Dental Dinosaurs
  Nylabone Dental Dinosaurs are another great toy idea from Nylabone and they come in three shapes – Brontosaurus, Stegosaurus and Tyrannosaurus Rex. These chew toys are naturally flavor-enhanced to encourage chewing and small nubs make great dental cleaners as the clean teeth and massage your dog’s gums. Benefits to the Nylabone Dental Dinosaurs include dental health, healthy chewing activity and better breath for your dog!
Nylabone Dental Dinosaurs are made from nylon as are other popular Nylabone products.
Always be sure to keep an eye on the condition of your dogs Nylabone Dental Dinosaurs toy and as the toy wears down replace it with a new one.

The Tug-a-Jug
  Here, the human puts dry food (kibble, treats, Cheerios, whatever) into the Tug-a-Jug , which unscrews at the bottom. The food comes out of a narrow hole at the top, which has a rope sticking into it. As the dog pulls on the rope, some food gets dragged out. Your pup will have crazy amounts of fun swinging this around and tugging at it. It comes in several sizes to accommodate different size dog mouths. I find that the rope usually doesn't last too long, but Premier does sell replacements–and sticking an old knotted sock halfway in pretty much does the same job. 

Busy Buddy Kibble Nibble Feed Ball
  A good one for medium and large dogs (think Labradors rather than Jack Russells), you put the dried food in the middle and it dispenses as they play. It has rubber bumpers, so it won’t damage the furniture or make too much of a racket when it’s used inside.




The Waggle
Stuff dry food into the sides of the barbell-shaped Waggle and the bits will fall out intermittently as your dog holds the middle part in his mouth and shakes it. Well, that's supposed to be how it works, at least–my dog prefers to just kind of roll it around with his paws until the treats come out. That works too. There are rubber teeth in the holes on the sides that can be snipped out in order to reduce the level of difficulty. Premier also makes the Chuckle, which is similar but a little sturdier and has a squeaker inside.

Safestix
  Wooden sticks can cause injury to dogs’ teeth, gums and mouths, yet they love to play with them. Available in three sizes, these are a safer alternative. They’re durable, comfortable to hold and will float – just the thing for a game of fetch on the beach.


Home of Paws Rotator Ball and Rope

This ball-on-a-rope toy is made from recyclable resin which the makers say is stronger, lighter and longer-lasting than rubber or plastic. The rope helps condition teeth, too. Available in two sizes of ball, 10 per cent of the cost goes to the Dogs Trust. 



The Dog Casino
  The Dog Casino is a one of the many fine toys by Nina Ottosson, a genius Swedish pioneer in the world of interactive dog puzzle toys. Her offerings come in a variety of levels of difficulty and in both plastic and wood. 


Mungo and Maud Pull My Leg Monkey Toy



  Dogs love to pull playthings apart. This toy from the luxury pet accessories store is designed with that instinct in mind. The fleece monkey’s limbs are attached with velcro, so will come off when tussled with, and it squeaks when squeezed. It’s not cheap, so this is one for pampered pooches.




Aerobie Dogobie disc
  Many dogs love a game of Frisbee, but plastic flyers often have hard rims which can damage teeth. This softer rubber alternative from the (mostly human) sports toy specialists is easy to throw and flexible, but durable enough to last many a game of fetch. It’s tear and puncture resistant but try to stop your dog chewing on it.

Good Boy Rubber Ball

  If you struggle throwing a ball or stick far, this good-value toy will make it easier to lob a decent distance and the rubber ball will stand up to some serious gnawing. Use for fetch or for tugging games. 




Pet Brands Rubba Guma Dental Dog Toy
  Dogs need to keep their teeth clean and their gums healthy. This innovative toy’s on hand to help; they chew and it helps with teeth cleaning, plaque removal and the spearmint flavour helps freshen breath. Available in three sizes.




  While your dog would likely choose every one of these toys as their favorite, choosing the right one is up to you. Only you know your dog’s likes and dislikes as well as their destructive tendencies. For example if you have a dog who loves to play ball then a Nylabone isn’t going to do the trick. If, however, you have a dog that adores plush toys but can get a little carried away then the SPOT Skinneeez Stuffing Free Plush Fox Dog Toy might be the right choice for you. If you keep your dog’s preferences in mind you won’t go wrong with any of these dog toy choices.
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