LUV My dogs: attention

LUV My dogs

Everything about your dog!

Showing posts with label attention. Show all posts
Showing posts with label attention. Show all posts

Saturday, July 12, 2014

Tips On How To Get Your Dogs Attention

Tips On How To Get Your Dogs Attention
 “My dog just doesn’t listen!” 
  It is very frustrating when your dog ignores you, but is he really ignoring you, or does he not realize you are even speaking to him. 
  Dogs are interesting beasts. They crave your attention and companionship. Why do you suppose there are times when your dog just completely ignores you?
  One of the things you have to learn is that you need to give your dog a reason to follow your command. If your pet has become accustomed to getting in trouble when his name is called, he is less likely to respond to you. The worst thing you can do is to call your dog, only to punish him. Would you turn to acknowledge someone calling your name if you knew it was not going to be a pleasant encounter? I wouldn't.
  Dogs, for the most part, are happy-go-lucky. They are always ready to play and get their feelings hurt very easily when there is a negative confrontation. You have the capability of humiliating or embarrassing your dog just by your actions. You do not want to do that. Believe me when I tell you, your dog is very sensitive to how you treat him. He wants your approval more than anything else. 
  If he is used to you reprimanding or punishing him when you call him, why shouldn't he ignore you. He may be thinking you will just go away if he pretends not to hear you.

Here’s how to teach your dog the “look” command:
1. Getting Started
“Look” is a very simple command to teach. You will need some treats, and your clicker if you are working on clicker training. Teaching “look” is a great way to introduce your dog to the clicker if you have not already done so. You should begin training in a quiet spot with very little to distract your dog. Once you have your clicker and treats ready, say your dog’s name followed by the command “look.”
2. Getting Your Dog’s Attention
For many dogs, hearing their name will be enough to get their attention. If your dog looks at your face after you give the command, you can praise him or click, and give him a treat.
Some dogs may not respond immediately to hearing their name paired with the “look” command. In this case, after you give the command, wave a treat in front of your dog’s nose, and then pull the treat up to your face. Your dog will follow the treat, and end up looking at your face. Praise him or click, and give him a treat immediately.
Within a few short training sessions, you will have no problem getting your dog to focus his attention on you. Continue practicing with your dog, and gradually move up to working in more distracting surroundings. Soon you will be able to get your dog’s attention in any situation.
  You want your dog to respect you for being fair and kind. Their feelings are not much different from our own. There is a difference between a command and a threat. "Come Shadow, good boy", this is good. "Shadow, if you don't get over here, you are going to get it", not good. Dogs respond to the tone of your voice. Do not confuse him by giving a command in an angry voice. You can be sure he will be ignoring you in no time.
  Your dog does not purposely disobey you. There is a better chance that he just does not understand what you want him to do. You need to give him a clear command so he does understand. 

There are a few things you can do to get your dog to acknowledge you... 
1. Does your dog know his name? Make sure you use his name a lot during training sessions while showing affection at the same time. If he does not know his name, that is your first problem. The idea is that you want him to pay attention to you when you speak to him or give him a command. He will begin to recognize his name and associate it with something pleasant.
2. Does your dog know you are talking to him? I know that sounds silly, but depending on your tone of voice, he may not be intentionally ignoring you at all. He may think you are talking to someone else.
3. Does your dog like to wander around and investigate the premises? When your pet does this, he is just in his own little world. It is as if we, as people, have something on our mind. We will just tune out our surroundings. So if we do it, why can't they? Get his attention by petting him and saying his name. Once you have gotten his attention, then give him a command.
4. Do not be afraid to make eye contact with your dog. It is hard for him to ignore you if you are looking him right in the eyes. This also helps to establish you as the alpha of his pack.
5. Once your dog realizes that what you want him to do is not going to be unpleasant, he will begin to acknowledge you. Always keep in mind that your tone of voice can put a different feel to any command. Always keep your voice pleasant, but not passive.
6. Do not try to get his attention if you are going to do something unpleasant. If you are going to bathe him or clip his nails, for instance, you need to go get him. This will help to keep real commands positive so he will listen to you.
7. Your body language is very important when training your dog to listen to you. Just like people, dogs will associate your body language with your mood. If, for instance, your arms are crossed and you are standing tall, your dog could associate this with you being angry. Stay relaxed and your dog will be relaxed and respond better.
8. If you are training your dog to come to you with treats, let him come all the way to you. Do not reach out and offer him the treat. Hold the treat next to your leg and make him come all the way to you. 
9. You need to establish yourself as the alpha dog, but not by seeming threatening to your dog. Always speak to your dog in a pleasant voice. Once your dog understands what you want, he is less likely to ignore you.

  By the way, did you notice how in order to teach your dog to pay attention to you, you have to pay attention to your dog? Yes, that’s the secret decoder ring of dog training, right there.

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Friday, July 11, 2014

Successful Dog Training Techniques

Successful Dog Training Techniques
   Many people can’t imagine life without dogs. We admire and adore them for their loyalty, unconditional affection, playful exuberance and zest for life. Nevertheless, dogs and people are very different animals. Although officially “man’s best friend,” dogs have some innocent but irksome tendencies-like jumping up to greet, barking, digging and chewing-that can make it downright difficult to live with them! To make the most of your relationship with your dog, you need to teach her some important skills that will help her live harmoniously in a human household.
    When you bring a dog into your home, you must be dedicated to helping him be the best dog he can be.  That is one of the most important jobs you have as the parent of a canine.      Providing him with the essentials for living is one aspect of this job, but teaching him right from wrong should be considered just as important.  As you raise your children, you teach them these lessons to make them happy and successful people.  Your dog deserves this same assistance and consideration.  

Old Dog, New Tricks?
  Many people are under the mistaken impression that if you adopt an adult or older dog, that he is past the age to be trained. Nothing can be further from the truth.  Dogs are extremely intelligent creatures, and their intelligence does not decrease over the years.  If anything, they get smarter as they get older.  Yes, they may be a little more set in their ways and a little less eager to jump on the training bandwagon, but with the love, support, and consistency of a good parent, any dog can learn better behavior.


Be Consistent
  Give clear and consistent commands for the desired behavior. For example, a "down" command should not be used interchangeably with an "off" command. Technically, these are two different behaviors. Always use commands and avoid vague words such as "no" or simply calling their name. For best results, replace "no" with the exact behavior you want him or her to do.


Too Young To Learn

   Alternatively, another myth with dog training is that if you begin training too early, your dog

will not be able to learn because she is too young.  This is not true, either.  No matter how

young your puppy is when you bring her home, start your training immediately. They are
essentially babes in the woods and do not know how to interact with the world around them.
      You are responsible for showing them what to do and what not to do.  Without this guidance, she will run amuck and get into things and damage your belongings, as well as injuring themselves or others.  

Be a Good Leader
   Some people believe that the only way to transform a disobedient dog into a well-behaved one is to dominate her and show her who’s boss. However, the “alpha dog” concept in dog training is based more on myth than on animal science. More importantly, it leads misguided pet parents to use training techniques that aren’t safe, like the “alpha roll.” Dogs who are forcibly rolled onto their backs and held down can become frightened and confused, and they’re sometimes driven to bite in self defense.

Positive and/or Negative Reinforcement
   Whether you are raising a human child or a canine one, you will hear a lot about positive and negative reinforcement.  Positive reinforcement is when you see that your child is doing the right thing so you pat him and speak to him in an approving voice and tell him what a good job he did. 
This is a very key part to almost any type of successful training activity.  When a puppy or dog is told that she is doing good things and getting positive attention based on her actions, she will want to continue doing these things.  She wants your love and approval, so she will do what she can to get it.  Your dog is extremely smart and will make the connection between her actions and your reactions.  Many owners choose to use a higher pitched voice when conveying approval. Dogs do respond well to this. 
   Negative reinforcement is basically the same process, but it is something you do when she has done something she should not.  Based on the rules of negative reinforcement, when your dog does something bad or dangerous, your reaction should be negative.  You should speak to her in a low and unhappy tone, telling her that his action was bad.  This does work, but should be used sparingly.  If your pooch is always getting negative reactions to her behaviors, she will go through life an unhappy, maladjusted dog.  She will become nervous and worried about pleasing you and could even develop anxiety problems.
When teaching new skills, keep training sessions short and sweet
 Like kids, dogs don’t have long attention spans. There’s no hard-and-fast rule, but an ideal average training session should last 15 minutes or less. Within that session, you can work on one skill or switch between a few different skills. To keep things interesting, try doing 5 to 15 repetitions of one behavior and then doing 5 to 15 repetitions of another behavior. You can also practice new skills and keep old ones polished by doing single repetitions at convenient times throughout the day. For example, before giving your dog a tasty new chew bone, ask her to sit or lie down to earn it.

Positive Reinforcement Only
  This tact has been used very successfully for many people, including various types of law enforcement personnel when training their dogs.  Using only positive reinforcement to help your dog understand what she is doing right and completely ignoring any bad action is a mainly passive type of training.  This can often take longer, but has been proven to work long term much better than other training methods.  Using this method, the only time you give your dog any attention for doing something negative is if what she is doing will endanger he in any way. 
   No matter what type of training you use with your dog, make sure that you reassure her of your love and acceptance.  You are doing what is best for her, which makes you the best parent you could ever be.

Help him Focus
  Some training sessions may be impromptu, and those are great if you can keep your dog's attention. If your dog is having difficulty focusing, he may need to drain some energy before hand with a walk, a game of fetch, time on the treadmill, or a play date. Focusing is as much of a skill as the command you are trying to teach. If your dog is having difficulty loose leash walking outside, practice inside where there are fewer distractions. Gradually increase diversions as he masters the skill.

  A training session can last as little as a minute or long as you have your dog's attention. Training and learning can be a way of life for your dog when he is guided to live within your rules and boundaries. Having your dog sit before you feed him, or wait at the door before you exit, or slowly walk down the stairs with you, these are all examples of daily training in action. Think of training as simply communicating with your dog and not something that requires special treats, experts, or lots of time. By communicating clearly, consistently, and with affection, your dog can always be learning.

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Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Everything about your Chihuahua

Everything about your Chihuahua

This sassy little dog has a super-size personality. He knows what he wants and goes after it with single-minded determination. For his size, he’s an excellent watchdog, but he can be yappy if he’s not taught to moderate his barking.

  Chihuahua's need special requirements because of their small size. So, they need a loving family to care for them. If you want to pay care and respect to your chihuahua, then this is the article for you!

 History 
  The Chihuahua is a native of Mexico, and his ancestors were surrounded by many myths. They were believed to be spirit guides that protected souls as they traveled through the underworld. While the stories about the dog’s origins are interesting, there’s no real evidence about how long they’ve existed or that they were known to the Aztecs or other peoples who inhabited Mexico before the Spaniards came.
  Some dog experts say they were among the first native dogs of the Americas, others that they were brought to the New World after the Spanish conquest of Mexico. Still others believe the little dogs may have originated as miniaturized versions of pariah dogs, the nondescript brown dogs with prick ears that result when dogs are left to breed on their own with no selection for color or other specific characteristics. Whatever the case, the breed takes its name from the state of Chihuahua, where late-19th-century American tourists first encountered the tiny canines.
  The Chihuahua we know today was developed by North American breeders. The first Chihuahua registered by the American Kennel Club, in 1904, was named Midget. The Chihuahua Club of America was formed in 1923. Today, the Chihuahua ranks 13th among the breeds registered by the AKC.

Breed Characteristics
  • Easy grooming
  • Pleasant temperament
  • Long lifespan
  • Portable
  • Territorial tendencies
Overview

  Don't let their compact size fool you — when it comes to Chihuahuas, big personalities come in small packages. Confident, intelligent and passionate, Chihuahuas love to play, cuddle and speak their minds when necessary. These little guys take loyalty to the next level. Primarily bred as human companions, Chihuahuas are known for attaching themselves to their owner. They can be protective, territorial and even jealous. Undeterred by their small size, Chihuahuas use their loud, high-pitched barks as a way of "guarding" their beloved masters.



Breed standards
  • AKC group: Toy Dog
  • UKC group: Companion Dog
  • Average lifespan: 12 - 20 years
  • Average size:  6 pounds and under
  • Coat appearance: Varies
  • Coloration: Tan, red, black, white or splash
  • Hypoallergenic: No
  • Other identifiers: Small frame and fragile head structure; ears are pointed and erect
  • Possible alterations: Head shape can be apple- or deer-shaped; coat can be long- or short-haired
  • Comparable Breeds: Papillon, Pekingese
Is this breed right for you?
  Chihuahuas are a great fit for many, but households with young children may want to think twice about bringing home this tiny breed. Due to their size, Chihuahuas must be handled with gentle care and require constant supervision around young children. Chihuahuas make excellent companions for apartment dwellers and families with older children as they require little maintenance and space. Whether you opt for a pet with a smooth coat or a long-haired Chihuahua, grooming for this breed is fairly low-maintenance. Chihuahua owners should also beware of a soft spot in their dog's skull known as a molera. As the only breed born with an incomplete skull, it's important to treat this breed with extra-gentle care, especially during the first six months of growth.


Other Quick Facts

  For the show ring, the Chihuahua should not exceed six pounds, but many Chihuahuas are actually larger than that, making them a better choice for families with children.
Chihuahuas that weigh less than three pounds often have a short life span.
Don’t think that the Chihuahua is a gentle lapdog. He is tenacious and terrierlike in attitude.
Chihuahuas are highly intelligent and take well to training when it comes with positive reinforcement in the form of treats and praise.
Chihuahuas come in any solid color or combination of colors, including fawn, black and tan, chocolate and white, blue and red. Avoid breeders who try to get you to pay more for supposedly “rare” colors.

How to Care- Step
1.Consider if you really should get a Chihuahua. They may be tiny, but they still need food, vet care, daily walks, and care for up to seventeen years. They are also prone to eye problems, weight gain, and can easily be injured if you accidentally step or sit on them. 

2.Decide if you want to buy or adopt your Chihuahua. Because they're so common, you can easily find a purebred in a shelter, but if you want a puppy your best bet will be a responsible breeder. However, never buy from a pet store or casual breeder, which can give you unhealthy puppies and are contributing to our huge pet overpopulation issue.

3.Don't baby your Chihuahua! You should treat your Chi like a big dog. For example, if a German Shepherd jumped up onto you, you would correct him. You should do this with your Chi too! If a Labrador snapped at another dog, you would correct him. If your Chi does the same, she should be corrected too!

4.Chihuahuas don't need much food, but the food they get should be high-quality and not random kibble. This might cost more, but it'll save you down the road by preventing health issues caused by bad food. Remember not to overfeed them, as Chihuahuas tend to grow fat, which is dangerous and unhealthy.

5.Take your Chihuahua to the vet for yearly check ups. Choose a vet who's experienced with Chihuahuas and their care!

6.Give your Chihuahua a daily walk! You might assume they get enough exercise running around the house, but walks offer mental stimulation that is necessary for your Chi. However, because of their short muzzles they can be susceptible to heat stroke; keep the walks short and only walk them during cool weather.

7.Grooming your Chihuahua is fairly easy. If your Chi is short-haired, he'll only need to be brushed or wiped over with a damp cloth occasionally. However, if your Chihuahua is long-haired, you'll need to brush her hair daily, and take care to watch for mats in the hair.

8.Love your Chihuahua! They can be difficult to care for, but their wonderful personalities, adventurous spirit, and lovable nature will win you over quickly.


What You Need to Know About Chihuahua Health
  Tiny dogs often come with big health problems, and the Chihuahua is no exception. Many Chihuahuas live long, healthy lives, but conditions seen in the breed include breathing difficulties caused by a windpipe that collapses in on itself; luxating patellas; eye disorders; congestive heart disease; certain neurological conditions including hydrocephalus (fluid buildup in and around the brain), neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, a condition in which fatty pigments in the brain cause the progressive loss of brain function, and atlantoaxial subluxation, a neck deformity that may require surgical correction; obesity; and dental problems caused by the small size of their mouths. 
  Luxating patellas are an orthopedic problem. The patella, or kneecap, of most very small dogs, including the Chihuahua, can very easily become displaced, causing pain and lameness. In mild cases the knee quickly slips back into place on its own, but severe cases must be corrected surgically. Ask your veterinarian to examine your dog's knees regularly, especially if you notice him limping or "bunny hopping" while running.
  The Chihuahua's round, protruding eyes are one of his most distinctive characteristics, but they are prone to a number of genetic eye disorders as well as to frequent injuries.
  Chihuahuas frequently have what's called a "molera," or an open fontanelle, which is a soft area under the skin of the forehead where the bony plates of the skull have not fused together. It may eventually close up and become hard, but in some dogs, the molera never fully closes. While many dogs can live a normal lifespan with a molera, some may have a condition called hydrocephalus (fluid buildup in and around the brain), which can cause seizures and even death if not treated. A Chihuahua with a molera can live a perfectly normal life, but he is more prone to head injuries so he’s not the best candidate for a home with rambunctious children or bigger, rougher dogs.
  Chihuahuas can also be born with a liver defect known as a portosystemic shunt, in which blood is diverted away from the liver. This may cause a buildup of toxins in the dog's body, stunted growth, and can be fatal if not corrected with surgery.
  Although Chihuahuas are prized for their small size, they're often fed to obesity. A Chihuahua's skeleton is not designed to carry much weight, and even a few extra ounces can be a significant burden to a dog this size. As with all dogs, leanness is far healthier – and cheaper, when it comes to veterinary costs. Keeping a Chihuahua lean is particularly important if he has luxating patellas.
  Tiny mouths frequently mean there's no room for proper development of teeth. It's essential to get regular veterinary dental care for a Chihuahua, and he may need to have some teeth pulled to make room in his mouth for proper development of the rest of the teeth.


Getting Their Attention 
  Sometimes when they are barking, it is impossible to get their attention. Try throwing a can of pebbles or can of coins in front of them or near them (don't hit them!) They will be startled and after a few times may conclude that barking brings about this startling thing and stop barking! Don't let your dog see you do this!

Chihuahua Grooming
  Chihuahuas come in two coat types: smooth and long. Smooth Chihuahuas wear a velvety, shiny, close-fitting coat and have a ruff — an area of thicker, longer hair — around the neck. They have a scant covering of hair on the head and ears. The tail should be furry, not bare.
  Smooth Chihuahuas shed, but they are so small that the amount is manageable for all but the most house proud. Brush them weekly with a rubber grooming glove or soft bristle brush to remove dead hair and keep the skin and coat healthy.
  The longcoated Chihuahua is the product of a recessive gene, meaning a puppy must have the gene from both parents for the long coat to express itself, so he isn’t seen in litters as frequently as the smooth. The long, soft coat is flat or slightly curly, and the dog has a ruff around the neck, fringed ears, feathering on the legs and a plumed tail. The hair on the rest of the body is almost as smooth as that on the smooth Chihuahua. Longcoated Chihuahuas are beautiful, and they’re easy to groom, but they do shed seasonally.
  Keep your Chihuahua’s big ears clean with a solution recommended by your veterinarian. Don’t use cotton swabs inside the ear; they can push gunk further down into it. Wipe out the ear with a cotton ball, never going deeper than the first knuckle of your finger.
  Trim his nails regularly, usually every couple of weeks. They should never be so long that you hear them clicking on the floor.

Adopting a Dog from a Chihuahua Rescue or Shelter
  There are many great options available if you want to adopt a dog from an animal shelter or breed rescue organization. Here is how to get started.

1. Use the Web.
  Social media is another great way to find a dog. Post on your Facebook page that you are looking for a specific breed so that your entire community can be your eyes and ears.

2. Reach Out to Local Experts
  Start talking with all the pet pros in your area about your desire for a Chihuahua. That includes vets, dog walkers, and groomers. When someone has to make the tough decision to give up a dog, that person will often ask her own trusted network for recommendations.

3. Talk to Breed Rescue
  Networking can help you find a dog that may be the perfect companion for your family. Most people who love Chihuahuas love all Chihuahuas. That’s why breed clubs have rescue organizations devoted to taking care of homeless dogs.

4. Key Questions to Ask
  You now know the things to discuss with a breeder, but there are also questions you should discuss with shelter or rescue group staff or volunteers before you bring home a pup.
  • What is his energy level?
  • How is he around other animals?
  • How does he respond to shelter workers, visitors and children?
  • What is his personality like?
  • What is his age?
  • Is he housetrained?
  • Has he ever bitten or hurt anyone that they know of?
  • Are there any known health issues?
  Puppy or adult, take your Chihuahua to your veterinarian soon after adoption. Your veterinarian will be able to spot problems, and will work with you to set up a preventive regimen that will help you avoid many health issues.

Did You Know?
  The Chihuahua is the most famous of the “purse puppies,” toy dogs toted around in chic upscale doggie bags by high-profile celebrities and socialites. The most famous celebrity Chihuahua is Tinker Bell, who spends her days nestled in socialite Paris Hilton’s handbag.

A dream day in the life of a Chihuahua
  Getting treated like the kings or queens they makes this tiny breed feel right at home. Chihuahuas love being carried around, and luckily, they're just the right size for it. Put this breed in a cute carrier, a stroller or gently carry them in your arms and consider their day made. This pint-sized pup is prone to suffering during extreme heat and cold so make sure they're appropriately dressed for the occasion.


Enjoy that Chihuahua!

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