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Showing posts with label apartment life. Show all posts
Showing posts with label apartment life. Show all posts

Tuesday, June 26, 2018

Everything about your Pomsky

Everything about your Pomsky
  Cute, silly, and suited for apartment life, the Pomsky is a dog that likes to be the center of attention, and with their adorable looks and playful antics, they often get the adoration they crave. Their unfortunate start as a designer breed mixed between Siberian Husky and Pomeranian parents hasn’t stopped them from earning popularity with dog lovers. Unfortunately, those who rush to buy Pomsky puppies from breeders are often overwhelmed and unprepared for their needs, and dogs of this breed sometimes find themselves left at shelters or with rescue groups. 

Overview
  The Pomsky is a mixed breed the result of crossing the Siberian Husky with a Pomeranian. She is a medium sized dog with a life span of 13 to 15 years. She is bred using artificial insemination as natural breeding would be dangerous due to the size difference between the parents. She is a fun and watchful dog who is great for families with older kids, couples or singles or seniors as long as she can be given the exercise she needs.
  The Pomsky is a dog best suited for a household that does not have children or other pets unless she is going to be raised with them. Early socialization and training are important for her. If you love the look of the Husky but do not have the room or the energy for a purebred the Pomsky is a great though expensive substitute.

Highlights
  • Pomsky are very trainable, but may inherit some stubbornness from the Siberian Husky, so they are best suited for experienced dog owners.
  • The Pomsky's thick coat makes it more tolerant of cold weather than most other kinds of lap dogs.
  • Pomskies are vocal dogs that tend to be yappy if they aren't properly trained.
  • The coat of the breed comes in a variety of colors, just like its parent breeds.
  • Socialization with other dogs and people is important, especially at an early age.
  • Pomsky are highly adaptable, don't have large space requirements, and only have moderate exercise needs, making them good apartment dogs.
Other Quick Facts

  • A Pomsky typically has a soft, fluffy, silky coat, prick ears and a furry tail that swishes over the back.
  • The Pomsky is usually bred from a Siberian Husky female and a Pomeranian male. Breedings are usually done through artificial insemination because of the size difference in the two breeds.
  • The size of a Pomsky can vary dramatically, from toy size to medium size. Like their parent breeds, the dogs can come in many different patterns and colors, such as grey/white, brown red, blue merle, blonde and more.
Breed standards
Dog Breed Group: Mixed Breed Dogs
Average lifespan: 12 to 15 years
Average size: 20-30 lb
Coat appearance: Fluffy, soft, wavy, double
Coloration: black-and-white coloration,this breed can exhibit a wide range of colors including black, grey, brown, red, blue, blonde, and more
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with older children, singles and seniors, apartments and houses with/without yards
Temperament: Loving, friendly, energetic, playful
Comparable Breeds: Pomeranian, Siberian Husky

History
  Pomsky breeders have formed the Pomsky Club of America, with the goal of achieving a recognized purebred dog. This can take years, however, and will not be accomplished any time soon.
  But crossing two breeds over and over does not a breed make. To achieve consistency in appearance, size and temperament, breeders must select the puppies with the traits they want and breed them over several generations for the traits to become set.
Crossbreeds such as Pomskies have become popular over the past 10 or 20 years as people seek out dogs that are different from the everyday Yorkie or Poodle. It’s also often claimed that crossbreeds are hypoallergenic or have fewer health problems or will carry the best traits of each breed, but this just isn’t true.
  Whatever his breed, cross or mix, love your dog for what he is: a unique and loving companion.

Personality
  The Pomsky is a bit of a comedian and tends to know that its cute antics will be met with plenty of adoration from human onlookers. They are highly adaptable to change, and their moderate exercise needs make them fairly suited to apartment living, so long as they get at least one long walk per day. That said, they tend to inherit their Husky parents' chatty howling and whining tendencies along with their Pomeranian parents' penchant for yapping.   This makes them very vocal dogs that may get on the neighbors' nerves. Also, they shed a ton, so be prepared to find hair everywhere and have some lint rollers and a vacuum cleaner at the ready. Pomskies tend to latch on to one favorite family member, though they may get along with all humans in the household. Socialization is very important and should begin at an early age. Pomskies can be nervous around strangers if they haven't been properly socialized.

Health
Since the breed is so new, not much is known about any common Pomsky health conditions. Keep in mind, though, that as is common with most mixed breeds, any hereditary health conditions that show up in either the Pomerian  or the Husky  may show up in your Pomsky, as well.

Care
As with any other breed, Pomskies need to be groomed on a regular basis to make sure their coats and skin are kept in top condition. They also need to be given regular daily exercise to ensure they remain fit and healthy. On top of this, dogs need to be fed good quality food that meets all their nutritional needs throughout their lives.

Living Conditions
The Pomsky’s generally small size makes this breed the perfect companion for someone living in an apartment all the way up to a larger home.

Training
Pomskies are highly intelligent and respond well to reward based training methods. However, they can sometimes inherit the Pomeranian’s stubbornness and the willfulness of the Siberian Husky and should therefore be handled with calm and assertive leadership. Failure to do so can result in “small dog syndrome” and other behavioral problems. For instance, Pomskies can be prone to resource guarding like the Pomeranians, and catching early signs of this behavioral problem will help you eliminate before it becomes a serious issue.
  For most new dog owners, it’s important to start with the basics such as potty training and learning to walk on a leash. Depending on the breeder you’ve got your Pomsky from and the puppy’s age, they might already know a trick or two, but it’s also highly likely you’ll need to be the one that that housetrains them. Training a puppy is not an easy feat, but it’s important to teach your Pomsky fur baby manners while they’re still young. If they sniff out you’re not an alpha, they’ll shamelessly exploit your weak side to their advantage- as any smart pupper would do!

Exercise
  Pomskies are high energy, intelligent dogs, much like both parent breeds. As such they must be given the right amount of daily exercise and as much mental stimulation as possible for them to be truly happy, well-rounded dogs. They need to be given a minimum of 30 to 40 minutes exercise a day, but more would be better so that boredom does not set in which could lead to a Pomsky developing some unwanted behavioural issues around the home.
  A shorter walk in the morning would be fine, but a longer more interesting one in the afternoon is a must. These dogs also like to be able to roam around a back garden as often as possible so they can really let off steam. However, the fencing must be extremely secure to keep these energetic dogs in because if they find a weakness in the fence, they will soon escape out and get into all sorts of trouble.

Grooming
  A Pomsky has a double coat that is usually soft, fluffy and silky. Brush or comb the Pomsky coat with a bristle brush at least weekly to distribute skin oils and prevent or remove mats and tangles.
  Bathe a Pomsky as needed. That might be weekly , monthly or somewhere in between.
Twice a year he “blows coat” as it’s called, losing a great deal of hair so new hair can grow in. This period can last up to three months during each shedding season — typically spring and fall. Brushing him daily at this time will help to ensure that loose fur comes out when you want it to and helps to keep it off your clothing and furniture.
  Other grooming needs include trimming his nails every few weeks, keeping his ears clean and dry and brushing his teeth regularly — daily if you can — with a vet-approved pet toothpaste. Small dogs can be especially prone to periodontal disease.

Children And Other Pets
  Pomskies are often wary of small children who may not be properly trained on how to handle animals, and they can nip if they feel uncomfortable or threatened. They can get along with other dogs if they are socialized, especially if they have been raised with them, though the high prey drive they inherit from the Husky means they might like to give chase to smaller animals like cats. It is best to socialize them early, especially if you plan to have them in a household with children or other pets.

Fun Facts About the Pomsky
  • The Pomsky is usually made by crossing a female Siberian Husky with a male Pomeranian to avoid complications caused by the smaller Pomeranian bearing a litter of larger puppies.
  • There is no way to predict which characteristics the Pomsky will inherit from each parent breed, but many Pomskies become protective of their owners and are skittish around children – they may not be the best family pet.
  • Though the black-and-white Husky-like coloration is the most popular for Pomskies, these dogs can range in coat type and length as well as color, including shades of brown, red, and even blonde.
  • Is the Pomsky a vulnerable breed? No, they have become one of the more popular cross breeds thanks to their kind natures and charming looks
  • A Pomsky’s sire is a Pomeranian and their dam is a Siberian Husky to avoid birthing complications
  • They come in lots of sizes, but prospective owners should be careful when considering buying an extra small Pomsky because of the health issues associated with their size
Did You Know?
Pomskies can be smart and learn quickly, especially when motivated by praise and food rewards.
  
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Monday, April 10, 2017

Everything about your Toy Fox Terrier

Everything about your Toy Fox Terrier
   A wonderful combination of both a toy breed and a terrier breed, the Toy Fox Terrier can be a bit like the Napoleon of the dog world: small in stature, but full of confidence. Able to complete a number of tasks just like the Toy Fox Terrier, but coming in a little package, it’s hard to deny that this dog can be one of the most endearing breeds around. After all, it’s rare to find a toy breed so durable, sturdy, and generally outgoing. These qualities are a mark of the Toy Fox Terrier’s unique pedigree, which we’ll detail in this overview of the breed.

Overview
  Bred as a means to make the Fox Terrier smaller, the Toy Fox Terrier was created by breeding a standard-sized Fox Terrier with a Chihuahua, Miniature Pinscher, Manchester Terrier and Italian Greyhound. A natural-born hunter, the Toy Fox Terrier enjoys chasing and playing around the yard. Extremely intelligent, this dog can be trained to assist the physically handicapped and as a hearing dog for the deaf.
  His intense loyalty to his family can make him aloof with strangers, but socialization and training to accept strangers should help your dog to realize there is no danger from visitors you allow in your home.

Highlights
  • The Toy Fox Terrier is not a suitable companion for all children. While a sturdy little dog, they cannot tolerate excessive rough handling, especially as they are prone to broken legs.
  • Terrier instinct may cause it to chase small animals, and thereby will need close supervision if outdoors off-leash with out a fence. Your dog should never be off-leash in an area where you cannot contain him should the need arise.
  • Being terriers they may not do well with smaller pets in the household such as hamsters, mice and gerbils.
  • They are a small dog but do not realize this; they sometimes challenge other dogs much larger than themselves. Supervised interaction with larger dogs is advisable.
  • Beneath the cute exterior of your TFT puppy can reside the heart of a tyrant. Be sure to train your puppy early to be a responsible and well-behaved member of your family.
  • Most Toy Fox Terriers would prefer to share your bed with you. However, jumping from such heights, especially when a puppy, can cause broken bones. Teaching your TFT to sleep in his own bed on the floor is a safer route.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • With their thin skin, Toy Fox Terriers like their comforts. Besides cuddling in a lap or snuggling under bedding, they’ll want a sweater to keep them warm whenever they’re exposed to prolonged cool or cold temperatures.
  • A Toy Fox Terrier’s worst qualities are his love of barking and his belief that he’s capable of taking on dogs many times his size. You have to protect him from himself.
  • A TFT’s best quality is his loving nature. He bonds strongly to his family and loves being a lap dog and companion.
  • Toy Fox Terriers don’t like getting wet.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy
UKC group: Companion
Average lifespan: 13 - 15 years
Average size: 4 - 10 pounds
Coat appearance: Short, smooth and thick.
Coloration: White, tan, chocolate, tricolored, white and black, white and tan
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Healthy, athletic body; small muzzle; small black eyes; black nose; erect V-shaped ears and docked tail
Possible alterations: Chocolate-colored dogs have like-colored noses; tail may not be docked
Comparable Breeds: Chihuahua, Rat Terrier

History of the Toy Fox Terrier
  This small American-bred dog has been around for the better part of a century. He was first known as a little farm dog, whose job it was to clear rats and other small vermin from barns and granaries.
  The Toy Fox Terrier was developed by breeding small Smooth Fox Terriers with several toy breeds, including the Chihuahua and Manchester Terrier. Some of the Chihuahua and Manchester Terrier traits did not fit with the type that the developers of the breed were trying to achieve, so after the initial crosses to set the size for the new breed, later breedings involved only smaller Smooth Fox Terriers.
   The United Kennel Club registered its first Toy Fox Terrier in 1936, but the breed didn’t gain American Kennel Club recognition until 2003. The TFT ranks 99th among the breeds registered by the AKC, and his size and temperament are sure to bring him greater popularity in the future.



Temperament 
  Intelligent, obedient, willing to work, this is the kind of toy dog that people who really love “working” dogs can still enjoy. It’s small but with the personality of a regular terrier, in many ways, and will even show these instincts by hunting small rodents and pests around the house. Given good discipline, it will be a good companion and willing to obey commands. Because it’s a small dog, be sure to teach children how to handle it and not to be aggressive with it.


Health
  The average life span of the Toy Fox Terrier is 12 to 14 years. Breed health concerns may include Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, patellar luxation and Von Willebrand disease.

Care
  The Toy Fox Terrier loves a soft warm bed or a lap. Because it is not an outdoor breed, coat care remains simple. It should, however, be provided with a daily exercise routine and sufficient playmates. Fortunately, a small area and some toys make for an excellent playground. The dog tends to bark and dig when it does not get sufficient training, attention, and exercise.

Living Conditions
  The Toy Fox Terrier is good for apartment life. It is very active indoors and will do okay without a yard. It cannot tolerate cold weather. It should wear a coat in the winter to help keep it warm.

Trainability
  Toy Fox Terriers are highly trainable and catch on to new behaviors quickly and easily. All you need to train a Toy Fox are treats and lots of excited praise. These tiny dogs don't take kindly to being treated harshly and will mistrust you if you use physical corrections. Luckily, training them is a joy and they are naturally well-behaved, so they hardly ever test a person's patience.
  Toy Fox Terriers are a snap to house train, unlike almost every other terrier and toy breed. They are small enough to use pads of canine litter boxes in the house, which is an added benefit for elderly owners or for people who live in apartments or condos.

Exercise Requirements
  Play is important; a daily walk is, as well, and they love a good yard. Just make sure the yard or area is fenced in, as these little dogs can escape through cracks and holes fairly easily. As they are small dogs, remember that their small strides can mean extra work to keep up with you.

Grooming
  All it takes to groom a Toy Fox Terrier is a lick and a promise. Give his short coat a quick brushing once a week and you’re done. Baths are needed only rarely, maybe after he’s rolled in something stinky. He sheds a little, but he’s so small that the amount of hair floating around is manageable.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Small breeds are prone to periodontal disease, so brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  They can be active, fun loving companions for older children, but like most toy breeds, they are not recommended playmates for very young children. Their small size, tendency to break bones easily, and terrier tenacity can make a bad combination with very young children.
  They get along well with other dogs and cats in their home, although they may be territorial toward strange dogs passing or approaching their property.

Is this breed right for you?
  A friendly and playful breed, the active Toy Fox Terrier requires a lot of physical and mental stimulation. OK for apartment living, he'll need regular exercise and toys to play with. Doing well with a fenced-in yard of his own, he'll constantly be at the side of his owner. Trained easily and well, he can be taught to learn many new tricks. This dog does better with older children; he may lose patience with younger children who don't know how to handle him. Getting along with cats if raised with them, he's likely to chase smaller animals and vermin. Not a fan of cold weather, he'll need a sweater when venturing outdoors in cooler climates.

Did You Know?
  Toy Fox Terriers are active and agile. They have even been known to climb trees in pursuit of squirrels.



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Friday, December 9, 2016

Everything about your Miniature Pinscher

Everything about your Miniature Pinscher
  The Miniature Pinscher is not a scaled-down Doberman, although he is fearless and makes a terrific watchdog. Known as the “King of the Toys,” this little fireball is best suited to an experienced owner who can manage his willful nature. On the plus side, his antics are pure entertainment, and he is simple to groom.

Overview
  Originating in Germany, the Miniature Pinscher was bred as a way to control the rodent population in stables. Developed from the Italian Greyhound and Dachshund, the Miniature Pinscher is small but fast. Often referred to as the "king of toys," the breed enjoys living a very active life that is stimulating both physically and mentally.
  The diminutive Min Pin is a bundle of energy, full of vigor. He's highly curious and tends to investigate — and possibly eat — everything. He must be watched closely so he doesn't get into something he shouldn't. He's a skilled escape artist and should never be outside off-leash — in fact, you'll have to make sure he doesn't dart out whenever you answer the front door.
  For these reasons, the Min Pin is not the dog for everyone, especially first-time dog owners. His energy and intelligence can catch his owner off guard. Without proper training and supervision, he can quickly become a tyrant in the household.

Highlights
  • Miniature Pinschers are hardy little dogs, but they can be easily injured by roughhousing. Because of this, they're better suited as pets for older children who have learned how to care for a dog properly.
  • The Min Pin is sensitive to cold. Be sure to put a sweater or coat on him when you take him outside in really cold weather.
  • Because they were originally bred to hunt vermin, Min Pins may attack small objects , which can be a choking hazard. He may also take off after small pets that he perceives as prey.
  • Min Pins have a lot of energy — probably more than you have. They're also very curious. You must supervise your Min Pin constantly, and if you can't, put him in a crate.
  • You must be willing to take the position of "alpha" in your household. If you don't, the Min Pin will gladly assume the role.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Min Pin is strong-willed and not for novices. He can be possessive of toys and food.
  • The Min Pin can have either cropped or uncropped ears and a docked tail. Coat colors include red, stag red (red with black hairs), black with rust markings, or chocolate with tan.
  • The Min Pin likes to play both indoors and out. He doesn’t need a lot of exercise, but a daily walk is important to give him the mental stimulation he needs.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 14 - 15 years
Average size: 8 - 12 pounds
Coat appearance: Smooth, short-haired
Coloration: Black and rust, red, stag red, chocolate and tan
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Compact, small, squarish body, with head proportional to the body; dark black eyes; scissor-bite teeth; strong, straight legs, cat-like feet, and cropped tail
Possible alterations: Tail may not be cropped and dewclaws may be removed.
Comparable Breeds: Cairn Terrier, Chihuahua


History
  The Miniature Pinscher is thought to be an old breed, but documentation can only trace it reliably back several hundred years. It was developed in Germany to kill rats in homes and stables.
Drawing of a pinscher and a miniature pinscher
by Jean Bungartz
   There it was first called the Reh Pinscher because of its supposed similarity to the reh, or small deer, that used to inhabit Germany's forests. Many people think that the Miniature Pinscher was developed as a mini Doberman, but though he looks similar, he's a distinct and much older breed.
  Development of the Miniature Pinscher took off in 1895 when German breeders formed the Pinscher Klub, later renamed the Pinscher-Schnauzer Klub. It was then that the first breed standard was written. Miniature Pinschers were first shown at the Stuttgart Dog Show in Germany in 1900, at which time they were virtually unknown outside of their homeland.
  From 1905 until World War I, the Miniature Pinscher rapidly grew in popularity in Germany. After World War I, breeders in Germany and also in the Scandinavian countries worked to improve the line. Around 1919, the first Miniature Pinschers were imported in the United States. Only a few were shown in American Kennel Club dog shows at first. But by 1929, the Miniature Pinscher Club of America, Inc., was formed.
  Also in 1929, the AKC recognized the breed. At that time Min Pins were shown in the Terrier group. In 1930, they were reclassified as Toys and called Pinscher (Miniature). They were renamed Miniature Pinscher in 1972.

Personality
  Contrary to popular belief, the Miniature Pinscher was not developed by breeding Doberman Pinschers down to size. In fact, Min Pins are actually a much olde breed than the Doberman. Nicknamed the “King of the Toys,” your Min Pin will also rule as King or Queen of your house. Breeders and owners agree, these little dogs believe they are the center of the universe and expect everyone to cater to their whims. They have a unique high-step manner of walking which has been likened to a prance, and they ooze confidence wherever they may go. Min Pins are cuddle bugs who will find their way to your lap the instant you sit on the couch. They do love to run, however, and will sometimes tear through the house for no apparent reason. Min Pins make excellent watchdogs, sizing up everyone who approaches his kingdom, and requiring all guests earn his trust.

Health
  The Miniature Pischer, which has an average lifespan of 12 to 14 years, may be prone to some minor problems like Legg-Perthes Disease, patellar luxation, hypothyroidism, Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) VI, and heart defects. Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) may also be seen in some Min Pins. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may recommend knee, eye, and hip tests for the dog, as well as DNA to confirm MPS.

Care
  Grooming is easy, as the smooth, short-haired coat requires little attention, needing only occasional brushing and shampooing. Care must be taken in cold weather. Sweaters or baby blankets for a Miniature Pinscher keep it from getting too cold. Miniature Pinschers are an active breed and need access to a fenced yard, or be given a daily walk.
  The Min Pin requires plenty of activity, but as it is small, its exercise requirements can be fulfilled either indoors or outdoors. It needs many good game sessions daily to keep it active. Even though it loves outdoor romps in a secure place, it is not fond of the cold.

Living Conditions
  The Miniature Pinscher is good for apartment life. It is very active indoors and will do okay without a yard. The Miniature Pinscher should be protected from the cold.

Training
  The Miniature Pinscher should not really be treated like a toy dog – it’s not a great socializer and will have a high tolerance for work and exercise. Consequently, if you want to make sure that your dog is properly raised according to the breed’s characteristics, it’s a good idea to make sure that your Miniature Pinscher has plenty of outdoor exercise on a regular basis. Miniature Pinschers aren’t ideal for large families and are generally regarded as a dog for one or two people.

Activity Requirements
  Min Pins are tiny, which makes them excellent for apartment and condo life, but they should be taken for daily walks and allowed to run once or twice per week. Min Pins are often high-strung to begin with, so allowing them to burn off as much energy as possible can keep their temperaments in check.
  A good activity to engage in with a Min Pin is agility. Once leadership is established, Min Pins are highly trainable, and take well to the agility course. He will enjoy the exercise, appreciate the opportunity to use his mental prowess, and more importantly, he will eat up the time spent with his favorite person.

Grooming
  Min Pins are really easy to groom — there’s almost nothing to it because of their short, smooth coat. Just use a bristle brush once or twice a week. They shed an average amount, but their small size means that there is less fur shed than from a larger dog with the same kind of short coat.
  Bathe the Min Pin as you desire or only when he gets dirty. With the gentle dog shampoos available now, you can bathe a Min Pin weekly if you want without harming his coat.
  As with all Toy breeds, dental issues are common. Brush your Min Pin’s teeth daily with a vet-approved pet toothpaste and have your veterinarian check them regularly. Nails should be clipped about every two weeks; you should not be able to hear the toenails click when the dog walks.

Children And Other Pets
  If a Miniature Pinscher is raised with children who treat him carefully and kindly, he will adore them and be a trustworthy companion. However, if children are allowed to grab or treat him roughly, even accidentally, he may develop a bad attitude toward kids, or at least want to avoid them as much as possible. The Min Pin is best suited for children age 10 and older.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Many owners have more than one Min Pin; properly socialized and trained, these dogs get along with other dogs just fine . As far as other pets are concerned, the Min Pin's instinct is to chase, so he isn't well suited to homes with small mammals.

Is this breed right for you?
  Although suited for apartment life due to his small size, the Miniature Pinscher requires a lot of activity to satisfy him. He enjoys running, playing and needs a daily walk to fulfill his physical needs. The Miniature Pinscher will partake of regular romps in the yard, but will require a large fence to avoid attempting an escape. In need of proper training, the dog can easily develop behavioral problems if allowed to form small-dog syndrome. OK with older children, it's advised that they are taught how to behave around dogs, as he may nip or bite. In addition, he doesn't care too much for strangers and may bark or attack them unless taught otherwise.

Did You Know?
  It’s thought that the Min Pin was created by crossing breeds as diverse as the Dachshund, the old German Pinscher, the Manchester Terrier, and the Italian Greyhound.

A dream day in the life of a Miniature Pinscher
  It's likely that your Miniature Pinscher will wake at the crack of dawn, before his owners. Ensuring the home is safe, he'll make his way outside to sniff out any vermin and engage in games by himself. Once he hears the family awaken, he'll greet you in the kitchen, patiently awaiting his meal. After a quick walk, he may have a quick nap, but will then spend the day guarding his home and playing with his toys. Not keen on too much affection, he'll end the day with a quick pat on the head for his excellent behavior.


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Thursday, December 8, 2016

Everything about your Bouvier des Flandres

Everything about your Bouvier des Flandres
  Always an adventurer, the Bouvier des Flandres has rugged good looks and is generally ready and raring to do almost anything. His rough and tumble looks are a mere reflection of his incredible personality. With an inherent work ethic, the Bouvier des Flandres will herd livestock or children. It is essential that he has a job to do or he can become unhappy, bored and destructive.

Overview
  Meaning "cow herd from Flanders," the Bouvier des Flandres was bred in Belgium to assist farmers, cattle merchants and butchers with herding. Nicknamed "cow dog," "dirty beard" and "cattle driver," the breed still enjoys being a working dog. Often used for police work, as a farm hand, as a watchdog, for military work, as an assistant to the blind and more, the Bouvier des Flandres does best on land with a lot of exercise and training.
  Like most dogs with a working background, the intelligent Bouvier is an independent thinker, so he must be taught from an early age that you are his leader. It’s also important to assign him daily “work,” such as helping to pull garden tools around the yard or participating in dog sports, like agility, carting, herding, and tracking. Bouviers are active and athletic, so they enjoy jogging, hiking, and long walks  twice a day. If you’re the outdoorsy type, look into search-and-rescue training for you and your Bouvier.

Highlights
  • The Bouvier is not recommended for fastidious people who can't stand a mess. Although he can be tidied up with a significant amount of elbow grease, his coat tends to collect dirt and debris, which in turn is deposited throughout your house.
  • Not surprisingly, the Bouvier requires a lot of grooming — which can be time-intensive and/or expensive.
  • Because of his assertive personality, this breed is not recommended for first-time dog owners.
  • The Bouvier's size, herding instinct, and strong personality make leash training highly advisable.
  • The Bouvier is happiest when he is with his family.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Bouvier’s coat comes in several colors, ranging from fawn to black. You may also see brindle and salt-and-pepper coats. A small star on the chest is the only white allowed.
  • Bouviers have had roles in movies, including Town and Country and A Dog of Flanders, a film about a boy and his beloved Bouvier.
Breed standards
AKC group: Herding Group
UKC group: Herding
Average lifespan: 10 - 12 years
Average size: 65 - 110 pounds
Coat appearance: Double coat with rough and harsh outercoat that is shaggy in appearance; soft and thick undercoat
Coloration: Black, salt and pepper, gray, fawn and brindle
Hypoallergenic: Yes 
Other identifiers: Powerful body with a rugged exterior; rectangular ears; black nose; bushy eyebrows; dark-brown eyes with black rims; muscular legs; high-set, docked tail
Possible alterations: Blond, white markings
Comparable Breeds: Airedale Terrier, Kerry Blue Terrier

History
  The monks at the Ter Duinen monastery in Flanders were among the earliest known breeders of Flanders. The bouviers bred by them are recorded as having been bred from imports such as Irish wolfhounds and Scottish deerhounds with local farm dogs, until a breed considered to be the predecessor of the modern Bouvier des Flandres was obtained.
  This became a working dog able to perform tirelessly, herding and guarding cattle and even pulling cargo carts, thanks to its strength and temperament, and to withstand the local weather conditions due to its thick coat.
  Historically, the ear cropping and tail docking could have been done for practical reasons, avoiding accidental amputations in the course of work, or to indicate the dog was working stock and not a pet subject to taxation.
  Up until the early 20th century, the breed was not completely defined, with three variants: Paret, Moerman or Roeselare, and Briard. Conflict between the proponents of these three variants held the breed's development back. In 1912 and 1913, several local kennel clubs recognized standards for Bouviers; however they usually had different standards for the Roeselare and other variants.
  World War I nearly caused the breed to disappear, due to the devastation that came over its region of origin and the fact that the dogs were used for military purposes. Indeed, Nic, a male trained as a trench dog who served during the war and was a perennial winner at dog shows after the war, is considered to be the founder of the early Bouvier des Flandres breed.
  A unified Bouvier des Flandres standard was created in 1936 by a joint French-Belgian committee. However, World War II again endangered the breed's existence. Due to these setbacks, progress was slowed, and it was not until 1965 that the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) breed standard, as agreed to by several minor kennel clubs, was adopted.



Personality
  Serious and thoughtful, The Bouvier Des Flanders is a dignified family companion who is built for athletics, but would much rather nap indoors by the fireplace. Rowdy and rambunctious as puppies, as adults Bouviers mellow into dignified and sober housemates.   They love to be with people and are happiest when completely surrounded by their “flock” of humans. Their protective nature makes them excellent watchdogs, and they are patient with children.
  The Bouvier has a strong personality: He needs an owner who can kindly and consistently show leadership, otherwise, he's likely to fill the void. This doesn't mean you should take a drill sergeant approach, but you must act the confident leader and consistently, albeit gently, enforce guidelines.

Health Problems
  Prone to hip dysplasia, eye problems such as cataracts. The Bouvier has a very high pain threshold. They can take a lot of contact with the cattle's legs without feeling it. This does not make them a veterinarian's favorite patient, as they cannot tell where the dog is hurting by manipulating the legs and/or other body parts. Tends to pass gas.

Care
  Although the Bouvier des Flandres breed is capable of living outside, they are at their best when given access to both house and field. They love human companionship and should be given a great deal of regular exercise. They enjoy playing for hours, which is a good exercise choice. Jogging or walking for long hours also keeps them healthy. Herding is one of their favorite games. Occasional combing and trimming of their coat is essential to keep them at their best. They can be great house dogs.
  You'll need to take special care if you're raising a Bouvier puppy. Like other large breeds, the Bouvier grows very rapidly between the age of four and seven months, making him susceptible to bone disorders. Don't let your Bouvier puppy run and play on very hard surfaces such as pavement or pull a cart until he's full grown and his joints are fully formed. Normal play on grass is fine, as is puppy agility play, with its one-inch jumps.

Living Conditions
  The Bouvier des Flandres will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is relatively inactive indoors and will do best with at least a large yard.

Training
  Bouviers are extremely intelligent dogs however; they require a strong authority figure. It is essential that a Bouvier des Flandres thoroughly understands his place within the household. Given the chance, he will overtake the home and attempt to rule the roost.
  Many Bouviers excel in herding, agility and obedience trials. Their desire to work and do their jobs well make them well-suited for many other things including tracking, search and rescue as well as police work. Training should be started early. It should be done with patience, kindness and assertiveness. Plenty of delectable treats should be used as rewards for doing well.

Activity Requirements
  This gentle giant requires a lot of vigorous activity throughout the day. As Bouviers move from adolescence to adulthood, they will become a bit lethargic and will often need to be told when it's time to exercise, but keeping their activity levels high is very important to their health and mental well being, even if they need to be coaxed into it.
  This breed, despite their large size, is well-suited for an apartment or condominium, so long as they are exercised daily. If Bouvier Des Flandres aren't exercised enough they can become destructive, and an apartment would be mincemeat in the mouth of a bored Bouvier. A house with a large fenced-in yard for running is great, but as the Bouvier gets older, he may appreciate long walks more so than romping in the grass.

Grooming
  The Bouvier has a double coat, with a tousled look. His undercoat, which offers warmth and water-resistance, is soft, dense, and topped by rough hairs that protect the dog from inclement weather. A mustache, beard, and eyebrows give the Bouvier his characteristic gruff appearance.
  If you adore the way Bouviers look in the show ring, think twice about getting the breed: This well-coiffed look takes hours to achieve. At home, the Bouvier is your typical shaggy dog. His coat doesn’t shed much, but it does develop mats and tangles if not thoroughly brushed once a week. A good brushing takes about an hour; ask your breeder or a groomer to show you how to line brush the coat, so you don’t miss any mats. You’ll need a stiff bristle or pin brush, as well as blunt-tipped scissors. If you don’t plan to show him, it’s okay to trim the Bouvier’s beard and coat for easier upkeep. The rest is routine care: bath your Bouvier when he’s dirty, as well as clean his ears and trim his nails on a regular basis.

Children And Other Pets
  The Bouvier is a wonderful family dog who is devoted and protective with his family, including children. He may wish to herd his children with nudges and barks.
  To best teach him to get along with kids, he should be raised with them or, if he doesn't live with them, he should be exposed to children as he grows up.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  The Bouvier should be raised with other dogs and animals for the best chance at getting along with them when he grows up. If he is socialized and trained properly, he usually just ignores other animals in his household. Buy hid instinct to herd and chase is strong, supervision is always a good idea.

Is this breed right for you?
  The Bouvier des Flandres is known as one of the most loyal of dog breeds on the planet. A friendly disposition, it can sometimes be shy and needs to be both trained and socialized young with both people and non-canine pets. A lover of children, it makes a great family dog, although it is a large breed and needs to learn how to behave around younger kids as a puppy. This dog most definitely needs a strong leader to show who is boss and avoid any behavioral problems. Generally inactive indoors, the Bouvier des Flandres does OK with apartment living, although it does best with a large yard or plenty of land in which to roam free. Requiring daily brushing and bathing, this breed requires a lot of grooming; however, due to low shedding, it is an awesome addition for allergy sufferers.

Did You Know?
  The Bouvier des Flandres has several European nicknames: Vuilbaard (dirty beard), Koehond (cow dog), and Toucheur de Boeuf (cattle driver).

Notable Bouviers des Flandres
Lucky, pet of Ronald Reagan
  • Soprano de la Thudinie, the post-war foundation stud of Justin Chastel's de la Thudinie kennel in Belgium and the most prominent ancestor of the modern type of Bouvier des Flandres.
  • Lucky, pet of Ronald Reagan.
  • Patrasche, the dog found by a boy named Nello in A Dog of Flanders, is often asserted to be a Bouvier des Flandres.
  • Max and his mate Madchen and their puppies, fictional characters featured in W.E.B. Griffin's Presidential Agent series.
A dream day in the life
The Bouvier des Flandres is a lover of people and family and will enjoy waking up around those it enjoys most. Going to work outside, it'll happily follow the commandments of its owner. Once its day's work has finished, it'll guard the house and romp around with the kids. After a nice run around the block, the Bouvier des Flandres will nestle in with the rest of the brood for a good night's rest..

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Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Everything about your Afgan Hound

Everything about your Afgan Hound
  The Afghan Hound is considered an aristocratic sighthound. Tall and slender with a long, narrow, refined head, silky topknot and powerful jaws, the back part of the head and skull are quite prominent. The muzzle is slightly convex and the nose is black. The Afghan has little or no stop, which is the transition area from backskull to muzzle. The teeth should meet in a level or scissors bite. The dark eyes are almond shaped. The ears lie flat to the head. The neck is long and strong. The height at the withers should be almost level and the abdomen well tucked up. The hipbones are quite prominent. The front legs are strong and straight and the feet are large and covered with long hair. The tail has a curl or ring at the tip, but is not carried over the back. The long, rich, silky coat is most often the color of sand with a darker face and ear fringes, though all colors are permitted. White markings, however, are discouraged.

Overview
  The Afghan is built along greyhound-like lines, enabling it to execute a double-suspension gallop and run-down fleet game. The comparatively short back and steep pelvis helped it to leap great heights and to turn almost in place, essential attributes for coursing in rocky mountainous terrain. The large feet gave it a better foothold and were more resistant to injury on rough ground. The silky coat protected the dog from cold nights at high altitudes.   The Afghan appears dignified and aloof, with an exotic expression and proud carriage. This dog's gait shows great elasticity and spring; the Afghan moves with its head and tail high. 
  Despite its glamorous reputation, the Afghan hound is a hunter at heart, bred to chase down game over rugged terrain. While it maintains its regal bearings inside, it needs a daily chance to stretch its legs in a safe area. Its worst trait is a reluctance to come when called. It will chase small animals outside; inside, it will coexist peacefully. Though gentle with children, it may not be playful and interactive enough with them. Described by some as "catlike," it is independent yet sensitive and not overly demonstrative. It is reserved with strangers; some can be timid. It has a gay, clownish side.

Highlights
  • Grooming is essential. Only those who really enjoy grooming, or are willing to pay a professional groomer to do it, should consider an Afghan Hound.
  • The Afghan's natural hunting instinct prompts him to chase prey (the neighbor's cat, your son's rabbit, the third grade class hamster, etc.).
  • The Afghan Hound can be challenging to train due to his independent nature. Training can take a long time and requires patience. House training can be difficult. This breed can continue having accidents in the house up to about six months of age.
  • The Afghan Hound has a low pain tolerance. A minor wound is more bothersome to this breed than to other breeds, and this dog can sometimes seem whiny or babyish.
  • Afghan Hounds are sensitive and high-spirited and do not respond well to rough handling-so be gentle.
  • Although this particular breed is usually good and even loving with children, it is best if the puppy grows up with the children he'll live with and the children are mature enough to understand the importance of being considerate of this dog's sensitive nature.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Afghan’s coat can be any color or combination of colors, including black and tan.
  • The comedic actor Zeppo Marx was an early fan of the Afghan, importing two from Britain in 1931.
  • The Afghan Hound stands out for his distant gaze; long, silky topknot; beautiful coat; prominent hipbones; large feet; and ring tail.
  • Afghan Hounds won Best in Show at Westminster in 1957 and 1983.
Breed standards
AKC group: Hound
UKC group: Sighthound and Pariah
Average lifespan: 12 - 14 years
Average size: 50 - 64 pounds
Coat appearance: Thick, fine, silky
Coloration: Red, off-white, black
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Other identifiers: Tall and slender with long, thin heads and defined skull bone; powerful jawline with black nose and long, outward muzzle; black, almond-shaped eyes; strong neck and flat ears; scooped abdomen, elongated tail, thick, furry and slick coat; lengthy front and hind legs
Possible alterations: May have white markings; coat is kept long with face exposed
Comparable Breeds: American Foxhound, Anatolian Shepherd Dog



History 
  The Afghan Hound is from Afghanistan, but little is known of his early history or how long he has existed. A drawing of one of the dogs, sent home by Thomas Duer Broughton while he was in India in 1809, was published in a book of letters in 1813, so the breed has certainly been around for more than 200 years and likely very much longer. Studies of the canine genome indicate that the Afghan descends from one of the oldest types of dogs.
The dogs in Afghanistan were found in several different types, depending on the region they were from. Dogs from mountainous areas were more compact with darker, heavier coats, while desert-dwelling dogs were more rangy, with coats that were lighter in both color and volume. They were used to course fast-running game such as deer and antelope, as well as hares, wolves and jackals. Hunting in partnership with falcons, they flushed quail and partridges for the falcon to bring down or the hunter to shoot.
  British military officers brought the dogs to the West after being posted to the India-Afghanistan border. The dogs died out in Europe during World War I because food shortages limited the breeding and keeping of dogs, but breeding began again in 1920 when some desert-type Afghans were imported to Scotland by people who had been stationed in Baluchistan. Some of the mountain-type dogs were sent from Kabul to England in 1925.   During the same decade, Americans imported some of the Afghans from Britain. The American Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1926, but the Afghan Hound Club of America wasn’t formed until 1937. Today the Afghan ranks 86th among the breeds registered by the AKC.



Personality
  The Afghan Hound is typically a one-person or one-family dog. Do not look for this hound to eagerly greet your guests. More likely, he will offend them by being indifferent to their presence. While some hounds may bark once or twice when a stranger enters the home, this breed is not known to be a good watchdog.
  The independent thinking of the Afghan makes it a challenge to train. This hound is generally not motivated by food and does not possess as strong a desire to please as many other breeds . Though the Afghan makes a stunning presentation in the show ring, for example, more than one professional handler has been embarrassed in the ring by a refusal to cooperative. Even so, this breed is known for outperforming other breeds when the decision to do so is his own.
  Rough handling can cause this dog to become withdrawn or mildly antagonistic. Gentle handling, kindness, and patience work best with this breed, along with an understanding that there will be times when the dog simply will not cooperate.

Health
  The Afghan Hound, which has an average lifespan of 12 to 14 years, is not susceptible to any major health concerns. It should be noted that the breed can suffer from tail injuries and reacts to barbiturate anesthesia. Health ailments like canine hip dysplasia (CHD), cataract and necrotic myelopathy are also occasionally seen in the breed. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may run hip and eye exams on the dog.

Care
  This perfect house dog requires careful brushing and combing of its coat. Special care should be given at the time when the dog sheds its puppy coat. The Afghan Hound also requires daily exercise such as a long walk or a short sprint. In fact, this hound loves to run at a fast pace in small areas. Afghan Hound lovers should make it a point to provide the dog outdoor access and a nice, soft bed.

Living Conditions
  The Afghan Hound is not recommended for apartment life. They are relatively inactive indoors and do best with acreage. This breed can live in or outdoors, although it would be happier sleeping indoors.

Exercise
  The Afghan Hound needs to be taken on a long daily walk or jog. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as in a dog's mind the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human. Dogs that do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display behavior problems. Teach them to enter and exit door and gateways after the humans. They will also enjoy running free in an open, fenced, safe area.

Grooming
  The Afghan Hound has long, thick, silky hair with a fine texture. The coat does not need to be clipped or trimmed; the dog wears it in all its glory. The finishing touch is a topknot of long, silky hair.
  Grooming is an essential part of living with an Afghan. Plan to brush and comb the Afghan Hound’s thick, silky hair three times a week to prevent or remove mats and tangles, and bathe him as needed. You may want to invest in a professional dog blow dryer if you bathe him frequently.
  The Afghan sheds moderately. The more often you brush him, the less hair you will have falling off the dog and onto your floors, furniture and clothing.
The rest is basic care. Trim the nails at least monthly, and keep the long, hanging ears clean and dry to prevent infections. At mealtime, you’ll probably want to put the ears up in a snood to keep them from dragging in the food dish. Good dental hygiene is also important. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.

Is this breed right for you?
  The Afghan Hound is a playful pup who needs and loves a lot of exercise. Great companions with a love of the outdoors, Afghan Hounds need a home that will give them plenty of space to stretch their legs. Best as one person's pet or as the only pet of the family with older children, Afghan Hounds will need an owner that can devote plenty of time to grooming their long, beautiful, thick coat.

Children and other pets
  The Afghan's independent nature and large size make him best suited as an adult companion. The Afghan is not likely to want to follow around and play with children. In fact, a child's quick movements and noise level can startle the Afghan. With proper socialization, though, the Afghan can adjust to life in a family with children and be loving and with them.
  The Afghan tends to most enjoy the company of his own kind-other Afghan Hounds. The Afghan will tolerate, even be indifferent, to other pets in a household. Not surprisingly, the Afghan's hunter's instinct leads him to chase small animals, especially if they run away.

In popular culture
  Because of its distinctive appearance, the Afghan hound has been represented in animated feature films and TV shows, including Universal Pictures' Balto (Sylvie), Disney's Lady and the Tramp II (Ruby), and Brainy Barker from Krypto the Superdog, an Afghan hound also appeared on 101 Dalmatians as well as in 102 Dalmatians as one of the dogs in Cruella De Vil's party and the television series What-a-Mess (Prince Amir of Kinjan; based on children's books by Frank Muir) and, as Prissy in the 1961 Disney animated film One Hundred and One Dalmatians and 101 Dalmatians II: Patch's London Adventure. Afghan hounds have also been featured in television advertisements and in fashion magazines. The Afghan hound is represented in books as well, including being featured in a series of mystery novels by Nina Wright (Abra), and a talking Afghan Hound in David Rothman's The Solomon Scandals (2008, Twilight Times Books). In the novel Between the Acts, Virginia Woolf uses an Afghan hound (named Sohrab) to represent aspects of one of the book's human characters.
  On August 3, 2005, Korean scientist Hwang Woo-Suk announced that his team of researchers had become the first team to successfully clone a dog, an Afghan Hound named Snuppy. In 2006 Hwang Woo-Suk was dismissed from his university position for fabricating data in his research. Snuppy, nonetheless, was a genuine clone, and thus the first cloned dog in history.
  The Afghan Hound features prominently in the avant-garde music video of popular French band M83's, "Set in Stone ."

Did You Know?
  British military officers brought this breed to the West after being posted to the India-Afghanistan border.

A dream day in the life of an Afghan Hound
  Waking up early in the morning with a bowl of chow, the Afghan Hound is ready and waiting for his morning grooming session. After a good brushing, he's yearning to get out and explore the outside world. He'll chase squirrels right off the property while his owner applauds, and after a few laps around the backyard, he'll engage in a wonderful game of play with his master. Going inside for a nice nap, he'll sleep at his owner's feet as he's lovingly brushed down for the second time that day. Another few runs in the yard and the Afghan Hound will happily snuggle down in his dog bed.
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