LUV My dogs: apartment

LUV My dogs

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Showing posts with label apartment. Show all posts
Showing posts with label apartment. Show all posts

Friday, January 13, 2017

How to Care for a Small Dog

How to Care for a Small Dog
  Small breed dogs are ideal for owners in a variety of living situations. For example, tiny dogs do better in small apartments than larger breeds.Toy dog breeds are extremely popular companion dogs. 
  Many small dog breeds were once the prize possessions of members of the ruling class, and some are a scaled down version of another breed. Bred as house pets, they have served as companions for hundreds, even thousands of years.
  As man's best friend, many small dogs were bred to be companion animals and are very loyal. Like other pets, small dogs have basic needs that are the responsibility of their owner. Caring for small dogs requires an owner to pay attention to the dog's health, their happiness, and their well-being. While dog ownership is a big commitment, it is very rewarding!

Choosing The Right Small Dog Breed
  Not all dogs are created equal and some breeds will be more suitable for your household than others. The first thing you should do once you've identified the breeds you like is to carry out a little research on their care needs, temperament and likely health issues. Don't be scared off by potential health problems - you will find long lists of ailments which can befall particular breeds but your dog may never suffer from any of them. Use them as a guide to what could happen in the future. Provided you are financially and emotionally capable of dealing with illness, you will be fine. If you can purchase pet insurance, do so at an early stage.
  When you are certain that you want to go ahead and buy a small dog, check out breeders in your area. 

Their small size makes them perfect for:


  • Apartment and city dwellers as well as those that live in the country
  • The young and old and everyone in between
  • For singles, couples,  and those with families
  • Basically just about anyone!



Research the unique characteristics of your pet's breed. We use the term ‘small dog’ to refer to dogs that are typically less than eighteen inches tall and weigh less than twenty pounds. This includes toy, miniature, and small breeds like Yorkshire Terriers, Chihuahuas, Miniature Poodles, and Miniature Pinschers. Each breed has their own temperament, appearance, characteristics, and needs.

Feed on a regular schedule. It is important to feed your dog on a regular schedule to maintain consistency and to establish a routine. The amount of food your dog will need to consume each day will depend on their age, size, and activity level. Incorporate training into your feeding schedule by having your dog practice certain obedience commands before you let them eat.

Brush your dog’s teeth several times a week. Tiny dogs often suffer from tooth decay and gum disease, and frequent brushing will keep the teeth and gums healthy.


Avoid feeding small dogs human food. It can be very tempting to share bits of your meal or to give human food to your pet as a treat. However, there are a number of foods that are very harmful to dogs. Feeding your dog human food also encourages negative behaviors, such as begging or bothering people when they are eating.


Always provide access to clean water. Along with food, dogs need water to stay healthy. Always leave a bowl of clean and fresh water for your dog to enjoy.

Crate your tiny dog when you can’t watch her closely. Very little dogs can squeeze into small spaces and may injure themselves trying to escape. Crating is also useful during parties and family gatherings to keep small dogs out from underfoot.

Provide a comfortable place to sleep. Whether you decide to crate train your dog or have them sleep in their own dog bed, your dog wants to feel safe when they sleep. Small dogs sleep an average of twelve to fourteen hours a day as adults, and puppies will sleep even more.

Fit your dog with clothes during cold weather. Dog clothes, such as jackets and sweaters, help regulate body temperature and keep your dog from getting too cold. Choose tight-fitting clothes made from soft material to keep your dog warm and dry.


Schedule routine veterinarian visits. Like humans, dogs need routine medical care to stay healthy. Different small breeds are at higher or lower risks for certain conditions than other breeds.

Spay or neuter your dog. Unless you are planning to breed your dog, neutering or spaying your dog has health benefits and can improve temperament. On average, dogs that are spayed or neutered live up to two year longer than dogs that have not undergone these procedures.


Vaccinate your dog. Your veterinarian will administer vaccinations to your dog, and the number of vaccinations that your dog needs will depend on their age and the area that you live in.

Exercise frequently. Some small dog breeds have more energy than others, though all small dogs need to exercise to stay healthy. Their exercise needs will depend on your dog’s age, their health, and their breed.

Groom the dog at least once a week. Many people assume that small, inside dogs don’t need to be groomed, which is untrue. Brush your dog from nose to tail with a soft brush, and check for mats in long-haired breeds. Clip her nails with a small pair of pet nail clippers, clipping off small bits at a time to prevent cutting the quick.

Provide mental stimulation. Much like physical exercise, small dogs need to exercise their brains to stay stimulated and engaged. Dogs that are not stimulated often exhibit destructive behaviors, like chewing on furniture and digging, because they are bored.

Handle your dog throughout the day. Little dogs are notorious nippers and may bite if not handled enough. Pet the dog gently, run your hands over her ears and touch each of her feet to acclimate her to being handled.

Train your dog. Many small dog breeds have stubborn and independent temperaments that can make training difficult. However, small dogs need to be trained to follow basic obedience commands and to walk on leashes.


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Thursday, August 4, 2016

Everything about your Affenpinscher

Everything about your Affenpinscher
   The Affenpinscher’s apish look has been described many ways. They’ve been called “monkey dogs” and “ape terriers.” The French say “diablotin moustachu” (mustached little devil), and "Star Wars" fans argue whether they look more like Wookies or Ewoks. But Affens are more than just a pretty face. Though standing less than a foot tall, these sturdy terrier-like dogs approach life with great confidence. As with all great comedians, it’s their apparent seriousness of purpose that makes Affen antics all the more amusing.

Overview
  Affenpinscher comes from the German word meaning "monkey dog/terrier." Living up to its name, the breed enjoys playing and monkeying around. With a Terrier-like personality, the Affenpinscher is bold, curious and very loving with people and other dogs. Requiring training, the dog will do well in apartment life and with children if handled properly.

Highlights
  • Like many toy dog breeds, the Affenpinscher can be difficult to housetrain. Crate training is recommended.
  • While the fur of an Affenpinscher is wiry and is often considered hypoallergenic, this is not to be mistaken with "non-shedding." All dogs shed or produce dander.
  • Because of their heritage as ratters, Affenpinschers tend to not do well with rodent pets such as hamsters, ferrets, gerbils, etc. They do, however, tend to get along with fellow dogs in the household and can learn to get along with cats, especially if they're raised with them.
  • Affenpinschers are generally not recommended for households with toddlers or small children--it is not a breed that is naturally inclined to like children. The Affenpinscher is loyal to his adult family members and can be a great companion for a family with older children.
  • The Affenpinscher is a rare breed. Be prepared to spend time on a waiting list if you're interested in acquiring one.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The German word Affenpinscher means “monkeylike terrier,” not necessarily because they resembled monkeys but because they often performed with organ grinders in much the same way as an organ grinder’s monkey might have done.
  • The Affenpinscher is distinguished by a beard and mustache, bushy eyebrows, a stiff wiry coat, ears that can be cropped or natural, and a tail that can be docked or natural.
  • The preferred color in Affenpinschers is black, but the dogs can also be black and tan, silver-gray, red, and mixtures of these colors.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 12 - 14 years
Average size: 7 - 8 pounds
Coat appearance: Shaggy and wiry
Coloration: Black, gray, silver, red, tan and black
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Other identifiers: Square body; deep chest; longer hair on face than rest of the body; round, black eyes; short, small nose; undershot jaw; tail is carried high at 2/3 length and ears are pointed upward; slightly curly undercoat
Possible alterations: Ears and tail may point down depending on breeder
Comparable Breeds: Brussels Griffon, Pomeranian

History
  The breed is German in origin and dates back to the seventeenth century. The name is derived from the German Affe (ape, monkey). The breed predates and is ancestral to the Brussels Griffon and Miniature Schnauzer.
  Dogs of the Affenpinscher type have been known since about 1600, but these were somewhat larger, about 12 to 13 inches, and came in colors of gray, fawn, black and tan and also red. White feet and chest were also common. The breed was created to be a ratter, working to remove rodents from kitchens, granaries, and stables.
  Banana Joe V Tani Kazari (AKA Joe), a five-year-old Affenpinscher, was named Best in Show at the 2013 Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show in New York City. This win is notable since it is the first time this breed has won Best in Show at Westminster.

Personality
  Affenpinschers are tiny, but they have large personalities. They take themselves very seriously, and require everyone else to take them seriously as well, resulting in humorous interactions with people. Their terrier blood makes them spunky and sassy, and many owners wonder if these tiny toy dogs know just how small they really are. Mostly seen as “purse dogs” by ladies around the world, the Affen is a lovely travel companion, easy-going and accepting of new situations. Just keep an eye on the Affenpinscher about town, this breed can be mischievous.

Health
  The Affenpinscher, which has an average lifespan of 12 to 14 years, has a tendency to suffer from minor diseases like patellar luxation and corneal ulcers. Respiratory difficulties, patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), and open fontanel are sometimes seen in this breed as well. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may run knee and cardiac tests on the dog.

Care
  The Affenpinscher is an ideal dog for apartment living, especially if you have neighbors who don't mind occasional barking. Short, brisk walks or a suitable length of time in the backyard is enough exercise for this sturdy but only moderately active dog.
  Because he's so small, the Affenpinscher should be a full-time housedog, with access only to a fully fenced backyard when not supervised. These dogs won't hesitate to confront animals much larger than themselves, an encounter that could result in tragedy.
  Like many toy breeds, the Affenpinscher can be difficult to housetrain. Be patient and consistent. Crate training is recommended.
  The key to training an Affenpinscher is to always keep training fun. Use lots of praise and motivation!

Living Conditions
  The Affenpinscher is good for apartment life. They are very active indoors and will do okay without a yard. These dogs are sensitive to temperature extremes. Overly warm living conditions are damaging to the coat.

Trainability
  Affens are generally people-pleasers but can be stubborn, so early training is key to having an obedient dog. They respond best to positive reinforcement, with lots of treats and affection. Consistency and a gentle hand are required to prevent the Affen from becoming distrusting of people.
  This tiny dog, with a penchant for mischief makes a good therapy dog. They travel well, adapt well in new environments and make people laugh, making them an ideal visitor for lifting the spirits of the elderly or the sick.

Exercise
  The Affenpinscher needs a daily walk. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as in a dog's mind the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human. Play will take care of a lot of their exercise needs, however, as with all breeds, play will not fulfill their primal instinct to walk. Dogs that do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display behavior problems. They will also enjoy a good romp in a safe open area off lead, such as a large fenced-in yard. Teach them to enter and exit door and gateways after the humans.

Grooming
  The Affen has a wiry coat that can be rough or smooth, but the words “smooth” and “rough” can be misleading. A smooth Affen has some feathering on the legs and a ruff on the neck. Dogs with a rough coat have hair with a slightly softer texture and heavier feathering. Some Affens have a coat that falls somewhere in between. Whatever type of coat he has, the typical Affen looks neat but a bit shaggy. You can be sure he’ll have leaves and twigs stuck in his coat after he’s been outdoors, so he does need regular grooming to maintain his appearance.
   Tools you’ll need are a slicker brush, a stainless steel Greyhound comb, a stripping knife, blunt-tipped scissors and thinning shears. Plucking dead hairs, called “stripping” the coat, is part of the package when living with an Affen. The Affenpinscher Club of America has an illustrated guide to grooming the dog to get the look just right.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Small breeds are prone to periodontal disease, so brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Affenpinschers don't like aggressive behavior such as hitting, unwanted squeezing or hugging, or chasing to catch them or cornering them to hold in a lap. If they can't escape, they will defend themselves by growling or snapping. For these reasons, they are not good choices for homes with young children. Often young children don't understand that a cute little Affenpinscher might not want "love and kisses."
  It's a good idea to socialize any puppy to young children, even if he won't be living with them, but you should always supervise their interactions. Never let young children pick up a puppy or small dog. Instead, make them sit on the floor with the dog in their lap. Pay attention to the dog's body language, and put him safely in his crate if he appears to be unhappy or uncomfortable with the child's attention.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Affenpinschers usually get along well with other dogs and cats in the family, but like most toy breeds they are completely unaware of their size and will take on dogs much bigger than themselves. Be prepared to protect them from themselves.

Is this breed right for you?
  A smaller breed that enjoys being around his family, the Affenpinscher will need consistent training in the home. Getting along well with other dogs and cats when raised with them, he'll become loving and affectionate with children if both the dog and children are raised together. Spunky and confident, he loves to play outside and will need a yard or daily walks if living in smaller spaces. Because of his wiry coat, he doesn't shed and will only require special grooming once or twice a year.

Did You Know?
  At some point in the 18th or early 19th century, someone had the bright idea of breeding the Affenpinscher down in size, allowing them to move up in the world by becoming companions to ladies.

A dream day in the life of an Affenpinscher
  Waking up to a quick cuddle session with his family, the Affenpinscher loves to start his morning with a nice walk around the neighborhood. Giving in to his curious nature, he'll smell every nook and cranny the lovely street has to offer him. On returning home, he'll take a quick nap before retreating to his toy area to play with the other animals and family members of the home. He'll end his day just as it started, by cozying up with his favorite humans.
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Monday, June 13, 2016

The 10 Best Apartment Dogs

The 10 Best Apartment Dogs
  There's a breed of dog for every person and lifestyle. But just because a certain breed is a match for your personality, it doesn't necessarily mean that breed is a good choice for you. If your home is a small apartment in a big city, it's not a good idea to adopt a breed that needs a lot of time and space outdoors. Fortunately, there are still plenty of options to fit your life.
  Size does matter – especially if you live in compact quarters. Whether you live in a cramped condo, an adequate apartment or closeted quarters, there’s a dog that will fit into your living space.

1. Basenji

  The Basenji is a great option when you have close neighbors and thin walls. This barkless dog rarely gets taller than 18 inches or over 25 pounds. But beware, when left unattended for long periods of time, the Basenji can be a mischievous companion.

2. English Bulldog

  This medium-sized dog doesn’t like to move around much, so an English Bulldog makes a wonderful dog for an apartment (as long as you don’t mind a little extra drool and snoring!). If this breed could talk, he would tell you he’d much rather hang on the couch than at the dog park. And if you don’t like to move about much, good news – the English Bulldog is just as lazy as you!

3.Boston Terrier

  The Boston terrier's nickname is "the American Gentleman," and it's not just for their black-and-white, tuxedo-like coats. They are also polite as a dog can be, and therefore ideal apartment pets. They're quiet, so they won't annoy your neighbors, and they bond closely with their owners, showing undying affection and loyalty. They're also conveniently small, and require only moderate amounts of exercise. Brisk city walks should be enough; no sprawling backyards necessary.

4.Bichon Frise

  Even at their largest, the Bichon Frise  won’t get taller than a foot. These little furballs are energetic, which means they love to play, but also need daily exercise. Bichons also shed less than similar breeds, making them ideal to leave with in close quarters or for people with allergies.


5. Great Dane
  “Huge dog” doesn’t seem like it fits with “great apartment dog,” but the Great Dane (at a majestic 100 to 130 pounds) is such a natural loafer that, though your couch will probably be fully occupied, he’ll take up far less space than you might think. Add to that his calm demeanor, friendliness, trainability, and quiet nature, and the Great Dane makes an excellent choice among apartment dogs.

6.Bulldog

  The Bulldog is perhaps most well-known for his laziness, making them a perfect dog for apartments. A short walk is all these guys need to keep them happy. Otherwise, they’re content to just laze around and snooze. They’re an incredibly gentle dog breed and rarely get taller than a 18 inches high.

7.Shih Tzu

  This regal-looking companion is small in size and maintenance. She doesn’t need much room to move around in. As long as she’s pampered, she’ll be happy. Shih Tzus aren’t a high energy dog, so you won’t need to make many daily trips outdoors for walks. If you don’t mind grooming all that hair, this may be the perfect apartment dog for you. 

  Years of being toted around in starlets' purses may have given this breed something of a privileged diva reputation, but they're actually quite gentle and low-maintenance. After all, how many other breeds are patient enough to tolerate being kept in a purse in the first place? Their tiny size means they can make it in even the most closet-y of New York studio apartments, and even longhaired chihuahuas require only moderate grooming. Keep in mind, though, that Chihuahuas can be a bit loud, so think twice if your pad has thin walls.

  Dachshunds love to be active, but luckily you’re the just the person to take them to the dog park twice a day. Right? Although they can be a little bit stubborn and tend to adapt better to adults and older children than small children, they are extremely affectionate and protective of their loved ones.

  Havanese dogs are small and adaptable to any kind of living situation, including apartment life. They're playful, but they'll burn enough calories charging around your home that gobs of outdoor time won't be necessary. That said, they're relatively quiet, so they won't disturb your neighbors with lots of yapping. One caveat: Of all the breeds on this list, the Havanese is the most high-maintenance in terms of grooming.

As always, it’s important to remember that every dog is an individual. While every breed has a general personality and disposition, there will always be variations. Do your research carefully and be sure to pick a pet that will fit your home, lifestyle, and personality.
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