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Showing posts with label ancient dog. Show all posts
Showing posts with label ancient dog. Show all posts

Wednesday, December 20, 2017

Everything about your Peruvian Inca Orchid

Everything about your Peruvian Inca Orchid
  The Peruvian Inca Orchid is an exotic blossom from the Andes: a sighthound that comes in hairless and coated varieties. The breed’s name in Quechua, the language of the Incas, translates to “dog without vestments,” or naked dog.

Overview
  The Peruvian Inca Orchid is a breed of dog native to Peru, and although the breed is most famous for being hairless, some breed members are born with a full coat of hair.  A truly ancient dog, Peruvian Inca Orchids were already well-established in their homeland prior to the expansion of the Inca Empire.  The Inca and some of their descendants believed that their hairless dogs possessed spiritual powers, and maintained the breed for many centuries.  
  Although still rarely seen outside of Peru, the dog has been attracting an increasing following in the West, including the United States.  The Peruvian Inca Orchid has been declared a National Patrimony by the government of Peru and is widely considered the country’s national dog.  Like the better known Xoloitzcuintli of Mexico, the Peruvian Inca Orchid comes in three sizes; small, medium and large. 

Other Quick Facts
  • The PIO’s skin or fur can be any color, including black, brown, gray, pink, tan, or white.
  • The PIO is a medium-size sighthound. Hairless and coated dogs can be born in the same litter and differ only in ear carriage, with the coated dogs having semiprick ears.
Breed standards

AKC group: Miscellaneous (The AKC Miscellaneous class is for breeds working towards full AKC recognition.)
UKC group: Sighthound & Pariah
Average lifespan: 11-12 years
Average size: 25-50 lb
Coat appearance: short hair on top of its head, on its feet, and on the tip of its tail
Coloration: chocolate-brown, elephant grey, copper, or mottled
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, apartments, houses with/without backyards
Temperament: Lively, protective, intelligent, affectionate
Comparable Breeds: Xoloitzcuintli, Chinese Crested



History
  This is an ancient breed. Although it is often perceived to be an Incan dog because it is known to have been kept during the Inca Empire , they were also kept as pets in pre-Inca cultures from the Peruvian coastal zone. Ceramic hairless dogs from the Chimú, Moche, and Vicus culture are well known. Depictions of Peruvian hairless dogs appear around 750 A.D. on Moche ceramic vessels and continue in later Andean ceramic traditions.The main area of the Inca Empire (the mountains) is too cold for the natural existence of hairless dogs. While they were commonly eaten in ancient times in the northern coastal areas of Peru the Inca prohibited the consumption of dogs when they conquered that region.
The Spanish conquest of Peru nearly caused the extinction of the breed. The dogs survived in rural areas where the people believed that they held a mystical value, and because of their reputation to treat arthritis.
  In recent years, the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) accepted the breed and adopted an official breed standard. Before that time, in the United States, some enthusiasts created another type of Peruvian hairless dog, the Peruvian Inca Orchid. The Peruvian Inca Orchid is recognized by the AKC, and all recognized dogs are descendants of 13 dogs brought from Peru in the early 20th century. The club UKC also recognized the breed in recent years.

Temperament
  The Peruvian Inca Orchid, also called the “PIO,” is a lively, alert, inquisitive sighthound that plays well with other dogs and is easy to live with. The PIO’s temperament is similar to that of a Whippet. They are loyal and affectionate to their family members and make excellent companions. These are sensitive dogs that are best suited for homes with adults and older children. They are instinctively protective and defensive around unfamiliar people and dogs. Because they are suspicious of strangers, PIOs make good watch dogs and guard dogs. They don’t appreciate being left alone for long periods of time and do best having at least one other canine friend in the family. These are active, agile, athletic animals that probably aren’t the best choice for first-time dog owners. However, with experienced owners, they can be alert guardians and friendly companions all in one package. It is very important to start socializing and training PIOs at an early age, so that they grow into stable, reliable adults. Mature PIOs are generally calm, quiet, smart and somewhat independent. They are devoted to their owners, reserved with strangers, but rarely aggressive.

Health 
  Like other hairless breeds, the Peruvian Inca Orchid can sometimes suffer from various dental issues. This is a result of the hairless gene that sometimes causes the dog to have fewer teeth than other breeds. They also sometimes suffer from epilepsy and pancreas inflammations.
  Peruvian Inca Orchids, like all hairless dogs, are extremely prone to cuts, bruises and skin irritations. Therefore care should be taken to moisturize the dog’s skin regularly to keep it soft and supple.

Living Conditions
  The PIO will do OK in an apartment. A fenced-in yard is recommended as the PIO is a sighthound and may take off chasing a small animal at any time. This breed should live indoors and be protected from the elements. The PIO sunburns very quickly. It should have a sweater in the winter and be kept at a comfortable temperature in the summer. Keep in mind this breed does not have hair to protect it from the weather and is basically naked.

Trainability
  PIOs are smart, alert, attentive and trainable. They usually learn standard obedience commands and household manners fairly easily. They can be a bit rambunctious, but still typically are fast learners, especially when trained with reward-based positive reinforcement techniques rather than harsh, loud verbal or physical corrections. PIOs do best with multiple short, fun training sessions instead of single long training sessions, to prevent boredom, distraction and loss of interest. They can be quite protective of toys, food and people. Consistent training from a young age is necessary to teach PIOs proper doggy etiquette.

Exercise Requirements
  Like any hunting breed, Peruvian Inca Orchids require a great deal of rigorous exercise. They can often run at extremely high speeds for long distances. Responsible owners should make sure that their dogs get enough physical activity each day to drain their energy levels. A failure to do so can often result in an unhappy and sometimes destructive dog.

Grooming 
  The grooming requirements of the Peruvian Inca Orchid are minimal, but there are some special considerations for this hairless breed. If he has furnishings, brush weekly with a very soft brush. Wipe the skin daily with cloth dampened with warm water to remove dirt. A bath with a mild dog shampoo once a week or every few weeks helps keep the skin blemish free. Apply moisturizing lotion daily, or as needed, depending on skin condition and climate. Some hairless breeds are sensitive to lanolin, so ask the breeder what lotion she uses on her dogs.
  His ears need to be checked every week and cleaned if needed, and toenails trimmed every few weeks. Regular tooth brushing with a soft toothbrush and doggie toothpaste keep the teeth and gums healthy. Hairless breeds are prone to sunburn so apply sunscreen  or dress him in a doggie T-shirt.

Is the Peruvian Inca Orchid the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep. No trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Easy Training: The Peruvian Inca Orchid is known to listen to commands and obey its owner. Expect fewer repetitions when training this breed.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  The Spanish conquistadors, who are said to have found these dogs living amidst orchids in Inca homes, called them “perros flora”: flower dogs. They are also sometimes called moonflower dogs, Inca hairless dogs, and Peruvian hairless dogs.

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Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Everything about your Cirneco dell'Etna

Everything about your Cirneco dell'Etna
  The Cirneco dell’Etna is a small and slender dog, similar in appearance to the Greyhound but with larger ears and a chestnut/tan coat. These dogs are an ancient breed native to the island of Sicily where they were valued for their intelligence and for their natural hunting ability. If you are looking for a small, active breed – especially one that takes well to dog sports – the Cirneco dell’Etna may be the right breed for you.

Overview
  The outgoing Cirneco (the plural is Cirnechi) weighs between 18 and 27 pounds, making him suitable for just about any home. Thanks to his innate athleticism, he’s a natural at agility and lure coursing, and he also does well in obedience, rally, and tracking. The Cirneco has a reputation for being easier to train than some other sighthounds — as long as you keep the training sessions short.
  Like most dogs, the Cirneco can become bored, noisy, and destructive if he doesn’t have other dogs to keep him company or if he doesn’t receive enough attention from his people. Despite his chase instinct, if a Cirneco is raised with other pets from an early age, he can live amicably with cats and small dogs.

Other Quick Facts
  • The Cirneco dell’Etna is a rare breed not readily found outside Italy — there are only 200 or so Cirnechi in the United States.
  • Although they are mainly companion dogs today, Cirnechi are known for their silent method of hunting, which allows them to catch animals off guard.
  • Since the breed is so uncommon, little is known about the health history of the Cirneco.
  • Like most sighthounds, Cirnechi aren’t too keen on having their feet touched.

Breed standards
AKC group: Hound Group
UKC group: Sighthound & Pariah
Average lifespan: 12 to 14 years
Average size: 18 to 27 pounds
Coat appearance: Close-Fitting, Long, Sleek, Smooth, Stiff, and Straight
Coloration:  tan- to chestnut-colored coat
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles, houses with yards
Temperament: Gentle, alert, independent, playful
Comparable Breeds: Pharaoh Hound, Ibizan Hound

History
  The Cirneco dell’Etna, also known as the Sicilian Greyhound, may resemble a small Pharaoh Hound, but he’s a distinct breed of Italian origin, with his own color markings, tail shape, and triangle-shaped ears. He gets his name from Mount Etna, on the Italian island of Sicily, where his ancestors hunted rabbit and hare. He stalks silently — so much so that he can even sneak up on birds. Today, this rare breed is predominantly a family companion.
  The Cirneco was recognized by the United Kennel Club in 2006. The breed is also part of the American Kennel Club’s Foundation Stock Service, the first step toward AKC recognition. In 2012, the Cirneco dell’Etna will be admitted to the AKC’s Miscellaneous Class.

Personality
  The Cirneco dell'Etna has a strong, inquisitive, independent temperament, which is important in keen hunting dogs. It is also outgoing, friendly, affectionate and smart. Cirnechi are loyal and loving with their owners and friends. They are willing and eager to please and love to receive pets and praise. They usually make great family pets, although they can be reserved around strangers. 
  The Cirneco is an extremely adaptable breed that can thrive in a wide variety of environments. However, these are house dogs that definitely need to live indoors due to their short coats, thin skin and absence of body fat. They like to nestle on warm soft furniture, blankets and bedding, almost as much as they like to snuggle with their favorite people. 
  Cirnechi typically are tolerant of children, although this is not a bomb-proof breed and probably isn’t the best choice for families with very young kids. Cirnechi are social animals that tend to get along well with other dogs. They rarely cause problems in multiple-pet homes and, unlike most sighthounds, get along remarkably well with familiar cats. Of course, the earlier any dog is exposed to other household pets and small children, the more likely it is to get along with them as they age.

Health
  Since there are so few of these dogs, little is known about the health of Cirnechi. In general, they appear to be a hardy breed, but they can get muscle and toe injuries while running. A reputable breeder will discuss potential health problems with you, including any conditions that she has noticed in her own lines.
  As an ancient breed that has been largely unmanipulated by man, the Cirneco dell’Etna is hardy and healthy. The main health concerns to which this breed is prone include injuries that can occur while running. Responsible breeding practices and genetic testing can help to reduce the risk for inherited conditions in this and other breeds.
  Careful breeders screen their dogs for genetic disease, and only breed the best-looking specimens, but sometimes Mother Nature has other ideas and a puppy can develop a genetic condition. In most cases, he can still live a good life, thanks to advances in veterinary medicine. And remember that you have the power to protect your Cirneco from one of the most common health problems: obesity. Keeping him at an appropriate weight is a simple way to extend your Cirneco’s life.


Trainability
  The Cirneco dell’Etna is an intelligent breed so they typically respond well to training. For the best results, start training early while your puppy is still young – that is when they will soak up the most training. Socialization is also important for this breed to help introduce them to new things and situations. Positive reinforcement training methods are recommended and you should be prepared to maintain a level of firm consistency with your dog to prevent him from becoming too strong-willed or independent. These dogs do very well when trained for hunting, lure coursing, agility, or other dog sports.

Exercise Requirements
  Cirnechi are high-energy animals that need quite a bit of regular exercise to keep them physically and mentally fit. They love taking long daily walks and having a chance to stretch their legs in safely-enclosed areas. It is important for Cirneco owners to have well-fenced yards, so that their dogs can run freely and burn off excess energy, which usually happens in short bursts. While they can be gregarious and playful, Cirnechi usually are calm and quiet, both indoors and out, as long as their exercise needs are met. They are great fans of toys of all sorts. A Cirneco can play with a single toy for hours, keeping it out of mischief. Cirnechi are active contestants in lure coursing and agility competitions. Participation in these and other canine sporting events provides a great opportunity to showcase the Cirneco’s athleticism, while at the same time giving him a chance to get physical exercise and canine socialization.
  Because the Cirneco dell’Etna was bred for hunting it is a fairly active breed with fairly high exercise requirements. This breed requires at least 30 minutes of moderate exercise each day in the form of a walk or jog – active play time is also appreciated. Training your dog for hunting, lure coursing, or other dog sports can help to meet its daily exercise requirements while also providing plenty of mental stimulation.


Grooming
  The Cirneco dell'Etna is a low-maintenance breed. Its short coat only needs an occasional brushing to keep it tidy and clean. A rubber curry brush or hound glove, or even a warm damp cloth, work well to keep its coat looking shiny and lustrous. Frequent bathing is not necessary and really should only be done when the dog is obviously smelly or dirty. Other routine maintenance is the same as for most breeds, including dental care to keep teeth clean, reduce plaque build-up and prevent bad breath. Regular nail clipping is also important. 
  Many sighthounds, including many Cirnechi, are sensitive to having their feet handled. Nail care should start at a very young age, so that it does not become a struggle. Owners should do their best to avoid cutting into the quick of the nail, which is quite painful for the animal. For those who are not comfortable clipping nails, a quick trip to a professional groomer can be a godsend for both owner and dog.

Did You Know?
  It’s believed that the Cirneco dell’Etna descended from dogs who were left behind by the Phoenicians along Sicily’s coast. The breed was depicted on Sicilian coins minted as early as the 3rd century B.C.


Is the Cirneco dell'Etna the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep. No trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Moderately Easy Training: The Cirneco dell'Etna is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

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Friday, September 15, 2017

Everything about your Thai Ridgeback

Everything about your Thai Ridgeback
  Few people in the United States have heard of the Thai Ridgeback, let alone met one in person. This breed was naturally developed in Thailand and has been a favored companion of those needing a loyal companion and watchdog. This breed is strong-willed and not for the novice dog owner.
  With proper socialization and training, the Thai Ridgeback can make a wonderful family pet. Of course, he needs a lot of exercise but older kids can keep him exercised by playing ball or fetch. Running is essential to this breeds physical and mental health, so a fenced yard, dog park or owner who is an avid runner is necessary.

Overview
  Primitive dogs, sometimes known as pariah dogs, have distinctive physical traits, such as a moderate size, prick ears, wedge-shaped heads, wrinkled foreheads, squarish bodies with long legs, and smooth coats. The Thai Ridgeback is a classic example of one of these dogs. He comes in four colors — red, black, blue (gray), and yellow (fawn) — and he has pigmentation or spots on his tongue, similar to the Chow Chow and the Chinese Shar-Pei. Most (but not all) members of the breed have the signature ridge of hair running down their back with up to eight different ridge patterns.
  A Thai Ridgeback needs plenty of companionship and activity to be happy. Bear in mind that he will need at least a good hour of strenuous exercise daily. Overall health permitting, a couple of long walks or runs should satisfy him. He is also eligible to compete in lure coursing competitions.
  Better yet, keep him indoors, especially if the weather is rainy or cold. Because he's from Southeast Asia, he’s not one to appreciate that type of climate.

Other Quick Facts:
  • Some Thai Ridgebacks are born with a plush coat instead of a smooth coat. This is considered a flaw, and the dogs are spayed or neutered and sold as pets.
  • The Thai Ridgeback’s tail tapers to a point. He carries it up or curved like a sickle.
Breed standards

FCI group: Primitive Hunting Dogs 
AKC group: AKC Foundation Stock Service
UKC group: Sighthound & Pariah
Average lifespan: 10 to 12 years
Average size: 35 to 55 pounds
Coat appearance: short, hard, and straight
Coloration: solid colors of blue, black, red or fawn with a black mask being acceptable on reds
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with older children, active singles, experienced owners, houses with yards
Temperament: Strong-willed, loyal, energetic, brave
Comparable Breeds: Rhodesian Ridgeback

History
  The Thai Ridgeback was first noted more than 350 years ago in Thailand, but he is thought to be far older. One theory suggests that he is a descendant of the now-extinct Hottentot dog, which may have played a role in the development of the Rhodesian Ridgeback
 Ancient artifacts show that the Thai Ridgeback originated in the isolated islands of Eastern Thailand an estimated 4,000 years ago. Because this area was secluded from others, with poor transportation methods, this dog breed has remained very pure with little to no crossbreeding.
  The Thai Ridgeback was an all-purpose dog, kept to guard property and serve as an alarm dog,  escort or pull carts, hunt small and large game, and keep cobras at bay. He lived mainly in eastern Thailand, as well as on the island of Dao Phu Quoc, near the border of Cambodia and Vietnam. His relative isolation ensured that he maintained his distinctive look.
  Today the Thai Ridgeback is considered a very rare breed outside of Thailand, with only an estimated 300 in the United States. The breed has been in the United States since 1994. The United Kennel Club recognized the Thai Ridgeback in 1996, and it was recorded in the American Kennel Club’s Foundation Stock Service in 1997.

Temperament
  Thai Ridgebacks are an intelligent breed. The energy level is typically medium to high, with most of the day spent lounging and activity periods occurring in sporadic bursts. Well bred and properly socialized Thai Ridgebacks make loyal, loving family pets. They are naturally protective of their home and family and can be aggressive or shy when not properly socialized.
  They are best kept by consistent owners who have a thorough understanding of dog behavior. Because of prior geographic isolation and lack of human contact, the Thai Ridgeback remains independent minded and much of the original natural instinct and drives remain intact, particularly prey drive. Due to its nature, the Thai Ridgeback is not recommended for the novice dog handler. They have an excellent jumping ability and may seek to roam if not properly contained.

Health
  Thai ridgebacks are a hearty, overall healthy breed with few inherent health issues. The breed has reproduced in Thailand almost exclusively by natural selection until the very recent past. The domesticated population is small. Inbreeding depression has not been observed in the breed. Thai Ridgeback Dogs are prone to dermoid sinus. Modern lines of    Thai Ridgeback, resulting from interpopulation crosses, may also be prone to hip dysplasia and other genetic disorders.

Care
  Because this dog breed originated in a tropical climate, the Thai Ridgeback generally does not do well in colder climates and should be kept as an indoor dog. The coat of a Thai Ridgeback requires little maintenance, however daily exercise is suggested to keep a healthy lifestyle for this breed.

Living Conditions
 Thai Ridgebacks will do okay in an apartment if it sufficiently exercised. These dogs prefer warm climates and cannot withstand the cold.

Training
  An independent breed, the Thai Ridgeback requires an experienced owner who can assert himself to be the leader of the family. Manhandling and harsh discipline is counter-productive to training this breed. The Thai Ridgeback responds well to positive training methods and learns rather quickly when delectable treats are involved. Repetitive training sessions will prove to be worth the time.
  One of the things that the Thai Ridgeback was bred to do was to pull carts in Thailand. Nowadays, he is well-suited for draft trials, obedience and agility. Of course, the Thai Ridgeback can be an incredible watchdog.

Exercise Requirements
  Thai Ridgebacks were bred to work and they require a lot of exercise. Long walks or jogs are great but this breed also needs room to stretch out and run. He can tolerate living in condos or apartment buildings provided there is a dog park nearby that he can use.
  Without enough exercise, the Thai Ridgeback can become incredibly destructive and disruptive. Although not a barker, the dog will become frustrated and try to communicate his need for activity vocally. He will also tear up furniture and chew whatever he can get his teeth on if he is bored. Exercise is essential to living peacefully with a Thai Ridgeback.

Grooming
  The Thai Ridgeback has a short coat that is easily cared for with a weekly brushing. Use a rubber curry brush to keep it gleaming. He sheds year-round, but not heavily. Give him a bath when he is dirty, maybe once or twice a year.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Keep the ears clean and dry, and check them weekly for redness or a bad odor that could indicate infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball moistened with a mild pH-balanced cleanser recommended by your veterinarian. Brush the teeth regularly with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath. Introduce your puppy to grooming from an early age so that he learns to accept it with little fuss.

Is the Thai Ridgeback the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep.
Moderate Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Difficult Training: The Thai Ridgeback isn't deal for a first time dog owner. Patience and perseverance are required to adequately train it.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  The Thai Ridgeback can have as many as eight different ridge patterns formed by hair growing in the opposite direction of the rest of the coat. Patterns include whorls, circles, and even the shape of a guitar.
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Thursday, August 4, 2016

Everything about your Japanese Chin

Everything about your Japanese Chin
  The Japanese Chin dog breed hails from Asia, where he has been prized as a companion for more than a thousand years. He was a popular member of Chinese and Japanese imperial courts, and it was in Japan that his distinctive look was developed. This breed is elegant and dainty, mild-mannered and playful.
  The Japanese Chin is a sensitive and intelligent breed whose only purpose is to serve man as a companion. Agile and playful, they can be taught to perform tricks and like to show off to an audience of friends. They are extremely cat-like in nature, smart when they want to be and coy when it suits them. Very loyal and loving, treat them right and you have a best friend for life; treat them wrong and you have lost your best friend forever!

Overview
  Despite his name, the Japanese Chin originates from China. Bred for the sole purpose of becoming a companion dog, the breed was originally referred to as the Japanese Spaniel. Eventually moving to Japan and other parts of Europe, the dog was given as a royal and meaningful gift. Playful and intelligent, the Japanese Chin is a good fit for any person or family.

Highlights
  • The Japanese Chin is catlike in many ways. The breed is commonly seen grooming itself by licking its paws and wiping its head. Also, they enjoy being up high and will perch on the back of couches and on tables.
  • Considered to be an average shedder, the Japanese Chin requires a few minutes of brushing each day to remove loose hair and to keep the coat from tangling.
  • Japanese Chin do not handle heat very well and need to be monitored on hot days to ensure that they don't overexert themselves.
  • Due to the breed's flat face, Japanese Chin will often snort, sniffle, or reverse sneeze. Generally, a Japanese Chin is still able to breathe through this, but if the attack becomes severe, you can try gently stroke his neck.
  • Japanese Chin do well in apartments.
  • Although Japanese Chin are intelligent and eager to please, they require interesting, fun-filled training sessions. Otherwise, they get bored and will turn their attention to something more entertaining.
  • Japanese Chin do very well with older children but are not recommended for homes with smaller children due to their small size. They can be seriously injured with minimal force.
  • Japanese Chin are companion dogs who thrive when they are with the people they love. They should not live outside or in a kennel away from their family.
  • Japanese Chin require a lower amount of exercise compared to other breeds but they do enjoy a daily walk or play in the yard.
  • Japanese Chin don't like being parted from their people, and separation anxiety is a common problem in the breed.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • In Japan, the Chin is considered a higher being than other dogs.
  • Chin love to go for walks, but they’re not fond of inclement weather. It’s a good idea to papertrain a Chin if you live in an area with a lot of rain or snow.
  • When the Chin isn’t playing, he’s perching on a high point, observing everything going on around him.
  • The Chin’s happy, cheerful nature, adaptability and range of sizes make him suited to almost any home. Chin who weigh eight or nine pounds are best for families with children, but they must still be handled carefully.
  • The Chin’s abundant silky coat comes in black and white, red and white, or black and white with tan points (tricolor).
  • Because of his acrobatic nature, climbing ability, and tendency to clean himself, the Chin has been described as a cat in a dog suit.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy
UKC group: Companion/Spaniel
Average lifespan: 12 - 14 years
Average size: 4 - 7 pounds
Coat appearance: Silky, straight and luxurious
Coloration: White with black patches, ruby and white
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Body is same length as height; wide-set, large eyes; small V-shaped ears covered with hair; typical black nose with like-colored markings; straight legs; tail set high with feathering
Possible alterations: Patches of color may be red, brindle, orange and other similar colors; markings will match the coloration of the nose
Comparable Breeds: Pekingese, Shih Tzu, Pug

History
  The Japanese Chin is an ancient breed that probably originated in the Chinese imperial court. Highly prized, he was often given as a gift to emissaries from other lands, and it was probably as a gift to the emperor of Japan that he made his way to that island nation which gave him his name. In Japan, the Chin was regarded not as a dog (inu) but as a separate being (chin). There, he was probably crossed with small spaniel-type dogs and eventually achieved the look he has today.
  The Japanese Chin remained unknown to the outside world until 1853 when Commodore Matthew Perry sailed into Uraga Harbor near Edo — now modern-day Tokyo — and introduced Japan to international trade. The Japanese Chin became a popular commodity and many were imported into Britain and the United States.
  Among the first American owners of the breed were President Franklin Pierce, then-Secretary-of-War Jefferson Davis, and Perry's daughter, Caroline Perry Belmont. They became popular with people of wealth and nobility. In the United States, the Japanese Chin was known as the Japanese Spaniel and he kept that name until 1977.

Temperament
  This breed is considered one of the most cat-like of the dog breeds in attitude: it is alert, intelligent, and independent, and it uses its paws to wash and wipe its face. Other cat-like traits include their preference for resting on high surfaces, their good sense of balance, and their tendency to hide in unexpected places. Japanese Chin are loyal to their owners and are typically a friendly breed. While Japanese Chin prefer familiar surroundings, they also do well in new situations. This, alongside their friendly demeanor, makes them good therapy dogs. Early socialization of Japanese Chin puppies leads to a more emotionally well-balanced Chin that is more accepting of different situations and people.
  Japanese Chin are defensive animals and thus although they are usually quiet, they will bark to alert the arrival of a visitor or to draw attention to something out of the ordinary.
  Japanese Chin were also bred for the purpose of entertaining their owners. While typically calm, they are well known for performing many tricks such as the "Chin Spin", in which they turn around in rapid circles; dancing on their hind legs while pawing their front feet, clasped together, in the air; and some even "sing", a noise that can range from a low trill to a higher, almost operatic noise.

Health
  The Japanese Chin, with an average lifespan of 10 to 12 years, is prone to minor ailments like patellar luxation, cataract, heart murmur, Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca (KCS), and entropion. Achondroplasia, portacaval shunt, and epilepsy are sometimes seen in this breed. The Japanese Chin is also susceptible to corneal abrasions and cannot tolerate anesthesia or heat. Knee and eye tests are recommended for this breed.

Care
  Japanese Chin require very little exercise. They are happy with a daily walk or a nice play session but they tend to require little else. Training can be slightly difficult since they have a mind of their own and become bored with repetitious training. When they like you, however, they'll work hard to please you. When they do wrong, a firm tone of voice is all you need to set them straight. Stronger corrections will only backfire and cause your Chin to stubbornly stand his ground.
  They can be difficult to housetrain but with patience and consistency, you can generally expect them to be housetrained by 4 months of age.
  Japanese Chin are companion dogs and should not live outdoors or in kennels. They become very attached to their people, and many suffer from separation anxiety. With their low exercise needs, Japanese Chin make wonderful apartment residents.
  The neck of the Japanese Chin is very delicate and it is strongly suggested that you use a harness instead of a collar when walking him.

Living Conditions
  The Japanese Chin is a good dog for apartment life. They are moderately active indoors and will do okay without a yard. This breed is somewhat sensitive to temperature extremes.

Trainability
  Japanese Chins have spaniel roots, making them easier to train than other small breeds. Training should be done with nothing but positive reinforcement, as harsh treatment will bruise their sensitive egos and they will simply stop listening. The daily training routine should be mixed up to keep the Chin interested, as he is easily bored with repetitive activities. Once basic obedience is mastered, teaching your Chin do to parlor tricks is a breeze, and he'll love the attention that gets lavished upon him when guests see him perform.

Exercise
  Chins do not require a great deal of exercise, however they do need to be taken on a daily walk. They will enjoy the opportunity to play in an open yard.

Grooming
  The Chin might look like he needs a lot of grooming, but he’s a wash-and-go dog. His silky, abundant coat is easy to care for and rarely mats, with the occasional exception of the ear fringes. Brush him weekly with a pin brush to keep the hair from flying around the house (yes, the Chin sheds), and bathe him once a month to keep him smelling nice. After a bath, towel him off until he’s almost dry, brush the coat upward and outward with the pin brush, then smooth it down. You’re done!
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Toy breeds are especially prone to periodontal disease, so brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Although the Japanese Chin is a gentle dog, he is not recommended for homes where there are young children. He can be easily hurt by an overexuberant child. The breed does well with older children who understand how to properly handle a dog.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Japanese Chin get along well with other dogs and cats, but they must be protected from larger dogs who could accidentally injure them in play. A cat's claws can injure their large eyes, so it's important to make sure everyone plays nicely together.

Is this breed right for you?
  Very friendly, the Japanese Chin fits in well with any family. Due to his delicate nature, it is best that children are taught how to handle the small breed. Good with other animals, he's an indoor dog that can live well in an apartment. Needing only moderate exercise, he'll be content with short walks around the neighborhood. The Japanese Chin is easily trained, enjoys playtime and is best kept out of the heat for a prolonged period of time. His luxurious coat will need to be groomed twice a week and it's best to socialize and train him to know that you are master to avoid any potential behavioral problems.

Did You Know?
  A Japanese Chin makes a cameo appearance in the 1984 Woody Allen film "Broadway Danny Rose."


A dream day in the life of a Japanese Chin
The Japanese Chin will ideally wake up in the bed of his master. Following the family wherever they may go, he may stop for a trick or two while awaiting his meal. After a bit of TV time with his master, the dog will enjoy a quick stroll around the neighborhood. Upon returning home, he'll be happy to hang out with the little ones of the house until bedtime, where he'll contentedly snuggle up to his humans.

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Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Everything about your Greyhound

Everything about your Greyhound
  Nicknamed the 40-mph-couch potato, Greyhounds are quiet, gentle, affectionate dogs who can fit into almost any home. They love a cushy sofa and they are satisfied with a 20-minute walk.
  Greyhounds were originally bred as hunting dogs to chase hare, foxes, and deer. Canines in this dog breed can reach speeds of 40 to 45 miles per hour, making them the Ferraris of the dog world. Not surprisingly, Greyhounds made a name for themselves as racing dogs and are still used in racing today. They also participate in many other dog sports, including lure coursing, conformation, obedience, and agility. Beyond their grace and speed, people love them for their sweet, mild nature.

Overview
 Whether or not you've seen one in the flesh, you know what a Greyhound looks like. The iconic hound with the aerodynamic build epitomizes speed with his narrow head, long legs, and muscular rear end. We've all seen images of this sprinter, if only through seeing it plastered on the side of a bus, but many of us don't truly know the breed.
  One of the most ancient of breeds, Greyhounds probably originated in Egypt and have been prized throughout history. Historic figures who were captivated by this breed include Cleopatra, Queen Elizabeth I of England, and General Custer, who raced his dogs the day before he set off on his fateful trip to Little Big Horn. The patronage of the two queens led to Greyhound racing being dubbed the "Sport of Queens."
  Aside from its royal fans, there's a lot to love about the breed. The Greyhound combines a stately appearance with a friendly attitude toward people and other dogs. Loyal and affectionate with his family, he's not aggressive toward strangers, although he will let you know — through a bark or a subtle pricking of his small, folded ears — that someone's approaching your home.
Greyhounds have a reputation for high energy levels, but in reality their favorite pastime is sleeping. Designed as sprinters, not distance runners, they'll be satisfied with a daily walk, although active people find they make good jogging or running partners. In fact, Greyhounds do fine in apartments or homes with small yards-although they need a solid fence to keep them from chasing animals they might see as prey, such as squirrels, rabbits, or trespassing cats.
  Regardless of their strong prey drive, there's no doubt that this is a wonderful breed that deserves many belly rubs. Whether you bought your Greyhound from a show breeder or adopted him from the racetrack, you'll find yourself regarding this breed with the same respect that others have given it throughout its long and glorious history.

Other Quick Facts
  • The Greyhound has a long, narrow head; small ears; dark eyes; a long, muscular neck that is slightly arched; a broad, muscular back; a deep chest; a long, fine, tapering tail; and a short, smooth coat that can be any color or pattern.
  • Greyhounds are the fastest of the dog breeds. They have been clocked at 44 miles per hour, which along with their restful attitude has earned them the nickname “40-mph couch potato.”
  • President Rutherford B. Hayes, in office from 1877 to 1881, kept several dogs in the White House, including a Greyhound named Grim.
  • Comparable Breeds: Borzoi, Saluki

 History
  Historically, these sighthounds were used primarily for hunting in the open where their keen eyesight is valuable. It is believed that they  were introduced to the area now known as the United Kingdom in the 5th and 6th century BCE from Celtic mainland Europe although the Picts and other peoples of the northern area now known as Scotland were believed to have had large hounds similar to that of the deerhound before the 6th century BCE.
 The breed's origin is romantically reputed to be connected to Ancient Egypt, where depictions of smooth-coated sighthound types have been found which are typical of Saluki (Persian greyhound) or Sloughi (tombs at Beni Hassan c. 2000 BCE). However, analyses of DNA reported in 2004 suggest that the Greyhound is not closely related to these breeds, but is a close relative to herding dogs. Historical literature on the first sighthound in Europe (Arrian), the vertragus, the probable antecedent of the Greyhound, suggests that the origin is with the ancient Celts from Eastern Europe or Eurasia. Greyhound-type dogs of small, medium, and large size, would appear to have been bred across Europe since that time. All modern, pure-bred pedigree Greyhounds are derived from the Greyhound stock recorded and registered, firstly in the private 18th century, then public 19th century studbooks, which ultimately were registered with coursing, racing, and kennel club authorities of the United Kingdom.
  The name "Greyhound" is generally believed to come from the Old English grighund. "Hund" is the antecedent of the modern "hound", but the meaning of "grig" is undetermined, other than in reference to dogs in Old English and Old Norse. Its origin does not appear to have any common root with the modern word "grey" for color, and indeed the Greyhound is seen with a wide variety of coat colors. The lighter colors, patch-like markings and white appeared in the breed that was once ordinarily grey in color. The Greyhound is the only dog mentioned by name in the Bible; many versions, including the King James version, name the Greyhound as one of the "four things stately" in the Proverbs. However, some newer biblical translations, including The New International Version, have changed this to strutting rooster, which appears to be an alternative translation of the Hebrew term mothen zarzir. But also the Douay–Rheims Bible translation from the late 4th-century Latin Vulgate into English translates "a cock".
According to Pokorny the English name "Greyhound" does not mean "grey dog/hound", but simply "fair dog". Subsequent words have been derived from the Proto-Indo-European root *g'her- "shine, twinkle": English grey, Old High German gris "grey, old", Old Icelandic griss "piglet, pig", Old Icelandic gryja "to dawn", gryjandi "morning twilight", Old Irish grian "sun", Old Church Slavonic zorja "morning twilight, brightness". The common sense of these words is "to shine; bright".
  In 1928, the very first winner of Best in Show at Crufts was Primley Sceptre, a Greyhound owned by H. Whitley.

Personality
  Greyhounds generally have a wonderful temperament, being friendly and non-aggressive, although some can be aloof toward strangers. Give them a treat, though, and they're likely to become a friend for life.
  They're intelligent and independent, even catlike in many ways. They do have a sensitive side and are quick to react to tensions in the home. They can become shy or timid with mistreatment, even if it's unintentional. Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner.
  Always meet at least one of the parents — usually the mother is the one who's available — to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.
  Like every dog, the Greyhound needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Greyhound puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.
   Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.

Health
 The Greyhound, which has an average lifespan of 10 to 13 years, is not prone to any major health problems. However, some of the minor ailments that can affect the breed include osteosarcoma, esophageal achalasia, and gastric torsion. Both the AKC and NGA Greyhounds cannot tolerate barbiturate anesthesia and are susceptible to tail-tip injuries and lacerations, while retired NGA Greyhounds are prone to racing injuries like muscle, toe, and hock injuries.
 The Greyhound will do okay in an apartment if it gets enough exercise. It is relatively inactive indoors and a small yard will do. Greyhounds are sensitive to the cold but do well in cold climates as long as they wear a coat outside. Do not let this dog off the leash unless in a safe area. They have a strong chase instinct and if they spot an animal such as a rabbit they just might take off. They are so fast you will not be able to catch them.


Exercise
  Greyhounds that are kept as pets should have regular opportunities to run free on open ground in a safe area, as well as daily long, brisk walks, where the dog is made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead. In a dog's mind the leader leads the way and that leader needs to be the human. Greyhounds love a regular routine.


Care
  Regular exercise in the form of an occasional run and a long walk on leash is good for the Greyhound. It loves to chase and run at great speeds outdoors, so it should be only let out in safe, open areas. The breed also requires warm and soft bedding and does not like living outdoors. It is easy to maintain its coat - just an occasional brushing to get rid of dead hair.

Grooming
  Greyhounds have a short, smooth coat that is simple to groom. Brush it weekly with a hound mitt or rubber curry brush to remove dead hair and distribute skin oils that keep the coat shiny. Greyhounds shed, but regular brushing will help keep the hair off your floor, furniture, and clothing. Bathe as needed. If you do a good job of brushing your Greyhound, he probably won’t need a bath very often.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Be aware that Greyhounds are especially sensitive about having their feet handled and nails trimmed. Do your best not to cut into the quick, the vein that feeds the nail. It’s painful and your Greyhound will remember next time and put up a fight. It’s also important to brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath. Greyhounds - track dogs in particular - are known for developing periodontal disease, so brushing and annual veterinary cleanings can help keep dental disease at bay.

Is this breed right for you?
  A reserved and quiet breed, the Greyhound feels comfortable living in a quiet home. Not a good playmate for younger children, this dog will do better with older children or as an only pet. Known to chase anything that runs, including cats, these pups are only good with felines if trained. OK for apartment living if regularly exercised, the Greyhound does best living indoors with a small yard for playtime.


Children and other pets
  Greyhounds can be patient with children and have been known to step delicately around toddlers, but they do best in homes with older children who know how to act around dogs. They're more likely to walk away from a teasing child than to snap at him.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Although Greyhounds do very well with other dogs, they can view smaller dogs, cats, or other small pets as prey, especially if the animals run from them. Some have a much lower prey drive than others, but it's always best to supervise your Greyhound around smaller animals. Instinct can overcome training, and Greyhounds have been known to injure or even kill smaller pets.
And even if they're best friends with your indoor cat, they may view outdoor cats that come onto their property as fair game.

Did You Know?
  A description written in 1486 is a poetic notion of just how a Greyhound should look: “A Greyhound should be headed like a snake and necked like a drake, backed like a beam, sided like a bream, footed like a cat and tailed like a rat.”


A dream day in the life of a Greyhound
  Prone to bloat, the Greyhound does best with breakfast, lunch and dinner. Lazily waking up in the morning to a rubdown, he'll enjoy sticking to his routine of a morning walk before his owner leaves for work. Enjoying having the house to himself, he'll lazily keep an eye on everything while you're away. Greeting you when you come in the door, he'll be ready for a run and perhaps a bit of racing before the day is over. Just make sure to keep him on the leash in case he spots a rabbit and feels the need to chase it down.
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