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Showing posts with label aggressive. Show all posts
Showing posts with label aggressive. Show all posts

Wednesday, December 7, 2016

Everything about your Plott

Everything about your Plott
  The Plott is first and foremost a hunting dog who specializes in big game or anything else you want him to go after. For the person who can satisfy his desire to hunt and be active, he can be a wonderful companion and watchdog, well suited to family life. His short coat is easy to groom, but it sheds.

Overview
  The Plott Hound is one of only four dog breeds developed exclusively in America; and although not previously in existence as a unique type prior to the 18th century, the Plott Hound can trace its ancestry to an archaic breed of dog called the Hanoverian Hound.  The Hanoverian Hound was developed in Germany and is believed to have originally descended from medieval Bloodhound breeds.  This lineage therefore, makes the Plott Hound undeniably ancient in its pedigree, and the only Coonhound breed not claiming British roots.

Highlights
  • Plott Hounds generally get along well with other dogs since they are a pack breed and many do best in homes where they are not an only dog.
  • Socialization is a must for this breed. They can be very dominant and should be socialized outside the home to avoid aggressive behavior.
  • Plott Hounds must have training at an early age. They are generally eager to please but without training dominance and aggression problems can arise.
  • Although they do well with older children who understand how to treat dogs, they are not recommended for homes with smaller children. They can become very possessive of food dishes and such. Even the best-trained or socialized dog should not be left alone with a young child.
  • The Plott Hound is an uncommon breed and there may be long waiting lists for a puppy. If you do not wish to adopt an older dog, please be prepared to wait and do not go to irresponsible breeders for a shorter wait.
  • Plott Hounds require at least an hour a day of walking or other exercise. They are not suited to living in apartments.
  • Plott Hounds require weekly brushing as well as other regular grooming care, such as nail trimming and tooth brushing.
  • Plott Hounds are not the best breed for an inexperienced or timid dog owner. Although they are very easy to train, they do have a dominant personality and will disregard an owner that is less sure of him or herself.
  • Plott Hounds should have a fenced yard or be kept on leash since they have a tendency to wander off in pursuit of an interesting scent. They do not have any road sense and will wander into oncoming traffic if their path takes them there.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • The Plott is an aggressive, bold, fearless hunter who is loyal, intelligent, and alert.
  • The Plott’s skin is not as loose and droopy as that of some scenthounds, and his ears aren’t as long.
  • The Plott has a distinctive “chop” — a loud, staccato, ringing bark that lets the hunter know he is on the trail of or has treed his prey.
  • The Plott is the dog of choice for big-game hunters in search of bears, cougars, or hogs. They are also used to tree raccoons, and many farmers like to keep them as all-purpose dogs.
  • The Plott’s smooth, fine coat can be any shade of brindle, black with brindle trim, solid black, or buckskin, which ranges from red fawn through sandy red, light cream, yellow ochre, dark fawn or golden tan.
Breed standards
AKC group: Hound
UKC group: Scenthound
Average lifespan: 12-14 years
Average size: 40-60 pounds
Coat appearance: Glossy, smooth, and fine
Coloration: Blue brindle, brown brindle, red brindle, black brindle
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: A medium-sized muscular and strong body, black lips and nose, black-rimmed brown or hazel eyes, tight skin around face, square-shaped muzzle, hanging ears that are medium in length, webbed toes, and long tail
Possible alterations: May be all black in color and have saddle markings. Dog has a "chop" sound when he has successfully hunted down his prey.
Comparable Breeds: Black and Tan Coonhound, Redbone Coonhound

History
  The Plott Hound descends from five Hanoverian Schweisshunds brought to North Carolina in 1750 by German immigrant Johannes Georg Plott. In Germany the dogs had been used as boarhounds, but North Carolina had bears, and that's what Plott trained his dogs to hunt. Plott's descendants continued to breed the dogs, and they became known as Plott's hounds.
Von Plott (left), a descendent of the original developers
 of the Plott hound breed in Haywood County, NC,
with a group of hounds at Lake Waccamaw, NC;
man on right is probably Von’s brother John Plott.
Circa early 1950s.
  They spread throughout the Smoky Mountains, with each hunter adding his own touch to the breed, and eventually returned to their roots by being used to hunt wild boar in addition to bear. They were also used to hunt mountain lions and, with judicious crosses to add better treeing ability, raccoons.
  In the early 1900s, a cross with some black-and-tan hounds owned by a man named Blevins brought the Plotts additional scenting talent as well as the black-saddled brindle pattern. Today, most Plott Hounds trace their pedigrees back to the two legendary hounds that resulted from this cross: Tige and Boss.
  The breed began to be registered by the United Kennel Club in 1946. The Plott Hound became the official dog of North Carolina in 1989. He's also registered by the American Kennel Club and is starting to make his way in the show ring.
  He is still relatively rare, however, and is most often found in the mountains of Appalachia, the Smokies, and other wild parts of the country where his hunting skills are appreciated.

Personality
  Plott Hounds originated in the Hills of North Carolina where they were used to hunt bear and wild boar. This makes them sturdy, fearless hunting companions and excellent family watchdogs. Plotts need to live in an active household with people who love the outdoors.   They enjoy hiking, running and romping in the yard, and hunters still use them in the field to hunt large game. Plott Hounds are pack dogs and are at their happiest in a home with multiple dogs for him to socialize with. Plotts are generally friendly toward strangers and enjoy the company of older, well-behaved children.

Health
  The Plott, which has an average lifespan of 11 to 13 years, is not prone to any major health concerns. However, some Plotts do succumb to canine hip dysplasia (CHD). To identify this condition early, a veterinarian may recommend hip exams for this breed of dog.

Care
  Although Plott Hounds have moderately low energy indoors, they are active outside. If you don't have a several fenced acres that they can explore and sniff, expect to give them about an hour of exercise daily. You can break it up into two or three walks or playtimes. The Plott is a walking companion, not a jogger. He likes to meander along and sniff out interesting trails.
  Plott Hounds should remain on leash when they are not in an enclosed area and they should have a fenced yard when they are left outside. They will wander away, and they have no road sense. They'll follow an interesting trail right into the path of a car. While a Plott needs a fenced yard for safety, he's not a yard dog. When you're home, he should be there with you.
  Plott Hounds are fairly easy to train due to their intelligence and eager to please temperament. They do have a dominant streak and are not suggested for inexperienced or timid dog owners who are unable to consistently enforce rules and commands. They do well with positive reinforcement, and corrections should never be harsh or cruel. That will only make your Plott become stubborn or sulky.
  Plott Hounds must be socialized to prevent any aggression problems. Many obedience schools offer puppy socialization classes and this is a great start. Also remember to gradually expose your puppy to various stimuli within the community and in your home.
  Plotts can be possessive of their food dishes and will attack other dogs and animals that nose around their food. Teaching your Plott Hound to allow people to handle and remove his food dishes is an important training step that cannot be missed.

Living Conditions
  The Plott Hound is not recommended for apartment life. It can live and sleep outdoors provided it has proper shelter. This breed has no road sense at all and should be kept in a safe area because it has a tendency to wander.

Trainability
  Plotts are a snap to train for experienced dog owners. If used in the field, they need virtually no training to work with a hunter. At home, obedience training goes quickly and smoothly if conducted early. This breed exhibits dominance, so it is imperative to teach them as puppies who exactly runs the household. Once leadership is established, everything else falls into place. Plotts are pack animals who instinctively respect the leader. Treats and positive reinforcement should be all you need to train a young Plott. Older Plotts who have developed bad habits may require a firmer hand, but this breed should never be treated harshly. If they aren't afraid to attack bears, they surely won't be scared to nip at you. Boundaries are important and rule enforcement should be done with absolute consistency.

Activity Requirements
  Plott Hounds need a lot of activity to maintain health and happiness. They can spend an entire day in the field tracking and penning prey, so companion Plotts should be allowed to run as much as possible during the day to burn off excess energy. They make excellent jogging companions and enjoy trotting alongside bike riders. They make excellent hiking and camping companions, acting as both comrade and protector.
  These are pure country dogs and do not do well in houses without yards or in apartments. Plotts need room to run and roam, and if penned inside all day will become rambunctious and destructive.

Grooming
  The Plott has a distinctive coat. It’s smooth and fine, but thick enough to protect the dog as he hunts in cold, wet or rough conditions. A few Plotts have a double coat: a short, soft, thick under coat topped by a longer, smoother, stiffer hairs.
  Caring for a Plott’s coat is easy. Groom it at least weekly with a rubber curry brush to remove dead hair and distribute skin oils. If your Plott spends a lot of time indoors, you might want to brush him more often to keep dead hair on the brush and off your furniture and clothing. Plotts with a double coat will shed more heavily and need to be brushed two or three times a week.
  Be aware that scenthounds such as the Plott can have what is often described as a musty odor. Regular baths can help keep the aroma under control, but it’s something you should be prepared to live with.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Keep the hanging ears clean and dry to prevent bacterial or yeast infections. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Plott Hounds do well in homes with children, although they're best suited to living with older children who understand how to interact with dogs. Plotts can be possessive of their food bowls, and this can pose a problem if a young child tries to snag a handful of kibble.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Plott Hounds can get along well with other dogs if they're introduced at a young age. If they raised with them, they can even learn to get along with cats, although they may tree cats they find outside.

Is this breed right for you?
  An outgoing and social breed, the Plott makes an excellent addition to a family with children. Loving and loyal, he does best with a home that includes a fenced-in yard. In need of a dedicated owner, he's fast to learn when given proper leadership. A natural-born athlete, this pup is in need of a lot of exercise and enjoys hunting and being outside. He's a good breed to keep inside or outside the home and is not recommended for apartment living. Only doing well with cats when raised with them, he will likely chase a cat that he doesn't know.

Did You Know?
  The mountains of western North Carolina are the birthplace of one of America’s few homegrown dogs.

A dream day in the life of a Plott
  Waking up early to hunt, the Plott will work from sunup to sundown. Returning home, he'll happily play with the family while running and chasing them outdoors. Inside, he'll engage in family time by following around those that he loves. With an afternoon walk including smelling a few scents, he'll be back in the home to spend quality time with his loving family.
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Monday, June 20, 2016

10 Most Dangerous Dog Breeds

10 Most Dangerous Dog Breeds
  Regardless of the breed, we can typically point to a puppy’s upbring to explain significant parts of its personality. However, certain breeds of dog have earned their terrible reputations, often labeled as vicious because of their apparent predisposition to violent interactions with other dogs and humans. Still, it has been suggested that training and domestication could iron out the kinks in the nature of an aggressive canine.
  So, almost any breed of dog can be a wonderful companion, but almost any breed of dog can kill. It’s true, though, that certain breeds are most susceptible to falling victim to a powerfully aggressive nature, and with a combination of improper care and the physical attributes and characteristics of a violent breed, these ten most dangerous breeds of dogs cause a higher number of injuries and fatalities than any other.

1. Pit Bull
  Pit Bull is one of the dangerous dog breeds in the world which types include Stafford shire bull terrier, American Pit Bull Terrier, and American Stafford shire terrier. The Pit Bull dog breed is very difficult to identify through its physical characteristics even experts may face difficulty to visually recognize the dog breeds. Pit Bull has various well known types having different behavior and temperament level towards their owners and strangers while some are both independent and stubborn and can’t be inexperienced dog owner may injure or kill other animals.
  Pit bulls often attract the worst kind of dog owners because of their power. Especially immoral people who are only interested in these dogs for fighting (which is unacceptable). While pit bulls were once considered especially non-aggressive to any people, their reputation has changed because of unscrupulous breeders and irresponsible owners. In fact, Pit bulls are commonly confident, people-oriented dogs that can develop a strong sense of dependence on their owners.

Facts About Pit Bulls: 
  • Though these dedicated companions love people more than anything but improper training can sometimes make them aggressive. They can even attack humans if not trained the right way. Otherwise, they won’t harm humans
  • 86.8% of American Pit Bull Terriers have passed their temperament tests
  • No matter what the task is, when pit bulls are committed to any task, they carry out it with full enthusiasm. It’s often the nature of pit bulls, which make us think that they have locking Jaws especially when they bite on something and refuse to release it that easily
  • Pitbulls are widely known for illegal sport of dog fighting
More about Pit Bull here...Everything about your Pit Bull


2.  Rottweilers
  Rottweilers are one of the most popular dog breeds in the world. They are powerful dogs with strong jaws, primarily meant to protect. They generally don’t like strangers and other dogs and if they think their owners are in danger, they can be very dangerous.
  This breed is often used as a police dog or guard dog. As an old breed dating as far back, according to historians, to the Roman Empire, Rottweilers have also been used as herding dogs.
  Many experts advise Rottweiler owners to seek professional training for their dogs as their strength is an inherent risk, particularly for children. If you choose to have one of these dogs, be sure it is properly socialized and always remain vigilant regarding its temperament.

Rottweiler Facts:
  • Rottweilers fall under “working dog breeds” category. It is one of the widely known Rottweiler facts
  • Life expectancy of this dangerous dog breed is around 12 to 14 years
  • After completing their first year, Rottweilers are considered as adults. 1 Rottweiler year is equivalent to 16 years of human age. After they complete 2 years, just add 5 years to find its equivalent human age
  • Generally, Rottweilers are considered unsuitable for family pet
More about Rottweiler here...Everything about your Rottweiler

3. Huskies
  Huskies is dog breed to pull sleds in northern regions which usually known for their fast pulling style mostly recognizable by its thickly furred double coat. Huskies are a very active, energetic, and resilient breed and one of dangerous dog breeds in the world because of their aggressive nature towards others. Huskies aren’t much violent but only few reasons made them vicious which can be reduced through positive reinforcement training program but consistency needed with these sessions and turned to be destructive without proper care. 

  However, they can be dangerous to smaller animals due to their strong predator instinct and are known for being destructive if they are bored.
  Huskies are very energetic and intelligent dogs. But their training is a complicated thing, and this dog is not recommended for beginning dog owners.

Husky Facts:
  • Although huskies have nabbed a spot in the list of most dangerous dog breeds, generally they are more friendly towards children, your visitors and other dogs. But again, you should train them properly
  • However, factors like improper training, poor socialization and bad social experiences can turn them aggressive
  • Due to its high shedding, huskies often don’t suit people who are allergic to dog hairs or want their home to be clean all the time
More about Husky here...Everything about your Siberian Husky

4.German Shepherds
  Famous K-9 dogs. They are known to be fearless and confident dogs. German Shepherds are in need of constant and serious physical activity though, and they seem to give preference to long walks and active games.
  The large-sized working dog breed German Shepherd developed originally for herding sheep stand among the top popular dog breeds in the United States and United Kingdom. The highly active and self assured dogs are keen to learn and eagerness to have a purpose proved as excellent guard dogs and best for search missions. German Shepherds are responsible for biting having a tendency to attack other breeds and human also became victims several times for which they are added among the most dangerous dog breeds in the world.
  The bite of a German Shepherd has a force of over 1,060 newtons, and some studies show that German Shepherds have a tendency to bite and attack smaller dogs.  German Shepherds are commonly used as police dogs today.



German Shepherd Facts:
  • Even though their aggressive nature had labeled them to be as one of the dangerous dogs but when they are trained properly, believe me — they are your best companion
  • By nature, German Shepherd is fond of food, fun and friends
  • These dogs show immense curiosity in exploring their surroundings. If you own one, you must have observed. This inquisitiveness behavior is apparently when he or she is a puppy
  • German shepherd can pick up great speed and at the same time can halt all of a sudden without stumbling on anything or its surroundings
  • German shepherd is an extreme hair shredder. Even if you brush its hair for every 15 minutes, you will still see hairs floating in air. So brush its hair every day if you want to keep your home hygiene
  • Though German Shepherds are subject to suffer from many different types of illnesses, most common one is “hip dysplasia”, which occurs due to poor breeding practices
More about German Shepherd here...Everything about your German Shepherd

5.Alaskan Malamutes
  A large breed of domestic dog Alaskan malamute is also among the top dangerous dog breeds in the world following their temperament and aggression if not trained and instructed well. Alaskan malamute can be described as more strong and sturdy compared to other dog breeds, very fond of people usually quiet dogs, seldom barking. These dogs can be dangerous or fatal for other human who are unknown to them only when they feel any danger for them and their owner or family member but other cases can be resolved through training sessions.


  Although some of these dogs are still used for mushing or sledding, most are employed as family pets where they tend to be beloved by their households.
Of course, these dogs, like other Arctic dogs, have a high prey drive. They must be watched with other small pets in the home. Due to their size, they should also be supervised around young children.
  As high-energy dogs, these animals are most likely to thrive and exhibit best traits when they have been properly socialized and have access to the exercise they need. It’s never good for Alaskan Malamutes to be caged or kept from mental stimulation.

Facts About Alaskan Malamutes:
  • Alaskan malamutes are slow learners. So you will need a lot of patience to train these dog breeds
  • These dogs are prolific hair shedders. Just bring Alaskan Malamutes to your home and watch how sooner your home is piled with whole lot of hairs
  • Alaskan Malamutes have the ability to make variety of sounds in order to convey their needs to you. As these dog breeds enjoy human company, you got to spend plenty of time with them to keep them happy
  • They need whole lot of energy, exercise, love and your attention too. Malamutes that lack exercises frequently misbehave & at times can turn dangerous too
  • They are ridiculously friendly with well-behaved kids
  • These dog breeds insist you to allow them to be a part of your family activities
More about Alaskan Malamutes here...Everything about your Alaskan Malamute

6. Doberman Pinschers
  Doberman Pinschers were once commonly used as police dogs, but this is less commonplace today. Dobermans can be often be aggressive towards strangers, but less frequently towards their owners. The breed’s reputation has improved in recent years, but their size and strength still makes them potentially dangerous. 
  Famed for their alertness, loyalty and intelligence, this breed of dogs is considered to be the best guard dog where they only attack if they are provoked or sense that their family and their property is in dangerAlthough once used as guard dogs or police dogs, they also exhibit aggressive behavior directed to strangers and other dogs, though owner-directed aggression is low. Their aggression due to their size and strength can also make them potentially dangerous.
  Trained properly, these dogs can become very loyal to their masters, but aggressive towards perceived threats to their owners. 

Doberman Pinschers Facts:
  • These intelligent dog breeds are often referred as “Dogs with a human brain”. Although Doberman pinchers serve you faithfully, you still have to train them properly with your leadership. Else, they assume they are the leaders
  • These dogs will do their best when they have something to do. They can even watch TV, help your business and suddenly can sit on your lap too. However, they are completely reserved with strangers.
  • Doberman pinchers can do self-estimations. So if your family is being threatened, you don’t have to utter a word. They will automatically sense and do everything to protect you
  •  As these dogs are highly intelligent and energetic, improper training can cause behavioral issues. This is why it has made my list of dangerous dog breeds.
  • These dog breeds are more sensitive to sounds. In fact, they can hear sounds 250 yards away
More about Doberman Pinschers here...Everything about your Doberman Pinscher

7. Chow Chows
  Some will be surprised seeing the Chow Chow in this ranking, but, nevertheless, this breed is one of the most aggressive dogs in the world. At first glance, Chow Chows are very attractive and cute fluffies, also the representatives of China. Before you buy this dog, you must remember that an adult Chow Chow cannot safely play with unfamiliar dogs and be left alone with children, because they are very irritable and defend their right to their food with a spiteful grin.
  Also Chow Chow are good guards, as they are very devoted to their owner, would not allow a stranger to approach to the master, and won’t not let anyone into their territory.  Better don’t try to get near a chow chow’s owner without his or her permission. Because chow chow is the one of the most aggressive dog breed in the world. They were bred for hunting and helping shepherds.
  They are usually held as pets, and due to their size they can be kept in apartments. The danger rests when they lack exercise or are just generally bored, and will sometimes lash out at strangers and even owners due to boredom.

Chow Chow Facts:
  • Chow Chow dog breed is the only dog breed that has purplish lips and tongue
  • Originating in China, Chow Chows are there since 4000 years. Therefore, they are believed to be one of the oldest dog breeds. Some experts believe that these dogs were the very ones to be evolved from wolves.
  • Chow Chows are usually stubborn. As they are more dominant, it’s good to train and socialize them when they are young
  • Once Chow Chows complete 1 year, they should be considered adults
More about Chow Chow here...Everything about your Chow Chow

8. Great Danes
  The large German breed of domestic dog Great Dane has enormous body and height known for looking physical affection from their owners. Great Dane are generally well disposed towards other pets including dogs and familiar human and not exhibit any extreme aggressiveness towards them but if not well trained or socialized can be very fearful and aggressive nature dog breed for unfamiliar human or any stranger happens towards them for which they have been added among the most dangerous dog breeds in the world.
  If trained properly then a Great Dane can be a gentle giant, but since these dogs are such large and imposing creatures they can prove to be very dangerous if improperly cared for.   Fully grown male Great Danes could well be killing machines, as they can weigh as much as 200 pounds and stand 86 cm tall. 

Facts About Great Danes:
  • “Giant George”, a Great Dane was measured 43-inches tall but it weighed only 245 pounds. It made a Guinness record for being the world’s tallest dog ever. There is a short sweet story about this gentle giant. You can read more about this here: “Top 10 Biggest Dog Breeds in the World”.
  • Apartment living is quite fine for this huge dog breed. Just half-an-hour walk a day can keep Great Danes fit
  • Great Danes grow rapidly. Within a year, it can grow 6 feet tall
  • These dog breeds barely eat their food
  • Great Danes are one among emotionally sensitive dog breeds. They won’t respond well to hard training methods. On the other hand, anxiety can easily kill this dog 
  • You can’t expect a poorly bred Great Dane to be a Scooby Doo friendly anyway
More about Great Danes here...Everything about your Great Dane

9. Boxer
  This dignified-looking dog is known for its distinctive head.
Revered for bravery and stamina, the boxer can make a great family pet; however, owners must be diligent when raising their boxer to be obedient and must also curb aggressive tendencies.
  The Boxer tends to be loyal and loving to its family; yet, again, proper socialization must be provided.
  Intelligent and generally tractable, the Boxer can make a great family pet, especially when positive reinforcement is employed during training.
  By nature, Boxers are not known to be vicious or overly aggressive as some breeds are. However, these negative tendencies may occur in neglected or mistreated dogs. For this reason, it’s important to get to know an adult Boxer well before introducing it to a family situation.
  Boxers are quite strong and may inflict serious injury if they choose to attack. Many trainers have insisted that Boxers boast above-average intelligence. They are very trainable and will reward their owners with loyal and even temperaments when induced. When obtaining a Boxer puppy, it’s important to provide adequate socialization.
  Though the breed was developed in Germany as a hunting dog, it is today typically employed as a companion or family dog. Some Boxers are used as guard dogs.

Facts About Boxers:
  • In United States, Boxers are the sixth most popular dog breeds
  • They became popular after WW-II when soldiers brought them home as their pets
  • One of the most funny facts about boxers is that they snore loud
  • In the past, you could have seen boxers in circus ring performances. The reason: they are intelligent and easily trainable. Thus, people used them to make money
  • Originally, these dog breeds were developed in Germany. There they are still used as police dogs
  • Boxers are loyal and die to please you. But if you punish them hardly for their wrong behaviors, they will turn worse
More about Boxer here... Everything about your Boxer

10. Akita
  Akitas are well known for their dominant temperament. Because they have a mind of their own, they can exhibit unruly behaviors which may make them risky in some situations.
  For this reason, the Akita requires a skilled owner who takes time to instill this dog with obedience.
  Akitas were originally bred to hunt deer and bears in their native Japan. They are bred for strength, endurance, and courage. As one of the world’s oldest native hunting breeds, the Akita still enjoys this pursuit and requires a good deal of exercise and mental stimulation to avoid boredom. A bored Akita is likely to find a negative pastime to occupy itself.
  Akitas boast thick double coats and don’t mind cold weather like other Spitz types of dogs such as the Siberian Husky. The breed is extremely territorial when it comes to its property. This is one reason why many people prefer the breed as it helps deter trespassers.
  Akitas can make excellent companions. Although they can be aggressive, with the right owner and family, they can make great pets. The idea is to provide an environment that allows them to thrive.

Facts About Akitas:
  • Akitas are loyal and fearless companion for your family
  • This dog breed would not back down from challenges in any situation and can’t be frightened so easily
  • If you don’t train and socialize them properly, this affectionate yet bold animal can screw up and turn into one of the most dangerous dog breeds
More about Akita here...Everything about your Akita


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