LUV My dogs: afganhound

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Showing posts with label afganhound. Show all posts
Showing posts with label afganhound. Show all posts

Wednesday, June 27, 2018

Everything about your Afador

Everything about your Afador
  A blend of noble Afghan Hound and gentle Labrador Retriever, the handsome Afador is a perfect pet for families with older children and those with previous experience as dog owners. In spite of his retriever lineage, this medium sized pooch has a spirited personality and can be a handful for a novice pet parent who may not be experienced at training a younger dog. His protective nature, wariness of strangers and resounding bark make him perfect for those who want an energetic family pet that brings watchdog benefits.

Overview
  The Afador is a hybrid dog produced, in the last decade or so, from crossbreeding the Afghan Hound with the Labrador Retriever. Afadors are highly intelligent, remarkably alert, loud barkers, more than a bit stubborn and nearly as difficult to train as they are loyal to loved ones — which is quite a bit! They don't make ideal indoor dogs due to the tremendous energy they possess, nor are they outside-only dogs as they strongly prefer to be with their family, but they do need a good amount of very secure outdoor space in which to run and play. They are also high maintenance in regards to exercise and grooming.

Breed standards
Dog Breed Group: Mixed Breed Dogs
Average lifespan: 10-12 years
Average size: 60-70 lbs
Hypoallergenic: No
Coat appearance: Long, fine, smooth
Coloration: Black, cream, yellow, chocolate, and parti colored with white
Best Suited For: Families with older children, house-owners with fenced yards, those with time for daily exercise.
Temperament: Affectionate, excitable, energetic, cautious
Comparable Breeds: Labrador Retriever, Afghan Hound

History 
  First bred in Alaska, the Afador is a perfect balance between the Labrador Retriever and the Afghan Hound. Although it is still a rare breed, the Afador has become quite popular in the last decade.
  With the intelligence and energy from the Labrador and the beauty and grace of the Afghan, they can be a great pet for anyone. When the breed first originated, the Afador was always a mix of Labrador Retriever and Afghan Hound, but now there are many breeders who have begun to use second generation Afadors to breed new Afadors. Due to this multibreed mixing, there is no guarantee of which attributes these Afador puppies will have. It depends on the amount of each original breed that was in the first generation and which genetics are the most dominant. 
  Breeders are now trying to stabilize the Afador breed by determining what amounts of each type of dog are most desired. The Afghan Hound originated in Afghanistan and is considered to be one of the oldest dog breeds there are, believed to have been around during the pre-Christian era. The Labrador Retriever is intelligent, lovable, and playful. This breed is one of the most popular guide dogs and working dogs because they are smart and friendly. The Afador is usually a strong and confident retrieving dog that likes to work but also has a playful and protective nature as well. 
  They make great watchdogs at home but also like to venture outdoors often and may want to retrieve random small animals even when you do not request it. Because they are a mixed breed, they are not a true purebred dog so they are not registered with the AKC. However, they are considered to be part of the hounding and sporting groups.


Temperament 
  The Afador is considered a hybrid or designer dog.Described as affectionate, independent, intelligent and loyal, the Afador is a greatly family pet who loves to play outdoors, but adapts well when spending time indoors. He loves kids but his high spirited nature means he does best with older kids who won’t get knocked about if he decides to jump up. He’s an alert and watchful dog who enjoys a good bark and to alert his human pack when strangers arrive. Because he comes from a hounding and sporting background, Afadors are known for their work in search and rescue, tracking, sledding, hunting, police work, narcotics detection, retrieving, herding and agility.

Health 
Afadors are generally a healthy breed, but some individuals may be affected by certain health conditions like allergies, hypothyroidism, cataracts, elbow dysplasia, hip dysplasia, epilepsy, and myopathy.

Care
  Because of the Afador’s long, fine coat, a lot of maintenance is needed to prevent matting and tangles. The Afghan Hound is known to be almost hypoallergenic but the Labrador Retriever is a moderate shedder, so the Afador is likely to shed. They should be brushed at least twice a week with a metal comb and bristle brush. The best way to brush your Afador is to comb one handful at a time starting at the bottom to keep it free of tangles. 
  Shampooing your Afador may be needed more often than other dogs due to their long fur and affinity for playing outdoors. Use a mild shampoo recommended by your veterinary care provider. The ears should be checked and cleaned once a week to get rid of excess wax and debris. They should be fed about two to three cups of premium dog food per day, depending on your Afador’s size and age. Because Afghan Hounds are prone to bloat, you should talk to your veterinarian about feeding your Afador smaller meals several times a day.

Living Conditions
  The Afador is not suited to living in apartments because of his energy levels nor in warm climates though he is fine in colder ones. 
  He does not bark a lot but will bark and can do so loudly if a stranger approaches. He is stable but should not be kept as an outside dog because of their more social nature.

Training
  The willful Afador can be a handful to train so best to start early with a particular focus on socialization to lessen his wariness of strangers. The breed is typically independent however is highly intelligent and when training is properly administered, he is known to listen to commands with few repetitions needed. For owners not seasoned at training a head-strong pooch, a professional dog trainer would be a good investment.

Activity Requirements 
  The Labrador Retriever and the Afghan Hound are medium sized dogs that do require at least 45 minutes a day of exercise. Both breeds can easily become couch potatoes and obese, therefore, when the two breeds are mixed, their offspring can also easily become obese and lazy. Ensure that your dog is getting plenty of exercise to build muscle tone and keep his body healthy. Do not just leave him in the back yard to play by himself, he will not do so and may even become destructive. By getting out there with your dog and playing games or simply taking a walk around the neighborhood you are building a bond with your dog that will last a lifetime.

Grooming
  With frequent brushing, its coat can be kept free from tangles and dirt while cleaning its ears every month using a vet-approved solution helps reduce accumulation of wax and dirt. Brush its teeth several times a week and trim its nails once a month.

Talents and Facts
  • The Afador is not officially recognized by any canine organization
  • The name of the dog is a portmanteau of the first syllable of the word “Afghan” and the last syllable of the word “Labrador”
  • Based on its mix, the Afador is sometimes referred to as an Afghan Hound Dog or a Labrador Retriever Hybrid Dog
  • These are not commonly used terms; they are simply acknowledgments of the cross-breed origins of the dog

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Everything about your Afghan Retriever

Everything about your Afghan Retriever
  The Afghan Retriever is a large breed with a long flowing coat, floppy ears, and a muscular but lithe body. In fact, this breed looks like a smaller built Golden Retriever. Both breeds are known for their hunting abilities so they are often used for that purpose. These dogs are bred to be sporty and energetic enough to take hunting but calm and friendly enough to be a good house pet. The Afghan Retriever is independent but lovable, smart and silly. They are good with kids and other pets but should not be left alone with any children under five years old. You will mostly find these dogs in yellow, cream, gold, white, and chocolate.

Overview
  The Afghan Retriever is not a purebred dog. It is a cross between the Afghan Hound and the Golden Retriever. The best way to determine the temperament of a mixed breed is to look up all breeds in the cross and know you can get any combination of any of the characteristics found in either breed. Not all of these designer hybrid dogs being bred are 50% purebred to 50% purebred. It is very common for breeders to breed multi-generation crosses.

Breed standards
Dog Breed Group: Mixed Breed Dogs
Average lifespan: 12-14 Years
Average size: 55-80 pounds
Coat appearance: thick, flowing coat
Coloration: brown and white, dark brown, chocolate, light brown, golden, white or cream
Hypoallergenic: No
Comparable Breeds: Golden Retriever, Afghan Hound

History 
  Because this breed is new, the history is not known yet. However, by looking at the history of the parent breeds, this can give you a good idea of the characteristics of the Afghan Retriever.
  The Afghan Hound is an ancient breed from Afghanistan, where these dogs were found roaming in the Afghan mountains. When these independent beauties were discovered, they were brought down to town and used in hunting and gathering rabbits and gazelle for food. In the 1920s, the Afghan Hound was brought to the United States but was mainly found among the wealthy. They were registered by the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1926 and became popular as show dogs for a while before losing their popularity in the 1950s. 
The Golden Retriever originated in England in the early 1800s and was documented by Lord Tweedmouth on the estate with Sir Dudley Majoribanks. This breed is famous for its retrieving abilities but is also good at hunting, field trials, obedience, and is often used as a guide dog for blind people. In fact, the first three dogs to win the obedience champion titles were all Golden Retrievers.
 This breed came to the United States in 1900 with Lord Tweedmouth’s sons to live on the family’s Texas farm. They quickly became popular as show dogs and as pets, being registered by the AKC in 1925 and is presently the 3rd most popular dog breed in the United States. The Afghan Hound ranks 113th most popular. Their fast learning skills made them invaluable to those who needed therapy dogs, guide dogs, and service dogs for the blind and handicapped, as well as narcotics detection.


Personality
  The Afghan Retriever can be sweet and silly, dignified and proud. They make great family pets and are good with children. As loyal, smart and obedient dogs, they tend to train very well and like to be given tasks to do. Even though they're easy to train, care should be given to treat them with firmness, fairness and consistency. They are a proud breed, but have no problem acting silly and playful when warranted.

Health 
  Afghan Retriever is a healthier breed like other hybrid breeds. However Afghan Retriever has tendency to suffer from cancer, hip dysplasia, Von Willebrand's condition, heart complications and congenital eye defects. 

Training
  Afghan Retriever require training in early age like other hybrid dogs. Afghan Retriever is easy to train.  It learns basic commands such as sit, stay, come easily. Behavior training is also very important for your Afghan Retriever.  Behavior training prevents and or corrects bad habits of your puppy or dog. Behavior and basic commands training for your Afghan Retriever should must on these lines. Do not get impatient. You will probably have to repeat the command many times. Never use negative reinforcement. Do not call your dog to come to you for punishment because this will teach your dog not to come on command. Be sure to keep any frustration out of the tone of your voice. If you feel yourself becoming frustrated, take a break. Your dog can sense this and will start to associate training with your unhappiness. You cannot hide your frustration from a dog. You cannot pretend. Dogs can feel human emotion, so stay relaxed, firm and confident.

Exercise 
  Daily exercise for your Afghan Retriever is important, dogs are living with human since thousands of years, wild dogs have challenges to survive so they work daily to find food, save food and themselves from other animals but companion dogs have nothing to do, they have ready food and couch to sit, which may affect their health, habits and activity. 
  Your Afghan Retriever is recommended Tuging,Running,Walking regular according to its breed specific exercise requirements. 

Care
   The Afghan Hound is hypoallergenic but the Golden Retriever is a mild seasonal shedder so you should expect some level of shedding during the warmer months of the year. It is best to brush your Afghan Retriever at least every other day to promote good skin care and prevent mats. You should also clean their ears and eyes at this time and check for any redness or swelling. Many owners of both the Golden Retriever and the Afghan Hound take their dogs to be professionally groomed every few months, which is a fine idea if you live in a warm climate. Otherwise, you can bathe your dog with a mild shampoo when needed and trim the nails regularly as well.

Children and other pets
Afghan Retriever are good with children and other pet.

Talents and Facts
  • This cross between the Afghan Hound and the Golden Retriever belongs to the sporting and hounding group
  • This breed requires lots of exercise
  • When left to play outdoors, they will run around to burn off energy
  • When indoors, they can be fairly playful and lively
  • Take them on daily walks or runs and make sure they have plenty of space to roam in a large backyard



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Wednesday, December 27, 2017

Everything about your Afghan Collie

Everything about your Afghan Collie
  The Afghan Collie, a cross breed between Afghan Hound and Border collie, was originally used as hunting dog in its native land. This dog belongs to the Hounding or Herding group. They are historically good with agility, obedience, narcotics detection, retrieving, tracking and sighting, which made them a good watchdog out on the prairies and farms.

Overview
  The Afghan Collie is a wonderful mix of an Afghan Hound and a Border Collie with a medium sized body and a long thick coat with talents in sighting, tracking, retrieving, detecting narcotics, obedience, and agility. These dogs are known to be friendly and energetic, but can also be used as guard dogs. 
  The Border Collie is known as the ultimate sheepdog and the Afghan Hound is an excellent hunter so this hybrid breed is perfect for hunting and gathering. Both breeds date back to pre-1800s and which then made their way to America by the 1900s. While the Afghan Hound is a large breed, the Border Collie is in the medium sized group so the Afghan Collie is a mid to large sized dog.

Breed standards
Breed Type: mixed breed
Average lifespan: 12 to 14 years
Average size:  20-50 pounds
Coat appearance: Dense and Short
Coloration:  white, brown, gray, blue, reddish-brown, and black
Hypoallergenic: No

History
  Because the Afghan Collie is a new breed, little is known about the history. However, the history of the parent breeds can help determine the outcome of the Afghan Collie. The Afghan Hound started out in the Afghanistan mountains prior to the 1800s when it was discovered and brought to towns to help hunters track and capture gazelle and rabbits. The popularity grew over time but this breed was mainly seen in wealthy families and among royalty. The Afghan Hound was brought to America in the 1920s and was accepted by the American Kennel Society (AKC) in 1926. 
  The breed became popular in the show ring for a while but lost its popularity since then. The Border Collie is thought to have been seen in wood carvings done by Thomas Beckwick from the History of the Quadrupeds sometime before the 1800s. During the late 1800s, the first sheepdog trial was held and won by a Border Collie named Hemp. The story states that Hemp was able to herd these sheep by just looking at them rather than barking and nipping at their heels. 
  It is thought that Queen Victoria became fond of these dogs when she saw one in Balmoral. The standard of the Border Collie was established in 1906 with a heavy emphasis on their working ability and not their physical attributes. In fact, the breed was known as a sheepdog until 1915 when they were named Border Collies. The name is thought to be derived from the region they were first recognized, between the English and Scottish borders. However, they were not recognized by the AKC until 1995.

Temperament
  They are an active, sociable and very friendly dog that make ideal family pets.  With high intelligence, partly owing to its Border Collie influence, Afghan Collies are quick learners and actually seem to enjoy and relish the opportunity to be taught.  They are lovable, clever, cheerful, high-spirited, with independent natures, getting along well with other pets and will even greet strangers with warmth and friendliness.  This type of dog loves to play and enjoys long walks in the countryside, especially with its owner by its side.  Being quite easy to train as they are obedient and have high energy levels and agile mobility. 


Health Conditions 
  These dogs have a life expectancy of 12 to 14 years. They may fall victim to allergies, cancer and hip dysplasia, and may display a sensitivity to anesthesia. They could also develop chylothorax, a rare disease that causes a leakage of the thoracic ducts.

Care
  Designer breed dogs have an average lifespan ranging from 7 years for dogs with many congenital health defects, up to 16 or 18 years for healthier breeds . The world’s oldest dog was an Australian Cattle Dog named Bluey, who was put to sleep at 29 years, 5 months. Larger designer breed dogs have a shorter average lifespan than small designer breed dogs.
  Due to their varied genetic makeup, mixed breed dogs are free from many of the health issues affecting purebreds—this is known as ‘hybrid vigor’. The most common health problem for large designer breed dogs is hip and elbow dysplasia. Generally, a designer breed will be most susceptible to health problems affecting its parent breeds.

Training
  Designer breed dogs require the same general training techniques as their purebred cousins. Most training should be conducted as early as possible . Most important is obedience training—the process of teaching your dog to reliably respond to basic commands such as ‘sit’ and ‘stay’. Any situations your dog will face in later life, such as grooming and bathing, should be introduced as early as possible.
  It is important to employ a system of consistent rewards and punishment, as well as a wide variety of training methods to hold the dog’s interest. Positive reinforcement is generally encouraged over harsh techniques, which backfire in many cases. Some designer breed dogs will recognize the trainer’s authority immediately, while others require a fair amount of effort. Housebreaking techniques will vary by breed.

Activity Requirements
  The Afghan Hound and Border Collie are both incredibly intelligent dogs who do well with any type of training. The Afghan does have a bit of a stubborn streak but the Border Collie will do whatever possible to please its owner. They are loyal and dependable due to their sheepherding heritage and have always been excellent family pets and guard dogs as well.    In fact, both breeds make good guard dogs due to their background in guarding the sheep. They are good with children but must be supervised and they tend to try to herd the younger children. It is important to socialize them to other animals early so they will get along well with other pets.

Is the Afghan Collie the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape.
Moderate Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Moderately Easy Training: The Afghan Collie is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
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Friday, November 10, 2017

Everything about your Afghan Spaniel

Everything about your Afghan Spaniel
  The Afghan Spaniel is not a purebred dog. It is a cross between the Afghan Hound and the Cocker Spaniel. The best way to determine the temperament of a mixed breed is to look up all breeds in the cross and know you can get any combination of any of the characteristics found in either breed. Not all of these designer hybrid dogs being bred are 50% purebred to 50% purebred. It is very common for breeders to breed multi-generation crosses.

Overview
  The Afghan Spaniel is an interesting blend of two dogs who like to hunt as much as they like to play. The Afghan Hound has always been known for their elegance and speed and the Cocker Spaniel is known for being eager to please and fun. The Cocker Spaniel has two types, the English and American, which are similar in size, energy, appearance, and temperament. These two were considered to be the same breed until 1936 when the English Cocker Spaniel Club was formed in America. The Americans modified the Cocker Spaniel in ways the English Cocker Spaniel Club did not agree with, so they separated.

Breed standards
Breed Type: Mix
Family: Sighthound
Average lifespan: 12-15 Years
Average size: 20-300lbs
Coat appearance: Medium, Short-Haired, and Silky
Coloration: cream, white, golden, black, light brown, brown, and combinations of these
Hypoallergenic: No
Comparable Breeds: Afghan Hound, Cocker Spaniel

History
  There is little known about the Afghan Spaniel because it is so new but the histories of the parent breeds can give insight into its characteristics. The Afghan Hound is a sighthound and one of the oldest breeds in history, dating back to Ancient Egypt where drawings of these beautiful dogs were found. It is thought that the Afghan Hound was used in hunting to flush and catch gazelle and rabbits. They were finally noticed in the early 1800s when they were brought down from the mountains of Afghanistan where they had lived isolated for centuries. 
  At first, the Afghan Hound was known as a Barukhzy Hound or Persian Greyhound but was later renamed for the area in which they originated. They were first noticed in the United States in 1926, when it was recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC) and it became popular but mostly with the wealthy. 
  The Cocker Spaniel comes from a large family called the Spaniels that have seven varieties, which are the Welsh Springer Spaniel, Sussex Spaniel, Irish Water Spaniel, Field Spaniel, English Springer Spaniel, Cocker Spaniel, and Clumber Spaniel. They were divided depending on whether they were water or land Spaniels, with several types of each. This breed dates all the way back to the 1300s when a description was written by Gaston Phebus. 
  The Cocker Spaniel is one of the most popular dogs in the United States and has been a member of the American Kennel Club (AKC) since 1878. The name Cocker comes from their special ability to hunt woodcock.


Personality
  With a playful personality and a love for playing around, the Afghan Spaniel is friendly yet reserved in certain situations. The hound part of the breed is very independent and doesn't need to be lavished with attention, yet the cocker part of the breed is very loveable and wants to be hugged and praised. To get out all their extra energy, the Afghan Spaniel craves long walks and outings at the park.

Health
  Afghan Spaniel is a healthier breed like other hybrid breeds. However Afghan Spaniel has tendency to suffer from some congenital disorders.

Care
  Both the Afghan Hound and Cocker Spaniel have long, fine hair that needs a lot of attention. Therefore, you should be prepared to brush your Afghan Spaniel at least three times a week to keep the coat from getting matted and the skin healthy. Another alternative is to get your dog trimmed and groomed every few months. You can bathe your dog when needed with a gentle shampoo and conditioner specially made for dogs with fine hair.

Activity Requirements
  Due to the limited amount of information on this breed, the temperament of their parent breeds is the best way to determine how they will turn out. The Cocker Spaniel is a loyal and lovable family pet that likes cuddling as much as she likes hunting. They do well with children and pets and is really too friendly to be a guard dog. The Afghan Hound is an independent breed that can be wary of strangers so they make good guard dogs. They can become destructive if they do not get enough of your time to keep them from being bored so think twice about this breed if you are away from home often. However, they are happy if they are able to chase the neighborhood squirrels in a fenced yard all day.

Exercise
  Daily exercise for your Afghan Spaniel is important, dogs are living with human since thousands of years, wild dogs have challenges to survive so they work daily to find food, save food and themselves from other animals but companion dogs have nothing to do, they have ready food and couch to sit, which may affect their health, habits and activity. 
  Your Afghan Spaniel is recommended Fetching,Walking,Swimming regular according to its breed specific exercise requirements.

Training 
  Afghan Spaniel require training in early age like other hybrid dogs. Afghan Spaniel is easy to train.  It learns basic commands such as sit, stay, come easily. Behavior training is also very important for your Afghan Spaniel.  Behavior training prevents and or corrects bad habits of your puppy or dog. Behavior and basic commands training for your Afghan Spaniel should must on these lines. Do not get impatient. You will probably have to repeat the command many times. Never use negative reinforcement. Do not call your dog to come to you for punishment because this will teach your dog not to come on command. Be sure to keep any frustration out of the tone of your voice. If you feel yourself becoming frustrated, take a break. Your dog can sense this and will start to associate training with your unhappiness. You cannot hide your frustration from a dog. You cannot pretend. Dogs can feel human emotion, so stay relaxed, firm and confident.


Children and other pets

  Good with children of all ages and other pets after early socialization training.

Is the Afghan Spaniel the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape. Occasional trimming or stripping needed.
Moderately Easy Training: The Afghan Spaniel is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
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Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Everything about your Afgan Hound

Everything about your Afgan Hound
  The Afghan Hound is considered an aristocratic sighthound. Tall and slender with a long, narrow, refined head, silky topknot and powerful jaws, the back part of the head and skull are quite prominent. The muzzle is slightly convex and the nose is black. The Afghan has little or no stop, which is the transition area from backskull to muzzle. The teeth should meet in a level or scissors bite. The dark eyes are almond shaped. The ears lie flat to the head. The neck is long and strong. The height at the withers should be almost level and the abdomen well tucked up. The hipbones are quite prominent. The front legs are strong and straight and the feet are large and covered with long hair. The tail has a curl or ring at the tip, but is not carried over the back. The long, rich, silky coat is most often the color of sand with a darker face and ear fringes, though all colors are permitted. White markings, however, are discouraged.

Overview
  The Afghan is built along greyhound-like lines, enabling it to execute a double-suspension gallop and run-down fleet game. The comparatively short back and steep pelvis helped it to leap great heights and to turn almost in place, essential attributes for coursing in rocky mountainous terrain. The large feet gave it a better foothold and were more resistant to injury on rough ground. The silky coat protected the dog from cold nights at high altitudes.   The Afghan appears dignified and aloof, with an exotic expression and proud carriage. This dog's gait shows great elasticity and spring; the Afghan moves with its head and tail high. 
  Despite its glamorous reputation, the Afghan hound is a hunter at heart, bred to chase down game over rugged terrain. While it maintains its regal bearings inside, it needs a daily chance to stretch its legs in a safe area. Its worst trait is a reluctance to come when called. It will chase small animals outside; inside, it will coexist peacefully. Though gentle with children, it may not be playful and interactive enough with them. Described by some as "catlike," it is independent yet sensitive and not overly demonstrative. It is reserved with strangers; some can be timid. It has a gay, clownish side.

Highlights
  • Grooming is essential. Only those who really enjoy grooming, or are willing to pay a professional groomer to do it, should consider an Afghan Hound.
  • The Afghan's natural hunting instinct prompts him to chase prey (the neighbor's cat, your son's rabbit, the third grade class hamster, etc.).
  • The Afghan Hound can be challenging to train due to his independent nature. Training can take a long time and requires patience. House training can be difficult. This breed can continue having accidents in the house up to about six months of age.
  • The Afghan Hound has a low pain tolerance. A minor wound is more bothersome to this breed than to other breeds, and this dog can sometimes seem whiny or babyish.
  • Afghan Hounds are sensitive and high-spirited and do not respond well to rough handling-so be gentle.
  • Although this particular breed is usually good and even loving with children, it is best if the puppy grows up with the children he'll live with and the children are mature enough to understand the importance of being considerate of this dog's sensitive nature.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Afghan’s coat can be any color or combination of colors, including black and tan.
  • The comedic actor Zeppo Marx was an early fan of the Afghan, importing two from Britain in 1931.
  • The Afghan Hound stands out for his distant gaze; long, silky topknot; beautiful coat; prominent hipbones; large feet; and ring tail.
  • Afghan Hounds won Best in Show at Westminster in 1957 and 1983.
Breed standards
AKC group: Hound
UKC group: Sighthound and Pariah
Average lifespan: 12 - 14 years
Average size: 50 - 64 pounds
Coat appearance: Thick, fine, silky
Coloration: Red, off-white, black
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Other identifiers: Tall and slender with long, thin heads and defined skull bone; powerful jawline with black nose and long, outward muzzle; black, almond-shaped eyes; strong neck and flat ears; scooped abdomen, elongated tail, thick, furry and slick coat; lengthy front and hind legs
Possible alterations: May have white markings; coat is kept long with face exposed
Comparable Breeds: American Foxhound, Anatolian Shepherd Dog



History 
  The Afghan Hound is from Afghanistan, but little is known of his early history or how long he has existed. A drawing of one of the dogs, sent home by Thomas Duer Broughton while he was in India in 1809, was published in a book of letters in 1813, so the breed has certainly been around for more than 200 years and likely very much longer. Studies of the canine genome indicate that the Afghan descends from one of the oldest types of dogs.
The dogs in Afghanistan were found in several different types, depending on the region they were from. Dogs from mountainous areas were more compact with darker, heavier coats, while desert-dwelling dogs were more rangy, with coats that were lighter in both color and volume. They were used to course fast-running game such as deer and antelope, as well as hares, wolves and jackals. Hunting in partnership with falcons, they flushed quail and partridges for the falcon to bring down or the hunter to shoot.
  British military officers brought the dogs to the West after being posted to the India-Afghanistan border. The dogs died out in Europe during World War I because food shortages limited the breeding and keeping of dogs, but breeding began again in 1920 when some desert-type Afghans were imported to Scotland by people who had been stationed in Baluchistan. Some of the mountain-type dogs were sent from Kabul to England in 1925.   During the same decade, Americans imported some of the Afghans from Britain. The American Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1926, but the Afghan Hound Club of America wasn’t formed until 1937. Today the Afghan ranks 86th among the breeds registered by the AKC.



Personality
  The Afghan Hound is typically a one-person or one-family dog. Do not look for this hound to eagerly greet your guests. More likely, he will offend them by being indifferent to their presence. While some hounds may bark once or twice when a stranger enters the home, this breed is not known to be a good watchdog.
  The independent thinking of the Afghan makes it a challenge to train. This hound is generally not motivated by food and does not possess as strong a desire to please as many other breeds . Though the Afghan makes a stunning presentation in the show ring, for example, more than one professional handler has been embarrassed in the ring by a refusal to cooperative. Even so, this breed is known for outperforming other breeds when the decision to do so is his own.
  Rough handling can cause this dog to become withdrawn or mildly antagonistic. Gentle handling, kindness, and patience work best with this breed, along with an understanding that there will be times when the dog simply will not cooperate.

Health
  The Afghan Hound, which has an average lifespan of 12 to 14 years, is not susceptible to any major health concerns. It should be noted that the breed can suffer from tail injuries and reacts to barbiturate anesthesia. Health ailments like canine hip dysplasia (CHD), cataract and necrotic myelopathy are also occasionally seen in the breed. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may run hip and eye exams on the dog.

Care
  This perfect house dog requires careful brushing and combing of its coat. Special care should be given at the time when the dog sheds its puppy coat. The Afghan Hound also requires daily exercise such as a long walk or a short sprint. In fact, this hound loves to run at a fast pace in small areas. Afghan Hound lovers should make it a point to provide the dog outdoor access and a nice, soft bed.

Living Conditions
  The Afghan Hound is not recommended for apartment life. They are relatively inactive indoors and do best with acreage. This breed can live in or outdoors, although it would be happier sleeping indoors.

Exercise
  The Afghan Hound needs to be taken on a long daily walk or jog. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as in a dog's mind the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human. Dogs that do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display behavior problems. Teach them to enter and exit door and gateways after the humans. They will also enjoy running free in an open, fenced, safe area.

Grooming
  The Afghan Hound has long, thick, silky hair with a fine texture. The coat does not need to be clipped or trimmed; the dog wears it in all its glory. The finishing touch is a topknot of long, silky hair.
  Grooming is an essential part of living with an Afghan. Plan to brush and comb the Afghan Hound’s thick, silky hair three times a week to prevent or remove mats and tangles, and bathe him as needed. You may want to invest in a professional dog blow dryer if you bathe him frequently.
  The Afghan sheds moderately. The more often you brush him, the less hair you will have falling off the dog and onto your floors, furniture and clothing.
The rest is basic care. Trim the nails at least monthly, and keep the long, hanging ears clean and dry to prevent infections. At mealtime, you’ll probably want to put the ears up in a snood to keep them from dragging in the food dish. Good dental hygiene is also important. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.

Is this breed right for you?
  The Afghan Hound is a playful pup who needs and loves a lot of exercise. Great companions with a love of the outdoors, Afghan Hounds need a home that will give them plenty of space to stretch their legs. Best as one person's pet or as the only pet of the family with older children, Afghan Hounds will need an owner that can devote plenty of time to grooming their long, beautiful, thick coat.

Children and other pets
  The Afghan's independent nature and large size make him best suited as an adult companion. The Afghan is not likely to want to follow around and play with children. In fact, a child's quick movements and noise level can startle the Afghan. With proper socialization, though, the Afghan can adjust to life in a family with children and be loving and with them.
  The Afghan tends to most enjoy the company of his own kind-other Afghan Hounds. The Afghan will tolerate, even be indifferent, to other pets in a household. Not surprisingly, the Afghan's hunter's instinct leads him to chase small animals, especially if they run away.

In popular culture
  Because of its distinctive appearance, the Afghan hound has been represented in animated feature films and TV shows, including Universal Pictures' Balto (Sylvie), Disney's Lady and the Tramp II (Ruby), and Brainy Barker from Krypto the Superdog, an Afghan hound also appeared on 101 Dalmatians as well as in 102 Dalmatians as one of the dogs in Cruella De Vil's party and the television series What-a-Mess (Prince Amir of Kinjan; based on children's books by Frank Muir) and, as Prissy in the 1961 Disney animated film One Hundred and One Dalmatians and 101 Dalmatians II: Patch's London Adventure. Afghan hounds have also been featured in television advertisements and in fashion magazines. The Afghan hound is represented in books as well, including being featured in a series of mystery novels by Nina Wright (Abra), and a talking Afghan Hound in David Rothman's The Solomon Scandals (2008, Twilight Times Books). In the novel Between the Acts, Virginia Woolf uses an Afghan hound (named Sohrab) to represent aspects of one of the book's human characters.
  On August 3, 2005, Korean scientist Hwang Woo-Suk announced that his team of researchers had become the first team to successfully clone a dog, an Afghan Hound named Snuppy. In 2006 Hwang Woo-Suk was dismissed from his university position for fabricating data in his research. Snuppy, nonetheless, was a genuine clone, and thus the first cloned dog in history.
  The Afghan Hound features prominently in the avant-garde music video of popular French band M83's, "Set in Stone ."

Did You Know?
  British military officers brought this breed to the West after being posted to the India-Afghanistan border.

A dream day in the life of an Afghan Hound
  Waking up early in the morning with a bowl of chow, the Afghan Hound is ready and waiting for his morning grooming session. After a good brushing, he's yearning to get out and explore the outside world. He'll chase squirrels right off the property while his owner applauds, and after a few laps around the backyard, he'll engage in a wonderful game of play with his master. Going inside for a nice nap, he'll sleep at his owner's feet as he's lovingly brushed down for the second time that day. Another few runs in the yard and the Afghan Hound will happily snuggle down in his dog bed.
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