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Showing posts with label active dog. Show all posts
Showing posts with label active dog. Show all posts

Monday, June 4, 2018

Everything about your Czechoslovakian Wolfdog

Everything about your Czechoslovakian Wolfdog
  Named for its wolf-like appearance, the Czechoslovakian Wolfdog is a new breed of dogs developed in Czechoslovakia and is considered to be rare. These herding dogs have a rectangular build with large barrel-shaped chest, broad neck, muscular belly and a bushy tail. They stand upon two pairs of straight forelimbs, and strong, long-calved hind limbs. Its muzzle is black, ears are erect and eyes are amber-colored and positioned obliquely. They are best suited for rural setting where they have lots of space to roam, and a family property to guard. They are used to living in cold climates.

Overview
  The Czechoslovakian Vlcak or Czech Wolf Dog is a relatively new breed of dog first bred as a military attack dog. This breed is the result of an experiment in 1955 that involved crossing 48 working line German Shepherds with Carpathian wolves. The idea behind creating the Czech Wolf Dog was to create a powerful breed with the trainability, temperament and pack mentality of the German Shepherd as well as the strength and endurance of the Carpathian Wolf. Although first used by the Czech Special Forces in special military operations, the breed has since been used successfully in search and rescue, tracking, herding, agility, hunting, obedience and drafting.
  The Czech Wolf Dog, like it name indicates, looks more like a wolf than it does a dog. Its body is lithe and powerful with long feet and a strong back. Its head too is like that of a wolf and its powerful teeth meet in a razor sharp bite. The dog’s chest is large and flat and its stomach is strong and drawn in. The Czech Wolf Dog’s coat too is reminiscent of that of the Carpathian Wolf and is short, thick and is yellow-grey or silvery-grey in color.
   The Czechoslovakian Vlcak is calm, self-assured and intelligent. It is extremely brave and protective over its masters but will rarely attack without cause or command. However, they do require a great deal of leadership and handling skills and are not recommended for beginner dog owners.

Breed standards
AKC group: The AKC Foundation Stock Service  is an optional recording service for purebred dogs that are not yet eligible for AKC registration.
UKC group: Herding
Average lifespan: 12-15 years
Average size: 44-54 lb
Coat appearance: Double layer, Straight, and Thick
Coloration: Yellowish-gray to silver-gray with a characteristic light mask
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Active singles, houses with yards, guard duty, farms and rural areas
Temperament: Lively, quick, courageous, sociable
Comparable Breeds: German Shepherd, Alaskan Malamute

History
  The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog, also referred to as the Slovak Wolfdog, could be a new breed, developed in 1958 being the offspring of an experimental crossing of a German shepherd with a Carpathian Wolf to ascertain that wolf and dog genes can be combined to form a healthy specimen. In 1982, it absolutely was recognized as a separate breed. Today, the Czechoslovakian Wolfdogs are not any longer used as the military dogs they are being used as companion and guard dogs.


Temperament
  The Czechoslovak Wolfdog is lively, very active, capable of endurance, docile with quick reactions. It is fearless, courageous, suspicious, yet does not attack without cause. It shows tremendous loyalty towards its master. Resistant to weather conditions. Versatile in his use. The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog is very playful. Without proper leadership it can be temperamental. 
  It learns easily. We can admire its all-around qualities rather than its specialization. However, we should not expect it should train spontaneously; the behavior of the CsV is strictly purposeful—it is necessary to find motivation for training. The most frequent cause of failure is usually the fact that the human is not as strong-minded as the dog, lacking leadership and/or the dog is tired out with long, useless repetitions of the same exercise, which results in the loss of motivation. These dogs have admirable senses and are very good at following trails. They are really independent and can cooperate in the pack with a special purposefulness. If required, they can easily shift their activity to the night hours. The independent work of the pack without the necessary control of a man was the reason for their use in the army. Sometimes problems can occur during their training when barking is required. 
  Czechoslovakian Wolfdogs have a much wider range of means of expressing themselves and in some situations barking is unnatural for them; they try to communicate with their masters in other ways. Generally, to teach CsVs stable and reliable performance takes a bit more time than it does to teach traditional specialized breeds. The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog can be a bit dog aggressive if the humans are not displaying the proper authority. It is not generally trustworthy with other pets. It is usually good with children, but suspicious and watchful with strangers.

Health 
  With his wild heritage, the Czechoslovakian Wolfdog is not known to be affected by any specific health problems. Because he is a larger breed, however, he may be prone to musculoskeletal issues like hip dysplasia and may also be prone to bloat.

Care
  The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog needs a lot of exercises, without which they would display restless behavior readily evident from their pacing back and forth inside the home. A minimum of 45 minutes of daily physical activities is recommended for this breed. Take them out every day for a long, brisk walk or jogging, leading their way, or allow them to play and run around openly in a broad, enclosed space.
  These dogs have a double coat and need special attention especially during heavy shedding seasons, occurring twice a year. Brush them thoroughly with a thick bristled brush.
  However, this dog is clean and do not typically develop any doggie odor. Hence, they seldom need bath since their coat can readily shed dirt. Although, you can dry shampoo them when required.

Living Conditions
  The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is moderately active indoors and will do best with a large yard. Well-suited for cold climates.

Training
  As a cross between the wild wolf and the German Shepherd, the Czechoslovakian Wolfdog is an extremely intelligent breed. These dogs learn quickly, though they can be tricky to train – they require a great deal of motivation since their behavior is strictly purposeful. It is also important to note that these dogs can be fairly independent as well, so they are best for experienced dog owners. You’ll need to maintain a firm hand in leadership with this breed and you’ll need to continue training throughout the dog’s life. Early socialization is also recommended, especially if you plan to keep the dog in a home with other pets.

Exercise Requirements
  The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog is a highly active dog that requires a lot of daily exercise. This breed needs a long walk at least once a day and will also appreciate having an outdoor space in which to run.

Grooming
  This breed sheds heavily twice a year. Bathing is most unnecessary, as the coat sheds dirt readily. Dry shampoo occasionally. This dog is clean and odorless.

Good with Kids
 This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Interesting Facts

  • The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog has a distinct 'facial mask', which is common to most wolf-like breeds.
  • Although these dogs were extensively used in the army, but they were less of a barker, sometimes problems occurred during their training sessions, when barking was required.
  • To own a Czechoslovak Wolfdog wolfdog in the UK, one needs to obtain permission from the local council since the breed is listed under 'Dangerous Wild Animals' license.
  • Like wolves, these wolfdogs have the ability to go without food for 2 to 3 days.
  • In 1982, the Czechoslovak Wolfdog was officially recognized as a national breed in Czechoslovakia.

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Saturday, January 31, 2015

Everything about your Brittany

Everything about your Brittany
  Brittanys are charming, gentle and personable members of the household. Except for the Golden Retriever, you would be hard-pressed to find a more personable family dog. Lively and fun, Brittanys are always up for a roll on the carpet, a game in the back yard or a cuddle on the couch.
  Brittanys were bred as gundogs, and they definitely have birds on the brain. Although they're often called Brittany Spaniels, the American Kennel Club dropped the word "spaniel" from this pointing breed's name in 1982. The energetic Brittany is a versatile family companion and hunting dog who works more closely to the hunter than other pointing breeds.

Overview
  Great balls of fire! Life with a Brittany is never dull. This breed is smart, active, agile and relatively easy to train. For an active home with room for an active companion, you can’t do much better than the Brittany, a moderately sized dog with relatively few health or temperament problems. This dog can hunt, if that’s what you’re into, but for most people, the appeal is that the Brittany is athletic, bright and people-oriented.
  If you want a dog that will do anything you want to do as long as it’s active, this is a great dog for you. His wash-and-wear coat can be kept in shape with a weekly brushing to keep shedding under control, and he's typically friendly with other dogs, cats and children.
But make no mistake: this is not a couch-potato puppy: The Brittany is a canine overachiever and needs daily, heart-thumping exercise to keep his high spirits from bounding off. Don't get a Brittany if you're not going to make him a part of your family, or if you're not going to give him mentally and physically challenging activities.
  That work doesn't need to be hunting, although the Brittany does remain very popular among people who value a good bird dog. The Brittany does well in all kinds of canine sports, including agility, flyball and obedience and will be an active participant in any human-centered activity as well, from running and hiking to playing fetch with the kids.
  When we say you need to keep your Brittany busy, we’re not just thinking of the dog but of you. Left to his own devices and without sufficient exercise, the Brittany can become destructive and noisy instead of the happy family dog he was meant to be.

Highlights
  • Brittanys are high-energy dogs. They need at least an hour of intensive exercise each day. Without sufficient exercise, your Brittany may become neurotic and destructive.
  • Brittanys are smart and need mental stimulation as well as physical exercise. Training for dog sports is a great way to provide this.
  • Brittanys don't respond well to harsh treatment. Be gentle and consistent but firm — don't let them run the household.
  • Brittanys are people-oriented and don't like to be left alone for long periods of time without something to keep them busy. If you work outside the home, you should consider getting two Brittanys to keep each other company.
  • Although they are friendly and like children, it's not recommended that you let your small children play with your Brittany without supervision. Your Brittany has so much energy and enthusiasm, he may accidentally injure your child.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Brittany is a French breed from the province of Brittany. He was developed to point and retrieve in different types of terrain.
  • Brittanies have a short coat with a little feathering on the legs and are easy to groom, but like all breeds they shed.
  • A Brittany’s coat is white and orange or white and liver. Some Brittanies have tricolor coats, but that’s not a popular pattern.
  • Comparable Breeds: Cocker Spaniel, English Setter
History
  The name "Brittany" is taken from the Brittany region in northwestern France where the dog originated. Images of orange and white Brittany-like dogs hunting and retrieving game were first seen on tapestries and paintings from the 17th century. The first written and verifiable record of Brittanys comes from a hunting description written by Reverend Davies in 1850. He described hunting with small "bobtailed" dogs who pointed and were excellent retrievers. It was around the same time that the modern Brittany is rumored to have been bred by mating with English Setters. The Brittany was first shown at the Paris Dog Show in 1900.
  The Brittany was first recognized as a breed in 1907 when an orange and white male named "Boy" was registered in France. As a result, the first standards were outlined in the same year. America recognized the Brittany in 1931 and the breed was approved by the American Kennel Club in 1934. In 1982 the "Spaniel" was officially dropped from the name.


Personality
  Brittanys are happy and alert. As befits a pointing breed, they are curious and independent, but respond well to their people and want to please them. They can be singleminded when it comes to birds, but when they're not focused on their feathered prey, they enjoy spending time with their people, especially if they're doing something active. Brittanys are not just energetic, they're smart, so they needs loads of exercise and mental stimulation each day. When it comes to training, be consistent but never harsh.
  Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner. Always meet at least one of the parents — usually the mother is the one who's available — to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.
  Like every dog, Brittanys need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Brittany puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog. Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.


Health
  Brittanys are generally healthy and hardy dogs. The median lifespan for Brittanys in France is 12.6 years.A UK Kennel Club survey puts the breed's median lifespan at 12 years 11 months, with about 1 in 5 dogs dying of old age at an average of 14–15 years.Brittanys have no undercoat and need minimal grooming or bathing. However, their floppy ears tend to trap moisture in the ear canal and should be cleaned regularly.
  Diseases found in the breed include Hip dysplasia, with 14.9% of Brittanys tested between 1974 and 2009 by the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals displaying the condition, and a lesser rate of 10.3% for dogs born 2003-2004. The breed is listed among those commonly affected by Canine discoid lupus erythematosus. Epilepsy is also found, with owners of affected dogs encouraged to submit DNA to the UC Davis Veterinary Genetics Lab's ongoing project on Brittany and canine health.

Care
  Mental and physical exercise are very important for the Brittany, as the breed is strong and tough by nature. One need not spend a great deal of time on coat maintenance, though. Brushing a Brittany dog once or twice a week is all that is needed. Brittanys are also quite adaptable to living in temperate weather outdoors.

Living Conditions
  The Brittany is not recommended for apartment life. They are very active indoors and will do best with acreage. This breed is resistant to cold and damp conditions.

Exercise
  Brittanys need and love extensive exercise and have great stamina. They should be taken on a long, brisk daily walk or jog and need an active owner.

Grooming
  The Brittany’s flat or wavy coat has a little feathering on the legs and belly, and it’s easy to care for with a weekly brushing. His coat sheds moderately, but regular brushing will keep loose hair off your floor, furniture and clothing. A bath is necessary only when he gets dirty.

  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every couple of weeks, and brush his teeth for good overall health and fresh breath.


Children and other pets
  Brittanys are a good choice for a family with active children, but their energy level might be overwhelming for toddlers.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Brittanys enjoy the company of other dogs and can also get along fine with cats, especially if they're introduced at an early age.

Did You Know?
  Brittanies are hunting dogs, but don’t skip this breed if you’re not a hunter; they also excel at canine sports, including agility, flyball and obedience, and enjoy running, hiking and playing fetch with their people.


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Saturday, November 22, 2014

Winter Activities That Are Fun for Your Dog

Winter Activities That Are Fun for Your Dog
  The nights are colder, the days are shorter and your dog's favorite chew toy is buried under ten inches of snow. What a perfect day to play with your dog. While not all dogs care for snow in the same way, they all still need regular exercise to stay fit and healthy for life. Here are few games you can try to help boost your dog's energy and fitness level over the next few winter months.

  Winter weather shouldn't be an excuse to hibernate. There are tons of fun winter activities you can do with your dog - inside and out. If you want a happy dog, give him regular exercise, after all it will be good for both of you! 

Snowed in? Keep your pup stimulated

  Dogs are meant to be outdoors, love being outdoors, live for being outdoors. Keeping your dog well-exercised will help you both keep your sanity. Regardless of the season, professional dog behaviorist Nicola Anderson, suggests daily stimulation for your pet. I often recommend doing some basic obedience exercises with your dog – just about 10 minutes a day.

Play a game with your dog.

  Hide-and-seek is a wonderful way to get your dog up and moving and mentally engaged. You can hide a treat or her favorite toy, but it’s better to make her come find you. Start by throwing a treat to get her to go away from you, and then hide in another part of the house. This game can really tire your pup out as she rushes around searching, and it’s good for reinforcing the “come” command.

Treasure Hunt

  Try burying a stick, toy or even a treat in the snow. Then sit back and watch his natural tracking instinct kick in. For dogs that require a bit of help finding their reward, try hiding the object closer to your dog at first, then slowly burying it further away the better your dog gets at the game.

Skijoring

  Another fun activity is Skijoring, an activity where all that is required is you, your dog, and a pair of skis. Even small dogs will enjoy this outdoor activity.

Cross country skiing is a popular activity all throughout the snowbelt. Bring your dog along to enjoy the experience, and you’ll find he’s just as excited to help pull you along the trail. That’s what Skijoring is all about!

Challenge your dog’s nose.

  Dogs have incredibly powerful scenting abilities, so exercises that require your pal to use her nose are especially stimulating. Make her work for her dinner by creating an obstacle course she has to get through to find her food. Hide her meal in a box, or, better yet, put it in a Kong Wobbler or a Buster Ball.

Fetch, Catch and Beyond

  If your dog loves to fetch or catch rubber balls chances are he will love trying to do the same with snowball. Fair warning dogs really love this game so be prepared to make a large stockpile of snowballs, and be careful not to pack the show too much.

Tracking - Sniff in all that cold winter air and train your dog to track scents.
  Tracking is like a game for dogs...hide-and-seek. Tracking challenges a dog's problem solving skills and keeps their keen sense of smell active. It also rewarding when they successfully track a scent. Call a local trainer or find a good tracking training book to get started.

Tracking - Sniff in all that cold winter air and train your dog to track scents. 
  Tracking is like a game for dogs...hide-and-seek. Tracking challenges a dog's problem solving skills and keeps their keen sense of smell active. It also rewarding when they successfully track a scent. Call a local trainer or find a good tracking training book to get started.

Snow Shoe
  If the snow isn't outrageously deep, you can always have your dog join you for a snowshoe walk. Keep in mind you may have to leash your dog so be aware of the local park or trail bylaws.

  Some popular people activities are simply too dangerous to try to include your dog. While cross-country skiing seems passive and relaxing enough, skis are fun to chase for dogs and your pet may end up injuring himself.


Don’t be a wimp…get outdoors!

  Most bigger dogs love snow, and they can get a great workout by plowing through it. Spend 30 to 40 minutes in the snow, and your dog will get a workout that leaves her exhausted—and her muscles toned. When you come in, be sure to wash your dog’s paws to clean off any salt.



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Wednesday, August 20, 2014

How to Train Your Dog with Hand Signals

How to Train Your Dog with Hand Signals
  Canines are visually oriented animals and will understand hand signals for dogs very well. They can read your body language more easily than understand your spoken words.
  Dog Training Hand Signals should be a chapter in every dog training manual. Training your dog to respond to hand signals can be fun to teach and very easy for your dog to learn, understand and obey.
  Hand signals are sign language. You use your hands to signal to your dog what you want him to do, such as sit or lie down. There are some standard hand signals recognized by most dog trainers, but you can also create your own signals to train a dog.
  The first thing to do is to choose a specific and clearly identifiable hand movement or gesture to associate with each command. Getting your dog to respond to that gesture is merely the act of repetition till you succeed.
  You start with issuing the verbal command performing the chosen gesture at the same time. You reward the dog with a treat each time the command is obeyed.
  When there is clear and spontaneous response to the verbal command and hand signal combination, you then drop the verbal command and start over again only with the hand signal, rewarding the dog with a treat each time the hand signal is obeyed.
  Repeat continuously till there is a spontaneous response to the hand signal. Drop the food reward and continue only with the hand signal till there is a clear and spontaneous response.
  Now you have mastered dog training hand signals, and will be having your dog, coming to you, sitting down, or lying down near you all on the movements of your hand.

1. Sit
  Begin the training session by standing your dog in front of you, with your hands hanging normally and loosely by your sides and with a treat in the hand that you have chosen to use in the signal.
  Begin the dog training hand signal by bringing the hand slowly and deliberately up, folding it at the same time as if you are about to throw something over. Let your movement be gradual and reward the dog with the treat as soon as it 'sits'. Repeat till there is no hesitation by the dog in responding to the command.
  Repeat hand signal without verbal command till the dog responds without any hesitation, rewarding each time with a treat. Then repeat the hand signal with intermittent rewards, then one reward every three to four commands and finally no rewards at all.
  Test hand signal for spontaneous response without any reward.


2. Down
  Begin this session by sitting your dog in front of you, with your hands hanging normally and loosely by your sides with a treat in the hand that you have chosen to use in the signal.
  The hand movement for this signal would be the raising your hand above your head. Follow the same procedure as you did in the 'Sit' command and test finally for spontaneous response without any reward.



3. Come
  Begin this session with the dog in front of you, and your hands hanging normally and loosely by your sides with a treat in the hand that you have chosen to use in the signal.
  The hand movement for this signal would be raising your hand to touch the opposite shoulder. If you are using your right hand touch your left shoulder.
  Follow the same procedure as you did in the 'Sit' and 'Down' commands and test finally for spontaneous response without any reward.


4. Stay
  Like a crossing guard would show at intersections, holding a hand with the palm facing out and forward means stop or "stay." Try alternating this signal with the "come" gesture for an impromptu red light/green light training game.

5. Bring It
  This is a key command to any game of fetch — unless you want to be doing all the retrieving yourself. In addition to giving the verbal command, place your hand at doggie eye level with palm facing the pooch, which gives you the perfect placement to then receive the item as he learns to let it go right in your hand.

Train with repetition
  Continue to practice all of the commands, using hand signals when walking, before feedings, or when letting the dog in from relieving themselves. This is not about control but canine communication and building habits.

Tips
  • Dogs that are trained for work in the movies, all respond to hand signals so when you see dogs in the movies do great things,understand that they are obeying hand signals.
  • Practice with your dog often and once he's got it down, offer verbal or physical praise as opposed to treats. Some dogs become too reliant on the treats and will not perform if a treat is not being offered.
Warnings
  • Do not exceed about 10-15 minutes of training time, your dog may get bored and the learning could become a struggle of wills rather than productive.
  • Make sure your dog has plenty of breaks during training sessions



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Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Everything about your Weimaraner

Everything about your Weimaraner
  A descendant from the Bloodhound, the Weimaraner is most known for its role on Sesame Street where it was often dressed in people's clothes during short skits. Bred in Germany to hunt large game, this breed is now an excellent bird pointer and retriever. Imported to the states in the 1920s, Weimaraners are wonderful with children and make excellent family pets.
  Originally bred as a gundog to handle big game like deer and bear, the "Silver Ghost" was a highly sought-after dog breed in its native Germany. Today, these elegant but demanding dogs can still be found out on the hunting grounds, but can also make a fine family friend if well exercised.


Overview
  You may not know his name, but you probably recognize his silvery gray snout and long ears, a face made famous by Weimaraner photographer William Wegman. His distinctive look aside, the Weimaraner isn’t an ornament — he’s an active dog, with a deep need to hunt and connect with his human family.
  In fact, there are two things a prospective owner needs to know about the Weimaraner: He has no “off” switch, and he’s not happy when left alone. Bred in Germany as a hunting dog and a family companion, the Weimaraner would love nothing more than to spend the day hunting with you — all day long, every single day. Failing that, he’ll settle for obedience training, agility, hiking, or participating in canine sports, just as long as it means that he can be active with you.
  If you’re getting the idea that Weimaraners tend to attach to their owners like Velcro, you’re right. Separation anxiety is a serious problem in this breed; some Weimaraners become so distraught when left to their own devices that they bark, dig, escape, and even injure themselves. They can also be stubborn, demanding, and tough to house-train. They’re frequently a hazard to cats and other small pets, and if they don’t get a lot of daily exercise, they go stir crazy.
  So why even have one? The answer is simple: They’re incredibly intelligent, loyal dogs who bond deeply with their owners. For some people, the depth of that relationship, coupled with the unique appearance of the breed, makes them the only dog to consider. To see if the Weimaraner is the right breed for you, take the Weimaraner Club of America’s interactive quiz.

Highlights
  • Weimaraners were bred to have a lot of energy and stamina. Be prepared to provide them with lots of exercise and mental stimulation.
  • Weims aren't a soft-mouthed dog like a Golden Retriever and some have a low tolerance for small, furry animals, such as rabbits, and even cats and dogs. Until you know your dog well, watch him carefully when small animals are in his presence.
  • Weims are high-strung dogs and can suffer from severe separation anxiety. If left alone for too long, they may bark, become destructive, or even injure themselves.
  • Although Weimaraners are hunting dogs, they don't like living outdoors. They require a lot of attention and want to be close to you.
  • Weims often are suspicious of strangers and can be unacceptably aggressive. Socializing them to many different people and situations when they are puppies and throughout their lives is critical.
  • Weimaraners are intelligent and they think for themselves. Firm, consistent, gentle training must continue throughout their lives.
  • Weimaraners can be difficult to housetrain. Crate training is recommended.
  • Unethical breeders may advertise blue or black Weims as "rare" to attract buyers and will charge more for pups of these colors, but the truth is that blue and black Weimaraners are disqualified in the breed standard.
  • Weims are intelligent and can learn quickly, but if their intelligence and energy aren't channeled constructively, they may learn some things you don't want them to know, such as how to open doors and escape.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • Weimaraners aren’t suited to apartment life — they need a home with a yard and an owner who won’t scold them for digging up moles and mice.
  • The Weimaraner’s beautiful coat is a snap to maintain, but it sheds.
  • Weimaraners love to play in the water, and they drip copious amounts it when they drink.
  • They are talented escape artists who excel at breaking out of enclosures, jumping fences, and figuring out how to unlatch doors and gates.
  • The Weimaraner has a mind of his own, so he needs consistent training throughout his life to reinforce that you’re the one in charge.
  • Females weigh between 55 to 70 pounds, while males can weigh in at 85 pounds.
Breed standards
AKC group: Sporting group
UKC group: Gun Dog group
Average lifespan: 10 - 12 years
Average size: 50 - 70 pounds
Coat appearance: Short and smooth
Coloration: Various shades of gray, silver
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Athletic build; blue, gray or amber eyes; folded straight ears; gray-colored nose; long legs with small, webbed paws
Possible alterations: May have a pink-colored nose.
Comparable Breeds: Greyhound, Vizsla
History 
  Members of Germany’s Weimar court created the breed in the early 19th century. They wanted a dog who possessed courage, intelligence, and good scenting abilities in order to hunt big game. It remains a mystery just how they achieved their dream dog, but it’s believed that several breeds played a role, including the Bloodhound, English Pointer, German Shorthaired Pointer, blue Great Dane, the silver-gray chicken dog, and the red Schweisshunde, a stellar scent hound. The result was a dog with speed, stamina, and the versatility to switch gears from hunting to pointing and retrieving upland game birds and waterfowl when big game was scarce.
  The American Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1943. In Germany, the Weimaraner is still used to hunt furry and feathered prey, as well as retrieve on land and in the water. In the United States, he doesn’t compete in retrieving trials, although he is used as a personal hunting dog. His popularity is evidenced by his AKC registration ranking, which has held steady at 32nd for the past decade, with a slight rise to 29th in 2005.


Personality
  Early tales about the Weimaraner made it seem as if the dog came fully trained and was perfect in all respects. Even today, many people still hold this belief about the breed. Unfortunately for them, there's no such thing as a dog that comes programmed with good behavior.
  The typical Weimaraner is friendly, fearless, alert, and obedient, all traits that make him an excellent companion and watchdog. On the flip side, he's assertive, smart, restless, and willful. This is a dog who will take over the household if you give him half a chance. He'll chew, bark, chase cats, and steal the roast off the counter — if you don't give him the socialization, training, and structure he needs throughout his life.
  Aggression and shyness are temperament flaws that are seen in this breed. They must be dealt with early and may require the assistance of a behaviorist or experienced trainer to avoid serious behavior problems such as biting.
  Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner. Always meet at least one of the parents — usually the mother is the one who's available — to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.
  Like every dog, Weimaraners need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. For the Weim, however, socialization should continue throughout his life. Socialization helps ensure that your Weimaraner puppy grows up to be a well-rounded, outgoing, friendly dog and stays that way.   Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.


Health
  According to the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals, Weimaraners enjoy low rates of dysplasia. The breed is ranked 102nd of 153 total breeds and has a very high test rate and a very high percentage of excellent rating among those dogs tested. It is generally recommended to acquire Weimaraners only from breeders who have their dogs' hips tested using OFA or PennHIP methods.
  As a deep-chested dog, the Weimaraner is prone to bloat or gastric torsion, a very serious condition that can cause painful and rapid death when left untreated. It occurs when the stomach twists itself, thereby pinching off blood vessels and the routes of food traveling in or out. Symptoms include signs of general distress, discomfort, no bowel movement or sounds, and a swollen stomach. Immediate medical attention is imperative when bloat occurs and surgery is the only option if it is caught early enough.
  One way to help prevent bloat is to spread out the Weimaraner's feedings to at least twice daily and to avoid any vigorous exercise an hour before or after meals. It is also recommended that the dog's feeding dish not be placed on a raised platform to discourage it from gobbling its food too quickly and keep air from entering the stomach. Raised food bowls have been found to more than double the risk of bloat in large dogs.
  Skin allergies can affect some dogs. Take your dog to the vet if he starts to lose hair, itch constantly or develop rashes. You should also check for dog for parasites, as they can cause an allergic reaction in addition to the normal irritation from bites.



Living Conditions
  Weimaraners will do okay in an apartment if they are sufficiently exercised. They are relatively inactive indoors and will do best with at least a large yard. They are not suited to outdoor kennel life.

Exercise
  These are powerful working dogs with great stamina. They need to be taken for a daily, long walk or jog. In addition, they need plenty of opportunities to run free. Do not exercise them after meals. It is best to feed a dog after a long walk, as soon as it cools down.

Grooming
  The Weimaraner’s short coat is easy to maintain: Brush it with a rubber curry brush at least once a week. The brush removes dead hairs that would otherwise end up on your floor, furniture, and clothing. Weimaraners shed, so the more you brush, the less hair you’ll have flying around. And bathe your Weimaraner only when he’s dirty, which shouldn’t be very often.
  The Weimaraner is a hunting dog, so good foot condition is important. Keep his toenails trimmed short. Last but not least, brush his teeth with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Is this breed right for you?
  Characteristically happy and affectionate, the Weimaraner will do best in a home in which it has a large yard to play and is given a sufficient amount of exercise. If not given enough activity, it will become disorderly and misbehave. Due to inactivity while in the home, it does OK with apartment life but is a loud barker. In need of training, this breed needs a happy and calm owner who is never harsh or abrasive. Known for becoming overexcited, it is best that it learns commandments for when this type of behavior is appropriate. The Weimaraner is awesome with children but does not do well with other small animals.

Children and other pets
  For an active older child who's familiar with dogs, a Weimaraner can be a great companion. They're far too rambunctious for toddlers, however, and may chase small children who are running.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Weimaraners are not the best choice for families with cats, small dogs, rabbits, hamsters, gerbils, or birds. Weimaraners have a strong prey drive and it's difficult, if not impossible, to redirect that instinct. They will go after and kill, if possible, any small or large furry animals they see.

 Did You Know?
  “Blue” Weimaraners can’t compete in the American show ring, but the color is considered normal and is not associated with any health problems. “Brown” Weimaraners, on the other hand, are not purebred Weimaraners, but rather German Shorthaired Pointer/Weimaraner mixes.

A dream day-in-the-life
  This happy-go-lucky breed will love to wake up surrounded by its loved ones. Going outside for a romp in the yard, the Weimaraner will happily hang out indoors with the family for the remainder of the day. Keeping its guard up as the good watchdog that it is, it'll be excited as ever when you two go for your daily run at sunset.


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