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Showing posts with label active. Show all posts

Monday, December 11, 2017

Everything about your Chinese Foo

Everything about your Chinese Foo
  Named after the Chinese city Foochow , the Chinese Foo is an extant breed of Spitz-type dogsthat come with a compact, square-shaped body, broad head, pricked ears, deep chest, muscular loin, and a tail that is carried over their back.
  This Chinese breed is a loyal and lively dog that makes a loving companion. Although never confirmed, it is said that the Chinese Foo was a cross between the Chow Chow and European hunting dogs. Let's dig into the Chinese Foo Dog breed information and facts you need to know when determining if this is the dog for you.

Overviews
  The Chinese Foo Dog is found in three sizes: toy Chinese Foo Dog (10 inches or less), miniature Chinese Foo Dog (over 10 inches up to and including 15), and standard Chinese Foo Dog (over 15 inches). The Chinese Foo Dog breed can also be classified by weight, with small dogs weighing up to 20 pounds, medium dogs weighing 21 to 50 pounds, and large dogs weighing over 50 pounds. A typical Nordic-type dog, the head is broad, the ears are upright, and the eyes are dark. These dogs often have a dark blue tongue. The tail is set high and curled over the back. Some breeders dock the tail.
  The Chinese Foo Dog coat is double, with a thick, dense undercoat and an outer coat that is hard and stands away from the body. With the heavy coat, grooming is very much a part of life with these dogs. This breed needs brushing at least twice a week, although when the heavy undercoat is shed, daily brushing will help keep the hair in the house somewhat under control.
   Foo Dogs are moderately active. They enjoy a walk morning and evening and can be quite playful. Chinese Foo Dogs are appealing to the sense of humor and continue to be playful on into adulthood. One of the original uses of Chinese Foo Dog is as guard dogs, and the breed continues to be wary of strangers. However, unlike some other watchful breeds, this one does not bark unless there is a reason to do so.
  Early socialization and training is important, and teaching the dog to accept regular grooming should be a part of that. The Chinese Foo Dog is an affectionate, intelligent, playful breed. They are good with well-behaved children but will not tolerate disrespectful behavior. The breed is good with other dogs, although interactions with other pets should be supervised. This is a healthy breed with few problems.

Breed standards
AKC group: Working
UKC group: Hunting
Average lifespan: 10-12 years
Average size: 20 lb
Coat appearance:Thick, hard, weather-resistant, double-coated; straight-haired, coarse outer coat; soft, dense undercoat
Coloration: Blue, black, brown and blue, black and tan, red, orange, gray/silver, sable, cream, fawn
Hypoallergenic: No
Lion’s mane on long-haired version
Courageous nature
Guarding ability
Gentleness with children

History
  The Chinese Foo Dog is thought to be a mix between the ancient Chow Chow and European hunting dogs, or a link between the Chinese Wolf and the Chow. It is an ancient breed, possibly named after the Chinese city of Fuzhou . The Standard Chinese Foo Dog was originally bred to guard Buddhist temples. They were also used for hunting and sledding.
  Until the Chinese Foo Dog’s numbers began to increase in the 19th century, it was rare enough to be thought extinct. Today, the breed is still rare but growing in popularity in the U.S., as seen by the creation of the Chinese Foo Dog Club of America.

Temperament
  The Chinese Foo is an independent and highly intelligent breed, so it is perfect for the owner who does not want an overly attached pet. However, this independence often leads to a proud and even stubborn personality, which can make training challenging. The dog also has a tendency to be dominating, although not aggressive. Even though the Chinese Foo is big, the dog can stay calm when it is indoors, so it can be a good apartment dog.

Health
  They are immune to major health problems. Some members, however, are susceptible to cryptorchidism as well as problems with their bones and joints.

Living Conditions
  The Chinese Foo Dog will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is relatively inactive indoors and a small yard is sufficient. Sensitive to heat, can live in or outdoors in cooler weather.

Training
  Since the Chinese Foo can sometimes be stubborn and domineering, training could become a challenge for first-time dog owners.
  The Chinese Foo is not a recommended breed for a person or family getting their first dog. This pup can be domineering and a challenge to train. Even though the crossbreed is not vicious, socialization needs to be taken slowly and carefully, especially with young children and other pets. Although the dog is difficult to train, it does take to the training well once it learns. In many cases, it will make sense to seek out formal dog obedience training with this pup.


Ideal Human Companion
  • Apartment dwellers (Toy and Miniature; the Standard can be kept in a smaller space as well as long as it gets extra exercise)
  • Those looking for a good guard dog
  • Experienced dog owners
  • Those who would love a toy version of their Chow Chow
Activity Level
  The Chinese Foo is athletic and active. It needs a lot of exercise, especially when still young. A daily walk is an absolute must. Sports such as Frisbee, running and fetch are advised as well.


Exercise
  Foo Dogs need a moderate amount of daily activity including regular walking and jogging. Recreational sports such as fetching a ball and catching the Frisbee will give them a great workout. Since they are easily exhausted during warm weather, make sure that they are not overly exercised.

Grooming
  The Chinese Foo has an amazingly beautiful, thick coat of fur. In fact, the coat is so thick you can just throw that dog brush in the trash. You are going to need a long tooth comb to get at this hair. The dog should be brushed once or twice a week. Baths can be a battle with all the hair, so once a month is usually good enough and using a professional groomer is usually more than worth the cost. 

What They Are Like to Live With Chinese Foo Dog
  The Chinese Foo Dog lives up to its leonine appearance. They are bold, courageous, and king of the castle. They can also make friendly family dogs as long as they are socialized early.
  Chinese Foo Dogs are known for their gentleness with children and make quiet and dignified companions. The Chinese Foo Dog can be overly independent, so consider a different breed if you’re looking for a constant, interactive pet.
  The Chinese Foo Dog needs regular daily exercise and brushing. Be prepared to have fur everywhere in your living space.


Things You Should Know
  The Chinese Foo Dog is also known as the Chinese Celestial Dog, the Chinese Dragon Dog, and the Happiness Dog. Its ancient skill as a guard dog is still prevalent. This means you will have a well-guarded home, but it also means a dog who may be averse to strangers. This is a stubborn breed, so early obedience training is a must for all three versions.

  The Chinese Foo Dog has no known health issues.




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Friday, April 21, 2017

Everything about your English Foxhound

Everything about your English Foxhound
  This pack hound has been bred for more than 150 years and is used primarily for fox hunting, but with plenty of exercise he can also make a fine family companion. His size and voice make him best suited to a rural home.

Overview
  Bred in England since the 1800s, English Foxhounds have been bred in over 250 packs. Coming to America in the 1900s, the breed is meant to hunt foxes on foot next to a hunter on horseback. With a strong nose and ability to run for miles, this breed is an active and gentle dog.
  The English Foxhound has a stately bearing, but beneath his classic good looks lies a dog who’s always ready to rock and roll. This is a dog bred to run full throttle over hill and dale, hot on the heels of a fox. Expect to provide him with lots of strenuous daily activity. A bored Foxhound with energy to burn will create his own entertainment, and you probably won’t like it. He’s also noisy, with a loud bay that carries long distances. It’s not a good idea to keep him in an urban environment.

Highlights
  • English Foxhounds need a large fenced yard and daily exercise of 30 to 60 minutes per day.
  • English Foxhounds are not recommended for apartment living. They are an active breed indoors, which makes them unsuitable for small dwellings.
  • Before you purchase your English Foxhound, research the breed and to talk to breeders. The English Foxhound is not the breed for everyone, and because the information about him is limited it is easy to purchase this breed while failing to properly understand its limitations and idiosyncrasies.
  • English Foxhounds need a strong owner who is fair and consistent. Obedience training is a must and should begin at an early age.
  • This breed does well with children, but English Foxhounds are quite active and bouncy when they are young. For that reason, they are not recommended for homes with small children.
  • Being pack dogs, English Foxhounds do well with other dogs and actually do better in homes where there are other dogs. They can become bored and destructive when they are the only dog in the home.
  • English Foxhounds are a rare breed and it may be difficult to find a responsible breeder. Breeders with puppies available may have a long waiting list.
  • Bred to pursue prey, the English Foxhound still possesses this drive. For this reason, they should have a fenced yard and should be walked on leash as they may not come back if they are in pursuit of something interesting.
  • The English Foxhound generally does well with other animals in the home, but it is important to understand that they are prey driven and may chase smaller animals.
  • English Foxhounds have a loud bark. This makes them wonderful watchdogs, but it may also make them unliked by neighbors.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The English Foxhound has a short coat that can be any hound color but is typically a tricolor of black, tan and white.
  • English Foxhounds are typically kept in packs by hunt clubs, but occasionally they are placed as companion dogs.
  • English Foxhounds are the rarest of the foxhound breeds.
  • English Foxhounds usually train for six months to a year before they are ready to go out with the pack.
  • The English Foxhound has a rich, deep, mellow voice.
  • One of the greatest English Foxhounds was a dog named Belvoir Gambler, who was admired for his beautiful proportions and rich color.
  • The English Foxhound is shorter and stouter than the American Foxhound.
  • Comparable Breeds: American Foxhound, Beagle


History
  The English Foxhound was created in the late 16th century, as a result of the perception of the depletion of deer in England. Nobles and royalty had hunted deer for both food and sport, using the Deerhound or Staghound for this purpose. During the reign of Henry VIII, it was perceived that a new prey was needed, and the fox was selected. The English Foxhound was then created by a careful mixing of the Greyhound, for speed, the Fox Terrier, for hunting instinct, and the Bulldog, for tenacity in the hunt.
English Foxhound circa 1915.
  During the British Raj, English Foxhounds were exported to India for the purpose of jackal coursing, though due to the comparatively hotter weather, they were rarely long lived. Foxhounds were preferred for this purpose over greyhounds, as the former was not as fast, and could thus provide a longer, more sporting chase.
  Studbooks for the English foxhound have been kept since the 18th century.Breeding lines and the work of people involved in breeding hounds is extremely important in the continual development of this working breed. Puppy shows are important events in the hunting calendar and allow the local hunt followers and visiting hound breeders examine the latest generation from the hound pack. The International Foxhound Association was created in 2012 for the promotion of the English Foxhound as a breed.

Personality
  Foxhounds are an excellent dog for an active family. They love being outdoors and have the endurance to stay active all day long. Foxhounds get along great with children and other animals, and in fact do best when they are part of a large pack (human or canine). They are versatile enough to spend all day hunting with dad, only to come home and romp around with children. Foxhounds are adaptable and easy going and are an excellent choice for rural families.

Health
  The average life expectancy of the English Foxhound is between 9 and 11 years. Breed health concerns may include epilepsy, hip dysplasia and kidney ailments. These are remarkably healthy dogs.


Care
  Bred to be a fast hunter with a great deal of stamina, the English Foxhound requires a substantial amount of exercise. If he can't hunt in a field as he was bred to do, take him on daily runs or provide other exercise that will help him burn off his natural energy.
  He's used to kennel life and can live outdoors if accompanied by another social dog and provided with appropriate shelter. If he's an only dog, however, he should live indoors with his human pack so he won't get lonely.
  It is important to crate train your English Foxhound puppy. Puppies explore, get into things they shouldn't, and chew things that can harm them. It can be expensive both in fixing or replacing destroyed items as well as the vet bills that could arise. Crate training ensures not only the safety of your puppy but also of your belongings.

Living Conditions

  English Foxhounds are not recommended for apartment life. They are very active indoors and do best with acreage.

Training
  Like most other hound breeds, English Foxhounds are highly independent and can sometimes be stubborn. Therefore they require firm, assertive leadership and consistent training. They are also bred to hunt in packs and require this firm leadership to be well-balanced. Obedience training can however take time and patience. Owners may experience trouble with the “come” command, especially when walking this dog without a leash. Their prey instincts are easily aroused and they can run off in pursuit of interesting ‘prey’ if walked off leash.

Activity Requirements
  Foxhounds need a lot of exercise, and their overall temperament is shaped by how much daily exercise they receive. A Foxhound who does not get enough daily activity can become reserved, anxious, or begin to exhibit dominance, whereas a Foxhound who gets plenty of exercise will be even tempered, social, and obedient. Expect to vigorously exercise this breed at least one hour per day. Those who are not hunters or who do not already jog, hike or bike daily should look to another breed, as should apartment or condo dwellers.
  Foxhounds are hard working hunting dogs and can be utilized as trackers in the field. They can move for hours on end without getting tired, and once they catch a scent they become 100% focused on tracking it. This trait can backfire in home life, so when Foxhounds aren't in the hunting field they should be kept on a leash or in a fenced-in area to keep them safe.
  Foxhounds do best in multiple-dog homes. While they enjoy the company of people, they only truly thrive around other dogs, so adopting two at a time would be the most ideal situation for a Foxhound.

Grooming
  The English Foxhound’s short, dense coat is easy to groom. Brush it weekly with a hound mitt or rubber curry brush to remove dead hairs and distribute skin oils. The dogs shed moderately, and regular brushing will help prevent loose hairs from settling on your floors, furniture and clothing. Bathe the dog as needed.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails every few weeks. Keep the rounded hanging ears clean and dry so bacterial and yeast infections don’t take hold. Brush the teeth for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  The English Foxhound is great with older children who are a match for his energetic and bouncy nature. He's not recommended for homes with small children simply because they're too easily knocked over by the swishing tail or enthusiastic antics of a rambunctious dog. Kind as they are, English Foxhounds, like all breeds, should never be left unsupervised with young children.
  Being pack dogs, they love the company of other dogs, especially other English Foxhounds, and they're quite comfortable around horses. They generally do well with other animals, but with their strong prey drive, they may chase smaller pets. Supervise interactions with cats, smaller dogs, or other animals until you're sure everyone gets along.

Is this breed right for you?
  If you're not a fox hunter, then this breed is perfect for someone with an active lifestyle. A great companion for running, biking, hiking and more, this dog needs a lot of activity in his life. If left bored, he may act out and break any rules given to him. Good with children, this dog does well with other pets and prefers the company of other dogs.

Did You Know?
  The typical quarry of the English Foxhound is the red or gray fox, but they are also used to hunt coyotes. But don’t worry: a hunt is all about the chase, not the kill, and the quarry lives to run another day.

A dream day in the life of an English Foxhound
  Ready for a hiking trip first thing in the morning, this pup will be up for any challenge regardless of the length. Following his master, he'll run the trail, picking up every scent he can. A strong animal, he loves to climb rocky terrain with you and other dogs or people too. Once the hike has ended, he'll be happy to chill out and socialize with his owner before hitting the dog bed.

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Thursday, April 20, 2017

Everything about your Manchester Terrier

Everything about your Manchester Terrier
   The Manchester Terrier is quite an old breed that was developed for the purpose of hunting and killing rats, rabbits and other rodents in urban Great Britain. Named after the city of Manchester in northwestern England, this breed has also been referred to as the English Gentleman’s Terrier and the Gentleman’s Terrier. The Manchester Terrier is a direct descendant and very close relative of the old Black and Tan Terrier and shares many of its physical and mental attributes, although the Black and Tan was a heavier, coarser dog with shorter legs. The Manchester is a leaner, more athletic animal, due to outcrosses with Whippets during the early development of the breed. 

Overview
  The oldest-known terrier, the Manchester Terrier was bred in England to hunt rats. The best vermin-hunting breed, the Manchester Terrier is extremely fast. Available in both standard and toy varieties, both are considered companion dogs with the same personality traits. Unfortunately, the popularity of the Manchester Terrier has gone down in recent years.

Highlights
  • Life expectancy can be up to 15 years.
  • Manchesters can become obese if overfed and under-exercised.
  • You can find them in two sizes: small and smaller.
  • They excel at sports such as agility, obedience, and rally.
  • They are great watchdogs and will bark enthusiastically if not trained to be quiet on command.
  • Manchester Terriers can be stubborn and difficult to housebreak. Crate training is recommended.
  • Manchesters are energetic dogs and like to go for walks. Be care in off-leash or unsecured areas; when their hunting instincts kick in, training is out the window. It's all about the chase.
  • They bark, dig, and kill vermin and small critters, including pocket pets.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.

Other Quick Facts

  • The Manchester Terrier is a small dog, slightly longer than he is tall, with a short coat in jet black with rich mahogany markings. He has a wedge-shaped head with a keen, bright expression shining out of black, almond-shaped eyes. This is a breed with curves. The neck is slightly arched; the topline (back) is slightly arched over the loins; and the abdomen is tucked up with an arched line. The tail tapers to a point and is carried in a slight upward curve.
  • With the exception of size, the only difference between the Standard and Toy Manchester is ear shape. The Standard Manchester has a naturally erect ear, a cropped ear or a button ear. Cropped ears are long and pointed. A Toy Manchester has a naturally erect ear, never one that has been cropped.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 15 - 18 years
Average size: 6 - 8 pounds
Coat appearance: Smooth-haired, shiny
Coloration: Black and tan
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Muscular, long tapered head, V-shaped erect ears, dark almond-shaped eyes, black nose, pointed and erect tail.
Possible alterations: Standard versions are larger in size. Ears are known to naturally flop over.
Comparable Breeds: Italian Greyhound, Whippet

History of the Manchester Terrier
  The sleek and handsome Manchester Terrier is thought to have been created by crossing Britain’s black and tan terrier with the Whippet and possibly other breeds such as the Italian Greyhound. He originated in Manchester, where popular sports included rat killing and rabbit coursing. The Manchester was designed to excel at both and became popular throughout Britain.
  The dogs were eventually imported into the United States. The American Kennel Club recognized the Toy variety in 1886 and the Standard in 1887. The Manchester Terrier Club of America was formed in 1923. Today the breed ranks 121 st among the dogs registered by the AKC.

Temperament
  Manchester Terriers are lively, spirited, sharp-witted dogs. Although they look like small Dobermans, Manchesters are true terriers, through and through. They are extremely smart, somewhat independent and devoted to the people in their close circle. This is neither a cuddly nor a clingy breed. In fact, Manchester Terriers can be stubborn and, like most other terriers, they have a tendency to test boundaries. Manchesters can become destructive and noisy if left unattended for long periods of time. They typically get along well with children, as long as they are well-socialized with kids from an early age. Manchester Terriers are not particularly suspicious of strangers, although they can be a bit aloof and stand-offish. All in all, this is an alert, attentive breed that makes an ideal companion for city-dwellers.

Health 
  Manchester Terriers have an average life span of about 15 years. Breed health concerns may include von Willebrand disease, Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, pattern baldness (mainly in females), Ehler-Danlos syndrome (cutaneous asthenia), lens luxation, cataracts and generalized progressive retinal atrophy (GPRA). These short-haired dogs become easily chilled and should wear a sweater or coat when outside in icy weather for any length of time.

Care
  Minimal coat care is required for the Manchester Terrier. It is an active and alert breed that should be led on moderate on-leash walks, off-lead outings in safe areas, or fun romp in the garden. Although it likes to spend the day in the yard, it should not be allowed to live outdoors and it needs a soft, warm bed.

Living Conditions
  The Manchester Terrier is a good dog for apartment living. They are very active indoors and will do okay without a yard. Manchester Terriers prefer warm climates.

Training
  Not the easiest breed in the world when it comes to training, the Manchester Terrier needs a patient and calm trainer. His stubborn streak means that the trainer must always have loads of cookies to keep him interested in the session. Harsh methods and yelling will cause this breed to shut down.
  Many owners have found that their Manchester Terriers can be great therapy dogs. They are easy to put in the car and actually like going for rides, which makes visiting hospitals and nursing homes easy. Providing they were socialized properly and had basic obedience training, Manchesters can do good things for those in less than ideal health.

Activity Requirements
  Manchester Terriers are active, athletic dogs, but unlike some little breeds they typically are not neurotic or excessively busy. A healthy dose of moderate exercise should suffice to keep them happy, healthy and fit. Manchesters love to accompany their human family members on all sorts of outings, from a simple stroll around the neighborhood to a trip to the grocery store. They absolutely adore playing fetch.

Grooming
  When it comes to grooming, the Manchester Terrier is an easy keeper. Though the breed is naturally clean with little doggie odor, a bath every three months (or when he gets dirty) in a mild shampoo is a good idea. Brush his sleek coat with a natural bristle brush or mitt. Use coat conditioner/polish to brighten the sheen.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually once every few weeks. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.   Check the ears weekly for dirt, redness or a bad odor that can indicate an infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with a gentle, pH-balanced ear cleaner recommended by your veterinarian. Introduce the ManchesterTerrier to grooming when he is very young so he learns to accept it, particularly nail trimming, patiently.

Children And Other Pets
  Typically, a Manchester is devoted to his family and likes children but his small size makes him vulnerable to youngsters who aren't old enough to know it hurts when you yank his ears. Some breeders prefer homes without very young children. It helps to expose him to a lot of children, small and not so small, when he's young.
  Show your children how to approach and touch dogs, and supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should be left unsupervised with a child.
  Manchesters and other pets depends on... the other pets. They are less scrappy than many terriers, but don't lose sight of why they were bred: to kill vermin. They have a strong prey drive. So while they generally do well with other dogs, cats might be pretty nervous around them, and small critters like rats, hamsters, and guinea pigs would be in permanent danger around this terrier.

Is this breed right for you?
  A completely devoted breed, the Manchester Terrier is very loyal, loving and faithful. Active and full of life, it needs a lot of mental and physical stimulation to avoid behavioral problems. Not capable of being left alone for long periods of time, it is in constant need of human companionship. With a natural instinct to hunt, it does not do well with cats but can get along with other dogs if raised with them. Enjoying walks, games of fetch and other forms of activity, it does best with a large yard. A good family pet, it does best with children if introduced to them as a puppy.

Did You Know?
  The Manchester Terrier and Toy Manchester were registered as separate breeds until 1959. They are now treated as one breed — the Manchester Terrier — with two varieties: Toy and Standard.

A dream day in the life of a Manchester Terrier
  A breed that enjoys snuggling with its favorite humans, it will enjoy waking up to the alarm in its owner's bed. Known for cuddling, it will wait to get out of bed until its master does. Once up for the day, it'll greet the kids with affection before going for a romp in the yard. After a good breakfast, it will enjoy engaging in a game of fetch. After a nap with the smaller humans, the Manchester Terrier will follow them outside to sniff out the perimeter for any unwelcome visitors. Ending its day exactly as it started, it'll be keen for a nightly snuggle session.


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Monday, April 10, 2017

Everything about your Toy Fox Terrier

Everything about your Toy Fox Terrier
   A wonderful combination of both a toy breed and a terrier breed, the Toy Fox Terrier can be a bit like the Napoleon of the dog world: small in stature, but full of confidence. Able to complete a number of tasks just like the Toy Fox Terrier, but coming in a little package, it’s hard to deny that this dog can be one of the most endearing breeds around. After all, it’s rare to find a toy breed so durable, sturdy, and generally outgoing. These qualities are a mark of the Toy Fox Terrier’s unique pedigree, which we’ll detail in this overview of the breed.

Overview
  Bred as a means to make the Fox Terrier smaller, the Toy Fox Terrier was created by breeding a standard-sized Fox Terrier with a Chihuahua, Miniature Pinscher, Manchester Terrier and Italian Greyhound. A natural-born hunter, the Toy Fox Terrier enjoys chasing and playing around the yard. Extremely intelligent, this dog can be trained to assist the physically handicapped and as a hearing dog for the deaf.
  His intense loyalty to his family can make him aloof with strangers, but socialization and training to accept strangers should help your dog to realize there is no danger from visitors you allow in your home.

Highlights
  • The Toy Fox Terrier is not a suitable companion for all children. While a sturdy little dog, they cannot tolerate excessive rough handling, especially as they are prone to broken legs.
  • Terrier instinct may cause it to chase small animals, and thereby will need close supervision if outdoors off-leash with out a fence. Your dog should never be off-leash in an area where you cannot contain him should the need arise.
  • Being terriers they may not do well with smaller pets in the household such as hamsters, mice and gerbils.
  • They are a small dog but do not realize this; they sometimes challenge other dogs much larger than themselves. Supervised interaction with larger dogs is advisable.
  • Beneath the cute exterior of your TFT puppy can reside the heart of a tyrant. Be sure to train your puppy early to be a responsible and well-behaved member of your family.
  • Most Toy Fox Terriers would prefer to share your bed with you. However, jumping from such heights, especially when a puppy, can cause broken bones. Teaching your TFT to sleep in his own bed on the floor is a safer route.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • With their thin skin, Toy Fox Terriers like their comforts. Besides cuddling in a lap or snuggling under bedding, they’ll want a sweater to keep them warm whenever they’re exposed to prolonged cool or cold temperatures.
  • A Toy Fox Terrier’s worst qualities are his love of barking and his belief that he’s capable of taking on dogs many times his size. You have to protect him from himself.
  • A TFT’s best quality is his loving nature. He bonds strongly to his family and loves being a lap dog and companion.
  • Toy Fox Terriers don’t like getting wet.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy
UKC group: Companion
Average lifespan: 13 - 15 years
Average size: 4 - 10 pounds
Coat appearance: Short, smooth and thick.
Coloration: White, tan, chocolate, tricolored, white and black, white and tan
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Healthy, athletic body; small muzzle; small black eyes; black nose; erect V-shaped ears and docked tail
Possible alterations: Chocolate-colored dogs have like-colored noses; tail may not be docked
Comparable Breeds: Chihuahua, Rat Terrier

History of the Toy Fox Terrier
  This small American-bred dog has been around for the better part of a century. He was first known as a little farm dog, whose job it was to clear rats and other small vermin from barns and granaries.
  The Toy Fox Terrier was developed by breeding small Smooth Fox Terriers with several toy breeds, including the Chihuahua and Manchester Terrier. Some of the Chihuahua and Manchester Terrier traits did not fit with the type that the developers of the breed were trying to achieve, so after the initial crosses to set the size for the new breed, later breedings involved only smaller Smooth Fox Terriers.
   The United Kennel Club registered its first Toy Fox Terrier in 1936, but the breed didn’t gain American Kennel Club recognition until 2003. The TFT ranks 99th among the breeds registered by the AKC, and his size and temperament are sure to bring him greater popularity in the future.



Temperament 
  Intelligent, obedient, willing to work, this is the kind of toy dog that people who really love “working” dogs can still enjoy. It’s small but with the personality of a regular terrier, in many ways, and will even show these instincts by hunting small rodents and pests around the house. Given good discipline, it will be a good companion and willing to obey commands. Because it’s a small dog, be sure to teach children how to handle it and not to be aggressive with it.


Health
  The average life span of the Toy Fox Terrier is 12 to 14 years. Breed health concerns may include Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, patellar luxation and Von Willebrand disease.

Care
  The Toy Fox Terrier loves a soft warm bed or a lap. Because it is not an outdoor breed, coat care remains simple. It should, however, be provided with a daily exercise routine and sufficient playmates. Fortunately, a small area and some toys make for an excellent playground. The dog tends to bark and dig when it does not get sufficient training, attention, and exercise.

Living Conditions
  The Toy Fox Terrier is good for apartment life. It is very active indoors and will do okay without a yard. It cannot tolerate cold weather. It should wear a coat in the winter to help keep it warm.

Trainability
  Toy Fox Terriers are highly trainable and catch on to new behaviors quickly and easily. All you need to train a Toy Fox are treats and lots of excited praise. These tiny dogs don't take kindly to being treated harshly and will mistrust you if you use physical corrections. Luckily, training them is a joy and they are naturally well-behaved, so they hardly ever test a person's patience.
  Toy Fox Terriers are a snap to house train, unlike almost every other terrier and toy breed. They are small enough to use pads of canine litter boxes in the house, which is an added benefit for elderly owners or for people who live in apartments or condos.

Exercise Requirements
  Play is important; a daily walk is, as well, and they love a good yard. Just make sure the yard or area is fenced in, as these little dogs can escape through cracks and holes fairly easily. As they are small dogs, remember that their small strides can mean extra work to keep up with you.

Grooming
  All it takes to groom a Toy Fox Terrier is a lick and a promise. Give his short coat a quick brushing once a week and you’re done. Baths are needed only rarely, maybe after he’s rolled in something stinky. He sheds a little, but he’s so small that the amount of hair floating around is manageable.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Small breeds are prone to periodontal disease, so brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  They can be active, fun loving companions for older children, but like most toy breeds, they are not recommended playmates for very young children. Their small size, tendency to break bones easily, and terrier tenacity can make a bad combination with very young children.
  They get along well with other dogs and cats in their home, although they may be territorial toward strange dogs passing or approaching their property.

Is this breed right for you?
  A friendly and playful breed, the active Toy Fox Terrier requires a lot of physical and mental stimulation. OK for apartment living, he'll need regular exercise and toys to play with. Doing well with a fenced-in yard of his own, he'll constantly be at the side of his owner. Trained easily and well, he can be taught to learn many new tricks. This dog does better with older children; he may lose patience with younger children who don't know how to handle him. Getting along with cats if raised with them, he's likely to chase smaller animals and vermin. Not a fan of cold weather, he'll need a sweater when venturing outdoors in cooler climates.

Did You Know?
  Toy Fox Terriers are active and agile. They have even been known to climb trees in pursuit of squirrels.



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Tuesday, December 6, 2016

Everything about your Black and Tan Coonhound

Everything about your Black and Tan Coonhound
  A descendent of the Bloodhound and Black and Tan Foxhound, this pup was bred to hunt raccoon and other small game. With a strong ability to deal with excessive heat and cold, he has since moved on to bigger game, including the mountain lion. An adaptable pet perfect for working and hunting, he is a loyal and passionate worker.

Overview
  The Black and Tan Coonhound is a true hound breed in every sense of its name. Not only does it look the part, but it’s got a nose on it that will track down whatever it is hunting – but the Black and Tan Coonhound really loves going after raccoons and opossums. Known to bay and howl until the hunter arrives, this dog is mellow, calm, determined and hardworking.
  A great pet for families and lovers of the outdoors, the Black and Tan Coonhound may be the perfect fit for your household.

Highlights
  • Bays and howls as only a hound can; city living is not recommended
  • Easily distracted by various scents. Once he has decided to follow one you'll have a very hard time calling him off — this dog needs to be leashed!
  • Coonhounds are not homebodies and will roam if given the chance. They can go for miles before looking up and realizing that home is nowhere to be found.
  • Makes a good jogging or running companion but is also more than satisfied with 30 to 60 minutes of daily exercise, and walks that allow for plenty of sniffing time.
  • This breed does well with children, but is active and bouncy when young.
  • Easily gains weight if given the chance.
  • Can be stubborn and independent, making training a challenge.
  • A bored Coonhound is a noisy, destructive Coonhound. He needs lots human companionship and training.
  • Obedience training is highly recommended and likely to lead to a closer relationship with your dog.
  • Never buy a Black and Tan Coonhound from a puppy broker or pet store. Reputable breeders do not sell to middlemen or retailers, and there are no guarantees as to whether the puppy had healthy parents. Interview breeders thoroughly, and make sure the puppy's parents have been screened for genetic diseases pertinent to that breed. Ask breeders about the health issues they've encountered in their dogs, and don't believe anyone who claims that her dogs never have any health problems. Ask for references so you can contact other puppy buyers to see if they're happy with their Coonhound. Doing your homework may save you a lot of heartbreak later.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Black and Tan was the first Coonhound breed admitted to AKC registration.
  • The Black and Tan is known as a “trail and tree hound,” meaning he can not only find his quarry but also tree it.
  • This breed has a black coat with tan points above the eyes, on the sides of the muzzle, and on the chest, legs and breeching (the upper thigh area), plus black pencil markings on the toes.
  • Comparable Breeds: Bloodhound, Chesapeake Bay Retriever

History
  Scenthounds descend from the Talbot Hound, the hunting dog used by nobles and kings a thousand years ago. The direct ancestor of the Black and Tan Coonhound is the English Foxhound, but the coonhound breeds themselves are a uniquely American creation.

  The Black and Tan Coonhound, developed in the mountains of the southern United States in the 1700s, takes his size, coloring, long ears, and scenting ability from the foxhounds and bloodhounds perched in the branches of his family tree.
  He was bred to tree raccoons and possums, but he's more than capable of running bigger game. That versatility made him an ideal companion for colonial settlers who created him to be a "trail and tree" dog, meaning he could find his quarry and tree it until the hunter arrived.
  The American Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1945. The first Black and Tan Coonhound registered by the AKC was Grand Mere Big Rock Molly.
  Despite his fine qualities, the Coonhound has never made the leap to popular companion dog, something for which his fans are probably grateful. He ranks 131st among the 155 breeds and varieties recognized by the AKC.

Personality
  Black and Tan Coonhounds are a pleasant, laid-back addition to families of all sizes and ages. Playful as puppies, this breed mellows out considerably in adulthood and is happy with moderate exercise and lots of time to relax around the house. Black and Tans are good with children, they are patient and not dominant, but they aren't particularly playful when the get older. Many Black and Tan Coonhounds think they are lapdogs, despite their size, and can ball up into the tiniest of spaces to sleep next to the people they love.

Health
  The Black and Tan Coonhound, which has an average lifespan of 10 to 12 years, is prone to minor health concerns such as ectropion and hypothyroidism, and major issues like canine hip dysplasia (CHD). The Coonhound also occasionally suffers from Hemophilia B. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may recommend hip and thyroid tests for the dog.

Care
  Grooming a Black and Tan Coonhound consists of the occasional brushing of the coat and regular ear checkups. Exercise, meanwhile, may be satisfied with a long walk, short jog, or an excursion on a field. The Coonhound also loves to run a few miles and wanders on catching a scent. As the Black and Tan drools, it is a good idea to wipe its face regularly.

Living Conditions
  The Black and Tan Coonhound is not recommended for apartment life. They are relatively inactive indoors and will do best with at least a large yard.

Trainability
  Black and Tans assume they are the leader and require their trainer to prove otherwise. They can be stubborn and even manipulative with their expressive brown eyes and droopy faces. Training a Black and Tan is not for the soft-hearted.
  As with most hound breeds, the Black and Tan is sensitive and needs to be trained with a confident, consistent, but gentle hand. Harsh treatment can lead to avoidance behaviors, and extremely sensitive individuals can shut down completely. Positive reinforcement, treats, and a lot of patience will yield the best results when training a Black and Tan.

Activity Requirements
  Black and Tans don't need an excessive amount of vigorous activity, and as adults they quite enjoy relaxing on the living room rug or attempting to curl up next to you on the couch, despite their large size. They can adapt to just about any living situation and will do just fine in an apartment.
  While outside, the Black and Tan Coonhound should be kept on a leash or in a fenced in yard. If they catch a scent, their instincts will take off and employ true hound dog “selective deafness,” and will not obey your commands to return home. They make excellent companions for hunters and farmers. They will track an animal across any terrain, in any weather, and won't stop working until they have that animal penned up a tree.

Grooming
  The Black and Tan Coonhound has a short, dense coat. It’s easy to groom, but it sheds a lot. Brush the coat with a hound mitt or rubber curry brush one to three times a week to remove dead hair and distribute skin oils.
  Regular brushing should keep your Coonhound pretty clean, but if he has a houndy odor you can bathe him to help reduce the smell. Be sure to rinse thoroughly. Shampoo left on the coat can cause dry, flaky skin.
  Keep those droopy ears clean and dry to prevent bacterial or yeast infections from taking hold. Plenty of Coonhounds like to swim, so dry the ears thoroughly any time they’ve been in the water.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Black and Tan Coonhounds are patient and tolerant with children. That said, it's never appropriate to leave dogs and young children alone together. They should always be supervised to prevent any ear biting or tail pulling on the part of either party.
  Being pack dogs, Black and Tan Coonhounds are always happy to have the company of other dogs. A bored hound will find ways to entertain himself — destructive ways that you won't like — so if no one's home during the day, it's best if he has at least one canine buddy.
  They can also get along well with cats, rabbits and similar pets if they're raised with them in the home. Be sensible and don't leave them unsupervised with other pets until you're sure they all get along.

Is this breed right for you?
  Due to great exercise needs, this pet will do best with an active family. Playful, loyal and passionate, this gentle giant is dedicated to his owner and his family. A friendly pooch, he'll greet others with ease. Needing good training, this breed will learn appropriate behaviors — without it, he may act out. Best for older children, he may be too aggressive and playful with younger children. In need of a yard and walks, in addition to being a big drooler, apartment life may not be suited for him.

Did You Know?
  Although they’re called Coonhounds, Black and Tans can also hunt other game, including deer, mountain lions and bear.

A dream day in the life of a Black and Tan Coonhound
  Waking up with a job to do, this pup will be happy to be taken on a walk first thing in the morning. After being fed and engaging in a bit of play, he'll head right back outside to ensure that the home is protected. Satisfied that no stray animals or new humans have come into his territory, he'll go back inside for a pat-down to reward him for a job well done. After an evening run and a swim in the pond, he'll catnap to prepare for tonight's guard watch. If you leave him, he may howl to let everyone know that he's there.



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