LUV My dogs: accidents

LUV My dogs

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Showing posts with label accidents. Show all posts
Showing posts with label accidents. Show all posts

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Is There Such Thing As Dog Life Insurance?

Is There Such Thing As Dog Life Insurance?
  Twenty years ago, if you suggested getting a pet health insurance policy, most pet owners would have taken it as a joke.
  Not anymore. As veterinary treatments have gotten more advanced and sophisticated -- and vet bills for serious conditions can quickly add up to thousands of dollars -- buying pet health insurance is something to consider.
   Just like people, canine companions suffer from unexpected illnesses, accidents and death.     For these unexpected occasions, you cover yourself with health and life insurance. Policies exist to cover the same for your pet. Not all insurances are the same and not every dog owner needs a life insurance policy.
  Dogs are considered a valuable member of the family and dog life insurance was created to answer for the needs of a bereaved family when the beloved dog dies.
  For one, it enables the family to immediately buy a replacement, especially when the children find it hard to deal with the loss of a pet.

What services does dog health insurance cover?
  Dog life insurance usually pays you the cost (based on the determined market value) of the dog when it dies. There are also dog life insurance products that pay for the original purchase price. In addition, dog life insurance also provide for end-of-life expenses, which includes:
  • burial or cremation expenses
  • euthanasia for your dog because of a major injury or a terminal illness
  • expenses for the funeral service
  • bereavement counseling
  • Dog life insurance may also cover for medical and veterinarian expenses needed to treat your dog because of an accident, an emergency or a terminal illness. Illnesses that are usually covered include digestive, respiratory and cardiovascular problems, as well as cancer.
  Some benefits of dog life insurance also involve co-payments and deductibles that you will have to shoulder. There are also hereditary and pre-existing conditions that may be excluded. The insurance company may also look into the dog's behavior and age to help them decide whether to provide life insurance coverage to your dog or not. Premiums are computed based on your dog's breed and health condition. It will also look at your dog's expected lifespan.
  Some dog life insurance policies are bundled with other dog insurance coverage, such as dog health insurance and dog bite insurance.


It's a Dog's Life (Insurance)
  It will take some digging and research, but it is possible to find life insurance for your dog. Traditional insurance companies, like the one your life or homeowner's policy is through, usually don't carry policies on dogs, even if they're purebred. There are companies that specialize in pet insurance, however, and they're the ones that can provide the coverage you're looking for.

Things to Consider
  Life insurance for dogs doesn't work exactly like life insurance for humans. You'll have to shop around and find out what different policies cover and how they determine the payout. Some policies are written for accidental death only, and some will pay for costs like final veterinary expenses, euthanasia, cremation or burial. One insurance company might calculate the payout based on the market value of the dog at the time of his death, while another will base it on the price you paid for your dog. Ask about age cut-offs, too. Some insurance companies won't insure dogs over a certain age and will even drop insurance once a dog reaches 10 or 11 years.

Other Dog Insurance
  If life insurance on your pooch isn't practical, consider getting help with healthcare to improve the quality of his life and possibly extend it. If you haven't looked into it before, you might be surprised at the number of companies that offer health insurance for pets. Like your own health insurance, there are usually different levels of coverage ranging from wellness plans to accident coverage. It may not insure the life of your dog, but it can help defray the costs of medical treatment -- which may end up literally being a life and death issue.

Do You Need Life Insurance?
  If you have health insurance for your dog, determine if the policy covers burial or cremation. If it does, you may not need a life insurance policy unless you are looking to recover a financial loss from the death of your dog. This is a common thought for breeders, owners of top show dogs and owners of service dogs. In these cases, the loss of your dog may cause a financial loss as well. For example, service dogs who provide assistance to those with disabilities undergo expensive training. When a service dog passes, the owner must replace this dog to continue to receive support. Having a life insurance policy will help cover this replacement cost.

How much does dog health insurance cost?
  Costs vary. Typically the fees are paid monthly and there may also be an annual fee.
  Online quotes are easily accessible. For instance, an ASPCA basic plan for a one-year-old mixed Beagle puppy living in Los Angeles would cost $8.99 a month with an annual issuance fee of $10.50. It's a level 1 plan, which is basic accident coverage. Boosting coverage to accident and illness would increase the premium to $26.64 a month. A plan that adds wellness care would be $43.23 a month. The premiere plan, with the most extensive coverage, is $72.01 per month.

How much does pet health insurance pay?
  Pet health insurance plans range from basic to deluxe, and the coverage varies from plan to plan. Typically, pet insurance plans are set up with a deductible that ranges from $100 to much higher. Then, Sullivan says, much like the human "fee-for-service" or indemnity model, the plans provide an 80% reimbursement for covered expenses.
  Plans are likely not to pay for "cosmetic" procedures. For instance, ear crops, often performed on show dogs, won't likely be covered unless they are medically necessary.


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Tuesday, April 8, 2014

Dog Life Cycles

Dog Life Cycles

  From bouncing baby pup to elderly matriarch, your dog will express different needs — and tender a range of rewards — at each stage of her life. Puppies are demanding and energetic, adolescents unpredictable. Adult dogs are eager and self-assured, and by the time they're seniors, they will have slowed to a comfortably lazy pace.
  On average, smaller dogs mature faster and live longer than larger breeds; bigger dogs mature later and generally know shorter spans of adulthood and senior citizenship. That said, every dog develops and ages at her own rate.

The first weeks
 Beginning in the third week, a puppy's senses begin to awaken. His eyes and auditory canals open so he can communicate with his brothers and sisters for the first time.
  At around the 21st day he'll make his first attempts at walking and barking. Within the safety of his family circle, he'll have his first experiences and get to know the complex social behavior of his species.
  By the fourth week, the senses of the puppy are fully developed so that he is able to carefully observe his environment. He will examine and sniff everything. At this stage of life, his ability to learn is as great as it will ever be. So this is the stage where you should spend a lot of time with your puppy to help him grow up to be a sociable dog. However, an intense relationship with his brothers and sisters is just as important. He can begin to eat solid food from the fourth week on.
  Between 8 and 12 weeks, the puppy is in the socialization stage, and can move to a "human pack". The best time for the separation from mother and brothers and sisters is at 10 weeks of age.

The first months
  If you adopt a puppy at about the 10th week, take him to the vet immediately. He/she will check his health status and will advise you on the right timing for vaccinations and worming.
  Your puppy now needs a lot of loving attention to be able to cope with the new environment and the loss of his brothers and sisters. You should praise him often and say his name at the same time. Also, you should set his boundaries with a stern "no" and begin with house training.
  The puppy's development until the 16th week is called the "phase of hierarchy" by dog researchers. Now your dog will need a "leader of the pack". This is also true for his diet. It is your decision what and when your dog is fed and what he is not to eat. So make sure your puppy's special requirements for nutrients are met in this phase of quick growth. Give him a variety of experiences such as riding in a car, riding in a bus or on an elevator, visits to restaurants, gatherings of people, and contact with children, other dogs, and other animals. This way he'll be an agreeable, strong-minded companion as an adult dog.

Puberty
  The phase of puberty is usually rather short and will last from between one month and six weeks. It starts around the sixth month, and can manifest itself in many different ways: often your dog will behave badly and won't want to learn anything new. Sometimes he may forget what he has learned so far, or at least pretend to. In this phase, you should be persistent and keep on with his education program.

Adolescent
  The puppy stage will give way to adolescence sometime between the ages of 6 and 18 months. Smaller breed dogs will go into the adolescent stage earlier than larger breed dogs. This is the stage of the life cycle when hormones start to kick in and, if not spayed/neutered, your dog may begin to act like a moody teenager. Your dog will lose his puppy fur and grow to his adult size, though he may be awkward with his body and appear gawky until he gets accustomed to his new size. At the beginning of this stage of the life cycle have your dog altered and consider obedience training.

Adult
   Between the ages of 1 and 3 years, your dog enters the adult stage of life. As with adolescence, smaller breeds reach this stage in less time than larger breeds. During this phase of the life cycle, your dog will still enjoy plenty of exercise and playtime, but he likely won't be so demanding of your attention and will not burst with the same amounts of energy that kept you busy during earlier stages. He is likely completely house-trained by now. Consider obedience training or advanced training. Your adult dog will continue to thrive from the mental and physical exercise of learning.

The senior dog
  Different breeds of dog are considered senior at different ages. It may also depend on the individual dog. The process of aging will begin slowly and nearly imperceptibly. Your dog will become less active, his metabolism will slow down, and he might put on weight. At this time, it's important to change his diet and give him smaller portions two to three times daily. This will relieve his digestive system and ensure an even intake of nutrients. Your dog might need a special diet, which you can get from your veterinarian.
  In general, the first signs of old age will appear between the eighth and tenth year. The head and muzzle might become grey, and he may experience a deterioration of sight and hearing. His sense of smell is normally not affected too much by aging.
  Your senior dog will still love to play - even if his fitness level has declined somewhat. And if he has some little house training "accidents," he'll be quite embarrassed. So it's best not to scold him.

The Twilight Years
  He's now your couch companion, content to just while away the hours in restful contemplation or short and sedate walks. Your best friend is an elderly dog now, and it's also time to start considering the inevitabe.



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